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"HUT" 2007 Obituary


HUTCHINGS  HUTCHINS  HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON  HUTNER  HUTT  HUTTER  HUTTON 

HUTCHINGS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-03 published
MALONEY, Helen or “Lena” (née PHILLIPS)
Passed away, surrounded by her family at Meaford Hospital on Friday, June 29, 2007 in her 87th year. Survived by her loving husband of 64 years, Larry (Lawrence Owen), her sons, Peter and partner Jin ZHE (Meaford, Ontario and Changchun, China,) Denny and wife Lyn (London, Ontario and Naples, Florida), Terry (London, Ontario), and Murray and wife Joani (Meaford, Ontario). Predeceased by her sons Larry, Jr. and Philip. Grandmother of Kevin and fiancée Nicole (Dallas, Texas), Craig and wife Sherry (Toronto, Ontario), Karen ZIMMERMAN and husband Craig (Oakland, Iowa,) Kelly (Pickering, Ontario), Michael (London, Ontario), Chris and Brendan (Meaford, Ontario,) and Andrea FISCHER and husband Chris (Wasaga Beach, Ontario.) Great-grandmother of Haley Navaisha MALONEY and Ava FISCHER. Predeceased by her sister, Evangeline, and her brothers, Dimitri (Jimmy) and Cyril (Carl), she is missed by sister, Nadejda (Annie) RAINVILLE (Toronto, Ontario,) her brother, Methody (Ted) PHILLIPS (Lackawanna, New York), daughter-in-law of Suzanne MALONEY. sister-in-law, Wynn (Newmarket, Ontario) and nieces and nephews, Dianne PAPADOPOLOUS, Gerry RAINVILLE, Sharon RAINVILLE, Stacey DELMONT, Shelley VRANJES, Peter PHILLIPS, Johnny PHILLIPS, Ed PHILLIPS, George MALONEY, Mike MALONEY, Mary MALONEY, Mark MALONEY, Bridget MALONEY, Carole BEST, Tommy BEAUVAIS, Peggy BEAUVAIS, Brian BEAUVAIS, Diane PIRIE, Cathy BEAUVAIS, Paul MALONEY, Tim MALONEY, Pat MALONEY, Helen HUTCHINGS, Fred RAPLEY, Penney BROWN, Elizabeth LEATHERDALE, and Georgea WAFFLE. Born May 27, 1921 in Toronto, eldest of six children born in Canada to Dina and Petre FILEFF, former Greek and Turkish subjects, from Western Macedonian mountain village of Trsye, who immigrated after World War I and adopted the anglicized name PHILLIPS. Lived on Wilkins Avenue in Cabbagetown area of Toronto. Attended Sackville Street School and Central Tech. Attended St. Cyril and Methody Macedonian Orthodox Church. Lifetime member of Daughters of Macedonia and Trsye Benevolent Society. Raised through the depression, she worked as a housekeeper and seamstress, for room and board and going dancing with sisters “Vee” and “Annie” at the Palais Royale or Masonic Temple. During the early years of World War 2 she met, and fell in love with a gentleman of the Air Corps, then Royal Canadian Air Force Airman L.O. MALONEY, to whom she was wed in 1943, after he returned from radar duty in England. Helen joined Larry when he was stationed at Royal Canadian Air Force Station Bagotville in 1944. After Sgt. MALONEY's demobilization, they started a family, living in a flat on Balsam Avenue in the Beach area of Toronto. While in Toronto, the family were members of Saint Michael's diocese. In 1951 the family moved to Point-aux-Trembles area of Montréal and later to St. Michel (1953-1972) at the northeast end of Montréal Island. While in Montréal, the family were members of St. Brendan's diocese. In 1972, moved to Scarborough, Ontario. Following Larry's early retirement in 1978, Helen and Larry wintered in Largo, Florida for 28 years of well-earned recreation and leisure time. In 2003, Helen and Larry moved to the family estate near Meaford, Ontario. Helen was the consummate homemaker, a skilled manager, budgeter, purchaser, chef, knitter, sewer, clothier, seamstress, launderer, cleaner, practical nurse and psychologist. She made it all seem easy. To children she was a cub and scout organizer, protector, comforter, supporter and healer. To her peers she was a graceful dancer, astute bridge partner, champion bowler, occasional golfer and good fun to be with at social events. To her husband, Larry, she was a lifelong friend, companion, partner and counsellor. Larry says that Helen saved him from an unstable life pursuing impractical daydreams. Between 1945 in Toronto and 1963 in Montreal, Helen gave birth to six sons. It was the great regret of her life that she never had a daughter, and so it was that she had a special affection for her nieces, grand-daughters and great-granddaughters. Helen was, in a category she herself sometimes applied to people, a “giver”. She was a good person with commendable standards of conduct and morality. Helen was always concerned about the feelings of others, always ready to lend a helping hand, always ready with a kind word. There are very few like her. She will be missed. Service held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, 3 July 2007 at Gardiner-Wilson Funeral Home, 60 Denmark Street, Meaford, Ontario. (519) 538 2550 Visitation begins at noon. The family receives visitors at home following service. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Alzheimer Society.

