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"GOU" 2007 Obituary


GOUDY  GOUGH  GOUIN  GOULD  GOULDEN  GOULDING  GOULET  GOULETT  GOURDON  GOURLAY  GOURLIE 

GOUDY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-29 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Mervyn Roy
At Grey Bruce Health Services-Markdale, on Tuesday November 27, 2007, Mervyn Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Markdale, in his 89th year. Beloved husband of Maxine THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (McFADDEN.) Dear father of Doug THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Jill) of Markdale. Stepfather of Bonnie (Doug ROSEN) of Plumis, Manitoba, and Doug McFADDEN (Shay PORTEOUS) of Markdale. Grandfather of Mark THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Heidi), Daryl THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Andrea), Brian THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Lisa) and Gary THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Cheryl Ann.) Great-grandfather of Cassidy, Acelyne, Hayley, Cooper and Bryce THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Step-grandfather of April, Becky-Lou and Tim ROSEN, Christina DE BOER (Dirk) and Regan McFADDEN. Step-great-grandfather of Riley and Dylan McFADDEN. Brother of Lawrence THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Margaret) of Owen Sound. Predeceased by wife Angeline THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (LOVE,) brother Eugene, and sisters Dorothy BOYD, Elva GOUDY, Lorrine TORRY, and Betty LOVE. The family will receive Friends at the May Funeral Home, Markdale on Thursday from 2-4: 00 p.m. and 7-9:00 p.m. where a funeral service will be held Friday November 30th at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Markdale Cemetery. If desired, donations to Annesley United Church or Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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GOUGH o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-08 published
GRAINGER, William Frederick " Bill"
Honourary Colonel of the Grey and Simcoe Foresters, O.St.J., CD, Phmb.
After a courageous battle and with great dignity, Bill passed away at his home on Tuesday, November 6, 2007 with his family at his side. Beloved husband of Billie Deyell GOUGH for over 62 years. Cherished father of Penny GARVIN and her husband Ken, Katie GILLESPIE and her husband Tom and Susan DAVEY and her husband John all of Owen Sound. Adored grandfather of Sarah and Heather GARVIN, Mitchell and Megan GILLESPIE and William, Elizabeth and Kathleen DAVEY. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home, Owen Sound 519-376-3710 for visiting on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 866 1st Avenue West, Owen Sound on Tuesday afternoon November 13, 2007 at 1 o'clock with Reverend Doctor Ted CREEN officiating. Interment, Greenwood Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Saint_John Ambulance, Owen Sound Branch, the G.B.R.H.C. Foundation or Presbyterians Aiding Nicaragua would be appreciated. Members of the Royal Canadian Legion Br. No. 6, Owen Sound will hold a memorial service at the funeral home on Monday evening at 6: 15 p.m. Members of St. George's Lodge 88, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons will hold a memorial service at the funeral home on Monday evening at 6: 45 p.m., all Masonic brethren welcome. Messages of condolence are welcome at www.tannahill.com

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GOUGH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2007-01-09 published
MATHESON, Margaret Matilda (née TOMLINSON)
At Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital, on December 27, 2006, in her 90th year. She was born on March 4, 1917 in Caradoc Twp. Margaret was predeceased by her parents Annie and George TOMLINSON and her husband of 56 years Leonard MATHESON (1999.) Margaret and Leonard lived in Windsor for many years before retiring to Strathroy in 1980. Margaret is survived by a sister Ilene GOUGH of Strathroy and many nieces and nephews. Beloved mother of Nancy (Wisconsin) and Barbara (Singhampton, Ontario). Margaret will be missed by her 5 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren. A 1939 graduate of Victoria Hospital School of Nursing, Margaret worked in this profession for over 30 years. She was, for many years, an active United Church member and community volunteer. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Canadian Lung Association. Visitation was held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, on Friday, December 29, from 1-3 p.m. where service was held at the chapel at 3 p.m. Rev. Jock TOLMAY and Rev. Cheryl BOLTON officiated. Interment Poplar Hill Cemetery. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Margaret.

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GOUGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-06 published
GOUGH, Helen
Teacher, social worker, counselor, activist, artist, adventurer, friend - died June 1, 2007 of cancer, having been cared for lovingly in her last days by staff of Glebe Manor, Toronto, and her many Friends. Helen, 76, was born and raised in Toronto, graduating from Jarvis Collegiate, the Toronto Teachers' College, the Anglican Women's Training College, and York University. She began her career teaching for the South Peel Board of Education in 1950 and later taught at an Indian/Métis day school in Moose Lake, Manitoba. She also worked at an Oji-Cree settlement on Bearskin Lake, Ontario. From 1960-63, Helen worked for the Anglican Diocese of Toronto as Indian Liaison worker with native people coming into Toronto and was co-signer of the incorporation papers for the city's first Native Canadian centre. She was also one of the originators of the city's first co-operative housing at Alexandra Park. She worked for the Young Women's Christian Association and Volunteer Centre of Toronto before taking a job with the Toronto Board of Education as a School-Community Relations worker, working extensively with immigrant parents. Her work on the Riverdale Intergenerational Project brought seniors into the schools as volunteers. Helen was an active member of the Church of the Holy Trinity (Anglican) and is believed to be the first woman elected as a parish warden in the Diocese, in 1971. Helen will be honored at the 10: 30 a.m. Eucharist on June 10 and at a special memorial service the same day at 1 p.m. at The Church of the Holy Trinity, 10 Trinity Square, Toronto. A light lunch will be served between the two events. All are welcome for any part. Recollections for a Power Point presentation may be sent to: ht@holytrinitytoronto.org. Memorial gifts may be made to The Church of the Holy Trinity, the Stephen Lewis Foundation or Hospice Toronto.

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GOUGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-09 published
GOUGH, Helen
Teacher, social worker, counselor, activist, artist, adventurer, friend - died June 1, 2007 of cancer, having been cared for lovingly in her last days by staff of Glebe Manor, Toronto, her adopted family, the Ransoms, Holy Trinity Church, and her many Friends. Helen, 76, was born and raised in Toronto, graduating from Jarvis Collegiate, the Toronto Teachers' College, the Anglican Women's Training College, and York University. She began her career teaching for the South Peel Board of Education in 1950 and later taught at an Indian/Métis day school in Moose Lake, Manitoba. She also worked at an Oji-Cree settlement on Bearskin Lake, Ontario. From 1960-63, Helen worked for the Anglican Diocese of Toronto as Indian Liaison worker with native people coming into Toronto and was co-signer of the incorporation papers for the city's first Native Canadian centre. She was also one of the originators of the city's first co-operative housing at Alexandra Park. She worked for the Young Women's Christian Association and Volunteer Centre of Toronto before taking a job with the Toronto Board of Education as a School-Community Relations worker, working extensively with immigrant parents. Her work on the Riverdale Intergenerational Project brought seniors into the schools as volunteers. Helen was an active member of the Church of the Holy Trinity (Anglican) and is believed to be the first woman elected as a parish warden in the Diocese, in 1971. Helen will be honored at the 10: 30 a.m. Eucharist on June 10 and at a special memorial service the same day at 1 p.m. at The Church of the Holy Trinity, 10 Trinity Square, Toronto. A light lunch will be served between the two events. All are welcome for any part. Recollections for a Power Point presentation may be sent to: ht@holytrinitytoronto.org. Memorial gifts may be made to The Church of the Holy Trinity, the Stephen Lewis Foundation or Hospice Toronto.

