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"KAN" 2007 Obituary


KANE  KANEE  KANGAS  KANN  KANSCHAT  KANTOR 

KANE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-01-05 published
KANE, Elizabeth Joy (née SUMMERS)
48, on December 28, 2006 suddenly left her home in Glendale, California. to be with her Lord Jesus. She leaves to mourn her passing her beloved husband, Richard, and her mom, Kathleen SUMMERS. Dearly loved daughter of the late Bill SUMMERS, and the loved sister of Bert and Bonnie, Flaxville, Missouri, Mary and Ivan FLIGG, Kitchener, Ontario, Ruth and Walt SQUIRE, Chatham, Ontario, John and Dianne, Waterloo, Ontario, Gord and Pat, Regina, Saskatchewan, David and Susan, Owen Sound, Ontario. Loved aunt of several nieces and nephews. Memorial service at a later date.
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KANE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-11 published
KNOTT, Orville Henry
Orville KNOTT, son of the late William H. and Mildred ABERCROMBIE) KNOTT of Euphrasia Township, passed away at Errinrung Residence in Thornbury on Wednesday October 10, 2007 at the age of 83. Dear brother of Maurice and Audrey KNOTT of Meaford. Predeceased by brothers Harvey in infancy, and Russell as a teen. Uncle of James KNOTT and his wife Patricia of Hickson, Wayne KNOTT and his wife Ruth of Meaford, Russell KNOTT and his wife Debbie of Clarksburg, Nancy and her husband Brian KANE of Thornbury, and Shelley and her husband Chris CORNFIELD of Rocklyn. Also remembered by 10 great-nieces and nephews, a great-great-niece, and three great-great-nephews. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend Dr. Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at the Grace United Church in Thornbury on Friday October 12 at 11 a.m. with interment and committal services to follow at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. Friends are invited to a time of fellowship and remembrances of Orville at the Grace United Church following interment. As your expression of sympathy, donations to Meaford General Hospital Foundation would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, in Thornbury to whom arrangements have been entrusted.

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KANE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-09-07 published
Crash victim a 'lovely' person
By Sun Media Staff, Fri., September 7, 2007
A 20-year-old woman who died in a crash near Tavistock was remembered yesterday as a devoted mother and volunteer.
Jessica JOCQUE died Wednesday while driving her 16-month-old son Nathan from Shakespeare to the boy's father's home in Tavistock, Perth County Ontario Provincial Police said. "She was a lovely girl," said Denise KANE, secretary at Sprucedale public school in Shakespeare. Rescue workers were shaken by the horrific crash that left the baby motherless, said Ontario Provincial Police Const. Glen CHILDERLEY. " There is no easy way to deal with something like that," he said. JOCQUE's son was taken to hospital in Stratford and kept for observation, CHILDERLEY said. The crash happened on Perth Road 107, about 11: 45 a.m. Wednesday. JOCQUE's car crossed the centre line and crashed into an oncoming car. Police were still investigating.

