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"MAX" 2007 Obituary


MAXMEN  MAXWELL 

MAXMEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-21 published
MAXMEN, Rowena " Paulie"
Passed away after a brief illness in her 81st year on Tuesday, November 20th, 2007 at Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto. Beloved wife of Doctor Marvin MAXMEN. Loving mother of Janice PIZER (Ken,) Kathy CHAPPELL (John), Paul MAXMEN (Sherry), Sally SMITH (Gord) and Jill GIBSON (Jamie.) Devoted grandmother of Jeff, David, Ryan, April, Victoria, Hallie, Bryan, Jessica, Nicholas and Harrison. Funeral Service will be held at 11 a.m. on Friday, November 23rd, 2007 in St. Luke's Anglican Church, ROSEMONT. Arrangements entrusted to the W. John Thomas Funeral Home, Alliston. If so desired, memorial donations may be made to the Salvation Army.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-18 published
NOBLE, Henrietta Louise (HIPPERT)
Peacefully went home to be with her Lord and Saviour on Friday, June 15th, 2007 at Grey Bruce Health Services in Markdale in her 81st year. The former Henrietta HIPPERT was the beloved wife of Harry NOBLE, she was the loving mother of Daniel and his wife Sandy, Nadine and her husband Jack JENNINGS, Marie and her husband Keith TURNER, Jamie, and Ron and his wife Mia. Her memory will be cherished in the hearts of her grandchildren: Lisa, Justin, Brian, Lindsay, Jenn, Erin, Kerry, Kelly, Paul and Mitchell. She will be sadly missed by her sister Ruth MAXWELL. A private family service was conducted at the Currie Funeral Home in Chatsworth. Pastor Brian DUNLOP officiated. Interment took place at Faith Lutheran Cemetery in Desboro. If so desired, memorial contributions to the Markdale Hospital Building Fund, Lutheran World Relief, A.L.S. Society, or a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family in lieu of flowers thank you.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-06 published
MAXWELL, Douglas Dean
Doug died peacefully, at home as he wished, on Friday, August 31, 2007 in his 80th year. Doug was a dear friend and loyal husband, a wonderful father, a delighted grandfather and father-in-law. His lifelong interest in journalism, broadcasting and curling and his wonderful supportive family permitted him, in his own words, “a life where he accomplished more than he thought possible.&rdquo Doug threw his first curling stone in 1949, starting a lifelong association with the sport. He served 20 years as the director of the World Curling Championship, and is credited with inventing curling's Skins Game. He wrote numerous books on the sport, including the bestseller Canada Curls, and published the Canadian Curling News for over 20 years. Doug and his wife Anne moved to “Larchwood&rdquo farm in the Markdale area in 1990, later moving to a house in town. His involvement in the community was rooted in Annesley United Church, where he and Anne made so many of their good Friends. In recent years, he was a key contributor to the fundraising campaign for Centre Grey Hospital and involved in numerous other community causes. Doug is survived by his loving wife of 54 years, Anne. He will always be close in the hearts of his children: Ward MAXWELL and wife Deborah KIRKEGAARD, Gord MAXWELL and wife Pat FENNESSY, Janet MAXWELL and husband Gary WICKHAM, James MAXWELL and wife Karen MAXWELL. Special Poppa to eight wonderful grandchildren: Jarret, Arlen, Emerson, Rhys, Sinead, Bobby, Georgia and Charlotte. He will be missed by his sister, Barbara Jane JOINER and her husband Bill, and his dear sister-in-law Mary Jane WARD. He is pre-deceased by his brother-in-law, Bill WARD. A memorial service to celebrate Doug's life will take place on Sunday, September 9 at 2 p.m. at Annesley United Church, Markdale, followed by a reception. In lieu of flowers, donations to Sick Children's Hospital, Oncology Department in memory of Doug and Arlen MAXWELL, or to a charity of your choice, would be gratefully appreciated.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-06 published
Curling icon mourned
By Don CROSBY, Thursday, September 06, 2007
Long-time curling journalist and promoter Doug Dean MAXWELL died of cancer at his Waterloo home Friday. He was 80.