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GOUGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-02 published
She was the First Anglican woman elected a parish warden in Toronto
Raised in 11 foster homes, she became a teacher and counsellor who championed the rights of aboriginal people, immigrants, gays, the poor and the marginalized long before it was trendy
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
Toronto -- You'd think being shunted from one foster home to another would make a person hard. Helen GOUGH -- born illegitimate at a time when that was a stigma -- spent her childhood in no fewer than 11 foster homes, and emerged a gentle but tenacious advocate with an outsized social conscience that was fired by her mentor, Jesus. "Whatever I did, I did it as a Christian," she wrote in the preface to her unpublished memoirs. "I was a Jesus freak. I wanted to lead that kind of life."
In doing so, Ms. GOUGH "turned the Gospels upside down [by] turning those who were down, up," eulogized Rev. Sara BOYLES, priest at Ms. GOUGH's beloved Holy Trinity Church in downtown Toronto. "Helen turned the world upside down."
She did that, against all odds, by excelling in the so-called helping professions: Teaching, counselling and activism for aboriginal people, immigrants, gays, the poor and the marginalized. She stood up for their rights long before it was trendy, often forsaking her own fragile psyche.
Far from being a household name, except perhaps within the Anglican Church's more progressive elements in Toronto, Ms. GOUGH would not have minded being labelled ordinary, though she was far from it. "It's ordinary people, ordinary women, who have done much of what it took to make this nation what it is," she stated not long ago. "Ordinary people with extraordinary courage. Whatever else I am, I'm a Canadian. I'm a Canadian woman."
She was the first woman elected a parish warden in the Anglican Church of Canada's Toronto diocese, in 1971.
Her mother, also named Helen GOUGH, play a pivotal role in her fatherless and husbandless life. The elder Ms. GOUGH, who died in 1981, had been a Barnardo child, one of some 30,000 sick, destitute or orphaned British children shipped to the colonies as "seedling citizens of the British Empire" by English philanthropist Thomas Barnardo to work on farms or as domestics. (Between 600 and 1,000 children were sent to Canada from the late 1800s to 1915.)
Helen senior, with still-fresh memories of time spent in an actual English poorhouse, arrived in Southern Ontario in 1912 as a 10-year-old, together with her younger brother, Arthur. She toiled as a servant at seven different places until she turned 18, surviving on the cheapest foods and not once being allowed to use an indoor toilet.
On her own in Toronto, she found work as a clerk at the Hospital for Sick Children, and soon fell in with a crowd that included a handsome, suave clothing salesman from Stratford. When she became pregnant, he denied all knowledge of her, as advised by his uncle, a judge. It wasn't until the younger Ms. GOUGH was in her late 40s that she discovered her father's identity; he had become a fat drunk and died of a coronary when he was 60.
Too poor to raise her daughter, the elder Ms. GOUGH, by this time a live-in domestic, appealed to Catholic Children's Aid. (The child's father was Catholic.) But if the agency took the child in, she would be raised in an orphanage as a Roman Catholic. Her mother declined. "It must have taken tremendous courage for a woman to do that in 1930, and she was one of many who simply refused," her daughter later wrote.
Instead, her mother turned to the Children's Aid Society, which transferred the sickly baby to a woman whose sole task was to nurse sick infants back to health. Then came long years of foster care at nearly a dozen places, during which mother and daughter saw each other only intermittently. By the age of eight, young Helen had already attended Baptist, United and Roman Catholic churches, but made up her mind that the Anglicans were for her. She finally went to live with her mother when she was 15.
Ms. GOUGH's first taste of overt racism came while she worked as a teenaged waitress one summer at the Pearson Hotel on Centre Island. As she recalled, a short, self-important Englishman working in the kitchen informed a Chinese dishwasher: "I'm not taking any orders from a bloody Chink!" The Chinese man, a foot taller, brought the dish he was holding down on the man's skull. The plate shattered, and the blood coursed down the small man's head. Both were fired, and the incident stayed with her forever.
She was 19 when she befriended Gerry O'DONOGHUE of Toronto (later Gerry RANSOM,) whose family adopted Ms. GOUGH as one of their own, and whose daughter Beverley was Ms. GOUGH's goddaughter.
The same year, Ms. GOUGH graduated from Toronto Teachers' College and went to teach near Port Credit, Ontario That was followed by four years of teaching status Indians and Métis at an "Indian Day School" in Moose Lake, southeast of The Pas, Manitoba
Life was primitive and harsh, but for Ms. GOUGH, it was happily reminiscent of the Girl Guides camps she'd attended as a child. The three teachers took turns doing the three main chores: one week each on cooking, cleanup and "wood and water."
It was here that she became smitten with the shy aboriginal children, and impressed with their determination to learn English. (There is no mention in Ms. GOUGH's memoirs of church-run residential schools, where native children underwent horrific abuses that led to multimillion-dollar legal payouts decades later.) After teaching catechism and assisting with church services, she returned to Toronto to deepen her spirituality by studying at the Anglican Women's Training College. One summer, she took a job with the federal government's Indian Affairs department teaching at an Ojibwa-Cree settlement in Bearskin Lake, Ontario
In 1960, she began as an "Indian liaison worker" in the Toronto diocese, helping aboriginals access "white" social service agencies. It was half-time initially, "since no one really believed there were Indians in Toronto," she would recall. She was a pioneer of the first native centre in Toronto, and proudly outed a co-worker who had referred to Ms. GOUGH's client as "dirty and drunken&hellip you know, a typical Indian."
The man who had made the remark "was not happy about being exposed, but it was a great moment of insight for me," she remembered. "It's important to speak truth to power when we are in positions to do so. If we don't, who will?"
Around this time, Ms. GOUGH noticed that she was prone to periodic bouts of depression, preceded by highs that dropped to debilitating lows, and an inability to control either. The condition led her to years of psychotherapy and such treatments as psychodrama, bioenergetics and Arthur Janov's primal therapy, during which she began to face the pain of separation she'd experienced as a child.
She went into social service work for the diocese, mainly on housing conditions in Toronto, before returning to school at 35 to earn a B.A. at York University. She confessed that it was the worst experience of her adult life. With a D average, "I was so ashamed, I didn't go to my graduation or tell my mother about it until much later." Despite that, she returned to York a decade later to earn a master's degree in English, with honours, and an essay prize.
Meantime, there was a flurry of action in Toronto: In 1968, she was one of the original activists to develop Alexandra Park Co-op, today a 410-unit housing project in downtown Toronto (she worked alongside June Rowlands, who went on to become mayor of Toronto). She then worked for the Young Women's Christian Association, finding rooms for Caribbean domestics, before taking a job for 17 years with the Toronto Board of Education, working extensively with immigrant parents. Her involvement with the Riverdale Intergenerational Project brought seniors into schools as volunteers.
She embraced gay rights through what she called a particularly Anglican resolution: "All may, none must and some ought." Tall, gangly and sometimes physically awkward, she denied being a lesbian, "although I feel more comfortable with women than men. If you grow up in a series of homes, you don't learn to establish primary relationships. There were boys I really liked but I saw myself as plain. I was a wallflower at dances and very bookish. I made good secondary relationships, but primary ones [were] much more difficult."
In retirement, she seemed to accelerate, taking up travel, river rafting, voice lessons and photography. She produced pictures that testified to an almost child-like wonderment about the natural world.
She saw her mission through a simple lens: If she was going to do anything as a Christian, it was to respond to society's dispossessed. "I was not there to hold office," she reasoned, "but to meet people on the ground."
Helen Noreen Honora GOUGH was born in Toronto on November 21, 1930, and died there of cancer on June 1, 2007. She was 76. According to her wishes, only men washed her body prior to burial. She leaves her adoptive family, the Ransoms, and many Friends and admirers.

