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"LEA" 2007 Obituary


LEA  LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH  LEADBETTER  LEAHY  LEAKE  LEAL  LEAN  LEANDRO  LEARMONTH  LEATHERDALE  LEAVER  LEAVITT 

LEA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-09 published
KIRKPATRICK, Mary Elizabeth (née LEA)
Peacefully in Ottawa, on Wednesday, June 6, 2007 in her 94th year. Beloved wife of the late Clare KIRKPATRICK. Loving mother of John KIRKPATRICK (Montreal.) Survived by her sister Frances LAVERTY (Ottawa.) Dear aunt of Mary Ann DE CHASTELAIN, Lea RUTHERFORD, Ann FIFE, John LEA, Ted LEA, Tony LEA, Don LEA, Patricia DEVERAUX and Frances TRIGG. Missed also by many great nieces and nephews. The family will receive Friends at the Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson Street, (at Barrie Street), Kingston, Ontario on Monday, June 11, 2007 for a memorial service in "The Chapel on The Corner" at 1 p.m. Interment following at Cataraqui Cemetery. Memorial donations, for those wishing, may be made to the Alzheimer Society, 175 Rideau Street, Kingston or to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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LEA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-18 published
LEA, Beryl (MULLINS)
Peacefully on June 15, 2007. Beloved wife of the late John C. LEA and dear sister of Gertrude, Louise, Bert and Harry. Resting at the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mount Pleasant Road (south of Eglinton). A Chapel service will be held on Tuesday, June 19, 2007 at 1 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to service time. Interment to follow at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations to the Christian Blind Mission, Billy Graham Evangelical Association or the Anglican Church of the Transfiguration, would be appreciated by the family.

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LEA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-20 published
TRIGG, Frances Elizabeth (née LEA)
Of Sundridge. Born June 17, 1957, she died unexpectedly on August 21, 2007, at Huntsville and District Memorial Hospital. Daughter of the late Edgar and Adrienne LEA of Toronto and Magnetawan. She was educated at Havergal College, Toronto. She is survived by her spouse Ken BOTHAM, her daughter Laura TRIGG and two sons, James and Andrew TRIGG. She will also be sadly missed by her four siblings: Ted LEA (Barbara) of Toronto, Tony LEA (Joanne) of Toronto, Don LEA (Kathy) of Alberta, and Pat Lea DEVEREAUX (Michael) of Barrie. She will be fondly remembered by her many nieces, nephews, Friends and by Brian TRIGG, father of the children. She had been working as a personal support worker in Sundridge. Interment was at Spence Cemetery, Magnetawan. Memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or charity of your choice.

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LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-26 published
SAWCHUK, Elizabeth (CHRISTIAN)
Of Chatsworth and formerly of Portage la Prairie, Manitoba, passed away peacefully surrounded by the love of her family on Saturday, September 22nd, 2007 at Country Lane Nursing Home in Chatsworth in her 86th year. The former Elizabeth CHRISTIAN was the beloved wife of the late Matthew SAWCHUK. She was the loving mother of Jane (Dick) TURNER, Ron (Wendy) SAWCHUK, and Carol Anne (Bob) WAITE. Elizabeth was the dear sister of Walter, Joe (Jackie,) Fred, Mary YORK, Alice (John) LAWRENCE, Kay (John) NAPOLIC and Elsie (Bob) LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH. Grams will be missed by her grandchildren: Terri, Tammy, Ricky (Tammy), Trevor, Jill-Ann (Tony), Jonathan, John (Jen), Ben and Andy as well as by her 5 great-grandchildren. Friends will be received at the Currie Funeral Home 239 Garafraxa Street, Chatsworth (519) 794-2631, for visitation on Thursday from 1 p.m. until service time at 2 p.m. Pastor Howard RITTENHOUSE will officiate. Interment: Hillside Cemetery, Portage la Prairie, Manitoba. If so desired, memorial contributions to the Children's Aide Society Sunshine Fund would be appreciated by the family.

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LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-26 published
BIRRELL, Edith Mabel (née ROUTLEDGE)
At the South Bruce-Grey Health Centre, Chesley, on Friday, November 23rd, 2007 at the age of 91 years, the former Mabel ROUTLEDGE of Elgin Abbey Lodge, Chesley and formerly of Pinkerton. Wife of the late Harold BIRRELL. Beloved mother of Judy and her husband Dennis REANY of Port Elgin, Don and his wife Ainslee of Strathroy, Doug of Hanover, James and his wife Grace of Pinkerton and Susan of Nanaimo, British Columbia. Grandmother of eight grandchildren, eleven great-grandchildren, and one step great-grandchild. Sister of Jean and her husband George LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH of Don Mills, Robert ROUTLEDGE and his wife Afifa of Arizona, Harold ROUTLEDGE and his wife Maureen of Atlin, British Columbia. Sister-in-law of Elizabeth (Betty) WILLIAMS of London. Aunt of many nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by her parents John and Edith ROUTLEDGE. Private family Interment. Memorial contributions to Westminster Presbyterian Church, Paisley or Elgin Abbey Lodge, Chesley would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Portrait and memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-22 published
LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH, Doctor Christopher E.
October 13, 2007, in his 62nd year. Survived by his children Ned, Cameron and Gratia. Brother to John, Tom (dec.), Anne, Ruth and Jim. Memorial Sunday, October 28, Inn at Christie's Mill, Port Severn, Ontario, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Donations to Crone's and Colitis Foundation or Canadian Cancer Society gratefully accepted.