MAXWELL was a curling journalist, broadcaster, event manager and promoter. He started his journalism career with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television and published his fourth curling book, "Tales of a Curling Hack", in 2006. He also owned and published The Curling News for 20 years and was until recently a Markdale resident.
"The World Curling Federation regrets the passing of a major contributor to global curling," federation president Les Harrison said in a statement Tuesday.
From 1968 to 1985, MAXWELL served as executive director of the Air Canada Silver Broom, the men's world curling championship.
"Doug's work with the Silver Broom took the world curling championship to a new level and had a large impact on the development of the sport of curling in new markets," said Harrison. Doug and his wife, Anne, moved to "Larchwood" - a farm in the Markdale area - in 1990, later moving to a house in town. They were involved with the Annesley United Church.
"He was a gentleman. Very committed to his family, to the church, the community and to the hospital fundraising project," said Dan Rose, who first met the couple at church.
"He had great communication skills and was always willing to help out when he could. It was an honour to know the man."
The former pastor of the church remembers MAXWELL's voice.
"He had one of those voices that you could listen to for a long time," said Don Pletsch. "He had great number of experiences&hellip he was great storyteller… and he liked to laugh."
In recent years, MAXWELL was heavily involved in the fundraising campaign for a new hospital in Markdale.
"He was so pleasant and so helpful," said Doctor Hamilton Hall.
Hall said MAXWELL brought his years of experience as a journalist to the preparation of some radio ads.
Doug MAXWELL threw his first curling stone in 1949, starting a lifelong association with the sport. He served 20 years as the director of the World Curling Championship and is credited with inventing curling's skins game. He wrote numerous books on the sport, including the bestseller "Canada Curls."
The MAXWELLs had recently moved to Waterloo.
He is survived by his wife Anne, his children Ward MAXWELL and wife Deborah KIRKEGAARD, Gord MAXWELL and wife Pat FENNESSY, Janet MAXWELL and her husband Gary WICKHAM, James MAXWELL and his wife Karen MAXWELL. He had eight grandchildren.
A memorial service will take place on Sunday at 2 p.m. at Annesley United Church in Markdale, followed by a reception.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-19 published
ARMSTRONG, Steven
Husband, father, real estate broker. Born April 30, 1918, in Montreal. Died May 29 of natural causes, aged 89.
By Karen ARMSTRONG, Page L6
When Steve was a little boy, his doctor said he had a weak heart and suggested that his mother buy him a dog to walk in order to give him strength. This novel solution had far-reaching results as he lived into his 90th year. Throughout his life, Steve had a dynamic energy and an insatiable curiosity.
His father died when Steve was only a year old. When he was about 10, his mother became concerned that he might start hanging out with the wrong crowd, so she enrolled him at the local Young Men's Christian Association, which gave Steve a strong sense of both discipline and focus. He specialized in basketball and gymnastics, and became a prominent coach.
In order to support his mother and sister, Steve left school when he was only in Grade 9. Later, he successfully wrote the challenge exams at Sir George Williams (now Concordia University). His advice for academic success: study three times harder than any other student. He received his B.A. and later his M. Ed.
After the war, there was a shortage of teachers and Steve was asked to fill in as phys. ed. teacher. He met the beautiful art teacher, Margaret MAXWELL, and a lifelong love affair began.
In 1955, Steve found a house that had been on the market for too long. He vowed to himself that if he could sell it, he would give up teaching and go into real estate. That year, he sold the house and acquired his broker's licence.
By this time, the couple had three children: Karen, Joan and Shirley. Steve often captivated us all with interesting stories of what happened on the way to the closing of a sale. His company became the second-largest in Montreal. He also developed a passion for the British car known as the Rover; he soon owned a dozen, often taking them apart and then re-building them.
He gradually acquired a number of houses; he rented them, with a rather heart-warming clause in the lease providing a discount for "being a good citizen." Steve believed integrity, determination, resourcefulness and humility are traits to be nurtured.
In his 70s, Steve developed an interest in technology that stayed with him the rest of his life. He bought dozens of computers, dismantling and re-assembling them, just as he had done with his cars. He loved to help young business owners and often gave them a computer to "start them off."
