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"LOB" 2007 Obituary


LOBBAN  LOBSINGER 

LOBBAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-24 published
BONYUN, Jean (formerly HACKER)
Passed away peacefully with her family by her side on Saturday December 22nd, 2007 in her 91st year. Predeceased by her husband N. Stanley HACKER and by her second husband Denis F. BONYUN. Cherished mother of Fred HACKER and his wife Barb, and Bets LOBBAN and her husband Ray. Lovingly remembered by her six favourite grandchildren Kim HACKER, Kristen BAUMANN (Markus), Chris LOBBAN (Andrea,) Steve LOBBAN, Kate HACKER and Craig LOBBAN and her three favourite great-grandchildren Taylor and Cameron BAUMANN and Liam LOBBAN. Survived by her sister Evelyn BONNEY (Dr. Robert) and predeceased by her sister Mabel McMULLEN and her brother Grant CAMPBELL. Also predeceased by her step-mother-in-law (and friend) Mae HACKER. Fondly remembered by her many Friends and her nieces, nephews and cousins. Visitation will be held at the Nicholls Funeral Home, 330 Midland Ave., Midland on Wednesday December 26th, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Thursday December 27th at Knox Presbyterian Church (539 Hugel Ave. Midland) at 11 a.m. If desired, donations to the Huronia Seniors Volunteer Care Team would be greatly appreciated. Everyone she touched will remember her love, vitality, faith, charity and compassion.

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LOBSINGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-04 published
Woman killed by garbage truck identified
The Canadian Press, Page A14
Toronto -- Toronto police have finally been able to identify a woman who was struck and killed by a garbage truck near Yonge and Lawrence on Monday morning - 74-year-old Nobuko SAGARA.
She carried no identification at the time, which made it difficult for police to find out who she was. Detective Paul LOBSINGER says a tip came late Tuesday night from one of Ms. SAGARA's neighbours.
Ms. SAGARA's brothers and sisters were contacted and made a positive identification in the city's 40th traffic fatality of the year.

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LOBSINGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-24 published
Couple 'arm in arm' as bus shatters their 58-year bond
By Unnati GANDHI with a report from James RUSK, Page A1
Toronto -- Just as she has done every morning for the past 58 years, Rosalia DORNYEI laid her husband Stephen's clothes out on the bed for him yesterday.
Then, hand in hand, the couple left their mid-Toronto condominium building to catch the Toronto Transit Commission bus that would take them downtown for Mr. DORNYEI's follow-up appointment with his eye surgeon.
It was about 9: 45 a.m., and Mr. DORNYEI, 80, could see the No. 25 bus coming down the street. Taking into consideration his wife's newly replaced knee, he decided it would be less painful for both of them if, instead of going all the way to the corner, they simply crossed the six live lanes of traffic to the Don Mills Road bus stop directly across from them.
Flagging down the bus as they walked, they made it to the west side of the street.
But the driver didn't immediately see them, police say, and they were both struck before they could reach the curb.
"They were still arm in arm," the couple's only daughter, Eva, told The Globe and Mail from her father's hospital bedside yesterday.
Mrs. DORNYEI, 77, died at the hospital, while Mr. DORNYEI suffered four broken ribs, two fractures to his pelvic bone, a collapsed lung, 16 stitches to his head and several large bruises and cuts to his body. Doctors say he'll survive the physical injuries.
Whether he'll be able to come to terms with the abrupt ending of a love story that began in Europe and spanned more than half a century, his daughter isn't sure.
"I hope my father finds the will to live," Ms. DORNYEI, 55, said. "But you just don't get over losing your soulmate like that."
They fell in love when they first met in their native Hungary. She was 16, he was 19. Within three years, they were married.
He was doing well for himself, having become the plant manager of a business that exported livestock and eggs across Europe. But less than a decade later, the Hungarian revolution geared up, and, in November of 1956, a large Soviet force invaded Budapest. An estimated 200,000 people, including the DORNYEIs and their young daughter, fled their country.
"They travelled through Europe and stayed in various places that were accepting Hungarian refugees, before finally making it to Canada," Ms. DORNYEI said.
Once in Toronto, language became a huge barrier, and the newly arrived couple found the country's people initially unwilling to help them integrate.
Mr. DORNYEI got his first job as a dishwasher at the Lord Simcoe Hotel before going back to school to become an engineering draftsman - the trade he worked in until he retired more than a decade ago. His wife worked odd jobs for a few years before deciding it would be best if she stayed at home to take care of her daughter.
"She was a wonderful, loving, kind woman. We were very close, just like Friends," her daughter said.
Mr. DORNYEI remained active, chairing the board of the condo tower.
"He always made sure everything was done properly. He's a very diligent, dedicated man. And I would say my mother was just as dedicated to him," she said. "They were very in love to this day. They really were soulmates."
On Monday, they would have celebrated their 58th wedding anniversary.
Police say that the accident was preventable. There was an intersection with signal lights at Overlea Boulevard about 100 metres from where the couple decided to cross, Traffic Services Sergeant Paul LOBSINGER said.
"It's so close to the intersection that they could have just walked down there, but they wanted this bus, I guess. How many times do we see that?"
It was unclear whether any charges would be laid against the bus driver, who was receiving counselling yesterday, Toronto Transit Commission spokeswoman Marilyn BOLTON said.
Ms. DORNYEI said that she would be looking at the final police report carefully, frustrated that nothing could possibly console her family's grief at the loss of a mother and wife.
"When they broke the news to us," she said, "all my father could say was, 'Why? Why? Why?' "