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LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-25 published
LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH, Doctor Christopher E.
October 13, 2007, in his 62nd year. Survived by his children Ned, Cameron and Gratia. Brother to John, Tom (dec.), Anne, Ruth and Jim. Memorial Sunday, October 28, Inn at Christie's Mill, Port Severn, Ontario, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Donations to Crone's and Colitis Foundation or Canadian Cancer Society gratefully accepted.

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LEADBETTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-10 published
HARPER, Lois Marjorie
Age 77, of Agincourt, Ontario. On Thursday, November 8, 2007 at Centenary Hospital, Toronto. She was the daughter of the late Gordon HARPER and Laura Harper EDWORTHY. She will be sorely missed by her sister and brother-in-law Eleanor and Norman TAILOR/TAYLOR, her longtime friend and companion Elaine Conner, nieces Laurie LEADBETTER and Laurel PRYDE, nephews David TAILOR/TAYLOR, Norman and Brian SHORE and their families.
A graduate of McMaster University and University of British Columbia School of Library Science. Lois taught school in Hamilton and Scarborough an then became Assistant to the Co-ordinator of Learning Resources for the Scarborough Board of Education. As a teacher and librarian, she avidly promoted Canadian literature for which she was honoured at her retirement.
Lois served her church and community in various capacities, active in Knox Presbyterian Church, Agincourt as an elder and choir member. She also volunteered teaching English as a second language to new Canadians. As a member of the Markham-Stouffville Parkinson Support Group, she lead a campaign to update Parkinson material in public libraries in the Markham and Scarborough areas, She also gave generously to Parkinson Community Outreach projects and research.
Friends will be received at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Ave. East, Agincourt (east of Kennedy Rd.), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday. Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday at 11 a.m. in Knox Presbyterian Church, 4156 Sheppard Ave. East, Agincourt. Interment in Grove Cemetery, Dundas, Ontario at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Parkinson Society of Canada or a preferred charity.

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LEAHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-03 published
DEWAR, Barbara Ann (née SWEENEY)
In hospital on Sunday, July 1, 2007, from injuries incurred in a fall, Barbara Ann DEWAR of Kanata, Ontario. Daughter of the late William James SWEENEY and Bessie Beatrice SWEENEY of Pembroke, Ontario. She is survived by her loving husband Daniel Bevis DEWAR, son Peter DEWAR and daughter Sarah LEAHY (Stephen.) Cherished grandmother of Daniel DEWAR and Kevin and Kira LEAHY. Friends may call at the Carp Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 115 Rivington Street, Carp on Wednesday, July 4, 2007 from 7 to 9 p.m. and on Thursday, July 5, 2007 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A memorial service will be held at Saint Mary's Anglican Church, Dunrobin Ontario on Friday, July 6, 2007 at 3 p.m. Those wishing may make donations to the Ontario Brain Injury Association, P.O. Box 2338, St. Catherine's, Ontario, L2R 7R9 Condolences, tributes or donations may be made at www.tubmanfuneralhomes.com

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LEAKE o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-26 published
QUARRIER, Lucy
The family of Lucy QUARRIER hearts are filled with gratitude at the number of family, Friends, neighbours, and former students who came to pay their last respects to their mother. She would have been so glad to meet all of you one more time. The floral tributes were out of this world - mom would have been so proud of them. The donations made in her memory are graciously accepted. For the cards, food and flowers sent to our homes we are truly thankful and blessed. To Grey Gables Staff - you could not have done more. To Rosanne JUDGE - your way of combining mom's little tidbits of information was amazing and comforting. To Pat KALAPACA a dear friend who so graciously delivered the eulogy for us a big thank you. To Bernice HATTLE who spoke on behalf of colleagues. To Hendricks Funeral Home Staff who went above and beyond being helpful when their own roster was filled to the brim. To Neville LEAKE who at the last minute was able to play so beautifully one of mom's favourite pieces "Star of the East." May God Bless You One and All.
- Betty, Diane and Peter and families.
Page 3

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LEAL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-26 published
CARLSON, Caroline “Cora“ (née CLARKE)
At Grey Bruce Health Services in Meaford on Wednesday October 24, 2007. The former Caroline Edna CLARKE of Heathcote, in her 94th year. Daughter of the late Alfred and Bertha (PERRYMAN) CLARKE. Beloved wife of the late Glenden Oscar CARLSON (2002.) Loving mother of Clarke (Torch) CARLSON and his wife Carol, of Heathcote. Fondly remembered by grandchildren Adam (Terri) CARLSON, Mark (Michelle) CARLSON, April (Michael) McLEAN, Tracy (Shane) KING, Lisa (Brad) LEAL and by her ten great-grandchildren. Cremation will be followed by private family arrangements. As your expression of sympathy, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home (The Valley Chapel), 20 Alice Street East, Box 556, Thornbury, Ontario N0H 2P0 (519-599-2718) with whom arrangements have been entrusted.