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HUTCHINGS o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-08-01 published
SMITH, Dave
The family of the late Dave SMITH of Wasaga Beach would like to extend their sincere appreciation to all who expressed their condolences, sent cards and flowers and kept us in their prayers. Special thanks to Ella EDWARDS and Susie IVES for providing food and the ladies of the Prince of Peace Church for providing the luncheon. To Rev. SEAGRAM for officiating. Leslie DEVLIN for her wonderful singing voice. The Firefighters of the Town of Wasaga Beach for all they have done. The hospital staff of Collingwood General and Marine especially Nurses Dotie and Kim and Doctor HUTCHINGS during Dave's illness. Our deepest gratitude to Kim STUBBS who helped us “keep it all together”.
From Shirley, David, Sonya, Christine and Mark.
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HUTCHINGS o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-12-12 published
MIGHTON, Doris Lovina
Passed away peacefully on Monday December 3, 2007 at her home, in her 81st year. Doris, beloved wife of the late Ken. Loving mother of Larry and the late Terry and dear mother-in-law of Jane and Irene. Cherished grandmother of Bonnie, Jeff, Jennifer, Denise, Sareena, Nicole, Kerry, Sherry, Ken and Dwight. Dear great-grandmother of 21 great-grandchildren. A private family service was held with interment Stayner Union Cemetery. Remembrances to the Children's Aid Society of Simcoe County or The Lung Association would be appreciated. The family wishes to thank Doctor Leslie HUTCHINGS and the staff of St. Elizabeth's who were dedicated to Doris' care during her illness and allowed her to remain at her home. Arrangements under the direction of the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, Stayner Chapel (705-428-2637). For more information or to sign the on-line guest book, log on to: www carruthersdavidson.com.
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HUTCHINGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-03 published
TAILOR/TAYLOR, John, D.C.M.
On Sunday, July 1, 2007 at Humber River Regional Hospital - Church Site. John TAILOR/TAYLOR, beloved husband of Marianne. Loving father and father-in-law of Michael TAILOR/TAYLOR and Sandra HUTCHINGS, Patricia TAILOR/TAYLOR and Brian McNEELY, and Richard TAILOR/TAYLOR. Dear brother of Claus SCHNEIDER of Chile, and the late Jurgen SCHNEIDER. Devoted grandfather of Dawn, Aaron, and Alexandra. Loving uncle of Edna, Ann, and Sonia and their families. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service information please call Tuesday, July 3rd after 10: 00 a.m. Interment Beechwood Cemetery. Donations may be made to the John Taylor Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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HUTCHINS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-22 published
CRUICKSHANK, Howard
At Lee Manor in Owen Sound Tuesday morning August 21, 2007. Howard CRUICKSHANK of R.R.#3, Allenford, in his 92nd year. After a valiant struggle, Howard has gone home to be with his Lord. Beloved husband of Edith (MacDONALD.) Loved father of Barbara (Robert) HUEHN of Sauble Beach, Mary (Orville) GUNSON of R.R.#3, Tara, Jean (Phillip) HUTCHINS of Port Perry, Ruth VAN ECK of Bognor and George CRUICKSHANK of Owen Sound. Lovingly remembered by his nine grandchildren; David GUNSON, Carol Ann (GUNSON) BERNARD, Justin, Craig, Ryan, Tara and Paul HUTCHINS, Jeffrey and Lisa VAN ECK and one great-granddaughter Emma BERNARD. Dear brother of Margaret (Charles) MIZEN and Edith (Harry) HUFFMAN. Predeceased by his parents Wesley and Mary CRUICKSHANK, his son Gordon (1971,) sisters Olive, Sadie and Marjorie and brothers Thorald, Leslie and Kenneth. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth Thursday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted from the Hepworth Baptist Church Friday morning at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Expression of remembrance to The Gideons or Hepworth Baptist Church would be appreciated. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Howard by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-27 published
VANDERMEY, Kryn " Chris"
The family of the late Kryn VANDERMEY would like to thank family Friends and neighbours for their support during this time. Special thanks to those who visited Kryn and Rita during his last days. Kryn died peacefully with family at his side. Thank you for the wonderful care of Kryn's "Grey Gables family" and Doctor Harvey WINFIELD for his compassionate care over many years. Thanks to our church family and the special funeral celebration provided by Rev. Donna MANN, with music by Jodee JACK, Nancy GULDNER, Bill HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and lunch served by Saint_John's United Church women. Beautiful floral tributes were created by Eckhardts, Flesherton. Many thanks to Rob and the staff of Fawcett Funeral Home for their caring and accommodating services. Thank you for the many contributions in Kryn's memory to support Grey Gables. Kryn worked hard, lived well and long. A man of family and a man of God. Kryn is greatly missed and always remembered.
- Rita and family.
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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-11-21 published
HARDY, Alma and Jim
In loving memory of my parents and our grandparents Alma HARDY who passed away November 14, 2092 and Jim HARDY who passed away March 13, 1988.
Loving memories never die,
As years roll on and days pass by,
In our hearts a memory is kept
Of the ones we love and will never forget.
- Always remembered by Eleanor, Harvey, Barb, Doug, Bob HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Families.
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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-29 published
ALDERDICE, Eva Mary (née WILLIAMSON)
In Meaford on Sunday, August 26, 2007. The former Eva WILLIAMSON, daughter of the late Robert and Martha (née CASWELL) WILLIAMSON, in her 81st year. Loved mother of Mary Jane and her husband Pat MULLANEY of Oregon, and Darryl HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Barb of R.R.#4, Meaford. Remembered also by Ross ALDERDICE of R.R.#4, Meaford. Predeceased by a son Robert 'Bob' HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON in May 2006 and by William “Bing” HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON in March 2007. Loving grandmother of Erin and Blue of Collingwood, Keegan, Colleen and Mark MULLANEY, Amber, Jocelyn, Devin and Joel HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, and Jason and Ryan VAIL and great-grandmother of Haley. Dear sister of John WILLIAMSON and his wife Doreen of Burlington, Reg WILLIAMSON and his wife Marie of Hanover, Hilda THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Markdale and Irene MCINNES/MCINNIS, also of Markdale. Predeceased by a brother Ed WILLIAMSON of Berkeley and fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews and their families. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, Thornbury on Thursday 5 until 8 p.m. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend Doctor Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at Grace United Church in Thornbury on Friday August 31 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment and committal services will be conducted at 1: 30 p.m. at the Markdale Cemetery. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Beaver Valley Athletic Association or the Meaford Amateur Athletic Association would be appreciated.

