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"KAT" 2007 Obituary


KATCHEN  KATES  KATONA  KATZ  KATZUR 

KATCHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-18 published
SHATZ, Jack
On Monday, July 16, 2007 at York Central Hospital. Jack SHATZ, beloved husband of the late Alice SHATZ. Loving father and father-in-law of Stacie and Stan KATCHEN, Eddie and Cheri, and Michael and Traci. Dear brother of Shirley GRAYMAN and the late Harry and Barney SHATZ. Devoted grandfather of Josh and Elizabeth KATCHEN, Devra and Jordan FREEDMAN, Samantha, Jessica, Kylie, and Jake, and great-grandfather of Joseph and Ari. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave., W., (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, July 18th at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Emeth Section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva 110 Rosedale Heights Drive in Thornhill from 1: 00 p.m. daily. Memorial donations may be made to Toronto Hadassah Women's International Zionist Organization at 416-630-8373.

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KATES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-23 published
KATES, Eugene (October 12, 1914 August 21, 2007)
Eugene KATES with his wife Helen by his side, at their cabin in Algonquin Provincial Park, a place he loved dearly, when he died peacefully. Many thanks to all their wonderful Friends for their love and support. A champagne party to celebrate Eugene's very special life will be announced at a later date. www.billingsleyfuneralhome.com

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KATES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
KATES, Eugene (October 12, 1914-August 21, 2007)
Was with his wife Helen, at their cabin in Algonquin Park - a place he loved dearly when he died peacefully. Many thanks to all our wonderful Friends for their love and support. A champagne party to celebrate his very special life will be announced at a later date.