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KANEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-03 published
SCHACHTER, Doctor Ricky (née KANEE) (1918-2007)
Healer, educator, innovator and advocate for the rights of women, Jews and people in need, passed away peacefully on July 1st following a prolonged illness during which she was constantly surrounded by the love of her family and Friends. We thank the staff at the Toronto Western and Baycrest Hospitals for their compassion and exemplary care. Our special thanks to the caregivers Naty, Lota, and Erwina. Doctor Ricky SCHACHTER had a long, productive and fulfilling life. Beloved wife of the late Doctor Benjamin SCHACHTER dear mother and mother-in-law of Doctor Daniel and Anya SCHACHTER, and Bonnie and Peter DRUXERMAN; adoring grandmother of Reva and Jonathan SCHACHTER, and Jessie and Cobi DRUXERMAN; and loving aunt to all of her nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her parents, Rose and Sam KANEE, and her brothers Abe, Doctor Ben, Sol, and Harry who died at an early age. Raised in Melville, Saskatchewan, Ricky was the daughter of self-educated immigrants, who instilled in her the value of education. She put herself through the universities of Manitoba and Saskatchewan, and through medical school at University of Toronto in the early 1940's, later following in her older brother's footsteps to specialize in dermatology at Columbia University in New York, becoming a Fellow of the Royal College in 1950. Ricky settled with her husband, a biochemist, in Toronto where they raised their family. Doctor Ricky, as she preferred to be called, spent every day of her career fighting for equality and patient care, opening many doors for women in her discipline and pioneering new techniques for treating chronic dermatological conditions such as psoriasis and scleroderma. Her hard work, energy and devotion earned her many distinctions, including the Award of Merit from the Federation of Medical Women of Canada, the Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal, the Order of Canada, the Canadian Dermatology Association Practioner of the Year Award and an honorary doctorate from Queen's University, but she always listed family on her CV as her most important contribution. She has been honoured for her contributions by medical associations from Ontario to Poland. Doctor SCHACHTER took great pride in her achievements, and continued working tirelessly for the benefit of her patients until she became ill in 2006. Doctor SCHACHTER will be sorely missed by her family, Friends, colleagues, students and patients. Her funeral will be held on Tuesday, July 3, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. at Beth Tzedec Synagogue, 1700 Bathurst Street. Interment will follow at Beth Tzedec Memorial Park, 5822 Bathurst Street. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Ricky Kanee Schachter Memorial Fund c/o the Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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KANEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-21 published
Canada's pre-eminent dermatologist refused to take no for an answer
She overcame the twin 'congenital anomalies' of being a Jew and a woman by entering medical school and becoming the country's best skin specialist
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
Toronto -- She was a mere slip - a hair over five feet tall, maybe 50 kilos - from a small Prairie town in the middle of nowhere, and was once told she suffered from two "congenital anomalies" that ensured her failure. Even so, people who knew Doctor Ricky Kanee SCHACHTER somehow lose their inhibitions when they describe her (not in so many words) as having had balls. She didn't just open doors for women in medicine, she kicked them down.
Diminutive in physical stature, a giant in her field and the definition of moxie, Doctor SCHACHTER was among Canada's pre-eminent dermatologists, and tallied several firsts: She was the first woman to head an academic division of dermatology in Canada, the first female president of the Canadian Dermatology Association (thus the first woman in Canada to lead specialists in her field) and was the first female to win the Canadian Dermatology Foundation's Practitioner of the Year award, in 2005.
As a woman and a Jew, she overcame tremendous obstacles at a time when being either, never mind both, meant that higher education was difficult, if attainable at all. But "these men and their rules," as she once put it, were not going to stand in her way. She became more determined than ever to become a doctor.
Her stunning success meant breakthroughs in the treatment of her specialties, scleroderma and psoriasis. In 1976, Doctor SCHACHTER established the Psoriasis Education and Research Centre, renamed four years ago the Phototherapy Education and Research Centre at Women's College Hospital in Toronto, the first of its kind in Canada.
Believing she could improve psoriasis sufferers' quality of life on an out-patient basis - that people were more or less capable of taking care of themselves - she first had to convince Ontario's Health Ministry that ambulatory care was more cost-effective than keeping patients in hospital. Her son, Doctor Daniel SCHACHTER, also a dermatologist, said her vision was to provide treatment that did not disrupt patients' daily lives and which stressed self-care - years before the concept existed. The facility remains one of the largest centres of its kind in Canada, and treats about 30,000 visitors annually. It has revolutionized the way some chronic skin diseases are treated.
"She empowered nurses in a way they were never empowered before to become not only caregivers but educators," noted Doctor Neil SHEAR, professor of dermatology at the University of Toronto. "She designed a clinic where people take responsibility for their own care. That has a huge impact on patient outcome.
"Ricky was not only the right person, but in the right place to really deliver a model of care that, even 30 years later, is still innovative and cutting-edge."