Until the end, he would always say, "I think that this has been the best visit we've ever had" - the best dinner, the very best day - always the best. And when Steve said it, you knew he really believed it. And indeed, we, too, knew that it was really true.
Karen ARMSTRONG is Steve's daughter.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-19 published
RANEY, Alan Fraser
Born January 24th, 1918 - Died July 17th, 2007. Beloved husband and best friend for 61 years to Charlotte (MOORE) RANEY, predeceased 2004. Father of Bill RANEY and wife Bonnie and Judy MAXWELL. Cherished Grandad to Leigh (Simon), Debbie (Dwayne), Mandy (Jon), Liz (Ryan), David and great-grandchildren Raney, Cameron, Norah, Lyjah-Sai, and Prema. Dear son of Fraser and Blanche (DAVIS) RANEY predeceased. Dear brother of Reginald (wife Gwyneth) and William (wife Brigitte). Resting at the Jackson Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury. Funeral Service in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Saturday, July 21st, 2007 at 11: 30 a.m. Cremation with interment beside his wife at Civic Cemetery. A memorial service will be held 7: 30 p.m. Friday under the auspices of the Royal Canadian Legion Br #336 Falconbridge. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Lung Association would be appreciated. Friends may call 2-4; 7-9 p.m. Friday and after 10: 30 a.m. Saturday.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
MAXWELL, Douglas Dean
Doug died peacefully, at home as he wished, on Friday August 31st, 2007 in his 80th year. Doug was a dear friend and loyal husband, a wonderful father, a delighted grandfather and father-in-law. His lifelong interest in journalism, broadcasting and curling and his wonderful supportive family permitted him, in his own words, "a life where he accomplished more than he thought possible."
Doug threw his first curling stone in 1949, starting a lifelong association with the sport. He served 20 years as the director of the World Curling Championship, and is credited with inventing curling's Skins Game. He wrote numerous books on the sport, including the bestseller Canada Curls, and published the Canadian Curling News for over 20 years.
Doug and his wife Anne moved to "Larchdale" farm in the Markdale area in 1980, later moving to a house in town. His involvement in the community was rooted in Annesley United Church, where he and Anne made so many of their good Friends. In recent years, he was a key contributor to the fundraising campaign for Grey-Bruce Hospital and involved in numerous other community causes.
Doug is survived by his loving wife of fifty-four years, Anne. He will always be close in the hearts of his children: Ward MAXWELL and wife Deborah KIRKEGAARD, Gord MAXWELL and wife Pat FENNESSY, Janet MAXWELL and husband Gary WICKHAM, James MAXWELL and wife Karen MAXWELL.
Special Poppa to eight wonderful grandchildren: Jarret, Arlen, Emerson, Rhys, Sinead, Bobby, Georgia and Charlotte. He will be missed by his sister, Barbara Jane JOINER and her husband Bill, and his dear sister-in-law Mary Jane WARD. He is pre-deceased by his brother-in-law, Bill WARD.
A memorial service to celebrate Doug's life will take place on Sunday, September 9th at 2: 00 p.m. at Annesley United Church, 82 Toronto St. South, Markdale, Ontario followed by a reception.