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LEAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-11 published
BAXTER, John Scott
Professor Emeritus, Department of English, Queen's University.
December 7, peacefully at Saint_Joseph's Villa, Dundas, Ontario. John is survived by his wife, Jean Rae (FOX,) his daughter Elizabeth and her husband Kevin Peter CLARKE, his daughter Alison and her husband Marc LEAN, and by his son John and his wife Anne HABERL. John was the proud grandfather of Trevor, Riley and Patrick CLARKE, Nathan and Naomi LEAN, and Karen, Jay and Thomas BAXTER. At John's request, his body has been donated to the Faculty of Medicine, McMaster University. Family members extend their thanks to the dedicated and caring staff at Saint_Joseph's Villa. There will be no memorial service. Private celebration of John's life to follow at a later date. In memory of John, donations may be made to Saint_Joseph's Villa, 56 Governor's Road, Dundas, Ontario, L9H 5G7, or to the Office of Advancement, Queen's University, 99 University Avenue, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 9Z9.

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LEANDRO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-30 published
McHALE, John Wilfred " Jack"
Retired from The Globe and Mail. Passed away peacefully, at the Uxbridge Cottage Hospital on Wednesday, November 28, 2007. Jack, beloved and loving husband for 50 years to Noreen DOYLE. Devoted father to Theresa BERRY, Nora WEBB, Anne LEANDRO, Stephen McHALE, Helen MIETA and the late Jim McHALE. Fondly remembered by his sixteen grandchildren. Survived by his brother Paul and sister Carol. Friends will be received at the Low and Low Funeral Home, Uxbridge, 23 Main Street South (905) 852-3073 on Friday, November 30, 2007 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held on Saturday, December 1, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. from Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church (70 Toronto Street North, Uxbridge). Interment Uxbridge Cemetery. In Jack's memory, donations may be made to the charity of your choice. On- line condolences can be made at www.lowandlow.ca.

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LEARMONTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-08 published
BENNETT, Roy F., F.C.A.
Former Chief Executive Officer Ford Of Canada
With deep sadness we announce that Roy F. BENNETT, cherished husband of Gail COOK- BENNETT, adored father of Bruce (Susan BLACK,) Brenda (Bob LEARMONTH,) Lynne and Christopher, died at home with his family present on Monday June 4th, 2007. He also leaves his much loved grandchildren, Tyler and Myles; Carolann, Christine and James; Shannon and Cody. Predeceased by his beloved brother Ken. He will be greatly missed by the extended Bennett and Cook families. A chartered accountant, Roy joined Ford of Canada and advanced rapidly to Chief Executive Officer at age 42. He continued as a director for 14 years after his retirement, until the company was privatized. Roy founded Bennecon, now in its 25th year of operation, to provide specialized cash flow advice to large corporations. He served as Chair of the Board of major corporations including BP Canada (now Talisman Energy), Midland Walwyn, Jannock, Metropolitan Life Holdings Company and as a director of Bell Canada, Inglis and several other organizations. He also served as Chair of Cougar Global and Innings Telecom and as special advisor to CAI Capital until his death. His commitment to the community was exemplified in his roles as founding Chair of the Better Business Bureau of Canada Advisory Council, cofounder of the Business Council on National Issues, Chair of the Director's Advisory Committee of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants, ViceChair Executive Council Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Chair of Niagara Institute; and member of the Royal Commission on Unemployment Insurance, Premier's Economic Advisory Council, Board of Governors York University, Board of Mississauga Hospital and a director of the Scouts Canada Foundation. For his contributions, he was honoured with an F.C.A. by the Institute of Chartered Accountants, with an honourary doctorate of laws (LL.D) by York University, and as an honourary elder by his church. Roy lived a very active life. Among his passions were skiing, tennis, squash, golf, classical music, art, and spending time with family at the cottage on Lake of Bays. He was a devoted husband and father, and admired friend to many. He will be dearly missed. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West (at Windermere, East of the Jane subway), June 14, 2007, 5 to 9 p.m. A memorial service will be held June 15, 2007 at 1 p.m., Humber Valley United Church. If desired, charitable donations may be made to the Roy F. Bennett Memorial fund by cheque payable to Toronto Community Foundation, 33 Bloor St. E., Suite 1603, Toronto, M4W 3H1. The family would prefer not to receive flowers.