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GOUGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
GOUGH, Frank Henry (1909-2007)
Painter -- Poet -- Wordsmith
Beloved husband of Maureen (née BENSON.) Loving father of Maieka (Mundy), Nina (Youd) and Roger (Gough). Dear grandfather of Leigh, Kanina, Adam, Gemma and Leighton; predeceased by Jason in 2005. Remembered fondly by 13 great-grandchildren. Frank was born in Birmingham, England, September 26, 1909. He emigrated to Canada in 1962 where he joined his two daughters and their families in Toronto. He retired from A.E.C.L., Clarkson, Ontario in 1974. Frank and Maureen spent 14 happy years in retirement at Sturgeon Point, Ontario, followed by 18 years on Vancouver Island. It was during his retirement years that Frank honed his artistic talents as a painter, poet and wordsmith. On August 19th Frank passed away at Qualicum Manor, Qualicum Beach, British Columbia with Maureen by his side. In respect for Frank's wishes, no service to be held. Cremation.

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GOUGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-09 published
GRAINGER, William Frederick " Bill"
Honourary Colonel of the Grey and Simcoe Foresters, O.St.J., CD, Phmb.
After a courageous battle and with great dignity, Bill passed away at his home on Tuesday, November 6, 2007 with his family at his side. Beloved husband of Billie Deyell GOUGH for over 62 years. Cherished father of Penny GARVIN and her husband Ken, Katie GILLESPIE and her husband Tom and Susan DAVEY and her husband John all of Owen Sound. Adored grandfather of Sarah and Heather GARVIN, Mitchell and Megan GILLESPIE and William, Elizabeth and Kathleen DAVEY. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home, Owen Sound 519-376-3710 for visiting on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 866 1st Avenue West, Owen Sound on Tuesday afternoon November 13, 2007 at 1 o'clock with Reverend Doctor Ted CREEN officiating. Interment, Greenwood Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Saint_John Ambulance, Owen Sound Branch, the G.B.R.H.C. Foundation or Presbyterians Aiding Nicaragua would be appreciated. Members of the Royal Canadian Legion Br. No. 6, Owen Sound will hold a memorial service at the funeral home on Monday evening at 6: 15 p.m. Members of St. George's Lodge #88, Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons will hold a memorial service at the funeral home on Monday evening at 6: 45 p.m., all Masonic brethren welcome. Messages of condolence are welcome at www.tannahill.com