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KATES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-29 published
'Country gentleman' doubled as the gravel-voiced Nose of Algonquin
Disarmingly direct, he kept a close eye on his resort's decorum and his campers' secrets
By Charles OBERDORF, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
For 30 years, most people met Eugene KATES as the proprietor of Arowhon Pines, the luxury resort in Ontario's Algonquin Park. Although sometimes disarmingly direct, he had the manners and style of what an earlier generation called a "country gentleman." In charge but at ease, he made a very reassuring host.
Mr. KATES's gentlemanly side often came as a revelation to the two generations of summer campers, more than 5,000 children and adolescents, who knew him in the 30 years before 1975 as the fearsome, gravel-voiced autocrat who owned and ran Camp Arowhon, two lakes away from "the Pines."
Seth GODIN, a former Arowhon camper and counsellor who is now a widely read marketing guru, wrote recently that, "In an age of 'the customer is king,' Eugene was an anachronism. He never said things to make people happy, didn't sugarcoat his point of view and didn't compromise. He stood up to the government, to rangers, to staff and even to his customers, the parents. He wasn't afraid to tell you what he thought, and it didn't take long to guess what he expected."
Behind his back, campers called him The Nose. That hurt, but as his daughter Joanne, now Arowhon's camp director (and in winter, this newspaper's restaurant critic), tried to tell him, it was really a backhanded compliment. Although he rarely dealt with campers individually - that was the counsellors' job - he always seemed to know everything that went on, including each child's most embarrassing secrets. The full phrase was "The Nose knows."
And so he did. When two counsellors-in-training got caught smoking marijuana, Mr. KATES immediately began arranging to send them home. Not an easy decision; one of the two was very popular and also a close relative. Within hours, one senior counsellor had begun organizing a resistance: "If those two have to go home, we should all quit."
Mr. KATES called a staff meeting for 11 p.m. His decision was final, he said, adding that he had heard talk about quitting. "I'm going into my office now," he said. "If any of you want to leave, meet me there and we'll do the paperwork." No one took him up on it.
However, he was less hard-hearted than his young charges thought. His second wife, Helen, remembers a pale yellow bathrobe in which he would patrol the grounds when he thought some campers were staying up too late. Helen, new and conscientious, took a walk herself one night, caught a boy in one of the girls' cabins and marched the miscreants to the director's cabin. Later, he told her gently that the idea wasn't really to catch anyone. It was enough that campers saw the yellow bathrobe and got scared back to where they belonged.
Eugene KATES was born in Toronto, the elder child and only son of Max KATES, a dentist, and his wife, Lillian. He grew up on Edgar Avenue in Rosedale, attended St. Andrew's College, Elm House School and Upper Canada College until his final school year, 1932-33, when he transferred to the University of Toronto Schools. At the university itself, he studied math, physics and chemistry. He then went for a short time to Rochester, New York to learn film editing, hoping to work in the industry.
But the Depression was cutting deeply into his father's income, and to eke things out, Lillian KATES determined to open a children's camp in Algonquin Park. She took over the lease on a bankrupt family campground, renamed it Arowhon (from Samuel Butler's utopian novel Erewhon - and "arrow"), and in 1934, signed up her first 60 campers, recruiting them through the sisterhoods of Reform synagogues within one day's drive of Toronto. Mr. KATES, then 20, dealt with logistics.
"The cabins had no lights, no running water," he later recalled. "There was a smelly central toilet system and a kitchen with a couple of old wood-burning stoves. To keep food cold, we had to cut ice from the lake in wintertime, carry it to the icehouse and pack it in sawdust. I was as much trouble as I was a value, but I installed a small 32-volt generator, which allowed a 25-watt bulb in each of the camper cabins. Almost every time there was a play, we would overload the generator and there'd be a mad rush up the hill to restart it while the camp waited in the dark."
In 1940, he and friend Tommy Walker joined the armed forces. He trained at Camp Borden and in 1941 was commissioned a second lieutenant with the 10th Armoured Regiment. By mid-1942, in England, he had been seconded to the Royal Air Force, interpreting aerial photographs and, it seems, spending many evenings at London's Savoy Hotel.
He always spoke fondly of his time in England, but hardly at all about later tours in Europe and North Africa, except to imply that what he witnessed there turned him forever against the idea of war. His last long conversation with his daughter was about the folly, as he saw it, of Canada's involvement in Afghanistan.
At war's end, he had a job offer in the British film industry but decided to help out for one season at the camp. The war years had left it with a staff more interested in having fun than in their charges, and his mother was giving it only partial attention, having also built and opened Arowhon Pines, for visiting parents.
"That season was so unsuccessful and so unhappy" he wrote, "that I had to come back to prove that I could beat it. I certainly had no experience as an educator, but I had trained men in the army and had become used to having my directions unquestioned. That first postwar year at camp hooked me on the life."
He abhorred the thought of running a babysitting service, though. He cleared a baseball diamond and an archery range, built stables and a riding ring, expanded the docks for canoeing, sailing and swimming. They could choose what skills to master, but they were expected to set goals, state them and meet them. "His philosophy," his daughter says, "was that the drive toward excellence and the pursuit of learning forged lifelong character - for both the child attaining the skill and the staff member teaching it."
He was also passionate about the wilderness, even though, as his son, Robert, an expert outdoorsman, points out, he never hiked in the bush, never paddled a canoe and hardly ever sailed. "But he loved Algonquin Park, loved being in business in Algonquin Park."
From the start, Camp Arowhon had been co-ed - one of the first such camps in North America. After the war, Mr. KATES set about diversifying it in other ways, reaching outside the Jewish community to replicate the rich mix of cultures he had experienced in the army. Soon enough, Arowhon was mixing not only Jews and gentiles, Americans and Canadians, but also campers from Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America.
His off-season life in Toronto went less well for a while. In 1949, he had married Ruth GROSS, Joanne and Robert's mother, but the pair divorced in 1962. In 1968, he married Helen DAY, an English-born businesswoman. In 1971, the two took over Arowhon Pines, the resort hotel, which had been fading under Mr. KATES's mother's management.
The hotel's lease then had only six years to run, and government policy called for an end to all private leaseholds in the park. Mr. KATES brought his full-bore energy and single-mindedness to bear on Queen's Park. "A park the size of Algonquin can't be the exclusive preserve of canoeists and backpackers," he argued. "Three hotels in a 3,000-square-mile park exclude no one."
The minister he addressed was impressed, and even more that the Pines had stayed solvent for 30 years with no liquor licence (guests bring their own) and operating only 18 weeks a year. Its lease was renewed, and the government was soon promoting it in its tourism brochures.
The KATESes set about upgrading on all fronts. As Mr. KATES put it with typical directness in a 1976 interview, "We're in the business of selling three things: a bedroom, a dining room and a setting. The setting is superb, but it's beyond our control, so we have to do our best with the other two." In 1987, Arowhon Pines was invited to join Relais and Châteaux, the very selective luxury hotel association.
By that time, it was already attracting guests from Europe. It has since seen them arrive from as far as Peru, Vietnam and Senegal. Mr. KATES delighted over the foreign guests, but when his staff was abuzz over serving Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell, William Hurt, Frances McDormand or Martin Short, he would ask, "Who?" And, while he fretted over decorum in the stately dining room, whenever hydro crews worked on lines to the camp or the hotel, they got invited to lunch, sweaty work clothes and all.
Until late in his 70s, he went skiing for three weeks each year in the Alps. In his 80s, he and Helen were beating couples 30 years his junior at doubles tennis. About five years ago, though, he was diagnosed with emphysema. Still, one afternoon in April, sitting in his Toronto garden with the management team, talking about reopening, he offhandedly said, "I don't know if 92 is the right time to retire."
He spent his final weeks in his cabin at the camp, amid the shouts and laughter of children. He died on the final day of camp, but not until after the last bus had left.
The Nose knew.
Eugene KATES was born in Toronto on October 14, 1914. He died at his cabin in Algonquin Park on August 21, 2007. He was 92. He is survived by wife Helen, children Joanne and Robert, and four grandchildren.