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-03 published
HADDOW, Elizabeth " Liz" Eileen (née HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON)
Passed away peacefully on January 1, 2007 at Peterborough Civic Hospital in 54th year after a long battle with diabetic complications surrounded by her loving family. Beloved daughter of Eileen and the late George HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON. Sadly missed by her beloved husband Ted HADDOW of Guelph and daughter Patricia VELDHUIS (Brent) of Guelph. Dear Sister of Laraine HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON of Richmond Hill, Carol DOHERTY (Wayne) and family of Peterborough, Kathy SSAINTOMAS (Ken) and family of Peterborough. Loved Nana of Elicia, Rianna and Andrew. Also missed by long time Friends Kathleen Flynn and Rose Daypuk and many relatives and Friends that have been touched over the years. Liz spent many years in Copper Cliff, Elliot Lake and London. The family sincerely thanks all health service workers for their loving care and compassion. A Memorial Service will be held on Thursday, January 4, 2007 at Northminster United Church, (300 Sunset Blvd. Peterborough) at 2 p.m. Private interment at a later date. In memory of Liz, donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Arrangements entrusted to Nisbett Funeral Home (705) 745 3211. Back In Her Father's Arms

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-29 published
Kitchener trucker killed on 401
His tractor-trailer slammed into the back of another rig.
By Kelly PEDRO, Sun Media, Fri., June 29, 2007
An Ontario Provincial Police officer examines the crushed cab of a transport truck that was involved in a fatal collision with another yesterday in the eastbound lanes of Highway 401 just east of Currie Road. The driver, a 22-year-old man from Kitchener, died after his rig ran into the back of the other. (Sue REEVE, Sun Media)
Ontario's police watchdog is investigating a crash on Highway 401 near Dutton yesterday morning that killed a 22-year-old Kitchener trucker.
The unidentified trucker died after the rig he was driving slammed into the back of another tractor-trailer.
The crash closed the eastbound lanes of the highway for more than eight hours as Ontario Provincial Police re-routed traffic onto Currie Road.
The collision happened about 9: 30 a.m., said Elgin Ontario Provincial Police Const. Michelle SMITH.
Elgin Ontario Provincial Police officers were escorting a truck towing another tractor-trailer from an earlier crash. In that crash, a tractor-trailer rolled into a ditch on the 401 near Currie Road about 4 a.m.
Police decided it was too dangerous to move the rolled vehicle and called in a tow truck, said Rose Bliss, spokesperson for the Special Investigations Unit.
A marked cruiser with its lights and sirens activated was leading the tow truck. Another marked cruiser followed the tow truck and tractor-trailer.
They were on the south shoulder of the eastbound lanes of the highway when the 22-year-old's tractor-trailer passed the convoy and slammed into the back of another truck, Bliss said.
"We're investigating because there was police presence at the time the crash occurred," she said.
"We're looking at the nature and extent of police involvement. Once we have a complete picture of what happened we can assess where we're going to take it from there."
Eight investigators with the agency are involved in the probe. The Special Investigations Unit probes cases where police actions may have resulted in serious injury or death.
Debris from the smashed cab of the tractor-trailer was strewn across the highway. Part of the cab was crumpled underneath the truck in front. Traffic collision investigators were still on scene late yesterday afternoon, probing the cause. No one else was hurt.
The death was the second this week on Elgin County roads. On Tuesday, Michael HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, 71, of Port Stanley was killed in a crash with a fuel tanker. He was driving east on Highway 3 between Quaker and Belmont roads when his car collided with the rear tires of a westbound tanker.
Police are still investigating that crash.
As police gear up for the long weekend, Smith reminded drivers to be safe on the roads.
"Like any other day of any other season, drive safely, leave enough time to get to your destination and be cautious," she said.

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-11-14 published
HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, Allan John
In Memory of Allan John HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON November 15, 2006
No farewell words were spoken, no time to say goodbye, you were gone before we knew it, and only God knows why. Sadly missed by Mom, Dad, Debbie, Ted, Cameron and Krista
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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-24 published
HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, William " Bill"
Soldier, athlete, writer. Born August 11, 1930, in Toronto. Died February 21, in Langley, British Columbia, after a series of strokes, aged 76.
By Lyndon GROVE, Page L8
At Central Collegiate Institute in Moose Jaw, he wore jeans with "Jeanius" stencilled across the bottom. Later, he wore the dress uniform of an officer in Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, and strode confidently into Toronto night clubs, regimental sword swinging at his side.
Hutch - which is what almost everyone called him - had come to Saskatchewan from Saint_John's College in Winnipeg. Bill's father had died in Europe in the First World War and his chic mother, Vera, had married big-hearted Art BROADFOOT, a prosperous owner of a Moose Jaw funeral home and ambulance service.
In high school, he was the BMOC (big man on campus) - coaching football, playing basketball, writing Teen Scene for the Times-Herald, and performing at school concerts.
Bill's goal was to be a college football coach, teaching history on the side. Ultimately, he achieved both in a roundabout way: He became a leader in British Columbia amateur football (he wore a Canadian Football League Builder's ring), and he taught history - military history - at the Canadian Land Force Command and Staff College in Kingston.
His military career came as a surprise to his Friends and, possibly, to him. At the University of British Columbia in the 1950s, he studied physical education and history.
To finance his tuition, he enrolled in the Regular Officers Training Plan. Then, after he completed his courses (including a catch-up in square dancing) he found the army was his true vocation. He went on to serve as platoon, company and battalion commander, with tours of duty across Canada, in Germany, at the Pentagon, and in Cyprus, where he commanded the Canadian contingent for the United Nations.
Bill also worked on state visits and military tattoos. He also found time for rugby as a player, referee and administrator.
His companion through most of this was Kay HUNTER, a spunky, athletic Doris Day look-alike he married in Moose Jaw. They had three children: Susan (an Anglican priest); Bill Jr. (an investment consultant), and Barbara Allyn (a children's songwriter).
Every marriage has peaks and valleys, and the Hutchinsons' was no exception. After some years apart, they reunited on the West Coast. Bill Jr. delighted in telling people, with feigned shock, "My mother and father are living together!" (Kay died of leukemia in 1986, a week after her 53rd birthday.)
Late in 2006, Bill suffered a stroke. And then another. And another. He gave away most of his 4,000 books and moved to a medium-care centre.
In praise of rugby, he wrote that it is "a game that teaches the values of dedication, perseverance, teamwork, initiative and respect for rules." So did he.
Lyndon GROVE is Bill's friend. He wrote this with help from the Rev. Susan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON.