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GOUIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-14 published
GOUIN, Jean Yvon " Ivan"
On November 11, 2007 Ivan, beloved husband of the late Carol GOUIN, passed away peacefully.
Ivan was born on February 15, 1916 in Vimy, Alberta. He was the second of seven children born to Rudolph and Rose Alma GOUIN. The family lived in rugged conditions on a small farm. As a teenager during the Great Depression of the 1930's, Ivan experienced the desperation of poverty. The lessons of misery defined his young life and taught Ivan that hard work, persistence and optimism would change his circumstance. Always practical even as a little a boy, Ivan once witnessed a fire and responded to those crying, 'God stop the flames, by saying you pray, I'm getting some water'.
An alter boy to an early mentor, Father Coolin, Ivan learned and lived by the notion, the most important thing was to look after those he loved here and now, not in the hereafter. Throughout his life, generosity flowed from a man who is defined by helping others. In 1938 at the age of 22, Ivan got a job at grain elevator. His salary of $15 a week was shared by his large family whose needs he understood as being more important than his own.
In 1940, Ivan discovered his entrepreneurial talent by purchasing a general store in Vimy with his sister. From those humble beginnings Ivan prospered, never forgetting his commitment to his family and those in need. World War Two interrupted his career as a shop keeper when he joined the Canadian Army and served in Ontario.
After serving in the military and seven years as a merchant, Ivan realized the future of rural Alberta would be roads and cars. Most important he understood this future would bring increased competition to little towns and jeopardize his business and so many others. Ivan sold his store and turned his attention to a career that would make him a pioneer in construction.
Ever the entrepreneur, Ivan noticed farmers in the area were using small bulldozers to clear their land. Most farmers did not have the capital to invest in this equipment so Ivan and his younger brother Bob bought one very old piece of equipment and then another, clearing the land of bush and rock. As business grew, the brothers broadened their horizons and secured work from the Alberta Department of Highways.
On New Years Day 1948, at the age of 31 Ivan went to a party that would change his life forever. At that happy occasion was a beautiful woman named Carol. Originally from Yugoslavia, Carol immigrated to Canada with her family as a child of 4. Ivan was immediately captivated by the vibrant young woman. Three months later they were married and began a family.
In 1951, Ivan and Carol moved their young family to a small house in Edmonton and soon thereafter to the West Edmonton neighbourhood of Valleyview. A home and a life Carol, Ivan and the children would come to cherish. In 1952, Ivan, brother Bob and two partners began work under the name North American Road Builders. Soon the brothers bought out their partners and so began the foundation of a company that expanded throughout Alberta. Twenty years later, in 1972 Bob decided to pursue other interests. Ivan bought Bob's share of the company.
There were many strenuous challenges, all of which Ivan faced with optimism and an unrivalled passion. He knew the business, worked hard to compete and expand. Survival was not always easy in the highly competitive and always risky business of construction. His success was by any standard, outstanding, fuelled by the need to innovate, to compete and to see just over the horizon.
In the late 1970's, Ivan experienced health problems that changed his approach to life and business, spending more time with Carol traveling to southern California to escape Alberta's winters and exploring the world. Ivan was blessed with an immense knowledge of history and politics. He was a voracious reader, affording him an intellectual presence that allowed him tolerance and perspective widely respected throughout his life. Ivan was honest, his ethics were beyond reproach. He had wisdom and grace, was a teacher of all who knew him and a friend of so many. His optimism was infectious. Ivan believed that obstacles in life provided endless opportunity. When it rained making road building difficult he would say, 'rain is why we include contingencies in our budgets, when it does not rain, we are more profitable. And that's just good business.' When faced with competition, Ivan would innovate. When paying taxes, he would remind colleagues 'working is a privilege and taxes remind us of that.' Business was his passion. Carol and his family was his life. He respected others and asked only what he expected of himself. Ivan is survived by his children Elaine BUSCH (Ron), Roger (Peggy), Renee KATZ (Daryl) Colette (Michael), Martin (Sarah). His grandchildren include, Renee, Arden, Justin, Anna, Lauren and Isabelle GOUIN, Britt FRENCH, Harrison and Cloe. Ivan's brothers and sisters include, Giselle, Jennie (deceased), Lucille (deceased), Lomar (deceased), Rolond and Robert. His many nieces and nephews. Ivan will be remembered for his many contributions to Edmonton, to Alberta and to Canada.
A man of substance and charisma, of depth, and always a man whose love of his wife knew no bounds. Ivan died in his 91st year at 11 a.m. on November 11. A fitting tribute to his country and to his wife, Carol whose birthday fell on that same day.
Special thanks to Doctor Allison Theman for her compassion in caring for both Carol and Ivan. And to the Emergency and Intensive Care Units of the U of A and Misericordia Hospitals. The family thanks Ivan's caregiver, Blandina Carilla for her many years of service.
There will be a family memorial service followed by a celebration of his life, for all, at the Royal Mayfair Golf and Country Club on south Groat Road in Edmonton, Thursday, November 15, at 4 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to a hospital of your choice. Connelly-McKinley Funeral Home 10011-114 Street Edmonton, Alberta 780.422.2222

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GOULD o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-05 published
LINTON, Harold Grant
In his 53rd year at Henderson General Hospital in Hamilton, leaving two sons Cole Matthew and Luke Edward. Lovingly remembered by fiance Catherine KERR, her children Calvin and Carrie and two grandchildren Justyce and Tytus. Sadly missed by Archie and Glenda KERR and Jean and Albert GOULD. Leaving many wonderful memories with his mother, Christina LINTON, and brothers and sisters Hugh LINTON (Carmen), Ida GIBSON (Pete), Frank LINTON, Beth ATTWOOD (Rick,) Gladys STONEHAM (Jim,) nine nieces and nephews and sixteen great-nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his father, Charles and a nephew. A brief interment service will be held at Shelburne Cemetery on Monday September 10 at 1 p.m. followed by family and Friends gathering at the Shelburne Legion. Donations in memory of Harold Grant LINTON to the Canadian Cancer Society or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. Friends may leave comments for the family by visiting www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com.
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GOULD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-22 published
GOULD, Betty Lou (née DEYELL)
Peacefully at Summit Place in Owen Sound with family by her side on Monday evening August 20, 2007. In her 79th year, Betty Lou GOULD (née DEYELL,) beloved wife of the late (Clare) Clarence GOULD. Loving mother of Rick (Monika,) Ron (Louise,) Pete (Cindy,) Patti LOW/LOWE/LOUGH (Dan), Joanne STEPHENS (Andy), Cathy MacMILLAN (Bob). Mother-in-law of Marg CAHOON and Dale GOULD. Loving grandmother of Andrew GOULD (Sue), Sherry FISHER (Tom), Jason GOULD, Melissa KUCAVA (Mike), Michelle BURLEY (Mat WHITE/WHYTE), Malinda SANFORD (Curtis), Barrett GOULD, Nicholas GOULD, Meagan GOULD, Tayra and Tayan MacMILLAN. Great-grandmother of seven great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Bob DEYELL (Sharon,) Pat BAINBRIDGE (Gary,) Charlene THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Ted.) Fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her son Paul and her sister Lois (Mrs. Robert McKENZIE.) Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Thursday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held at Saint Mary's Church on Friday morning at 10 a.m. A Vigil service will be held on Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. Interment in Saint Mary's Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Alzheimers' Society would be appreciated by the family.

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GOULD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-19 published
HARWOOD, Gordon Walter, OLS, CLS
Of Wiarton, peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services Wiarton on Saturday, November 17th, 2007. Gordon Walter HARWOOD in his 72nd year. Beloved husband and best friend of the former Betty WILSON for 42 years. Cherished father of Barbara WEST- BARTLEY and her husband Bill BARTLEY, of Wiarton; Linda and her partner Barry WISMER, of Port Elgin; and Douglas GOULD, of Calgary. Treasured grandfather of Graham GOULD; Rhonda (Mike SSAINTURENT;) Melissa BARTLEY (and friend Simon CULYER); Kevin WEST; Drew WEST; Isaac WISMER; Anne WISMER, and Ian WISMER. Brother of Roy HARWOOD, of Sauble Beach; and brother-in-law of Roy WILSON (Harriett,) and Nancy SCHURMAN (late Ron.) Sadly missed by his many nieces, nephews and Friends. Predeceased by his parents, Harry and Lil brothers Jim and Ken; a sister Jean; and sisters-in-law Lois, Elaine and Elsie; and a brother-in-law Russ. Gord will be remembered as a man of devotion and dedication. His love of family and his community is known near and far; belonging to the Grey-Bruce Motorcycle Club, Wiarton Legion, and the Wiarton and District Lions Club (35 years). Gord had just recently become a Melvin Jones Fellow, the highest honour that Lions International can bestow. Family will receive Friends at the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel, Sauble Beach (519) 422-0041 on Tuesday, November 20th, 2007 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A Celebration of Gord's Life will be conducted from the chapel on Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock. Rev. Robert HARWOOD officiating. A Lions Memorial Service will be conducted. Interment in Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Wiarton and District Lions Club or Christ Anglican Church Tara would be appreciated. In living memory of Gord an Oak tree will be planted in the funeral home meadow by the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel. Condolences may be expressed on-line at www.whitcroftfuneralhome.com.