In lieu of flowers, donations to Sick Children's Hospital, Oncology Department in memory of Doug and Arlen MAXWELL, or to a charity of your choice, would be gratefully appreciated.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-29 published
SPEARN, Charles Franklin
Peacefully at Roberta Place, Barrie on Thursday September 27th, 2007. Charles SPEARN of Barrie and originally of Penetang in his 87th year. Beloved husband of 64 years to Frances Eileen (née MAXWELL) SPEARN. Loving father of Ann (Norman DOWDS) of North Vancouver, British Columbia, John (Diana, née ORMSTON) of Waterloo, Scott (Paula, née MARSDEN) of Toronto, Greg of Hidden Valley, P.A., and Robert (Jill, née JENNER) of Rossland, British Columbia Loving grandfather of Matt, Adam, Emma, Blair (Julia SCHNEIDER), Brooke (Scott DOWLING), Max, Ainslie, Sarah, Lucie, Sam, and great-grandfather of Ellie DOWLING. Dear brother-in-law of Ean MAXWELL (Pat GIBSON) of Saanich, British Columbia "Charlie" devoted his entire professional life to the health care industry. He served with the Canadian Navy during World War 2 and thereafter continued to serve the medical community as a supplier of medical products. He always balanced his commitment to business with his love for family and anything the outdoors had to offer. Funeral Service will be held from Burton Avenue United Church (37 Burton Avenue) Barrie on Monday afternoon October 1st, 2007 at 3: 00 o'clock. Memorial donations to the Burton Avenue United Church Organ Fund would be appreciated. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.steckleygooderham.com Arrangements entrusted to the care of Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Homes (201 Minet's Point Road at Yonge Street) Barrie. (705) 721-1211.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-02 published
In a famous role, the spy didn't love her
James Bond's flirtatious foil grew up in Ontario; she returned and penned tabloid columns, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
Gutsy, impetuous and adventurous, Lois MAXWELL ran away from home as a teenager to become an actress and became famous as Miss Moneypenny, M's flirtatious secretary in the James Bond films. Although she appeared in 14 Bond films, she had a tough life, supporting two young children after her husband died prematurely of heart disease. Writing a weekly newspaper column in Toronto and starting a company to build crowd-control barriers were just two of her schemes.
Lois Ruth HOOKER was born on February 14, 1927, in Kitchener, Ontario For the rest of her life, she loved to throw people off balance with her name, introducing herself by saying, "I'm a hooker." Her father was a school teacher and her mother a nurse she once described her family as religious and temperate while she was scrawny, freckled and saucy and sulky. When she was a child, the Hookers moved to Toronto. Lois attended John Wanless Public School and then Lawrence Park Collegiate.
Lively, rebellious and game for anything, she was much more interested in performing on stage than sitting in a classroom solving algebra equations. She played parts in radio dramas under the name Robin WELLS, at least partly so that her parents wouldn't find out. After winning a part in Maurice Maeterlinck's play The Blue Bird at Hart House, she was determined to become an actress. However, an oft-told story has her running away from home in 1942 to join the Canadian army. She would have been 15.
"Teenagers in those days were terrified that the war would end before they could get into it," explained journalist Peter WORTHINGTON, a friend and former newspaper colleague. There's another version of the story, which Ms. MAXWELL told when she began writing a weekly column in The Toronto Sun in 1979: She skipped school in 1943 to audition for the army's entertainment corps, earned a place and then went to England with the show, where she sang and danced and (according to some reports) often appeared on a bill with comedians Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster.
Seven months later, army officials discovered she was underage and prepared to send her home. Undeterred, she knocked on the doors of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where she persuaded officials to name her "the first winner of the Lady Louis Mountbatten Scholarship," according to an account she wrote in The Sun. At Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, her favourite classmate was Roger Moore - she once played his uncle, complete with red beard, in a performance of Shakespeare's Henry V. After leaving Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, she found small parts in plays and films and was "discovered" by Canadian-born film mogul Jack Warner, who put her under contract and sent her to Hollywood. Her first major role was as a schoolteacher in That Hagen Girl (1947), starring Ronald Reagan and Shirley Temple. She was so impressive that she won a Golden Globe as "best newcomer." Two years later, Life magazine included her and Marilyn Monroe in a photo spread of eight starlets.
She never made the Hollywood big time and after appearing in two forgotten Warner Brothers films, The Big Punch and The Decision of Christopher Blake, she went to Italy with friend Geraldine Brooks. Ms. MAXWELL lived in Rome for five years, making British and Italian films.
During this time, she met British television executive Peter Churchill MARRIOTT - "a handsome sardonic stranger," as she later described him. They married in 1957 and moved to London, where they had two children: daughter Melinda in 1958 and son Christian in 1959.