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KATONA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-24 published
SPEAGLE, Patricia (née QUARRY)
On Saturday, September 22, 2007 at the age of 77, Patricia SPEAGLE passed away after a lengthy illness at The Brant Centre in Burlington, Ontario. Her equanimity and patience throughout her illness were inspiring to all. Survived by her loving husband Walter, dear sons Paul (Janelyn), John, Michael (Christine) and daughter Mary BOUCHER (Alan.) She will be missed by her 8 wonderful grandchildren - Robert, Madeleine, Matthew, Melissa, Penny, Patricia, Kathryn and Alison. She is survived by her sisters Margaret SILCOCK, Betty CAVANAUGH and Hélène RYAN. Predeceased by her parents James and Dorothy QUARRY, sisters Claire TRUDEL, Eleanor KATONA and brother Doctor Gregory QUARRY. She will be missed by numerous nieces and nephews. The family wishes to extend its thanks to the caring staff members of The Brant Centre. Born in Burlington in 1929, Pat lived a happy and productive life in both Burlington and Montreal. She was a longtime hospital volunteer, secretary of the Newcomers Club, member of Saint_John's choir, a lifetime member of the C.W.L. and a wonderful mother who made innumerable trips to swimming, dancing and music lessons, soccer, hockey and schools, all of which produced terrific memories, great Friends, and a legacy that will not be forgotten. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 1167 Guelph Line (one stoplight north of the Queen Elizabeth Way), Burlington (905-632-3333) on Wednesday from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be Celebrated at Saint_John the Baptist Roman Catholic Church, Brant Street (at Blairholm), Burlington on Thursday, September 27, 2007 at 11 a.m. Interment Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Burlington. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Huntington Society of Canada would be appreciated by the family. Vigil for Patricia Wednesday at 8: 30 p.m. at the Funeral Home. www.smithsfh.com