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GOULD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-20 published
Czech wartime refugee became one of Canada's greatest composers
Originally a pianist, he forced himself to write a fugue a week until he had mastered composition. He rejected avant-garde electronic and 12-tone techniques in favour of laments and tributes that probably drew inspiration from his memories of Europe, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
A Czech refugee from Nazism, Oskar MORAWETZ was 23 when he arrived in Toronto, but he remained a European in his sensibilities and his musicianship throughout his long and prolific career as one of Canada's best known and most frequently performed composers. Known for his deep emotion, lyricism and melodic line, Prof. MORAWETZ wrote more than 100 orchestral and chamber works, including Carnival Overture, Piano Concerto No. 1, Memorial to Martin Luther King and From the Diary of Anne Frank. His music, both vocal and instrumental, was performed by such musicians as Glenn GOULD, Maureen Forrester, Ben Heppner, Anton Kuerti, Yo-Yo Ma, Lois Marshall and Zubin Mehta.
His knowledge of the great European composers was encyclopedic, which made him a valuable teacher and mentor. In his own work, he eschewed his colleagues' embrace of avant-garde electronic and 12-tone techniques in favour of deeply felt emotional laments and tributes that probably drew their inspiration from his memories of Czechoslovakia, as it was before Hitler occupied the country, and the trauma both of his own escape and the horrific fate of many of his Friends and extended family members.
Pianist Mr. Kuerti remembered Prof. MORAWETZ as a composer "whose eclectic style was reminiscent of music written 50 to 75 years earlier, as were, among others, Bach and Brahms in their time.
"He was in no way experimental or avant-garde, during a time when radical innovation and destruction of tradition were highly prized by the critics and other would-be oracles, if not by the general public. For this he earned considerable disdain. But his music is absolutely sincere, just as his personality was, and it was extremely well crafted and has a distinct aroma of its own.
"He had an uncanny memory for a great deal of music from the past, and from his acquaintance with it he knew thoroughly all about balance, form, orchestration and sound colours. Had he been a visual artist, one would admire how wonderfully he could draw, rather than just splash paint on a canvas. I think some of his best works should continue to keep a foothold in the repertoire."
As well as two Juno awards, three senior fellowships from the Canada Council and a Golden Jubilee Medal, Prof. MORAWETZ was awarded the Orders of Ontario and Canada. Although he could speak several languages, he never lost his heavy Czech accent.
Oskar MORAWETZ was born January 17, 1917, in Svetla nad Sazavou, Czechoslovakia, the second son of four children of a secular Jewish couple, Richard and Frida (GLASER) MORAWETZ. His father made his living running jute factories that had been founded by his grandfather. When Oskar was 3, the family moved to Upice, a mill town in the foothills of the Sudeten mountains in western Czechoslovakia, where Mr. MORAWETZ and his older brother owned a jute factory, although they continued to spend their summers at the ancestral family estate in Svetla. As a child, Oskar loved building blocks, playing the piano and listening to music. When he was 10, his father moved the family to Prague so that the children could attend high school. They lived in a large apartment in the centre of Prague close to theatres and coffee houses and enjoyed an affluent, cultured lifestyle, complete with skiing vacations at Christmas and Easter.
By 1932, Mr. MORAWETZ was president of the International Cotton Congress, and Oskar was studying piano and theory at the Prague conservatoire under Karel Hoffmeister and Jaroslav Kricka, in addition to his academic classes. Fascinated by music, Oskar was barely interested in other subjects and did poorly in school despite extra tutoring. He graduated in 1935 and then suffered such a severe nervous breakdown (exacerbated by a fear that his fingers would lose the ability to play the piano) that his parents took him to Vienna to see a psychiatrist, who treated him for several weeks before the overwhelming sadness lifted.
Oskar had such an acutely developed ability to sight-read orchestral scores that George Szell recommended him for a position as assistant conductor of the Prague Opera. Despite his longing to become a musician, he never questioned his father's wish that he take forestry at university. In 1937, two years after he began studying forestry, he finally won his father's permission to move to Vienna to study piano. A year later, after he watched Adolf Hitler parade through the streets of Vienna, the anti-Semitism he had already endured increased dramatically and, following a run-in with the Gestapo, he headed home to Prague.
That September, England and France signed the Munich Agreement, giving Germany the Sudetenland, the sections of Czechoslovakia that were heavily populated with Germans and contained most of the country's fortifications. Mr. MORAWETZ sent Oskar to Paris, ostensibly to study music, but really to get him out of the country, and sent his son John and daughter Sonja to England. On March 15, 1939, Hitler marched his troops into Prague, slept in the Royal Castle and boasted that Czechoslovakia had ceased to exist. Mr. MORAWETZ was doubly marked because of his Friendship with political leaders Jan Masaryk and Edward Benes. Nevertheless, he managed to acquire exit permits for himself and his wife and fled to England, then sailed for Canada, arriving in September of 1939.
Oskar, thinking he was safe in Paris, where he was enjoying his musical life immensely, had declined to accompany his parents. But he was treated like an enemy alien and his bank account was frozen. After a series of harrowing near-arrests, he acquired an exit visit that took him from France to Italy by way of Switzerland, where he was helped by a former business associate of his father. In March of 1940, three months before the fall of France, he flew from Rome to the Canary Islands and boarded a ship sailing to the Dominican Republic. From there, he set off for Canada, landing on June 17, 1940. His brother Herbert and sister Sonja had come here in December of 1939; his brother John and his bride Maureen arrived after the war in November of 1946. The family was finally safely reunited in Toronto, although many of their relatives had been murdered in concentration camps. By then, Oskar, who had been rejected for military service because a chest X-ray had revealed dormant tuberculosis cells, had become a naturalized Canadian citizen.
From afar, Oskar had seen Canada as a cultural backwater, but it actually provided him with a nurturing artistic environment. He lived with his parents and dedicated himself to studying music. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in music (1944) and a doctorate in composition (1953) from the University of Toronto, studying under Leo SMITH and Albert GUERRERO -- two of his fellow piano students were Mr. GOULD and John Beckwith. Initially, he wanted to be a pianist, but because he had to write an original composition to complete the prerequisites for his bachelor's degree, he forced himself to write a fugue a week.
"He was very frustrated at first," said his daughter Claudia, "but after writing 40 or 50 of them, he found them easier to do." His graduate composition was his first string quartet, Opus 1, and it won a Composers, Authors, and Publishers Association of Canada award. In 1946, he began teaching at the Royal Conservatory of Music, was appointed to the faculty of the University of Toronto as an assistant professor six years later, where he continued to teach composition and harmony for the next three decades.
On June 7, 1958, at the age of 40, he married Ruth SHIPMAN, a pianist and piano teacher from London, Ontario, in a ceremony at Bloor Street United Church in Toronto. (Mr. GOULD played the organ.) The MORAWETZes settled in a house in Forest Hill, with him occupying an upstairs room furnished with a Heintzman piano and a large oak desk, where he composed music. There was a second piano in the living room, a Steinway grand, that Prof. MORAWETZ played occasionally, but it was used much more frequently by his wife, who gave music lessons there. Her office, aside from the kitchen, was in the basement.
Two years after his wedding, Prof. MORAWETZ won the first of three Senior Arts Fellowships from the Canada Council, which gave the young couple the opportunity to travel in Europe, attending concerts and making connections with musicians and, coincidentally, conceiving Claudia, their first child (now a computer scientist) who was born in 1962. Their son Richard (an economist) followed in 1966.
About this time, Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich asked Prof. MORAWETZ to compose a work for cello and orchestra. He said later that he was having trouble finding the inspiration to write a note until he watched the "slow, sad and very moving" funeral procession for Martin Luther King in Atlanta, three days after the civil-rights leader's assassination on April 4, 1968. When he saw the inscription on Rev. King's gravestone, taken from his favourite spiritual - "Free at last, thank God Almighty I am free at last!" - he resolved to write a work dedicated to Rev. King's memory: "I saw clearly in front of me the form, content and orchestration of my composition." Memorial to Martin Luther King was first performed by the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in Another death, long after the fact, inspired another of his memorable musical eulogies. In a radio interview in 1990, Prof. MORAWETZ spoke about the inspiration for From the Diary of Anne Frank (1970), explaining that he hadn't read the diary when it was published in the early 1950s because it reminded him too painfully of the fate of so many of his Friends and family members. When he read it in 1968, he was haunted by the entry in which Anne writes about her friend Hanneli Goslar ("Lies Goosens" in the published diary), who was arrested and sent to a concentration camp while the Frank family was in hiding in Amsterdam. The two girls met up again briefly in Bergen-Belsen in the last months of the war. "I still think it's the most moving passage of the whole book… [it] is nothing else but a prayer for the survival of her friend Lies," Prof. MORAWETZ once said. Soprano Lois Marshall premiered the work with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra in May of 1970.
Prof. MORAWETZ's marriage was not a harmonious one. The couple separated in 1982 and divorced two years later. At 67, Prof. MORAWETZ found himself not only divorced, but retired from his teaching job at the U of T. After some initial dilemmas about housekeeping, he settled happily into a busy lifestyle of composing, giving guest lectures and travelling for most of the next decade. He gave his last performance as a pianist in March, 1992. Two years later, the Elmer Iseler Singers sang one of his last major commissions, Prayer for Freedom, at the inaugural concert in the North York Performing Arts Centre. The work, which was commissioned by the Canada Council, draws on two anti-slavery poems written by 19th-century African-American writer Frances E.W. Harper, reflects Prof. MORAWETZ's thematic commitment to human rights and social justice.
The following year, in May of 1995, he went back to Prague, the city he had fled nearly 60 years earlier. He fell into a depression that was compounded by his failing eyesight and the arthritis that stiffened his fingers and made it difficult for him to play the piano. The breakdown may have been a reverberation of the severe depression he suffered as a teenager, with both episodes linked by a fear of being cut off from his music. He was never able to compose music again.
Six years later, he fell and hit his head, suffering brain damage that severely affected his memory and his ability to express himself. In 2002, after being diagnosed with Parkinson's syndrome, he moved into a retirement home in Toronto. Several symphony orchestras in Canadian cities, including Toronto, Edmonton and Ottawa played concerts of his works in January to celebrate his 90th birthday, and the University of Toronto music faculty organized a tribute to the man and the musician.
Oskar MORAWETZ was born on January 17, 1917, in Svetla nad Sazavou, Czechoslovakia. He died in his sleep at Leaside Retirement Residence in Toronto on June 13, 2007, of complications from Parkinson's syndrome. He was 90. He is survived by two children, two grandchildren and extended family. There will be a memorial service on June 28 at 7 p.m. in Walter Hall at the U of T's Edward Johnson building.