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-28 published
HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, Anna Joyce "Joy" (née WRIGHT)
Peacefully passed away at Saint_Joseph Health Centre, Saturday August 25, 2007. Survived by loving husband Richard of 59 years. Cherished mother of Sherry and Karine, Don, and Mike and Jude. "Gramma" to 9 grandchildren and "Great-Gramma" to 8 great-grandchildren. Fondly remembered Aunt to many nieces and nephews. Joy was active throughout her life at Saint Paul's United Church and Islington United Church. In lieu of flowers donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation and Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated. Interment Glendale Memorial Gardens.
Friends will be received at the Ridley Funeral Home, 3080 Lake Shore Blvd. W. (between Islington and Kipling Aves., at 14th Street, 416-259-3705) on Thursday August 30, 2007, from 7 to 9, Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Celebration of Life will take place Saturday at 10 a.m. at Islington United Church. Messages of Condolence may be placed at www.RidleyFuneralHome.com

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-22 published
HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, Doctor Harry Clinch
After many years of service to his family and his community, Dr. Harry Clinch HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON passed away peacefully, surrounded by his family, on Friday, October 19th at 2: 30 p.m. in Toronto. Beloved husband of Beryl (SCHOOLEY,) his partner in life for 55 years; cherished father of Heather and her husband, Tom PAUK Sandra and her husband, Richard HOLLINGER; Wendy and her husband, Bob PEART; and Cameron. Devoted grandfather to Andrew, Matthew, Emily, and Shira. Doctor HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON was predeceased by his son Scott in July 2006.
Born in Dundee, Scotland in 1921, Doctor HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON emigrated to Canada with parents, Hannah and Alexander, and siblings, Sydney and Jean, at the age of six. Doctor HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON grew up in Toronto. He served in the Royal Air Force during World War 2 and in 1957 received his Ph. D in Psychology from the University of Toronto.
Dr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON worked at the Toronto Forensic Clinic and was an expert witness in the Ontario criminal justice system. He was an honourary lecturer in the Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, at the University of Toronto. He was Chief Psychologist at the Toronto Psychiatric Hospital, where he conducted pioneering research on many aspects of human behaviour. His research was published in academic journals of international renown. He held various positions in the Ontario Ministry of Corrections, including Administrator of Adult Male Institutions, Executive Director of Health Care Services, and Executive Director of the Juvenile Division. After his retirement from the Ministry of Corrections, he worked as a consulting psychologist for the Workers' Compensation Board.
Of all his achievements, personal and professional, he took the greatest joy and pride in his five children, for whom he was a constant source of love, encouragement, and guidance. In his later years, his four grandchildren gave him great pleasure, and he took delight in watching them grow.
Dr. HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON is admired for the strength of his character, his intellectual gifts, his wisdom, his sense of humour, and his compassion. He lives on in all those who know and love him.
Family will receive visitors on Monday from 7-9 p.m. at the Ward Funeral Home in Weston, 2035 Weston Road (north of Lawrence), Weston. Service will be held in the chapel on Tuesday, October 23, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment will be at Mount Pleasant Cemetery.
As an expression of sympathy, donations may be made to the Special Olympics or to Easter Seals.

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-03 published
GREEN, Evelyn, R.N.
October 24th, 2007, Orillia. 'Nana' has left us in her 90th year after what can only be described as an incredible life by a spirited character. Evelyn was born in Calgary and grew up in Alberta which was also the birthplace of her sister Pat HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, now of Mayne Island. In 1941 Evelyn went on to graduate in Nursing from Kingston General Hospital. It was here where she met her late husband, Doctor Thomas GREEN, and worked alongside him in his medical practice in Orillia, Ontario while they raised their two daughters, Marsha REGENSBURG (Bruce) of Victoria, British Columbia, and Marilyn GREEN of Orillia. Evelyn worked for many years as an administrator at the Ontario Hospital and her generosity helped many patients go on to live productive lives in the community. In her mid life she began a new career as a special education and substitute teacher and taught at Twin Lakes and Park Street High Schools where her contagious wit made her extremely popular with the students. Evelyn was adored by her grandchildren Steven LAUER and Alison DOMINELLI (Joe); Paul, Nicole, and Mark REGENSBURG, and her great-grandchildren Nicholas and Lucas DOMINELLI. She was affectionately known as 'Nutty Nana' to them and you would routinely hear people, young and old, approaching Evelyn on the streets with a hearty 'Hi Nana!' Evelyn was very proud of her heritage home at 77 Peter Street N where she lived for 60 years and kept the door open to everyone whether it be family, young triathletes visiting for a competition, or her grandchildren's college buddies. The minute you entered her house you felt welcome and she would ask 'Beer or Bloody Mary?' Her sense of humour, love of animals, and zest for playing piano will always be fondly remembered. Thanks to the caring staff at Trillium Manor and to her daughter Marilyn for being by her side in the final days of her life - Nana's funny faces and sense of humour was with her until the end - we would expect no less from her. As she wished, there will be no service. The family would appreciate you sharing memories at regen@shaw.ca