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KATONA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-27 published
CAVANAUGH, Betty (née QUARRY)
(January 7, 1922-September 23, 2007)
Betty died with the courage, grace and dignity that she displayed throughout her long, rich and full life. She lives in the heart of Bill CAVANAUGH, her husband, best friend and life-companion of 65 years. She is much loved and cherished by her eight children: Peter (Peg), Peggy MANIS, Cathy (John BECKINGHAM), Chris (Joan), Betty Lou REYNOLDS, Michael, Nancy HELMERS (Bill) and Paul (Sue.) Grandma is remembered joyfully by her eleven beautiful grandchildren, Linda, Alexi, Christy, Sean, Colleen, Laura, Beth, Christopher, Simone, Esme and William. She is an inspiration to her three great-grandchildren, Jordon, Gavin and Oliver. Betty is survived by her sisters Margaret SILCOCK and Hélène RYAN, her sister-in-law, Barb QUARRY, and brothers-in-law Joe, John (Mavis) and Paul (Gwen.) She was predeceased by her parents James and Dorothy QUARRY, sisters Claire TRUDEL, Eleanor KATONA, Patricia SPEAGLE, and brother Greg. She is fondly remembered by her many nieces, nephews and cousins. Her special gift for Friendship leaves many with warm and fond memories. Born in Stratford, Ontario, Betty grew up in Waterdown and Burlington. She taught elementary school in Kingsbridge, North Bay, Terrace Bay and Thunder Bay where she also worked as a Christian Living Consultant with the Catholic School Board and provided leadership in the revision of Catholic curriculum for primary grades in the 1980s. Following her retirement in 1987, Betty and Bill made their home in Burlington where they enjoyed family get-togethers, celebrations and many cultural and sporting events. A lifelong reader, Betty especially appreciated her book club. She taught and regularly attended aquafit classes at the Y. She looked forward to bridge games, fun luncheons and walks in Spencer Smith Park. She was an active member of the Newcomers Club. During these years she grew in her faith and belief in God who granted her many blessings, including a peaceful death, gently and lovingly cared for by her family and the staff and volunteers at Carpenter Hospice. We are deeply grateful for their support and compassion. We also thank Doctor Ernest HAJCSAR for his concerned and timely care. A memorial mass will be celebrated at St. Raphael's Roman Catholic Church, 4072 New Street (at Longmoor, east of Walker's Line), on Friday, September 28, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, the family will appreciate donations to The Carpenter Hospice, 2250 Parkway Drive, Burlington, L7P 1T1. Arrangements entrusted to Smith's Funeral Home, Burlington, 905-632-3333 www.smithsfh.com

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KATZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-11 published
KATZ, Sophie

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KATZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-20 published
CHOLAKIS, Harry A. (December 16, 1926-July 16, 2007)
It is with great sadness that the family of Harry CHOLAKIS announces his passing at age 80 in Toronto. Survived by his loving wife of 54 years, Marina, his beloved children Ernest (Rebecca LAST,) Nancy (Richard RACZKOWSKI,) Cynthia (Robert GEMMELL) and George (Hanya KATZ.) Cherished grandfather to Jennifer, Greg, Laura, Megan, Michelle and Michael. Survived by brothers, John, Paul and Leo CHOLAKIS, predeceased by brother Chris and parents, Ernest and Helen CHOLAKIS, all of Winnipeg. Harry was born in Winnipeg to a Greek immigrant father and an American mother. His passion for sports resulted in recruitment to the Winnipeg Blue Bombers Football team before polio ended his dream. He then focused his energy coaching the Winnipeg Rods, a Manitoba junior football team. He joined the family business, Broadway Florists and Greenhouses and then at 41 years of age moved to Toronto with his young family after purchasing Helen Simpsons Flowers. He soon acquired Stan Muston Florist, Graingers and Staines Florists, opened shops at the Royal York Hotel and on Bay Street and was managing the flower shop at the downtown Simpsons department store. Harry was active with FTD and was the first elected Canadian director. He was proud to be a founder of the Ontario Florist Conference and was honored when, in recognition of his many years of involvement in the floral industry, the conference created a 'Harry Cholakis Award'. His family will forever miss his wisdom, strength, humor, integrity and devotion. Harry felt fortunate to have had grandchildren to share his life with the past 18 years. It was a joy for him to celebrate their milestones and to frequently travel with them, often to watch them compete in junior squash tournaments throughout North America and Europe. They will miss his sense of fun, wit and love. A private family funeral service was held followed by interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Condolences can be sent to marinacholakis@sympatico.ca