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GOULD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
LAINE / VARKEY
Oscar Lee Thuthikattu joined big brother Owen, and parents Su and Rick on May 10, 2006. Family and Friends here, in India, Finland and abroad have warmly welcomed him into the fold. Oscar is named for Rick's paternal THUTHIKATTU family in Kerala, India, and in loving memory of Libardo (Lee) MELENDEZ and Oscar GOULD, who are surely smiling down on him. The wonderful Denise HOO was once again our unwavering guide, ensuring that Oscar was born into love, music, beauty and calm. We will always be grateful for the magical births we shared with her. Heartfelt thanks also go to Doctor BERNSTEIN, Doctor ENGLE and Deborah HAYNES of Mt. Sinai Hospital for their exceptional care. Oscar was baptized on February 11, 2007 by Rev. Jenny ANDISON (Saint Paul's Anglican, Toronto) and is a godson to Jenni LAWLESS (Kingston) and Wayne WOLANSKI (Forest.) And to our wonderful Oscar: your beautiful soul brings light to our hearts each and every day. Thank you for coming into our lives.

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GOULD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-25 published
GOULD, Albert
With dignity, on Sunday, September 23, 2007. Devoted and beloved husband of Ruth for 61 years. Loving father of Susan and the late Ralph BERGER, and Bonnie and Gary LIPTON. Adoring grandfather of Eric and Julia BERGER, Esther BERGER, Lili, Noa and Dina LIPTON. Very proud great-grandfather of Sophia and Ella BERGER. Dear brother of Bea and the late Wilfred GOULD, Irwin GOULD and Judy SCOLNIK. Much loved brother-in-law of Norma and the late Kiva BARKIN, Sol and Anna Mae BELMONT. Loving and dear uncle to numerous nieces and nephews. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday, September 25, 2007 at 2: 30 p.m. Interment Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to Na'amat Canada 416-636-5425.