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-08 published
BAKER, Donna Marie (née HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON) (1927-2007)
Died peacefully in the late afternoon on Wednesday, December 5, 2007. Beloved wife, mother, animal lover, friend, neighbour and community activist, Donna's warmth and kindness touched many. The family thanks Donna's many caregivers for their assistance and compassion during the final days. A funeral service will be held at 3 o'clock on Tuesday, December 11th in the Cathedral Church Of Saint_James, 65 Church Street, Toronto. If desired, donations may be made to the Cathedral Church of Saint_James (M5C 2E9) or to a charity of your choice. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-11 published
MOORE, Fred
Fred MOORE died peacefully in the early evening of December 9th, 2007 at the Northumberland Hills Hospital, Cobourg, Ontario at age 92. Fred was born in Picton, Ontario on January 24th, 1915, the son of Frederick Gwyer MOORE and May Lilly ROLLINSON. His father died during World War 1 and Freddy was raised on his grandparents' farm at Salmon Point, Prince Edward County. He married Elsie HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON on August 2nd, 1940 and settled in Toronto where they enjoyed a full life. Fred was stationed in Halifax from 1940-45 and worked at White Motor Company and Smith's Transport as a sign painter. They had one son, Gwyer, born on April 11, 1945. After Elsie's death in 1990, Fred devoted his life to being an incredible father-in-law to Diane, and a wonderful grandfather, first to Julia and Geoffrey, then to the Humber Valley Village neighbourhood as "Grampa Fred". Fred leaves a legacy of kindness and compassion to the many people who had the privilege of knowing such a gentleman. A Remembrance celebration will be held in Toronto later in the month.

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HUTNER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-07 published
RABKIN, Norman
On Friday, July 6, 2007 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Norman RABKIN, beloved husband of Sylvia RABKIN. Loving father and father-in-law of Lionel and Susan RABKIN, and Samuel RABKIN and Aline HUTNER. Devoted grandfather of Sol, Max, Noah, and Ari. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave., W., (three lights west of Dufferin), for service on Sunday, July 8th at 10: 00 a.m. Interment, New McCaul section of Dawes Road Cemetery. Shiva 3900 Yonge Street, Suite 508. Memorial donations may be made to Magen Dovid Adom at 416-780-0034, or Alzheimer's Society of Ontario at 416-967-5900.