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LEARMONTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-12 published
BENNETT, Roy F., F.C.A.
Former Chief Executive Officer Ford of Canada
With deep sadness we announce that Roy F. Bennett, cherished husband of Gail COOK- BENNETT, adored father of Bruce (Susan BLACK,) Brenda (Bob LEARMONTH,) Lynne and Christopher, died at home with his family present on Monday June 4th, 2007. He also leaves his much loved grandchildren, Tyler and Myles; Carolann, Christine and James; Shannon and Cody. Predeceased by his beloved brother Ken. He will be greatly missed by the extended Bennett and Cook families. A chartered accountant, Roy joined Ford of Canada and advanced rapidly to Chief Executive Officer at age 42. He continued as a director for 14 years after his retirement, until the company was privatized. Roy founded Bennecon, now in its 25th year of operation, to provide specialized cash flow advice to large corporations. He served as Chair of the Board of major corporations including BP Canada (now Talisman Energy), Midland Walwyn, Jannock, Metropolitan Life Holdings Company and as a director of Bell Canada, Inglis and several other organizations. He also served as Chair of Cougar Global and Innings Telecom and as special advisor to CAI Capital until his death. His commitment to the community was exemplified in his roles as founding Chair of the Better Business Bureau of Canada Advisory Council, cofounder of the Business Council on National Issues, Chair of the Director's Advisory Committee of the Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants, ViceChair Executive Council Canadian Chamber of Commerce, Chair of Niagara Institute; and member of the Royal Commission on Unemployment Insurance, Premier's Economic Advisory Council, Board of Governors York University, Board of Mississauga Hospital and a director of the Scouts Canada Foundation. For his contributions, he was honoured with an F.C.A. by the Institute of Chartered Accountants, with an honourary doctorate of laws (LL.D) by York University, and as an honourary elder by his church. Roy lived a very active life. Among his passions were skiing, tennis, squash, golf, classical music, art, and spending time with family at the cottage on Lake of Bays. He was a devoted husband and father, and admired friend to many. He will be dearly missed. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West (at Windermere, East of the Jane subway), June 14, 2007, 5 to 9 p.m. A memorial service will be held June 15, 2007 at 1 p.m., Humber Valley United Church. If desired, charitable donations may be made to the Roy F. Bennett Memorial fund by cheque payable to Toronto Community Foundation, 33 Bloor St. E., Suite 1603, Toronto, M4W 3H1. The family would prefer not to receive flowers.

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LEARMONTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-26 published
Ford Canada president recognized the value of a free-trade auto pact
Described as a youthful financial whiz when he took over at 42, he also persuaded head office to build a engine plant in Canada after twisting the arms of Pierre Trudeau and Bill Davis
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Roy BENNETT helped his buddies set up the "Friday Night Poker Club" while attending North Toronto Collegiate Institute in 1945. He would continue to attend its monthly sessions for more than 60 years.
During that time, he became a chartered accountant, rose through the ranks of the Ford Motor Co. of Canada to become its president at age 42 without having gone to university, and held executive and board positions with many of the country's leading businesses and institutions. But he never abandoned the regular poker-and-beer nights with his old Friends, many of whom also became business leaders.
"Whatever he did, he was committed," said Jim Hunter, who worked with him on a number of financial projects and is now president of NexGen Financial. "Whether it was business, tennis or poker, those commitments were life-long," he said. He was also very bright, affable and "a counter-thinker, who would look at a problem and come up with a different conclusion than everyone else."
Ken Harrigan, who followed Mr. BENNETT as president of Ford Canada, said his predecessor's main contribution was convincing government officials in Ottawa to negotiate a free-trade auto pact with Washington. The Canada-United States Automotive Agreement, signed in 1965, allowed free movement across the border of vehicles from Big Three auto plants in both countries. For Canada, this meant lower car prices and an increase in Canadian production, which created new jobs.
While heading Ford's Canadian subsidiary from 1970 to 1981, Mr. BENNETT worked to build a profitable operation independent of the U.S. head office. He also made relations with employees a priority and reached out to find common ground with both government and organized labour. After stepping down as president in 1981, he founded and ran Bennecon, a firm that provides cash-flow advice to large companies. At the same time, he served terms as chairman or director with BP Canada, Midland Walwyn, Jannock, Metropolitan Life Holdings Co., York University, the Mississauga Hospital, Scouts Canada and a host of other companies and organizations.
Ron Osborne, chairman of Sun Life Financial, called Mr. BENNETT a role model for accountants who want to make other contributions - "to go straight," as he put it. "He was the model director big picture, strategic, not prone to sweat the details, rigorous in his questioning, but, after the decisions were made, very supportive."
Mr. BENNETT and his wife, Gail COOK- BENNETT, were one of corporate Canada's power couples. When they were married in 1978, he was president of Ford Canada and she was executive vice-president of the C.D. Howe Institute of Research in Montreal. They met at a Canadian-American Committee meeting in Washington. At the end of one session, Dick Schmeelk, an American who served as co-chair of the group, invited them for a ride in a Cadillac to go and get a nightcap. The irony, Mr. Schmeelk said, was that the president of Ford Canada had that "first date" in a General Motors vehicle.