In 1991, the Ricky Kanee Schachter Dermatology Centre was opened at Women's College Hospital to treat and educate ambulatory patients, after six years of fundraising. (Her reaction to the campaign's establishment: "I thought I'd faint. I'm basically a shy person.") Shy maybe, but definitely dogged, a trait acquired from her immigrant parents - Russian father, Sam, and Austro-Hungarian mother, Rose - who came to Canada to escape the anti-Semitism of Europe. They had six children - the first died in childbirth - with Ricky their only daughter.
Sam KANEE had arrived in 1903 to work on the Canadian Pacific Railway. He settled in Melville, Saskatchewan., opened a general store and eventually went into the grain business to establish the successful Soo Line Mills.
Young Ricky had two role models as a child: her old brother Ben, who went to Columbia University to study dermatology, and her mother, who lovingly tended Ricky's younger brother Harry, who had cerebral palsy. Harry, who died at 16 of chicken pox, couldn't speak, and Rose KANEE taught him to communicate through magazine pictures.
Her other brothers were no slouches: Abe KANEE was an executive with Soo Line Mills. Sol KANEE, who died in April, practised law in Melville and was a former president of the Canadian Jewish Congress. He also formed the first small-loans bank, served on the board of the Bank of Canada longer than anyone and founded the Royal Winnipeg Ballet.
Ricky, meantime, had skipped several grades, graduated from high school at 14, and announced her plans for university. Her father, an otherwise progressive man, countered that she would be taking up a place for a man, and wanted his daughter to get married and start a family. Ricky threatened that she would never get married until she had a university education. Her father scraped together the money.
She enrolled at the University of Manitoba, where she had her first encounter with anti-Semitism - an "awakening," as she put it in a 1995 published interview. "There was a sign in the women's locker room: 'You Jews have taken over Winnipeg Beach but we don't want you in our locker room.' " She transferred to the University of Saskatchewan where the dean informed her that all the universities in Canada, except in Halifax, had filled their quota of Jews. Six weeks before her final exams, despite being among the top three students, she was told she had to take an IQ test. She refused. Then she was told she couldn't graduate because she lacked a credit in physical education. "So while everybody else was studying, I learned how to swim."
She completed two years in one and, armed with a degree in science (and a swimming badge), she set out for medical school at the University of Toronto. In her only interview with the dean of medicine she was told there was no place for her because she had two congenital anomalies: She was a woman and Jewish.
"What a silly man," she recalled. "I don't think I ever spoke to him again. He didn't know how I felt about medicine. He didn't know how hard my parents worked to send me to university. He didn't know about my brother Ben. And he didn't know I had already been accepted at U of T."
In 1942, she married Benjamin SCHACHTER, a University of Toronto biochemist who was researching female sexual hormones, and graduated the following year. That was followed by two years of postgraduate training in dermatology at Columbia University in New York. Her association with Women's College Hospital began in 1946, and in 1961 she was appointed associate professor in the University of Toronto's faculty of medicine.
She challenged tradition, her grand_son Jonathan, 23, eulogized at her funeral. One of her patients, a nun, had developed a scalp condition from her veil, so in 1959, she wrote the Pope to complain about the dress code for nuns. "Boba got a response, though not from the Pope directly, granting permission for the nun to dress appropriately to cure her condition." A few years later, Jonathan added, the dress code for nuns was relaxed amid other reforms of the Second Vatican Council. "She was by no means an ordinary grandmother, nor an ordinary Jew or woman for that matter, but she was a fiercely driven person who could do whatever she wanted."
That didn't mean she was hard. Health care, poverty and the disparity between rich and poor were her greatest concerns, and her family her greatest love (the names of her children and grandchildren are on page one of a 24-page curriculum vitae).
"I learned so much from how she practised, how she handled patients [and] got to know them all exceedingly well," said Doctor Vera PRICE, who'd been a teenaged patient of Doctor SCHACHTER's, and later shared her practice.
"To this day I insist that all my residents and fellows get to know who they're treating. You have to know how to relate to them… I certainly got this from her," added Doctor PRICE, who now teaches medicine at the University of California in San Francisco. "[Patients] knew she loved them. She could be very strict and not mince her words, but the tremendous caring was there."
Among her many honours were the 1994 Award of Merit from the Federation of Medical Women of Canada, a 1995 award from the Women's Dermatologic Society, and in 1998, induction into the Order of Canada.
She retired several times, beginning in 1985, and stepped down from teaching when she reached 65. "No problem," she pronounced in 1995. "I just haven't accepted any salary for teaching the past 11 years."
Asked once about the best advice she ever received, she replied: "Don't take no for an answer - and I have passed it on to many people."
Ricky Kanee SCHACHTER was born in Melville, Saskatchewan., on December 23, 1918. She died in Toronto on July 1, 2007. She was 88. Her husband, Benjamin SCHACHTER, died in 2001. She is survived by her children, Doctor Daniel SCHACHTER and Bonnie DRUXERMAN. She also leaves grandchildren Reva, Jonathan, Jesse and Cobi.