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HUTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-28 published
'He became effortless in his greatness'
It was his experience under fire as an army medic serving in Italy during the Second World War that imbued him with a spiritual appreciation of humanity, writes Sandra MARTIN. He would later draw on it as one of Canada's finest classical actors
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
A man who could command a stage in any country and who chose to make his career in Canada, William HUTT was a formidable presence at the Stratford Festival since its founding in 1953, appearing in myriad roles from Prospero, Lear and Falstaff to Lady Bracknell in The Importance of Being Earnest. For fans, he made Shakespeare accessible, speaking in his homegrown voice rather than adopting plummy tones from across the Atlantic. For actors, he was a mentor, a friend and an avuncular presence, showing them how to inhabit a stage without hogging the limelight. And he did it all with generosity and panache. The stage was his home, and no stages were more familiar to him than those at Stratford, where he performed in 130 productions over 39 seasons.
"This is a historic moment in Canadian arts," Richard MONETTE, artistic director of the festival, said in an interview. "It is a cause of mourning for this loss and also a cause of great celebration because of his legacy. He was a great classical actor and he essayed all the great roles. He was equally at home with crowds as well as kings. He had a great range, everybody in the audience could relate to him - whether they were society people or farmers, he could appeal to them. He became effortless in his greatness."
William Ian deWitt HUTT was the middle of three children of Edward deWitt HUTT, a magazine editor, and Caroline Frances Havergal (née WOOD.) His mother suffered from septicemia after his birth, and was soon pregnant with her third child. Consequently, he spent long periods of time with an aunt and uncle in Hamilton. "My aunt belonged to Christ Church and they were doing a Christmas pageant. I was only 4 or 5 years old, but I wanted to be in it," he said later. He had only one line - "Beads for sale" - that he delivered looking directly at the audience. At that moment, he fell in love with performing.
During the Depression, his father's magazines failed and he was forced to sell insurance, a job he "loathed," and to move his wife and children into a home belonging to her family. Young Bill attended Vaughan Road Collegiate and then North Toronto Collegiate, performing occasionally in school productions, including a role as a policeman in The Pirates of Penzance. A gangly loner, he was socially awkward as a teenager; that's when he realized he was bisexual. Homosexuality was morally taboo and illegal in the 1930s, and that increased his sense of isolation from his family and his peers.
He did very poorly in high school and left without graduating in 1941 to enlist in the army and the 7th Light Field Ambulance Unit. He was 21 and, unlike many young men who dash off to war deluded by visions of glory, he "had no intention of shooting anybody," as he explained in an interview in his Stratford living room last Friday afternoon.
After going overseas, he saw a production of Arsenic and Old Lace in London with Sybil Thorndike and Lillian Braithwaite that enthralled him, but it was his experience as a medic that imbued him with a spiritual appreciation of humanity that he would draw on later as an actor. "You see a lot of death and dying and the one thing you realize is that the cheapest commodity on the market is one human life." He won the Military Medal for bravery and was promoted from corporal to sergeant after he volunteered to set up a first aid centre under heavy mortar fire just north of Cassino in Italy. He never liked talking about his heroism, explaining that "you just do what needs to be done, you don't think about it."
When he returned to Toronto in 1946, he marched into Exhibition Stadium and was told that his parents were sitting in the section of the stands marked H. When he saw his mother for the first time in five years, she looked at him blankly across a morbid divide of devastating experience, and said nothing, not even his name. "It haunted me for a while," he admitted on Friday.
He realized he "had to get on with my life," so he enrolled at the University of Toronto's Trinity College, which gave him a high-school equivalency based on his war service. He performed at the Hart House theatre, and graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in 1949.
By then, he had already gained experience in summer repertory and a season with Canadian Repertory Theatre in Ottawa. He also directed Little Theatre groups throughout Ontario and adjudicated for the Western Ontario Drama League from 1948 to 1952. When he heard that Tom PATTERSON was launching the Stratford Festival in 1953, he said he had to look up the place on a map. Although he thought Mr. PATTERSON was "out of his cotton-picking mind," he signed on and spent most of the next decade serving an apprenticeship in supporting roles such as Sir Robert Brackenbury and Captain Blunt in Richard III and Minister of State in All's Well That Ends Well in the festival's inaugural season, and Froth in Measure for Measure, Hortensio in The Taming of the Shrew and Leader of the Chorus in Oedipus Rex the following year, when he became the first recipient of the Tyrone Guthrie Award.
He was not an overnight sensation, waiting until after he was 40 to land his first major role at Stratford - Prospero in The Tempest - in the festival's 10th season in 1962. The following year, he dazzled critics and audiences with his sexually ambivalent portrayal of Pandarus in Troilus and Cressida.
Although the stage was his mainstay, Mr. HUTT also appeared in film and on television, notably as a port-soaked Sir John A. Macdonald in the 1974 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television production of Pierre Berton's The National Dream, a performance that earned him both a Genie and an Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists award. He also played the father in Robin Phillips's The Wars, based on the novel written by his friend, Timothy Findley. Mr. HUTT generally disliked the disjointed "bits and pieces" approach of filmmaking, complaining that it was antithetical to the process of developing a character and fleshing it out with other actors in the immediacy of a continuous theatrical performance. Nevertheless, he recently starred in six episodes of the television series Slings and Arrows, playing an aging actor performing Lear.
People were surprised when he was cast in the female role of Lady Bracknell in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest in 1975, but he made the character his own. He said he learned "stillness" from a comment by director Robin Phillips: "Lady Bracknell moves through a room without disturbing one speck of dust." Her towering feathered hat perched atop his 6-foot-2 frame made it awkward for him to move, and he resolved "never to move on stage, unless it improved on stillness." What he wanted to share with the audience was the fact that "thought conveys itself" through the stillness that precedes movement.
In 1979, he played the fool to Peter Ustinov's Lear, making way for the British actor's celebrity turn on the Stratford stage in a role that Mr. HUTT had already played twice. But it was Mr. HUTT's tragic death-haunted fool that drew the raves; according to backstage lore, Mr. Ustinov was "shaken" by his supporting actor's greatness, never thinking that "such an actor was here on this continent."
He had a dry spell at Stratford under John Hirsch, who was artistic director from 1981 to 1985, and only cast him in one role. He fared better under John Neville, but truly enjoyed a renaissance when Richard MONETTE became artistic director in 1994. By then, Mr. HUTT had become heavily involved in the Grand Theatre in nearby London, where Martha Henry was artistic director from 1988 to 1994, and had appeared at the rival Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake in Man and Superman in 1989.
When Mr. HUTT received a Governor-General's Award for lifetime achievement in the performing arts in 1992, he couldn't accept in person because he was performing in A.R. Gurney's The Dining Room at the Grand. The following season, he had three major roles at Stratford: Falstaff in Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor, diplomat Harry Raymond in Timothy Findley's The Stillborn Lover (a play that Mr. Findley had written for Mr. HUTT and actress Martha Henry; Stratford reprised it in 1995 as a 75th birthday present for him), and James Tyrone in Eugene O'Neill's A Long Day's Journey Into Night.
About this time, people began asking when he would retire from the stage. He blamed himself for starting the rumour after he performed in The Tempest at Stratford in 1999 and said he wanted to take a year off. That same year, Canada Post issued a stamp celebrating the Stratford Festival with an image of its famous thrust stage superimposed with an ethereal depiction of Mr. HUTT as Prospero with his arms outstretched and a wistful expression on his face. The following year, the City of Stratford renamed the Waterloo Street bridge in his honour.
Instead of taking a final bow at Stratford, he added a new venue to his repertoire by agreeing to play the poet Spooner in Soulpepper's remounting of Harold Pinter's No Man Land in 2003, the first time he had been on a Toronto stage in nearly two decades. " HUTT's Spooner is a miracle of economy, delivering every ounce of the text with an efficiency that makes his performance almost terse in the play's first act," said Kate TAILOR/TAYLOR, then theatre critic for The Globe and Mail, before he "masterfully delivers Spooner's final proposal with an expansiveness that leaves one speculating about the desperation beneath and so closes the play."
The man who lured Mr. HUTT to Toronto was Soulpepper impresario Albert SCHULTZ. A member of the Young Company when Robin Phillips was artistic director at Stratford, Mr. SCHULTZ had played Edgar to Mr. HUTT's desolate monarch in the festival's 1989 production of King Lear. Mr. HUTT returned to Toronto and to Soulpepper in 2004 to play Vladimir in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. During rehearsals, he told The Globe's Ian Brown that "most of my dark moments now centre around just how many more years I am going to be granted. When I turned 80, the heart specialist - because I have a bit of a heart problem - said, 'Well, after 80, it's a bit of a crapshoot, you know.' " By then, he had a bad back from an injury he incurred in the 1950s when, as a minor player in The Merry Wives of Windsor, he jumped into a laundry hamper and jolted his spine.
Although Mr. HUTT had officially retired from Stratford at the end of 2005 with his poignant and masterful performance as Prospero in The Tempest, leaving the audience with the final words, "Let your indulgence set me free," he agreed to come back for one role this year as a farewell gesture to artistic director Richard MONETTE, in Diana LeBlanc's production of Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance. In March, he underwent a series of tests and was diagnosed with anemia, which turned into acute leukemia. He withdrew from the play, offering "my most profound apologies for the problems and inconvenience I'm sure it will cause."
And then he prepared for what he said on Friday was his final project - death - of which he was determined to be the "project manager." With landscape gardener Matthew MacKAY, the man who shared his home since 1973, he chose a cemetery plot and decided on his epitaph: Soldier and Actor. After a stay in hospital, he returned to his home on the banks of the Avon in Stratford and visited with family and Friends, including Albert SCHULTZ. "Bill was extremely brave and generous in preparing those near to him for his final exit. And yet today it seems unthinkable that he is no longer among us," he said in a statement.
On Tuesday, Mr. HUTT decided it was time to go back to hospital. That same afternoon, Michael Therriault, who once played Ariel to Mr. HUTT's Prospero and is currently getting raves as Gollum in the English production of The Lord of the Rings, cancelled a performance to fly home to see him. Sadly, he arrived a few hours too late.
The three stages of William HUTT
His voice was commanding and polite when I requested an interview two weeks ago. "I will be happy to talk with you, but my days are short," he said. "I am looking on my demise as a project, and I am the project manager." We set a date for last Friday afternoon.
On a clear, sunny day I walked across the bridge named in his honour to his house on Waterloo Street in Stratford, where the white Cadillac, with WMHUTT on the licence plate, was parked in the driveway. I rang the doorbell and was ushered into the living room by his housemate, Matthew MacKAY. Wearing a loose, brown-patterned shirt over casual trousers and, with terribly swollen ankles showing above a pair of moccasins, Mr. HUTT sat in a wing chair beside a window. He was attached to a portable oxygen tank and did not rise to greet me -- yet another indication, from an unfailingly courteous man, that his strength was failing. His face had a waxy pallor and, as a reformed smoker after more than 60 years of cigarettes, he was often racked with coughing spells, but his conversation was thoughtful and engaging. Over the next 90 minutes, he talked frankly about his parents, the war and his introduction to death before he had had a chance to know much about life. He said there are three major changes: The first is adolescence, when things happen to your body and your mind. The second stage is when you are in your 20s and your parents become your Friends rather than authority figures (the war had interrupted that process for him and left him divided from his parents). The third stage, the one he was entering, is death and wondering what that will be like.
Mr. HUTT was well aware of his own capacities as an actor. "I will leave the word 'great' to history," he said, "but I do know that in some kind of way, my career as an actor has paralleled the growth of theatre in this country." He said he had always been very practical as an actor, and that his decision to stay home rather than to chase fame in London and New York came from an "arrogant pride" in Canada. "I had no intention of leaving this country until I was invited. I wasn't going to beg." And by doing so, he showed that it was possible to have both a stellar career here and illustrious offers to work elsewhere. Of artistic director Richard MONETTE, who built so much of the last 15 years at the festival around him, Mr. HUTT said: "He has prolonged my life and my career."
The only question he deflected was about his romantic life. He referred to his housemate Mr. MacKAY as "the backbone of my life," but insisted on keeping the nature of their relationship private. "He has his own life, he always has had. I know people would like to pigeonhole it, but it isn't a pigeonhole thing."
Sensing his fatigue, I said my goodbyes. After struggling to get up, he pulled my face down and kissed me on both cheeks, a farewell that only now I realize was permanent. Sandra MARTIN
William deWitt HUTT was born in Toronto on May 2, 1920. He died in hospital in Stratford, Ontario, on June 27, 2007, of acute leukemia. He was 87. A funeral is being planned for Saint_James Anglican Church in Stratford.