Over the years, they twice served on the boards of competing corporations - once in the petroleum field, once in insurance. No discussion of their respective companies was allowed at home, said Ms. COOK- BENNETT, who is now chair of the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.
While president of Ford Canada, Mr. BENNETT persuaded the U.S. head office to build a $535-million engine plant in Windsor, Ontario, instead of Ohio, which was offering state subsidies. He alerted Queen's Park and Ottawa to the urgent need for their involvement, and arranged a meeting between prime minister Pierre Trudeau and Ontario premier William Davis while both were attending the Calgary Stampede. On the spot, the two agreed to a $68-million cash incentive plan that helped seal the deal.
The youngest of two sons of English-born parents, William Charles BENNETT and Gladys Mabel (MATTHEWS), Roy Frederick BENNETT spent his early years in Winnipeg. Roy was 10 when his father, a manufacturing agent in the woollens industry, moved the family to Toronto. In 1941, while attending Maurice Cody Public School, Roy played on the team that won the Toronto school soccer championship.
Athletics were to play an important role in his life. He enjoyed hockey, golf and squash. As a young man, he once won a tennis match against Don Fontana, who later became one of Canada's top-seeded players.
After high school, Mr. BENNETT chose a fast-track route to become a chartered accountant. He apprenticed directly with the accounting firm Lever and Hoskin, rather than attending university. He worked with the firm until 1954, when he joined Kelvinator.
Two years later, he moved to Ford Canada as supervisor of financial planning. He was made marketing manager in 1964 and vice-president of finance in 1965. In the early years at Ford, Mr. BENNETT was offered a posting in South Africa and was told it could help his chances of becoming president. He declined, preferring not to uproot his family, according to daughter Brenda BENNETT- LEARMONTH. He had married Laurie McDERMOTT in 1955 and they had three children, Bruce, Brenda and Lynne. The couple later separated and were divorced. Laurie McDermott BENNETT later died.
But opportunities knocked again at Ford Canada. Mr. BENNETT had won the admiration and backing of Ford Motor Co. chairman Henry Ford II by making himself the company expert on free trade, and on November 16, 1970, he was given the job of president.
Heading one of Canada's largest companies at 42 won Mr. BENNETT the reputation of being a wunderkind. In a profile, The Globe and Mail described him as a "youthful financial whiz who never graduated from university." Two years later, he was given the additional title of Chief Executive Officer.
When he was made president, Mr. BENNETT said he would take the job for no less than five years and no more than 10, says his son Bruce, now president of Bennecon. "He felt if you couldn't do what you wanted in 10 years, it was time for someone else to take charge."
So in 1981, he stepped down as president, although he served a brief period after that as chairman. He turned down an executive job offer at the U.S. head office because he didn't want to leave Canada. He continued to serve on the Ford Canada board until the subsidiary was privatized in 1995.
Claude Lamoureux was an executive at Metropolitan Life Holdings when Mr. BENNETT was named chair of the company's board. He went to their first meeting together prepared to answer questions about sales and finances. Instead, Mr. BENNETT wanted to know about the human resources department. "He put real emphasis on people, on having the right human resources department… on having the right team," said Mr. Lamoureux, now president and Chief Executive Officer of the Ontario Teachers' Pension Fund.
In 1986, Mr. BENNETT served on the Royal Commission on Unemployment Insurance and issued a minority report saying that plans to remove seasonal benefits would be too Draconian a measure for chronically depressed regions. He argued that an income-supplement program should be put in place before any move was made to base unemployment benefits on a full year's income. That strong sense of fair play was demonstrated again in February, 1995, when he wrote a critical letter to Ford's U.S. head office. It charged that the parent company's transfer pricing policy was suppressing profits at the Canadian subsidiary.
He called the low earnings "an embarrassment for management, employees and dealers as well as Canadian directors." The letter suggested that Ford Motor Co. buy out the minority shareholders if it was not prepared to let the Canadian operations become more profitable. A buyout plan was announced two months later.
A focal point for the BENNETT family's time together was a cottage on an island in Lake of Bays, in the Muskoka area, north of Toronto. Mr. BENNETT installed "the smallest car ferry in the world" to transport his Ford Explorer to the island, said Keith HILLYER, who had a cottage nearby. A motorized cable system pulled the ferry across. "To get on the ferry, the car had to go down a precipitous incline," Mr. HILLYER said. "He had to be careful it didn't slide off the other side."
Mr. BENNETT pursued his busy lifestyle of business, charitable, athletic and social endeavours into his late 70s - it was just last year when a diagnosis of bladder cancer forced him to slow down.
A year ago, he attended his last session of the Friday Night Poker Club and lost $120. David FLEMING/FLEMMING, one of four founding members still living, says the group plans to carry on its six-decades-old tradition.
Roy Frederick BENNETT was born in Winnipeg on March 18, 1928. He died at his Toronto home of bladder cancer on June 4, 2007. He was 79. He leaves his wife, Gail Cook- BENNETT; children Bruce, Brenda, Lynne and Christopher; and seven grandchildren. He was predeceased by his brother, Ken.

