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"LAB" 2007 Obituary


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LABA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-16 published
BERNSTEIN, Anna
On Sunday, July 15, 2007 at Baycrest Hosptial. Anna BERNSTEIN, beloved wife of the late Mannie BERNSTEIN. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Leon and Hannah, MILTON and Temmy, and Linda and Syd SOSNOVICH. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Issie and Freda LABA, the late Jack and Lilly LOEB, and the late Joe LABA. Devoted Bubie of Joanne, Matthew, Barry, Steven, Richard, Lisa, Shawna, Erin, and the late Andrea, and great-grandmother of twelve. She will be sadly missed by her family and Friends. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W. (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday, July 16th at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Sholom Synagogue section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 18 Woolsthorpe Cr., Thornhill. Memorial donations may be made to the Baycrest Centre Foundation, 416-785-2875, or Heart and Stroke Foundation, 416-499-1417.

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LABAO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-13 published
SACKS, Melvin
In his 100th year on Friday, October 12, 2007 at home. Melvin SACKS, beloved husband of Sheila SACKS. Loving father and father-in-law of Morty and Gloria SACKS of Toronto, and Gloria and Edward SILVER of Montreal. Devoted grandfather of Jody and Jeff, Michael and Nadine, Darren and Kerry, Gem and Steve, and Warren and Brent. Loving great-grandfather of Jackie, Justin, Rachel, Matthew, Ryan, Dani, Zachary, and Ryan. Dear brother of the late Jean LANGSNER, Gwen ROUTBARD, and Pearl RANDOLPH. Special thanks to Elizabeth LABAO for her care and kindness. At Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Community Section for a graveside service on Sunday, October 14, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. Memorial donations may be made to Lung Cancer Canada, 416-785-3439.