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GOULD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-10 published
DALE, David
It is with the deepest sorrow and grief that we must announce the passing on Friday, December 7, 2007 of our incredible and wonderful husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather. His dearest devoted and beloved wife and best friend, Mary, was by his side, as always. Everyone who knew them admired their truly remarkable and precious love. They had been in love, devoted and inseparable since childhood. A rare, exceptional and remarkable love, one to be greatly admired and emulated by all. David was the most adored and treasured father, friend, mentor and first love to daughters Betsy FRUITMAN and Lynda WINE, and a most admired and loved father-in-law and friend to Lou FRUITMAN and Fred WINE. Exceptionally caring and loving grandfather of Pamela and Howie GOULD, Lisa and Daniel BELZOWSKI, Marla and Ronald STRUMINGER, Paul and Risa WINE, Robyn and Brian WILKS, and Bryan and Stephanie WINE. He will be cherished and lovingly remembered as their beloved "Puppy" to all the wonderful "Little People" in his life: Amanda and Joshua BELZOWSKI, Jeffrey and Jason GOULD, Jarod and Phoebe STRUMINGER, Matthew, Jeremy and Marlee WILKS, Chelsea and Holden WINE, and Lyndsey WINE. David was a gentleman and gentle man, filled with love, compassion and integrity. He touched everyone in his life with his kindness. He was admired and loved by all who knew him as an exceptional husband, loving father, grandfather and great-grandfather. He was a dedicated and devoted family man. We loved him so very much and we were so proud of him, that to describe our loss and to express how much we will miss him is just not possible. As our family's guiding light, he will truly shine in our hearts and memories forever. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday, December 10, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Workmens Circle Section of Roselawn Cemetery. For shiva information see www.benjamins.ca or call 416-663-9060. Memorial donations may be made to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation, 1-888-473-4636, directed to Amanda's Lemonade Stand.

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GOULDEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-13 published
ZIEGLER, Thomas Calvin
At London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital following a stroke in September 2006. The family sadly announces his death on January 11, 2007. Survived by Elizabeth Maria (BOL.) Loving father of Dorothy MORGAN (William,) Carolyn GOULDEN, and Bruce and Dina ZIEGLER all of London. Grandpa to Crista and Ashlee GOULDEN, Nikita ZIEGLER and Cody and Brittany CRAFT. Tom will be remembered by his family and Friends looking back at the years he spent at Gord Chant Auto Parts, time spent on the water boating and camping and all the good times bowling. Thank you to all the doctors and nurses at University and South Street Campus. Special thank you to Sharon (7th floor) for all your care and compassion. No funeral service at Thomas's request. Cremation. Arrangements entrusted to London Cremation Services. 519-672-0459

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GOULDING o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-29 published
MUSSEN, Helen Harry (née HOOPER)
Peacefully at Kelso Villa on Friday, December 28, 2007. Helen MUSSEN (née HOOPER) of Owen Sound in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late Peter V. MUSSEN. Dear mother of Peter and his wife Karin of Owen Sound. Sadly missed by two grandchildren Simon and Lauren. Predeceased by her sister Marion GOULDING. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home for visiting on Wednesday, January 2, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at Saint Thomas Anglican Church on Thursday, January 3, 2008 at 11 o'clock. Following cremation, interment, Greenwood Cemetery in the spring of 2008. Memorial donations to Saint Thomas Anglican Church, The Women's Crisis Centre or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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GOULDING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-08 published
GOULDING, Mary McIntosh (née ADAM/ADAMS)
Passed away peacefully at Vermont Square on September 2, 2007 at 96 years of age. She was a sixth-generation Torontonian. Predeceased by her husband John Philip. Mother of John Philip (Cathy), five grandchildren, and many great-grandchildren; and Peter ADAM/ADAMS (Barry WHITE/WHYTE.) Private family service. Donations to the Women's Auxiliary of the Hospital for Sick Children would be appreciated.

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GOULET o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-11-14 published
WALKER, George William
Peacefully on Sunday November 11, 2007 at Southlake Regional Health Centre, Newmarket with his family by his side in his 82nd year. George, of Stayner, beloved husband of Dorothy (née TEBBEY.) Dear father of Ron and his wife Aline, the late Kathy (1973), Colleen and her husband Jim HICKS and Debbie and her husband Ken GOULET. Loving grandfather to Terry and his wife Cathy WALKER, Jennifer WALKER, Dianna GOULET and Todd GOULET. Proud great-grandfather to Danica. Brother of Jack and his wife Betty, the late Kay and her late husband Irvine BEATTIE, Donald and his wife Margaret and Robert and his wife Lois. George was a dedicated member of Northern Light Lodge 266 and the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 457. As a World War 2 Veteran, it was appropriate that he fought his last battle on Remembrance Day. Friends will be received at First Baptist Church, 205 Oak Street, Stayner from 5 to 7 p.m. on Wednesday November 14, 2007. A Memorial Service will follow at 7 o'clock. Remembrances to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by his family. Arrangements under the direction of Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, Stayner (705-428-2637). For more information or to sign the online guestbook, log on to: www.carruthersdavidson.com.
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GOULET o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-07 published
GARON, The Honourable Alban, Q.C.
Passed away tragically on Friday, June 29th, 2007, at the age of 77. Beloved husband of 36 years of the late Raymonde GARON (née LURETTE,) also deceased on June 29th, 2007. He was born in St. Lambert (County of Lévis), Québec on March 4th, 1930. son of the late Willie GARON and of the late Amérilda GOULET. He will be sadly missed by Maria Elena DURAN (Michel ROCHON) and his goddaughter Marie Isabelle ROCHON- DURAN. Predeceased by his brother Paulin and survived by his brother Cyprien (Lucette PÉPIN,) his brothers-in-law Jean-Pierre LURETTE (Claudette ROLLIN,) Richard LURETTE (Gaétane LACHANCE,) his sisters-in-law Suzanne LURETTE (late Marcel LANOUE), Gisèle Lurette LÉVEILLÉ. He also leaves behind many nephews, nieces, cousins and numerous Friends. He studied at Laval University in Québec City and at the University of Ottawa. He was called to the Québec Bar in 1955 and was named Queen's Counsel in 1968. He was a part time Professor at the Faculty of Law at the University of Ottawa from 1956 to 1978 and from 1986 to 1992. He practiced law with the Federal Department of Justice from 1955 to 1986 and occupied the following positions: Chief, Legal Services, Department of Public Works from 1959 to 1965; Director, Departmental Legal Services from 1965 to 1974 Assistant Deputy Attorney General from 1974 to 1982; and Associate Deputy Minister of Justice from 1982 to 1986. He was appointed Director of the French legislative drafting program at the University of Ottawa from 1986 to 1988. He was appointed Judge of the Tax Court of Canada in September 1988, Associate Chief Judge in February 1999 and Chief Judge in February 2000. He was Chief Justice of the Tax Court of Canada from July 2nd, 2003, until his retirement in November 2004.