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LEATHERDALE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-03 published
MALONEY, Helen or “Lena” (née PHILLIPS)
Passed away, surrounded by her family at Meaford Hospital on Friday, June 29, 2007 in her 87th year. Survived by her loving husband of 64 years, Larry (Lawrence Owen), her sons, Peter and partner Jin ZHE (Meaford, Ontario and Changchun, China,) Denny and wife Lyn (London, Ontario and Naples, Florida), Terry (London, Ontario), and Murray and wife Joani (Meaford, Ontario). Predeceased by her sons Larry, Jr. and Philip. Grandmother of Kevin and fiancée Nicole (Dallas, Texas), Craig and wife Sherry (Toronto, Ontario), Karen ZIMMERMAN and husband Craig (Oakland, Iowa,) Kelly (Pickering, Ontario), Michael (London, Ontario), Chris and Brendan (Meaford, Ontario,) and Andrea FISCHER and husband Chris (Wasaga Beach, Ontario.) Great-grandmother of Haley Navaisha MALONEY and Ava FISCHER. Predeceased by her sister, Evangeline, and her brothers, Dimitri (Jimmy) and Cyril (Carl), she is missed by sister, Nadejda (Annie) RAINVILLE (Toronto, Ontario,) her brother, Methody (Ted) PHILLIPS (Lackawanna, New York), daughter-in-law of Suzanne MALONEY. sister-in-law, Wynn (Newmarket, Ontario) and nieces and nephews, Dianne PAPADOPOLOUS, Gerry RAINVILLE, Sharon RAINVILLE, Stacey DELMONT, Shelley VRANJES, Peter PHILLIPS, Johnny PHILLIPS, Ed PHILLIPS, George MALONEY, Mike MALONEY, Mary MALONEY, Mark MALONEY, Bridget MALONEY, Carole BEST, Tommy BEAUVAIS, Peggy BEAUVAIS, Brian BEAUVAIS, Diane PIRIE, Cathy BEAUVAIS, Paul MALONEY, Tim MALONEY, Pat MALONEY, Helen HUTCHINGS, Fred RAPLEY, Penney BROWN, Elizabeth LEATHERDALE, and Georgea WAFFLE. Born May 27, 1921 in Toronto, eldest of six children born in Canada to Dina and Petre FILEFF, former Greek and Turkish subjects, from Western Macedonian mountain village of Trsye, who immigrated after World War I and adopted the anglicized name PHILLIPS. Lived on Wilkins Avenue in Cabbagetown area of Toronto. Attended Sackville Street School and Central Tech. Attended St. Cyril and Methody Macedonian Orthodox Church. Lifetime member of Daughters of Macedonia and Trsye Benevolent Society. Raised through the depression, she worked as a housekeeper and seamstress, for room and board and going dancing with sisters “Vee” and “Annie” at the Palais Royale or Masonic Temple. During the early years of World War 2 she met, and fell in love with a gentleman of the Air Corps, then Royal Canadian Air Force Airman L.O. MALONEY, to whom she was wed in 1943, after he returned from radar duty in England. Helen joined Larry when he was stationed at Royal Canadian Air Force Station Bagotville in 1944. After Sgt. MALONEY's demobilization, they started a family, living in a flat on Balsam Avenue in the Beach area of Toronto. While in Toronto, the family were members of Saint Michael's diocese. In 1951 the family moved to Point-aux-Trembles area of Montréal and later to St. Michel (1953-1972) at the northeast end of Montréal Island. While in Montréal, the family were members of St. Brendan's diocese. In 1972, moved to Scarborough, Ontario. Following Larry's early retirement in 1978, Helen and Larry wintered in Largo, Florida for 28 years of well-earned recreation and leisure time. In 2003, Helen and Larry moved to the family estate near Meaford, Ontario. Helen was the consummate homemaker, a skilled manager, budgeter, purchaser, chef, knitter, sewer, clothier, seamstress, launderer, cleaner, practical nurse and psychologist. She made it all seem easy. To children she was a cub and scout organizer, protector, comforter, supporter and healer. To her peers she was a graceful dancer, astute bridge partner, champion bowler, occasional golfer and good fun to be with at social events. To her husband, Larry, she was a lifelong friend, companion, partner and counsellor. Larry says that Helen saved him from an unstable life pursuing impractical daydreams. Between 1945 in Toronto and 1963 in Montreal, Helen gave birth to six sons. It was the great regret of her life that she never had a daughter, and so it was that she had a special affection for her nieces, grand-daughters and great-granddaughters. Helen was, in a category she herself sometimes applied to people, a “giver”. She was a good person with commendable standards of conduct and morality. Helen was always concerned about the feelings of others, always ready to lend a helping hand, always ready with a kind word. There are very few like her. She will be missed. Service held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, 3 July 2007 at Gardiner-Wilson Funeral Home, 60 Denmark Street, Meaford, Ontario. (519) 538 2550 Visitation begins at noon. The family receives visitors at home following service. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Alzheimer Society.