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KANGAS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-10 published
ARMSTRONG, Jane (née McNAMARA)
It is with great sadness that our family announces the passing of our beloved mother Jane ARMSTRONG on January 7th, 2007. Mom is greatly missed by her children, Michael of London, Pattye and Gregg of Kirkton, Barbara and Kevin, Cindy and Mark all from London and Sherrie and Shannon of Saint Marys. Grandma Jean has a very special place in her heart for all 12 grandchildren and 6 great-grand_sons. Jean is sadly missed by sisters Barb and Harold SNODDY of Exeter, Joan and Larry KANGAS of Toronto and sister-in-law Norma McNAMARA of Byron. Aunt Jean is fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews. Jean is predeceased by big brother Jack McNAMARA and infant grand_son David. A memorial service will be held on Thursday, January 11th, 2007 at 2 p.m. at Street, George's Church, 1475 Dundas St. East London Ontario. Donations to the Cancer Society in lieu of flowers. You may be gone, but you will always be in our hearts.

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KANGAS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-11 published
ARMSTRONG, Jean (née McNAMARA)
It is with great sadness that our family announces the passing of our beloved mother Jean ARMSTRONG on January 7th, 2007. Mom is greatly missed by her children, Michael of London, Pattye and Gregg of Kirkton, Barbara and Kevin, Cindy and Mark all from London and Sherrie and Shannon of Saint Marys. Grandma Jean has a very special place in her heart for all 12 grandchildren and 6 great-grand_sons. Jean is sadly missed by sisters Barb and Harold SNODDY of Exeter, Joan and Larry KANGAS of Toronto and sister-in-law Norma McNAMARA of Byron. Aunt Jean is fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews. Jean is predeceased by big brother Jack McNAMARA and infant grand_son David. A memorial service will be held on Thursday, January 11th, 2007 at 2 p.m. at Street, George's Church, 1475 Dundas St. East London Ontario. Donations to the Cancer Society in lieu of flowers. You may be gone, but you will always be in our hearts.

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KANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-22 published
CURTIN, Walter A.
Photographer Walter A. CURTIN died peacefully at home at the age of 96 on October 21st, 2007. Born in Vienna, Austria, he fled the Nazis for England in 1939, married painter Isabel KANN and in 1952 moved to Toronto.
Once dubbed "Canada's greatest photographer" by Peter C. Newman, CURTIN captured his subjects' unguarded moments with kindness and humanity.
He made Friends readily and seldom lost them. He loved good food, travels with Isabel, and spoiling his dog Bertie. In old age, he increasingly loved to sleep, saying it prepared him for eternal rest. He gave himself over to this in the presence of his wife, six children and their families. He is much loved, and will long be remembered.
Mass and reception 10 a.m. Tuesday at Holy Rosary Church, 354 St. Clair W. In place of flowers, donations to Plan International Canada.