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HUTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-28 published
A master of the graceful exit
By Kamal AL- SOLAYLEE, Theatre Critic, Page R1
William HUTT was not one to linger. Anyone who saw his farewell performance as Prospero at the Stratford Festival on October 28, 2005, knew that.
His curtain call on that memorable evening was a master class in poise, humility and grace. Everybody expected a farewell speech. He said nothing. A thank you, perhaps? Nope. HUTT took a good, heartfelt look at his audience and co-stars, savoured the moment and took his leave.
In life, as in theatre, HUTT didn't linger. News of his death at the age of 87 came exactly three months after he officially withdrew from the current Stratford season, where he was set to star as Tobias in director Diana Leblanc's production of Edward Albee's A Fine Balance. The man knew when to make his entrances and his exits.
Although this particular and final exit has been anticipated, it still comes as a shock. I interviewed him at the end of 2005, and my most lasting impression was his infectiously youthful spirit. (He was 85 then and handsome as ever.) In a hotel suite in Toronto where he was holding back-to-back interviews to promote the third season of the Canadian television series Slings and Arrows, HUTT showed no signs of fatigue or jadedness. He was there to do a job and was determined to do the best darn job he could.
For most of us, though, it was his job - his calling, really - as a stage actor that we've come to love and discuss and that we struggle to find the right words to describe. Ask any actor, director or critic about HUTT and the first thing they'll cite is his voice. Mellifluous and unmistakably thunderous, it captured the uniqueness of Shakespearean English - a language both musical and violent in texture - more precisely than any of his contemporaries. An American woman sitting next to me at one of his recent Stratford performances told me that she occasionally "watched" HUTT with her eyes closed in order to let his "gorgeous" voice wash all over her. I followed her lead in Act 2 for a few minutes. It worked.
It wasn't just a matter of diction and articulation, either (although he was a master of both.) HUTT brought a feeling of what lies unspoken behind the words and sounds. Although I'm too young to have seen his career-defining years at Stratford and elsewhere in the fifties, sixties and seventies, and can't comment fully on the physicality of his performances, I never felt cheated on that front in the shows I've attended in the past 10 years or so. HUTT used his body with an economy and an awareness of both its life-affirming abilities and its many crushing frailties. Nobody has ever criticized HUTT for overacting - not even when he took an astonishing stab at drag and played Lady Bracknell, not once but twice, in productions of Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest.
Although his turn as Lady Bracknell may have shown his comfort with gender roles, it also confirmed his immeasurably wide range as an actor. Sure, he can handle Shakespeare and other playwrights from the 16th and 17th centuries. But he also had an ear for, and an understanding of, seminal works of modernist theatre as he proved with his performances of Harold Pinter's No Man's Land in 2003 and Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot in 2004 (both for Soulpepper Theatre Company in Toronto).
It's sad to think that we'll never see this level of commitment, versatility and shameless talent on stage again. What softens the blow is that he's leaving behind him a grand theatrical legacy and generations of actors who have worked with him and, if they're lucky and smart enough, have learned what it's really like to be part of Canadian acting royalty. His job is done. Why would he linger?