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LEATHERDALE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-15 published
HERBERT, Georgia Beryl
Suddenly at the North Bay General Hospital on Thursday September 13, 2007 at the age of 82. Beloved wife of William of Tara. Dear mother of Mark and Renate of Tara and Merren of Kitchener. Loving Nana to Angela, Steven (Cathy), Dana (Jon), Mark Jr. (Julie), and Kelly (Rene). Great Nana to Britney, T.J., Payton and Evan. Dear sister of Clifford SWEEZEY of Pembroke, Dreana LEATHERDALE and Dehlia FINCHEN, both of North Bay. Predeceased by sister Ruth LOMAS. She will be missed by many nieces and nephews as well as all her Friends she played bridge with. Georgia had a special place in her heart for Special Needs Children and Seniors with whom she volunteered regularly. Friends may call at Paul H. Eagleson Funeral Home in Tara on Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Monday, September 17, 2007 at 2 p.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Lung Association would be greatly appreciated. Condolences may be expressed online at www.paulheaglesonfuneralhome.ca

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LEAVER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-09 published
Gerry LEAVER, 89: Engineer
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Ottawa -- Gerry LEAVER was so traumatized by what he went through as a gunner during the Second World War that he seriously considered becoming a Roman Catholic priest when he was demobilized at the end of 1945.
Serving in Italy and Northwest Europe as a battery captain with 1st Canadian Survey Regiment, he was present at all its battles, both large and small. Spending more than a year in action, including leave and rest periods, he saw the full horror of warfare up close. A reserved man who almost never spoke of his experiences, he was appalled at the tremendous waste and never forgot the suffering he witnessed.
After slogging up the Italian peninsula in a series of hard-fought battles in 1944, he and his regiment arrived in the Netherlands in February, 1945, for almost three more months of fighting before Germany surrendered on May 7, 1945.
Although Mr. LEAVER quickly dropped his plan of studying for the priesthood - he went back to Queen's University in Kingston, finished a degree and got on with his life by building a career and a family - his memories of war profoundly affected his life for the next 60 years, his daughter Maureen LEAVER said. "He suffered for his entire life from post traumatic stress syndrome, but he suppressed it until the last years of his life, until the demons became too strong."
Those demons appeared during the summer of 2004, when he started suffering nightmares. They upset him greatly, so he asked his caregiver, Carol GOLDENBERG, if she would write them down in diary form. The result is a valuable record of war-time experience.
The entries, which began on January 4, 2005, describe various incidents that took place during his life, both military and civilian, from the routine to the dangerous. A week later, he dreamed about charging up a hill during an attack with his batman and personal servant beside him. The batman was seriously wounded and soon died in his arms, he told Ms. GOLDENBERG. " Gerry holds him, but does not know or remember how he was feeling or what happened next," she said.
The torment continued unabated. The emotion, suppressed for decades, was not unique to Mr. LEAVER. Thousands of Canadian servicemen experienced the similar trauma. Some carried on, no matter what, and elected to suffer in silence. For some, the pressure was released through excessive drinking. Others took it out on their families.
Gerry LEAVER grew up in a post-First World War Ottawa of horse-drawn delivery wagons. Considered pretty much a backwater at the time, it was known for lumber, civil servants and the Stanley Cup-winning Ottawa Senators.
Besides delivering the Ottawa Journal, a daily newspaper that folded in 1980 after 95 years, young Gerry spent a lot of time at his father's store in the Byward Market, just down the street from Parliament Hill. After school, he would sweep the floor, stock shelves and do whatever else needed to be done. "He would help out by standing out in front and calling out either 'cold milk' or 'meat' so people would come to LEAVER's store," Ms. GOLDENBERG recorded.
Some days, he and his sister, Betty, would walk to the Carnegie Library and check out books. However, their father disapproved of reading and told them books would "burn your eyes out."
In 1937, Mr. LEAVER matriculated at Queen's University, electing to study civil engineering. Perhaps with an eye to the war clouds then gathering over Europe, he joined the Canadian Officers' Training Corps and gained a commission in the army. Not long after that, on September 10, 1939, Canada declared war on Germany.
Nine months later, on July 5, 1940, Mr. LEAVER volunteered for the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery, joining 1st Field Brigade, Royal Canadian Artillery, in Ottawa. His prewar training proved valuable, since the brass gave him the rank of lieutenant, one step up from second lieutenant. He was soon transferred to 1st Canadian Survey Regiment. He shipped out to Britain for more training and landed in Sicily with his unit in July, 1943.
What followed -- particularly after the Italians surrendered that September -- was some of the hardest fighting that Canadian soldiers endured during the war. For his gallantry during an action in February, 1944, he was made a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) for displaying "great devotion to duty at all times… He completely disregarded his own safety and by his skillful handling of the situation, safeguarded that of his men," the official citation said.
By March, 1945, Mr. LEAVER and the rest of 1 Canadian Corps were in France, moving up to the fighting in the Netherlands as the German army fought tenaciously to keep the Allies from crossing the Rhine. On May 6, 1945, Mr. LEAVER's war was over.
There was one more event to come, though. In October, 1946, he was summoned to Ottawa's Rideau Hall to accept his MBE from the governor-general, Lord Alexander.
After graduating in 1947, Mr. LEAVER joined the department of mines, energy and resources two years later. Working in surveying and mapping, he retired in 1977.
Fond of playing tennis, and reading history, politics and current events, Mr. LEAVER devoted his retirement to volunteering. "He helped people all his life," said Ms. LEAVER. "He was a man for all men."
Although he attended few regimental reunions after the war, Mr. LEAVER never missed the annual Remembrance Day parade at Ottawa's National War Memorial.
Gerald Joseph LEAVER was born November 24, 1918, in Ottawa. He died of natural causes in Ottawa on October 22, 2007. He was 89. He is survived by his daughter, Maureen, and by sons Frank and Garrett. He also leaves his sister, Betty, and grand_son Stephan. He was predeceased by his wife, Ruth.