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KATZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-12 published
MOSES, Eleanor
On Monday September 10, 2007 at Saint Michael's Hospital. Eleanor MOSES beloved wife of the late Aubey. Loving mother of Susan, and John. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Sybil KESTEN, Marjory and Harry KATZ, David and Dorothy PULLAN, and the late Ruth and Dr. Robert VOLPE. At Beth Tzedec Synagogue 1700 Bathurst Street, for service on Wednesday September 12th at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society 1-888-939-3333.

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KATZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-22 published
KATZ, Sidney
On Thursday, September 13, 2007, Sidney (Sholem) KATZ died peacefully in his 92nd year at Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital after a long battle with kidney disease.
Born in Ottawa in 1916, he was the third son of Samuel KATZ of Russia and Susan SUGARMAN of Lithuania. Educated at Lisgar Collegiate and St. Patrick's College (now Carleton University), where he received his B.S. Sc., he then moved to Toronto, where he was named editor of the now-defunct publication Magazine Digest.
In 1941, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force as a radar mech., serving in the Eastern Air Command and, later, overseas with the Royal Air Force. Returning to Canada after the war, Sid continued his education at the University of Toronto, obtaining a M.S.W. (Master of Social Work), specializing in psychiatry. He later received a Diploma in Alcohol and Drug Addiction from Yale University.
Having married Ottawa-born journalist Dorothy SANGSTER while on leave during the war, the couple settled in Toronto. Sid joined the staff of Macleans Magazine as a feature writer, gaining national acclaim for his numerous articles over a period of fifteen years, including his breakthrough 1954 article "I Was a Madman for Twelve Hours", the first detailed, first-person account in a general magazine of the effects of the hallucinogenic drug LSD, given to Sidney under the supervision of Doctor Humphrey Osmond in Weyburn, Saskatchewan.
Sid later joined the Toronto Star, where he was a feature writer and columnist, specializing in issues of mental health, mental illness, and social and behavioural problems. Retiring early from the Star, he continued his career as a freelance journalist and broadcaster as well as acting as an Adjunct Professor at the University of Western Ontario's Graduate School of Journalism, and authoring the book The Divided Woman.
His concern about Canadians with special needs often led to the establishment of organizations designed to help them, including the Non-Smokers' Rights Association, Parent Finders, The Patients' Rights Association and the Allergy Information Association. He was actively involved in several other groups, including those dealing with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome and gay rights, and as a member of the Conference on Aging's planning committee and of the executive planning committee of the Ontario Consultation on Youth.
Sidney received numerous awards for his work, including the City of Toronto Civic Award, the Canadian Mental Health Award, Metro Police Award, the University of Western Ontario's President's Medal (twice), the Canadian Education Conference Award, Canadian Nurses Association Award, Allergy Information Association Award, the Ohio State University Award, and ten Maclean-Hunter Awards for editorial excellence.
Sidney is survived by his wife Dorothy, son Jeremy, sisters Esther (Mrs. Irving ROBINSON) of Toronto and Miriam (Mrs. Lou WEINER) of Ottawa, and numerous nieces and nephews. He was pre-deceased by his son Stephen in 1989.
The family would like to express its sincere appreciation to the staff of Sunnybrook Hospital's K Wing (Veterans) and Dialysis Unit for their wonderful care over the past several years.
A private family service was held at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (2 stop lights west of Yonge St.) on Wednesday September 26 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m.
In lieu of flowers, donations to Sunnybrook or The Kidney Foundation.