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LABATT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-01 published
Battle of Britain fighter pilot won DFC twice and a rare DSO
Having learned to fly at the Montreal Flying Club, he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force along with many other members after Canada entered the Second World War. He was soon in the thick of the action
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S11
Knowlton, Quebec -- Wing Commander Dal RUSSELL was one of the last surviving Canadian pilots who fought in the Battle of Britain, and one of most highly decorated Canadian fliers of the Second World War.
He was a 23-year-old pilot officer when he started flying Hurricanes with No. 1 Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron (later known as Royal Canadian Air Force 401 Squadron) on August 19, 1940. By the end of September, 1940, he had destroyed more than five German aircraft.
After several of his victories he sent telegrams home to his parents in Montreal. "Tommy [Flying Officer Thomas Little of Montreal] and I got our first Dornier," said part of a 27-word telegram. In mid-September another said: "Cigarettes and food arrived. Many Thanks. Got my third Hun yesterday. Heinkel bomber. Love to all."
In almost every telegram sent home he asked for cigarettes, food and, in one case, a sleeping bag. Every telegram, press clipping and letter that arrived were kept in scrapbooks by his sister Jane. When she went overseas to join her two brothers, their mother took over the record-keeping.
The reality of battle was much less cheery than the telegrams. Wing Commander RUSSELL later described the fear and danger of aerial combat: "When you are in the thick of a fight at 20,000 feet, and travelling at a speed of 400 miles per hour through a sky filled with hostile aircraft, you haven't time to think about much but keeping the other fellow off your tail, avoiding a collision and getting a German within the reach of your eight machine guns. You try to draw a bead on him and watch out behind you at the same time. Your mouth is as dry as cotton somehow, and the palms of your hands are dripping wet."
His ground crew nicknamed him Deadeye Dick for the number of German bombers and fighters he was credited with damaging or destroying. They painted the legend "Ace of Spades" on his Hurricane for luck. Like many allied fighter pilots, he was certain he shot down or damaged more planes than he was given credit for.
"Claimed two shot down and four badly damaged. But I am quite sure we got five in all. Yesterday, August 28th, we were told that our bag was three shot down, and three disabled; so that is a good start anyway," he wrote in a letter home.
A handsome man, he featured in a Canadian Press story about a visit to his base on September 26, 1940, by Air Marshal Billy Bishop, the First World War flying ace. The reporter described him, though did not mention him by name, after he landed during an inspection of the base.
"Air Marshal Bishop examined one of the Hurricanes which was in the scrap. An even dozen holes and scars on its propeller and fuselage showed its pilot, a blond curly-haired youth [Mr. RUSSEL], had been in the bomber's bullet stream."
By the end of October, 1939, the British, Canadian and Polish pilots had won the Battle of Britain and forced German to cancel its plans of invasion. The squadron had destroyed and damaged more than 70 aircraft, while losing 16 Hurricanes and three pilots.
Mr. RUSSELL was a certified war hero, the first of three Royal Canadian Air Force officers to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. To Ottawa, that made him more valuable as a walking recruiting poster, so they brought him home for a tour of cities and towns.
"See and hear about the Royal Air Force from One of Them," read a poster for a meeting on August 9, 1941, that charged admission to raise money for the war effort. Flight Officer RUSSEL, DFC, was the star speaker. He also wrote articles for newspapers.
Along with his propaganda efforts he was training for a special mission with the Royal Canadian Air Force. Promoted to the rank of squadron leader, Mr. RUSSELL was in command of a secret mission to prepare pilots in flying U.S. P40 Kittyhawks. After initial training in Ottawa, and in Camp Borden north of Toronto, they moved to a base at Sea Island near Vancouver.
After that, the squadron was transferred to bases in Alaska, but for some unknown reason Mr. RUSSELL did not accompany them. His letters home at the time reflect bitterness about not being sent on one of the few missions in the war in which Canadian fighter pilots were pitted against the Japanese.
Instead, he soon found himself back in Europe, this time flying Spitfires. Many of his missions were spent escorting bombers and in 1943 he won a second Distinguished Flying Cross. The award came shortly after his promotion to Wing Commander. "This officer as Wing Leader has led his wing on a large number of escort sorties without the loss of single bomber to enemy fighters," the citation said. "The high praise earned by the wing for its skill is largely due to the great devotion to duty and ability displayed by Wing Commander RUSSEL."
In April of 1944, he requested a demotion to squadron leader so that he could fly combat mission in the invasion of France, which everyone knew was coming. As a wing commander he would likely have been assigned to a desk.
On D-Day, June 6, 1944, he flew many missions over Normandy but, as it happened, the Luftwaffe was almost entirely absent. In all, he spent eight hours in the air doing sweeps of the beaches to protect troops. He wrote home of watching the fighting on the ground: "The tank battles are quite amazing… a job I would hate to have. They looked like a bunch of ants crawling around, hiding between the hedges and trees and suddenly opening fire with devastating effect on some poor Hun that happened along."
Four days later, he flew to a forward airfield in France and became the first Spitfire pilot to land in recaptured France. "First Spit pilot to make successful landing in France," read the entry in his logbook for June 10, 1944.
Less than a month later, at the peak of the fighting in Normandy, he was again made a wing commander and put in charge of No 126 wing. A large unit comprised of four Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons, the promotion meant he was more or less grounded.
"I will be doing very little flying, which will please you both, I am sure," he wrote to his parents, who by that time were also worrying about his brother, Hugh, also an Royal Canadian Air Force fighter pilot.
Even so, he still managed to go on three missions in September and seven in October. An entry in his logbook on October 4, 1944, describes a victory by his pilots against a German jet, the Me 262. "401 Squadron destroyed the first jet job ME 262 in the Royal Air Force."
In late 1944, he was awarded a Distinguished Service Order, a rare distinction medal for an Royal Canadian Air Force officer. "In recent intensive air operations the squadrons under the command of Wing Commander RUSSELL have completed a large number of sorties," the citation read. "Within a period of three days a very large number of enemy transport vehicles were attacked, of which 127 were set on fire and a bigger number were damaged. In addition, four hostile aircraft were destroyed and seventeen tanks and nineteen other armoured vehicles were damaged. By his masterly leadership, sound judgment and fine fighting qualities, Wing Commander RUSSELL played a good part in the success achieved. His example inspired all."
June of 1944 was also a month of tragedy for the RUSSELL family. They received word that Hugh RUSSELL had been killed in an encounter with German fighters. In 1945, Dal RUSSELL returned to Canada and by the end of the year he had left the Royal Canadian Air Force and was working in a sales job.
Dal RUSSELL was born in Toronto but moved to Montreal when he was eight months old. His father's family ran Russel Steel, while his mother, Mary LABATT, was from the famous family of brewers. In Montreal, he attended Selwyn House and then went to boarding school at Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario, where he proved to better at football and hockey than at algebra. (Years later, when he was awarded the DFC in the Battle of Britain, the school declared a half-day holiday in his honour.)
After graduating, he went back to Montreal where he got a job and took up flying. He joined the Montreal Flying Club and learned on a Gipsy Moth biplane at the Carterville Airport.
Canada declared war on Germany on September 10, 1939. It was a Sunday, and Mr. RUSSELL was home for the weekend visiting his parents. He and most of the other members of the Montreal Flying Club joined the Royal Canadian Air Force by the end of the week. Mr. RUSSELL enlisted on Friday, September 15.
They were soon in Britain, flying Canadian-made Hurricanes. "We became so used to our Hurricanes that they were very nearly part of us," he told a reporter at the time. "We flew by instinct, without consciously handling the controls."
In all, he flew 286 operational sorties in three tours of duty. He was never shot down and the most notable damage he suffered was to the canopy of his Hurricane. Curiously, it had been hit by spent shell casings from the machine guns of a fellow Royal Canadian Air Force pilot.
Along with his two DFCs and the DSO Mr. RUSSELL was awarded France's Croix de Guerre with Silver Star, the Order of Orange-Nassau with Swords from the Netherlands and the Czechoslovak War Cross.
After returning home, he worked for Sperry Gyroscope in Montreal and served as a director of Labatt Breweries. In the 1960s, he and his wife Lorraine bought a shop called Heaney's, an upscale linen store. They later expanded the business and opened a shop in Toronto.
After retiring in the mid-1980s Mr. RUSSELL and his wife spent a great deal of time at their farm in Dorset, Vt. He practised fly-fishing on a pond stocked with trout in preparation for salmon fishing expeditions. He was invited to hunt by Friends, but after returning from the war he never again liked shooting. He also gave up flying, having found recreational aviation too expensive for his tastes.
In the 1990s he and his wife settled in Knowlton in Quebec's Eastern Townships.
Blair Dalzel RUSSELL was born in Toronto on December 9, 1916. He died after a stroke in Knowlton, Quebec, on November 20, 2007. He was 90. He leaves his children, Diana, Blair and Charles.
He also leaves three Canadian Battle of Britain pilots: Robert Barton of New Westminster, British Columbia; John Stewart Hart of Naramata, British Columbia; and Henry SPRAGG of Dundas, Ontario