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LEAVITT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-27 published
Hospital physiotherapy pioneer was a 'tough but sympathetic' taskmaster
For more than 25 years, she was a force to be reckoned with at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, where she helped polio victims and treated Canada's first separated conjoined twins
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Isabel BRODIE was a pioneer physiotherapist who played a key role in rehabilitating children crippled by a polio epidemic that swept across North America, and treated the first set of Canadian conjoined twins to be successfully separated. For more than 25 years, she headed the physiotherapy division at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, where she was a force to be reckoned with.
She was variously described by Friends as outspoken, feisty, loud, compassionate and caring. Doctor Barry SHANDLING, the former pediatric surgeon at Sick Kids, called her "tough but sympathetic" - exactly the qualities needed for treating infants whose heads were bent to one side because of wry neck.
The condition, which is caused by a shortened muscle, can be corrected in small babies provided someone has the skill and tenacity to twist the head to its proper position. Most parents and physiotherapists do a "wishy-washy" job of this because they are too concerned about being gentle, he says. Not so Ms. BRODIE.
In 1972, she performed physiotherapy on Heather and Kristen, the first set of Canadian conjoined twins to be successfully separated. Doctor SHANDLING performed the surgery and she helped to keep them active and to mobilize their joints.
Early in her career, she had treated scores of children who had been crippled by polio. Successive epidemics had affected thousands of children across the continent until Doctor Jonas Salk of the University of Pittsburgh developed a vaccine in 1955.
"Ms. BRODIE was a very dedicated, compassionate physiotherapist who was very effective in treating of children with paralysis, particularly those who suffered from poliomyelitis in the years before the vaccine was developed," said Doctor Robert SALTER, a professor emeritus of surgery at Sick Kids.
But her contributions at the children's hospital went beyond simply treating young people. She also became involved in their lives. She invited numerous children and their families to live at her home while the youngsters were undergoing treatment.
As director of physiotherapy, however, she was a strict taskmaster who asked her staff to address her as Ms. BRODIE, recalled Anne-Marie HAMILTON, a former co-worker. Later, after stepping down for health reasons and rejoining the front-line therapy team, she asked them to call her by her nickname, Skip. "Then we got to see her soft side," Ms. HAMILTON said. "We saw she had a sense of humour."
Isabel BRODIE grew up in Oakville, Ontario Her Scottish-born father, Robert BRODIE, had travelled around the world as a ship's carpenter before building the family home. Her mother, also from Scotland, was a homemaker who often returned to the old country to visit relatives.
Ruth MacDONALD, who also grew up in Oakville, remembers bicycling along the shore of Lake Ontario with Ms. BRODIE to visit Friends in the nearby village of Clarkson when both were girls. After the outbreak of the Second World War, Ms. BRODIE joined the Royal Canadian Air Force and convinced Ms. MacDONALD to do the same.
They were among 17,000 Canadians who enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force to serve in the Women's Division, which trained those who joined in more than 40 trades. Ms. BRODIE, who enlisted in 1942, worked as an equipment assistant and achieved the rank of leading air woman. She was posted to a number of places in Canada, as well as Torbay, Newfoundland., which at the time was considered to be "overseas."
She used to talk about the snow in Newfoundland being so high that she had to go in and out through an upstairs window to get to the mess hall, said Marion LEAVITT, a close friend and frequent travel companion over the years years. She also told about talking an air force chef into cooking up some steaks so she could organize a party. After the war, but while still in uniform, she was sent to England and posted to an Royal Canadian Air Force airbase in Topcliffe, Yorkhire.
After returning to civilian life, Ms. BRODIE used her military allowance to take a three-year physical therapy course at the University of Toronto. She graduated in 1950 and practised for about four years at Toronto's Saint Michael's Hospital before moving to Sick Kids, where she worked for more than a quarter of a century.
Mary SAURIOL, who worked with her at Saint Michael's, said: "She was wonderful with children. If they wanted to run around, she ran around with them." She often took outpatients on excursions to the Canadian National Exhibition or on day camping trips.
Next to her work, Ms. BRODIE's greatest love was travelling, both within North America by camper van, and abroad, including Russia, China and several times to India. She sponsored a number of children through the Christian Children's Fund and visited some of them overseas.
Her most constant companion for travel, sports and pastimes was Mable STUBBS, a Revenue Canada employee who had also served in the air force. After the war, the two women shared an apartment and later bought a house in Clarkson. In 1988, when Ms. STUBBS was quite ill with cancer, they took their final trip together, a Mediterranean cruise. Ms. STUBBS died shortly after their return. Friends said Ms. BRODIE took a long time to recover her bounce after the loss.
Their relationship was one of Friendship and convenience, but nothing more, said her niece, Heather HEAPS. Ms. BRODIE was engaged to a man who was killed during the Second World War, and later to a second man, but she broke that relationship off when she realized she still loved the first.
A woman of eclectic interests and athletic prowess, she filled her leisure time with camping, canoeing, cross-country skiing, bird-watching, photography, wood-carving, dressmaking, gardening, playing the organ, folk dancing, and playing bridge. She took up golf in her early 70s, and went on to win three hole-in-one trophies.
Isabel BRODIE loved entertaining, said Marilyn BRODIE, a niece by marriage. "The first time I met her was at a corn roast in her backyard. She had a giant pot like a witch's cauldron."
In her early 80s, she began to develop Alzheimer's disease and could no longer drive. But that didn't ground her. She would jump on her bicycle and ride to a favourite restaurant for ribs and a rum and Coke, Ms. HEAPS said.
As her health deteriorated, she began using a cane. "Unfortunately, the cane became a lethal weapon," Ms. HEAPS added. "When dining in a restaurant, she thought nothing of smacking the waitress with the cane to get her attention."
Isabel BRODIE was born in Oakville, Ontario, on May 31, 1920. She died of complications of Alzheimer's disease at the King Nursing Home in Bolton, Ontario, on June 1, 2007, one day after her 87th birthday. She is survived by a nephew and five nieces. She was predeceased by her older brothers John, a former Mountie, and Robert, who died in Walkerton, Ontario, in 2000 when the municipal water supply there became contaminated with E. coli bacteria.

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