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KATZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-14 published
GOUIN, Jean Yvon " Ivan"
On November 11, 2007 Ivan, beloved husband of the late Carol GOUIN, passed away peacefully.
Ivan was born on February 15, 1916 in Vimy, Alberta. He was the second of seven children born to Rudolph and Rose Alma GOUIN. The family lived in rugged conditions on a small farm. As a teenager during the Great Depression of the 1930's, Ivan experienced the desperation of poverty. The lessons of misery defined his young life and taught Ivan that hard work, persistence and optimism would change his circumstance. Always practical even as a little a boy, Ivan once witnessed a fire and responded to those crying, 'God stop the flames, by saying you pray, I'm getting some water'.
An alter boy to an early mentor, Father Coolin, Ivan learned and lived by the notion, the most important thing was to look after those he loved here and now, not in the hereafter. Throughout his life, generosity flowed from a man who is defined by helping others. In 1938 at the age of 22, Ivan got a job at grain elevator. His salary of $15 a week was shared by his large family whose needs he understood as being more important than his own.
In 1940, Ivan discovered his entrepreneurial talent by purchasing a general store in Vimy with his sister. From those humble beginnings Ivan prospered, never forgetting his commitment to his family and those in need. World War Two interrupted his career as a shop keeper when he joined the Canadian Army and served in Ontario.
After serving in the military and seven years as a merchant, Ivan realized the future of rural Alberta would be roads and cars. Most important he understood this future would bring increased competition to little towns and jeopardize his business and so many others. Ivan sold his store and turned his attention to a career that would make him a pioneer in construction.
Ever the entrepreneur, Ivan noticed farmers in the area were using small bulldozers to clear their land. Most farmers did not have the capital to invest in this equipment so Ivan and his younger brother Bob bought one very old piece of equipment and then another, clearing the land of bush and rock. As business grew, the brothers broadened their horizons and secured work from the Alberta Department of Highways.
On New Years Day 1948, at the age of 31 Ivan went to a party that would change his life forever. At that happy occasion was a beautiful woman named Carol. Originally from Yugoslavia, Carol immigrated to Canada with her family as a child of 4. Ivan was immediately captivated by the vibrant young woman. Three months later they were married and began a family.
In 1951, Ivan and Carol moved their young family to a small house in Edmonton and soon thereafter to the West Edmonton neighbourhood of Valleyview. A home and a life Carol, Ivan and the children would come to cherish. In 1952, Ivan, brother Bob and two partners began work under the name North American Road Builders. Soon the brothers bought out their partners and so began the foundation of a company that expanded throughout Alberta. Twenty years later, in 1972 Bob decided to pursue other interests. Ivan bought Bob's share of the company.
There were many strenuous challenges, all of which Ivan faced with optimism and an unrivalled passion. He knew the business, worked hard to compete and expand. Survival was not always easy in the highly competitive and always risky business of construction. His success was by any standard, outstanding, fuelled by the need to innovate, to compete and to see just over the horizon.
In the late 1970's, Ivan experienced health problems that changed his approach to life and business, spending more time with Carol traveling to southern California to escape Alberta's winters and exploring the world. Ivan was blessed with an immense knowledge of history and politics. He was a voracious reader, affording him an intellectual presence that allowed him tolerance and perspective widely respected throughout his life. Ivan was honest, his ethics were beyond reproach. He had wisdom and grace, was a teacher of all who knew him and a friend of so many. His optimism was infectious. Ivan believed that obstacles in life provided endless opportunity. When it rained making road building difficult he would say, 'rain is why we include contingencies in our budgets, when it does not rain, we are more profitable. And that's just good business.' When faced with competition, Ivan would innovate. When paying taxes, he would remind colleagues 'working is a privilege and taxes remind us of that.' Business was his passion. Carol and his family was his life. He respected others and asked only what he expected of himself. Ivan is survived by his children Elaine BUSCH (Ron), Roger (Peggy), Renee KATZ (Daryl) Colette (Michael), Martin (Sarah). His grandchildren include, Renee, Arden, Justin, Anna, Lauren and Isabelle GOUIN, Britt FRENCH, Harrison and Cloe. Ivan's brothers and sisters include, Giselle, Jennie (deceased), Lucille (deceased), Lomar (deceased), Rolond and Robert. His many nieces and nephews. Ivan will be remembered for his many contributions to Edmonton, to Alberta and to Canada.
A man of substance and charisma, of depth, and always a man whose love of his wife knew no bounds. Ivan died in his 91st year at 11 a.m. on November 11. A fitting tribute to his country and to his wife, Carol whose birthday fell on that same day.
Special thanks to Doctor Allison Theman for her compassion in caring for both Carol and Ivan. And to the Emergency and Intensive Care Units of the U of A and Misericordia Hospitals. The family thanks Ivan's caregiver, Blandina Carilla for her many years of service.
There will be a family memorial service followed by a celebration of his life, for all, at the Royal Mayfair Golf and Country Club on south Groat Road in Edmonton, Thursday, November 15, at 4 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to a hospital of your choice. Connelly-McKinley Funeral Home 10011-114 Street Edmonton, Alberta 780.422.2222