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KANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-03 published
He escaped the Nazis to become Canada's 'most brilliant photographer'
Initially trained as an engraver in Vienna, he pursued a passion for photography that led him to produce trademark black-and-white images. The results took him to the heights of his profession
By Charles OBERDORF, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S11
Toronto -- Peter Newman once described Walter CURTIN as Canada's greatest photographer. A Viennese Jew who fled Nazism, he became one of the country's most successful photojournalists of the Fifties and Sixties.
His best-known image is probably also the best-known photograph of its subject, Glenn Gould. In it, the pianist, wearing a heavy overcoat and a driver's cap, sits in profile, hunched over the keyboard of a shopworn Canadian Broadcasting Corporation studio piano, his mouth slightly ajar, as if singing along with his playing.
Mr. Gould himself seems to have preferred a different Walter CURTIN shot.
Over the years, thanks to several CURTIN assignments, the two had become Friends. ("Walter," Mr. Gould once said, "you're as crazy as I am.") The Friendship had an opposites-attract element: the charming, gregarious and dapper Viennese and the unkempt, argumentative and reclusive Canadian.
During one conversation - possibly one of Mr. Gould's famous late-night phone calls - the pianist described a nightmare he'd recently had in which he was a passenger in a 747 jet. A flight attendant came to him and whispered that the pilot had just died and that only Mr. Gould could land the plane. He woke up in terror.
In his darkroom, Mr. CURTIN dug out the negatives from an assignment he'd done that included a shot of a pilot at the controls of a big jet. He printed an enlargement, then one of Mr. Gould with his head at a matching angle. Carefully, he substituted the pianist's face for the pilot's, framed the result and sent it to Gould. He heard nothing, but later learned that for years there had been a shot of Mr. Gould in a pilot's uniform, with someone else's hairy hands, hanging in the pianist's bedroom.
Walter CURTIN was born Walter SPIEGEL in the imperial Vienna of Gustav Mahler and Ludwig Wittgenstein, Arthur Schnitzler and Gustav Klimt. In that well-fed city, the SPIEGELs were food importers and wholesalers. The business ran into trouble, however, when Walter was about 15.
A few years later, in 1933, his father died, leaving him head of the family. In November, 1938, eight months after Hitler's Germany annexed Austria, the concierge in their apartment building saved the family during the brutal Kristallnacht pogrom by sowing such seeds of deceit and confusion that the Nazi mob who came for them went away empty-handed. The strategy gained precious time, and Mr. CURTIN and his brother, Otto, soon fled to Britain. Their mother would die in Poland along with thousands of other Viennese Jews.
In England, Mr. CURTIN worked at odd jobs, tried to enlist on the day war was declared in September, 1939, but was rejected as an "alien." After the fall of France, both brothers, along with 2,000 other German-speaking aliens of military age, were shipped to an internment camp in Australia. When British Prime Minister Winston Churchill changed the policy to allow "friendly aliens" to enlist, Mr. CURTIN joined the British military and was advised to change his name in case of capture.
The brothers served first in the 93rd Pioneer Corps, and then Mr. CURTIN joined the Royal Engineers "after passing a test that required putting together two bits of old-fashioned toilet chain. That's how I became an Army engineer," he once wrote. He served until 1946, mainly with the Royal Air Force.
Once out of the military, he decided to pursue a career in photography. It was an interest that had followed him through the years. In Vienna, he had studied photoengraving and worked briefly for a portrait photographer; in London, before he was deported, he had learned colour printing; on the ship to Australia, he and some had formed a keen if under-equipped photography club.
Returning to London, he talked his way into an apprenticeship at a busy commercial photo studio. He was soon behind a camera making copy photographs of paintings. In 1948, he set up shop on his own in Kensington, where such clients as Time-Life Books wanted his well-crafted photos of paintings and art objects.
Along the way, Mr. CURTIN became acquainted with a talented young British painter 10 years his junior whom he met through an old military friend. As it happened, his friend was married to a painter who had decided to play matchmaker. Invited to dinner, Mr. CURTIN showed up in all innocence to be introduced to a beautiful young woman named Isabel KANN. She was Catholic and he was Jewish, but no matter. As these things go, a relationship quickly developed and they fell in love. They married in 1949.
On visits to Paris, he made Friends with the founders of the Magnum photo agency - including Robert and Cornell Capa, Dimitri Kessel and Henri Cartier-Bresson - who were setting new standards in photojournalism made possible by the inconspicuous mobility of the 35 mm camera and the versatility of high-speed film.
In 1952, hard economic times in Britain, together with the needs of a young family, led the CURTINs to emigrate to Canada.
Settling in Toronto, Mr. Walter decided to follow the lead of his Magnum Friends and began shooting people and events rather than paintings and sculpture. Within months he had sold a cover to Liberty magazine. It was a portrait of the hockey giant, King Clancy. Not long after that, the National Film Board in 1953 commissioned him to document the first season of the Stratford Festival.
It soon became apparent, though, that photojournalism would not support a growing family that by 1963 would number six children. So, according to his colleague, John Reeves, "Walter did this amazing thing. He unleashed that Viennnese charm of his on the ad agencies and somehow convinced them that his kind of shooting was just what they needed. All of a sudden, these black-and-white, available-light images started showing up in magazine ads and at the art directors' shows."
It was during this period that he worked with the journalist Peter C. Newman, who was then a senior editor and columnist at Maclean's. In a hand-written dedication, Mr. Newman wrote: "To Walter CURTIN, the most brilliant photographer in Canada. With admiration and best wishes. Peter Newman, May, 1961." It was a respect that was to remain unchanged through the years.
By then, Mr. CURTIN had moved the family back across the Atlantic to again try his luck in London. There, he replicated his Toronto ad-agency breakthrough, most memorably in a series of ads for Wills cigars. Each one featured a large informal close-up portrait of a man, clearly not a model, usually working-class - one was a street sweeper - each in his working garb and almost off-handedly holding a cigar. Freed of their ad copy, the series still stands up as a vivid collection of genre portraits.
Eight years later, the CURTINs returned to Toronto, where he would soon begin an obsessive personal project to document the major figures in Canada's classical music scene. In concert or rehearsal, in their homes or sometimes his own, he shot them all, from an aging Wilfred Pelletier in 1971 to a just-unpacked-from-Finland Jukka-Pekka Saraste in 1994. His Canadian Brass look slimly resplendent in the bell-bottomed, peacock tailoring of the early 1970s. Lotfi Mansouri of the Canadian Opera Company gesticulates, soprano Teresa Stratas clasps her hands to her mouth in embarrassment, the Huggett family clutter the floor with their many wind and string instruments. In 1994, some 80 of these images (from tens of thousands of negatives) finally became a book, Curtin Call, published by Exile Editions.
One reason Mr. CURTIN could indulge in this labour of love was that just as he was reaching retirement age in the mid-1970s, his wife, Isabel, took up painting again and was soon a success in major galleries with calm canvases that always included a vase of flowers, a colourful swatch of fabric and a sun-shot view through a window. Increasingly, in paintings made in winter, the window looked out on a corner of Cannes or Albuquerque.
The six CURTIN children also flourished. All of them have worked in the arts, but as one son, John, said, "We keep out of each other's way." One daughter paints, another sculpts, another writes poetry, another designs stage sets. John CURTIN makes award-winning documentary films. Joe, a designer and builder of concert violins and violas, recently received a $100,000 "genius" fellowship from the MacArthur Foundation for advancing the science of his field.
At the age of 80, Walter CURTIN, an agnostic Jew, converted to Roman Catholicism - primarily, his Friends speculated, to be buried with Isabel. Characteristically, he took Israel as his baptismal name. Until his early 90s, he seemed to live as energetically as ever, though, travelling whenever possible, especially to Europe, at home running errands for Isabel, entertaining Friends and eating heartily in the Viennese style, always with a glass of port before dinner, music after. He loved walking the dog, Bertie, and sitting in Isabel's overflowing garden of lilies. In the last year or two, though, he loved more and more to sleep, claiming it was preparing him for "the eternal snooze."
Walter CURTIN was born Walter SPIEGEL, on August 16, 1911, in Vienna. He died of age-related causes in Toronto on October 21, 2007. He was 96. He leaves his wife, Isabel KANN, and two sons and four daughters. He also leaves four grand_sons.