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LOBSINGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2007-01-07 published
No end to pain in unsolved fatalities
Road accident cases hard for families, police
By Nick KYONKA, Staff Reporter
The parents of Andres MALDONADO still have questions about the night their son was killed in a hit-and-run accident two months ago.
"I would like to clarify what happened that night because nothing is clear for me," his father, Galo MALDONADO, said Friday. "I would like to talk to the people who were involved in this accident&hellip I need answers."
Those people, however, are not coming forward.
Nineteen-year-old Andres died while trying to cross Highway 27 near Humber College Blvd. shortly after midnight on October 29.
Crossing against a red light, he was struck by one car in the passing lane before falling into the curb lane and being struck again.
The first car stopped but the driver has never come to speak to the teen's family. The second car, believed to be light-coloured and mid-sized, sped away and has not been seen since.
The teen's death is one of three unsolved fatal accidents in 2006, and officers from the Toronto police Traffic Services division are calling on the public to help shed light on each of the cases.
"None of us like to have outstanding cases where we haven't been able to find who's responsible for the victim's families," said Det. Paul LOBSINGER. " When we're unable to solve it, we have some sense that we haven't just let the family down, we've let the community down."
In MALDONADO's case, he said, it's even more frustrating because the driver of the second car would not have faced any criminal charges had he or she stopped after the accident.
"(MALDONADO) was dressed completely in dark clothing, crossing a highway in the dark against a red light," he noted.
The other two unsolved road deaths last year came about half an hour apart on the morning of March 11.
At about 8: 50 a.m., 69-year-old Jure KOZINA was crossing the road near Dundas St. and Bloor St. W. when a car plowed through the intersection, fatally striking KOZINA.
The car, which did not stay at the scene, was believed to be a dark-coloured, late-'90s Mercury Sable.
At around 9: 15 a.m. on the other side of the city, 47-year-old Ronald HARDING was taking advantage of some unseasonably warm weather by taking his motorcycle out for a ride in the city's east end when he ran a red light at Morningside Ave. and Sheppard Ave. E.
Another vehicle, believed to be a mid-to-late-'90s silver Pontiac Grand Am, was heading through the intersection at the same time and collided with Harding's bike. The driver of the car stopped briefly at the scene before speeding off.
"We all know in our mind that there are people out there who know what happened and who know who's responsible," LOBSINGER said of the cases. "It's hard to get it in our mind that they would not come forward."
As for Galo MALDONADO, he and his family are no longer angry with the driver who killed his son. They simply want to know what happened. "We are Christians and we don't want nothing against them but we need to clarify the situation," he said.

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