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HUTTER o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-01-10 published
HUTTER, Elizabeth
Of Mount Forest, formerly of Proton Township in her 86th year. Passed away at Saugeen Valley Nursing Centre, Mount Forest on Saturday, December 16, 2006. Beloved wife of the late Franz HUTTER. Loved mother of Frank HUTTER and wife Susan of Toronto, Gertrude VANALSTINE and husband Ronald of R.R.#2 Holstein and predeceased by infant daughter Erika HUTTER. Elizabeth will be sadly missed by her grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Maria STAUDACHAR of Ridgewood, New York and Josef MATZELLE of Kapuskasing. Predeceased by brothers John and Henry MATZELLE. Friends called at the Hendrick Funeral Home, Mount Forest on Sunday. A prayer vigil was held Sunday evening at 7 p.m. Funeral Mass was celebrated at Saint Mary of the Purification Church, Mount Forest on Monday, December 18 at 11 a.m. Interment at Holy Cross Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Arthritis Society would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences may be made at www.hendrickfuneralhome.com
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HUTTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-01 published
SNELGROVE, Margaret L. (née CREIGHTON)
At Craigwiel Gardens, Ailsa Craig on Saturday, December 30th, 2006 Margaret L. SNELGROVE formerly of Mount Brydges and Strathroy in her 98th year. Beloved wife of the late Clarence R. SNELGROVE (1974.) Predeceased by her parents James and Letitia CREIGHTON and her brother Harry. Also predeceased by her brothers and sisters in laws John SNELGROVE, Margaret WILEY and Pearl HUTTON. Survived by sister-in-law Helen SNELGROVE as well as several nieces and nephews. Mrs. SNELGROVE was a respected teacher and principal in the surrounding area for 40 years. Friends may call at the Elliott-Madill Funeral Home, Mt Brydges on Tuesday, January 2nd, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday commencing at 11 a.m. with Rev. Jock TOLMAY officiating. Interment Mt Brydges Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations to the Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital or the Heart and Stroke foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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HUTTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2007-01-09 published
SNELGROVE, Margaret L. (née CREIGHTON)
At Craigwiel Gardens, Ailsa Craig, on Saturday, December 30, 2006, Margaret L. SNELGROVE, formerly of Mount Brydges and Strathroy, in her 98th year. Beloved wife of the late Clarence R. SNELGROVE (1974.) Predeceased by her parents James and Letitia CREIGHTON and her brother Harry. Also predeceased by her brothers and sisters in-law John SNELGROVE, Margaret WILEY, and Pearl HUTTON. Survived by sister-in-law Helen SNELGROVE as well as several nieces and nephews. Mrs. SNELGROVE was a respected teacher and principal in the surrounding area for 40 years. Friends called at the Elliott-Madill Funeral Home, Mount Brydges on Tuesday, January 2 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service was held on Wednesday, commencing at 11 a.m. with Rev. Jock TOLMAY officiating. Interment Mount Brydges Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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HUTTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-25 published
KOLISH, John
Peacefully at his home in Weston on Monday, September 24, 2007 in his 64th year after a prolonged and valiant battle with cancer. John, lifelong friend and common-law partner of Debra FRALEIGH, dear son of Ernst and the late Ilse KOLISH, loved brother of George and Sharon KOLISH and Evelyn KOLISH and Michel LEFORT. Beloved son-in-law of Jack and Teddie FRALEIGH and brother-in-law of Ron and Bev FRALEIGH, Warren and Sandy FRALEIGH and Michael and Anthony FRALICK. Proud and loving uncle to Isabelle KOLISH, Veronique LEFORT, Jim HUTTON, Dan and Kristy FRALEIGH, Andrea FRALEIGH, Lisa and Aaron KRULICKI, Jeremy and Angie FRALEIGH and Hannah and Joshua FRALICK. Great uncle of Jack and Sydney HUTTON, Taylor and Ryan KRULICKI and Devlin FRALEIGH. The family wishes to thank John's Friends, neighbours and caregivers for their support and compassion.
A Celebration of John's life will be held from 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, September 26, 2007 at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Road, Weston 416-241-4618. In John's memory donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation would be appreciated. Condolences may be sent to john.kolish@wardfh.com

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HUTTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-03 published
BROWN, Lt. Col. George Masterton "Chip," CD
(Governor General's Horse Guards)
Passed away Tuesday, October 2, 2007, at York Central Hospital. Beloved husband of the late Mary BROWN (née HUTTON.) Loving father of Derek, Martha WILSON (Phil), Loney (Cathie), and Daphne HOULTON (Tim,) and predeceased by Robin TROJEK. Cherished grandfather of Carly and Jeffrey BROWN, Mary-Michelle and Molly HOULTON, and Jan-Michael TROJEK, and predeceased by Chloe HOULTON. Dear brother of Emmeline HAYHURST. A celebration of Chip's life will be held on Friday, October 5, 2007 at 2 p.m. at Saint_James Cathedral, 65 Church Street, Toronto. Donations to the Governor General Horse Guard's Foundation would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to Marshall Funeral Home, Richmond Hill.

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