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KANSCHAT o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-07-11 published
KANSCHAT, Henry Gerhard
After a lengthy illness at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital, on Friday June 29, 2007. Henry in his 79th year, beloved husband of Elena. Dear Step-Father of John (Roz), Stephen (Jane) and Chris MUIRHEAD. Grandfather of John-Luke, Tom, Kyle and Hannah. Visitation was held at the Watts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre (132 River Rd. East, Wasaga Beach) Tuesday July 3, 2007 from 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday July 4, 2007 from 12-2 p.m. Funeral Service was conducted in the Chapel Wednesday July 4th, 2007 at 2 p.m. Interment Wasaga Beach Cemetery. Donations to the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital Heart and Stroke Department would be appreciated.
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KANTOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-07 published
CULNAN, Rita Marie (née LORTIE)
Passed peacefully at Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga on Wednesday, July 4, 2007. Rita, beloved wife of the late Doctor George F. CULNAN. Loving mother of Doctor James CULNAN (Pamela), Michael (Jocelyn), Patty (Nick KANTOR), Marie CASSELBERRY, Anne, Georgette (David BIGELOW) and Thérèse. Cherished grandmother of Charlie (Barbara,) Jeremy (Tracy), David, Michael, Amanda, George, Michelle, Veronica, Andrew and great-grandmother of Tyler, Jaxon, Dylan and Holly. Loving sister of Sr. Jeanne Marie LORTIE, Anna McKANE, Doctor Paul LORTIE and the late Jean MORRISSEY. Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 109 Reynolds Street, Oakville 905-844-3221, from 6-9 p.m. Sunday, July 8. Funeral Mass to be held at Saint Michael's Cathedral, 65 Bond Street at Shuter, Toronto, Monday morning at 10 o'clock with cremation to follow. By request, donations in Rita's memory may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the charity of your choice.

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KANTOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-21 published
GOMME, Paula (née IVANCHUK)
Died peacefully on Friday, September 14, 2007 after a brief illness, in her 88th year, at Toronto East General Hospital. She is survived by her husband, Edwin Arthur GOMME, and three sisters, Helen FOOTE, Vicky SIEMENS and Anne KANTOR. For many years Paula was a loyal volunteer of the Canadian Red Cross Society and in more recent years she devoted much time, as a volunteer, to Roy Thomson Hall. She travelled extensively and for several years was a travel agent and tour director. Cremation has taken place.

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