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KATZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-04 published
SINGER, Belle
On Monday, December 3, 2007. Belle SINGER, beloved wife of the late Fred SINGER. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Rosalyn and Bernard NATHANSON, and Francine and Ralph GREEN. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Rose and the late Ben KATZ, Jules NEWTON and the late Wallace J. and the late Tillie NEWTON, Francis and the late Samuel NISSENBAUM, the late Toba and the late Harry KASH. Devoted grandmother of Bill and Shaindy NATHANSON, and Lani and Bryon ALEXANDROFF, great-grandmother of Lindsi and Michael, Brandon and JoJo, Daniel, and Adam, great-great-grandmother of Zoe Nora. Blessed to have outstanding caregivers Lisa, and Beth. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday, December 4, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Memorial donations may be made to the Fred and Belle Singer Memorial Fund c/o Baycrest Centre, 416-785-2875.

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KATZUR o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2007-05-23 published
Lucie Jane DOAN (née COLLINS)
In Loving Memory of Lucie Jane DOAN (née COLLINS) who died peacefully at the Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Sunday, May 20, 2007 at the age of 94.
Predeceased by her beloved husband Andrew in 1987. Loved by her children Betty BOWERMAN (husband Clint predeceased) of Espanola, Everett and wife Maralynn of Rexdale, Lillian (predeceased in 1975), George (predeceased in 1996) wife June of Toronto. Cherished grandmother of Sandra and husband Albert BEAVEN, Debora and husband John MERCHANT, Joanne and husband Peter KATZUR, Cathie and husband Cas BURNS, Staccy and husband Michael DUNNE, Kim and husband Jeff TOPPIN, Derwin DOAN and Samantha, Leanne and husband Royce HAMIGUCHI, Leslie and husband Dave GUYON. Special great grandmother of Chris and wife Joelle MERCHANT, Megan MERCHANT and fiance Matt, Kara MERCHANT, Ehren KATZUR, Michael BURNS and fiance Jennifer, Anthony BURNS, Patrick and Thomas DUNNE, Jessie TOPPIN, Britney and Jake DOAN, Cassidy Hamiguchi, Cole GUYON. Proud great great grandmother of two - Jack and Darcy MERCHANT. Will be missed by her siblings Alice KIRK (predeceased by both husbands Ivan KIRK and Russ HORE,) Pearl SMITH (husband Aubrey predeceased,) Dorothy WISSON (friend Orest NADOR) (husband Lorne "Spike" predeceased,) Richard COLLINS (wife Dorothy predeceased,) Clifford COLLINS and wife Moria, Percy (predeceased) wife May COLLINS, Elizabeth and husband Wilbert McCULLIGH (both predeceased,) Walter (predeceased) wife Norine COLLINS, Bella and husband Fred DENNIS (both predeceased,) Mable PETERS (predeceased,) Norman and wife Ruth COLLINS (both predeceased.) Will be forever remembered by many nieces and nephews. Visitation was 7 - 9 pm Monday. Funeral Service was at 11: 00 am Tuesday, May 22, 2007 at Island Funeral Home, Little Current. Reverend Faye STEVENS officiating. Burial in Elmview Cemetery, Sheguiandah. Donations to Sheguiandah United Church, Manor Bed Fund or to cancer.

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