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LABELLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-05 published
BITOVE, James " Jim"
Passed away peacefully on Wednesday, July 4, 2007, in his 86th year, with family by his side. Loving companion and husband for 61 years of Helen. Dearly loved father of Chris, Linda LABELLE (Tom), Paul (Sarah) and Stephen (Kathy). Dearest granddad "Dedo" of Ross, Jennifer, Lisa, Justin, Olivia, Maddie, Tory and Alex. Jim will be deeply missed by his many great neighbours from Lawrence Park, Muir Park Residence as well as his pals from Riverdale Collegiate. Friends may call at the Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) on Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A funeral service will be held in the chapel Saturday morning at 11 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, remembrances may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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LABELLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-08 published
LONG, David A., B.A., LLB (July 13, 1957-august 30, 2007)
David died peacefully at Saint Paul's Hospital following a 13 year battle with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. He is survived by his mother Jean, his wife Anne LABELLE, his children Jennifer and Malcolm, their mother Katherine WELLBURN, and his siblings Victoria and Mark. David's father, Fred, died in 2004. David grew up in West Vancouver, attended St. George's School and earned his B.A. and law degree at University of British Columbia. David practiced law with the Vancouver firm of Douglas, Symes and Brissenden from 1983 to 1991 and later joined Miramar Mining Corporation where he became Vice-President, Legal. David was an outstanding athlete, a philosopher, an eloquent public speaker, a teacher, coach, son, husband, father, and friend. David loved living in the post-card picture that is the West Coast and sharing that magic with family and Friends, especially from the vantage point of his speedboat. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in David's name to either the Canadian Cancer Society (B.C. Division) or the Pacific Lung Health Centre. There will be a celebration of David's life from 2: 00 to 5:00 p.m. (with brief remarks at 3: 00 p.m.) on Saturday, September 29, 2007, at Eagle Harbour Yacht Club, 5750 Eagle Harbour Road, West Vancouver. Please bring or send a note for Anne, Jenny and Malcolm with your thoughts and memories of David. David, we will all miss you.