In 1962, Mr. MARRIOTT collapsed with a serious heart condition and Ms. MAXWELL was forced to seek film work to support the family. That year, she was given a small part as a nurse in Stanley Kubrick's Lolita and the role of Ms. Moneypenny in Doctor No, the first Bond film. Apparently, director Terrence Young, who had once turned her down for a role because she looked like she "smelled of soap," offered her the part of either Moneypenny or Bond's girlfriend, Sylvia Trench. Ms. MAXWELL was squeamish about playing sex scenes, so she chose the part of the chaste secretary to the head of MI6. She supplied her own clothes and was guaranteed two days' work at what was then the daily rate of £100. At the wrap party at the end of filming, she met Ian Fleming, the creator of the James Bond books. "I visualized Moneypenny as a tall, elegant woman with the most kissable lips in the world," Ms. MAXWELL remembered him saying. "You, my dear, are perfect."
As Moneypenny, she created a character who was cheeky and flirtatious but also knowing and impervious to the seductive prowess of a series of Bonds, including Sean Connery and her old Royal Academy of Dramatic Art pal Roger Moore. Her last Bond film was A View to a Kill in 1985. She asked producer Cubby Broccoli if he would kill off her character, but he recast it instead. Miss Moneypenny was subsequently played by Caroline Bliss and Samantha Bond.
Ms. MAXWELL, who always had ambitions beyond her secretarial character, set her sights on M, but that part was out of bounds as an equal opportunity role until Judy Dench laid claim to the position.
"She was always fun and she was wonderful to be with and was always perfect casting," Mr. Moore told the British Broadcasting Corp.'s Radio 5 Live on the weekend. "… It was a great pity that after I moved out of Bond, they didn't take her on to continue in the Timothy Dalton films. I think it was a great disappointment to her that she had not been promoted to play M. She would have been a wonderful M."
The good part about playing Miss Moneypenny was that she was so identified with the role that she became a recognizable part of popular culture. The bad part, of course, was that she was so typecast as the smouldering secretary that it became hard to win other major roles.
After Ms. MAXWELL's husband died in 1973, she returned to Canada to film a television series, Adventures in Rainbow Country. She bought a property in cottage country and a bungalow in Fort Erie, Ontario, settled down with her young children and established a company called Great Barrier Industries, which manufactured crowd-control stands. She eventually opened a British subsidiary and planned to market her barriers in Europe.
In the late 1970s, she proposed writing a column for The Toronto Sun to editor Peter WORTHINGTON and publisher Donald Creighton. They took her for a boozy lunch at Winston's, according to Mr. WORTHINGTON, and long before the coffee was served, they had a deal. She wrote her chatty, gossipy, opinionated weekly column, called "Moneypenny," for almost a dozen years.
After Kim Campbell's Progressive Conservatives went down to an ignominious defeat in the 1993 federal election, Ms. MAXWELL confided that she had declined an invitation to run. "Kim Campbell's handlers threw her to the slavering wolves," she said. "She is a gutsy, bright strong woman who didn't deserve the treatment she received from her party."
As for Ms. MAXWELL, she had her own problems in the newsroom at The Sun, according to Mr. WORTHINGTON. " There was a certain resentment that she was a celebrity getting into the column business," he said. "She was also one of the better-read people and that was a problem, too."
Her final column appeared April 23, 1994. By then, her daughter, Melinda, the married mother of a small child, was living near the market town of Frome in Somerset, England. Ms. MAXWELL decided to join them, planning to live every day, "with gusto!"
Her last film was The Fourth Angel (2001) with Jeremy Irons. The same year, she underwent surgery for colorectal cancer and then moved to Perth, Australia, where her son, Christian, and his wife had settled.
Lois Ruth MAXWELL was born in Kitchener, Ontario, on February 14, 1927. She died of cancer in Fremantle Hospital in Perth, Australia, on September 29, 2007. She was 80. Ms. MAXWELL is survived by her daughter and son and extended family.

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MAXWELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-28 published
CLARKE, Barbara " Joy"
Passed away peacefully at the Toronto Rehab Institute on Wednesday, December 26th, 2007 in her 78th year. Loved sister of Wally (Kitty) MAXWELL. Loving Aunt of David, Tim, Rob and Brad. A Memorial Service 10 a.m. Friday December 28th, 2007 at Bayview Golf and Country Club 25 Fairway Heights Doctor Thornhill, Ontario. In remembrance of Joy, donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements entrusted to Highland Memorial Funeral Home.

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