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LABOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-10 published
LABOW, Perry
Peacefully on Sunday, December 9, 2007 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. Perry LABOW, best friend and loving husband of Esther (BALABAN.) Loving father of Louise and Bob DAILY, Jeffrey and Elaine LABOW. Dear brother of Shirlee SAPPELL, and brother-in-law of Doodie and the late Earl BALABAN, and Phil and Sharon BALABAN. Devoted grandfather of James and Amy, Matt, and Evan DAILY, Shainie and Jordan BLUM, and Jake LABOW. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday, December 11, 2007 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Community Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 7300 Yonge Street Suite 602. Memorial donations may be made to a charity of your choice.

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LABRECHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-20 published
ALLETSON, Mary Patricia Joan (née LABRECHE), R.N.
Entered into rest at the Brockville General Hospital, Garden Street, Site Brockville on November 18, 2007. Mary Patricia Joan ALLETSON in her 76th year. Beloved wife of Charles ALLETSON of Brockville. Dear mother of Trevor ALLETSON, Kim HENDERSON (Philip) and Robert ALLETSON (Sylvie-Diane.) Fondly remembered by her six grandchildren Johnny, Jamie, Matthew, Zachary, Cedric and Elyane. Predeceased by her parents Wilfred (Harry) LABRECHE and the former Catherine MacDONALD. Family and Friends may pay their respects at the Irvine Funeral Home and Chapel, 4 James Street East, Brockville from Wednesday 7-9 p.m. A celebration of Joan's life will be held in Saint Paul's Anglican Church, Pine Street, Brockville on Thursday at 11 a.m. Cremation will follow at Roselawn Memorial Gardens, Maitland. In memoriams to the Brockville and District Palliative Care Service will be gratefully acknowledged.

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LABRON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-21 published
SEIB, Diana Lynn (née SALES)
Of Red Bay, peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services Owen Sound, on Tuesday, September 18th, 2007. The former Diana Lynn SALES in her 62nd year. Devoted and loving mother of Paul Douglas CLARK, of Victoria, British Columbia; and Tracy Lynn CLARK, of Creston, British Columbia. Cherished grandmother of Danielle EGGERT and Tyler EGGERT, of Creston, British Columbia. Dear daughter of Herb and Annie SALES of Paris, Ontario. Much loved sister of Carol COOK (Gary,) of Dundas; Susan KELLEY (Jim,) of Falkland, Ontario; Paul SALES (Kathy,) of R.R.#2 Hepworth; Ann Marie LABRON (Jim,) of R.R.#5 Simcoe; and Lorie STEINER (Jeff,) of Brantford. Treasured companion of Bill and Carol Young, Red Bay. Sadly missed by her many nieces, nephews, and close Friends. At Diana's request there will be no visitation or service at this time. Cremation has taken place. Arrangements entrusted to the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel, Sauble Beach (519) 422-0041. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre Foundation or the charity of your choice would be appreciated. In living memory of Diana, a Birch tree will be planted in the funeral home meadow by the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel. Condolences may be expressed on-line at www.whitcroftfuneralhome.com. 'When the white birch whispers and the Blue Jays call, we hear your voice and smile… for we know you are near. Forever in our hearts.'

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