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GOULETT o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-19 published
MacCANNELL, Nina May (née SMITH)
Passed away at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Monday November 12, 2007. Nina May MacCANNELL (née SMITH) in her 91st year. She resided at Manitoulin Island, Markdale and the Hamilton area. Beloved wife of the late Malcolm Alexander MacCANNELL. Dear mother of Jim MacCANNELL of Dundas, Mary TOWNSEND of Hamilton, Kathy STODDART (George) of Chatsworth, Anne NORRIS (Rodger) of Mount Forest, Clara SAVELLI (Nicholas) of Little Current, Manitoulin Island, Carolyn McCRACKEN of Durham. Sadly missed by her sister Lila GOULETT and numerous grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Predeceased by sons Maurice and John, daughters Betty and Maxine, and brothers George GREXSTON and Robert SMITH. Friends may call at the May Funeral Home, Markdale on Monday November 19, 2007 from 2-4: 00 and 7-9:00 p.m., where a funeral service will be held Tuesday November 20th at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Markdale Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Diabetes Association would be appreciated.

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GOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-17 published
KARON, Kurt S.
Peacefully passed away at Sunrise Assisted Living in Windsor, Ontario on November 16, 2007 at the age of 101. Predeceased by his first wife Irene (TILLICH) and son Ralph. Survived by his second wife Madeleine (GOURDON) of Joyeuse, France, son Dan and wife Rita, daughter-in-law Irene, grandchildren Kim, Ann, Ted, Irene and Kevin. Great-grandchildren Grace, Ryan, Kristopher, Katherine, Rebecca, Amy and Cole. He lived a full and active life travelling in Europe, Middle East and North America and was a successful banker and businessman. He was a longtime member of the Montreal Board of Trade and St. Luke's United Church. Friends and family may pay their respects at the Windsor Chapel Funeral Home, 1700 Tecumseh Road East, on Saturday, November 24, 2007 from 1 p.m. until time of Funeral Service at 2 p.m. Cremation to follow with interment at Mount Royal Cemetery in Montreal. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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GOURLAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-14 published
RICHARDSON, Norman R.
After a lengthy illness, passed away peacefully on Tuesday July 10th, 2007 in his 94th year at York Central Hospital Palliative Care Unit. Predeceased by his loving wife Marion Isabella MATHESON and his three brothers Kenneth, Russ, and Harold. Dear uncle of Peter and Gillian RICHARDSON, Penny GHARTEY, Pat HARLEY, Jim and Luba RICHARDSON, Robin and Karen RICHARDSON, Janet and Earl JONES, Judy and Rudy MEIER, Pat and David DAVIES, Michael and Sandra RICHARDSON, David and Pamela RICHARDSON, Donald and Glynda MATHESON, Rae GOURLAY, Anne and Ken ROBERTS, Ken and Debra MATHESON and Hugh and Judi MATHESON. Will also be sadly missed by his many great nieces and nephews. Norman graduated from the University of Toronto with a Bachelor of Commerce and Finance in 1935. During World War 2, he served as artillery lieutenant in the 14th Field Regiment, which was instrumental in the freedom of Holland. He became President of Cheeseborough Ponds, and, subsequently President of C.C.T.F.A. After his retirement in 1983, he volunteered for a number of years as Treasurer of Hospital Special Needs. Norman led a very active life. He loved to travel, was a patron of the arts, was a sports enthusiast and had an interest in wildlife, particularly birds and racoons, whom he fed for 44 years in his backyard on Revcoe Drive. He will be dearly missed, and forever remembered. At Norman's request, there will be no service. In his honour, donations to his favourite charity, the Alzheimer Society of Ontario (in memory of his wife Marion) would be greatly appreciated. Condolences - www.rskane.ca R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

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GOURLAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-24 published
McKENZIE, Margery Georgina (née GOURLAY)
Passed away peacefully in her sleep on Thursday, August 23, 2007. Beloved wife of 52 years to Geoffrey Gordon McKENZIE. Beloved and cherished mother and Nana to Laurie and Edward and their children; Andrew and Caitlin. Morag and Bob and their children Cameron, Fraser, Aaren and Eamon. Sandy and Lisa and their children Jessica and James. Her greatest pride and joy were summers spent at her cottage in Muskoka with her children and grandchildren. She never let her long and difficult illness interfere with her zest for life, great sense of humour, love of tradition and willingness to participate in all things fun. Marge was an avid bridge player who rose to the challenge of debate and conversation at all times. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy 10, N. of the Queen Elizabeth Way) on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at St. Stephen's On-the-Hill United Church, 998 Indian Road, Mississauga on Monday, August 27, 2007 at 2 p.m. If desired, remembrances made to the Ontario Humane Society, the Arthritis Society or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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GOURLAY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-29 published
SPOHN, Margaret Alice (née GOURLAY)
Surrounded by family, passed away with great courage at Groves Memorial Community Hospital in Fergus, on August 25, 2007 in her 87th year. Loving Mumsie to Michael and his wife Sheela, Elizabeth and her husband Martin STOREY and Valerie. Survived by grand_son Spencer STOREY, and brother Michael GOURLAY. Memorial Service will be held at Saint_John's Anglican Church, corner of Henderson and Smith Street, Elora, on Wednesday, August 29th at 10: 30 a.m. Donations in memory of Margaret can be made to Groves Memorial Community Hospital Building Fund, cards available through the funeral home (519) 843-3100. www.grahamgiddyfh.com

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GOURLIE o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2007-01-05 published
WRIGHT, Don
Born in Alliston, May 24, 1924, Don WRIGHT was the first child of Sydney and Beatrice WRIGHT (née GALLAUGHER.) At the age of 11 his mother died leaving five children. Don initially lived with his grandparents then moved to Edgar to live with his aunt and uncle, Hilda and Gordon BIDWELL. While living on the farm he discovered he had an aptitude for mechanics. He left the farm in 1939 at the age of 15 to live in Collingwood with his father and stepmother. At the same time Don's brother Harold moved from Collingwood to the Bidwell farm. Don received an early license to drive and started as an apprentice mechanic at Scheffer Motors. He then moved to Kelly Motors to continue his apprenticeship until he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1942. He served as an aero engine mechanic in Quebec for the duration. After the war he returned to Collingwood and Kelly Motors. He successfully wrote the apprenticeship examinations and became a licensed mechanic September 2, 1946. Don's good friend, Andy PLATER, encouraged a relationship between his sister Jean and Don. The two fell in love and were married July 28, 1949. They moved into 159 Fourth Street West which is the family home to this day. Don and Jean decided to start their own business and on Halloween night, 1952 they opened a White Rose service station on Hurontario which is now The Candy Factory building. Due to Don's hard work the service station soon prospered and he expanded into car sales, becoming an American Motors dealer. In March 1953 Jean and Don had their first daughter, Nancy. In September 1955 their second daughter, Donna was born and in July 1959 their third daughter, Susan was born. Don was very proud of his daughters; he named his boat 'The Three Daughters'. The following decades were filled with work, family and his antique car collection. During a trip to England in 1988 Don experienced some heart difficulties and in 1989 he suffered a heart attack. After a period of recovery he returned to his very active life but at his doctor's suggestion, he decided to retire. The family business was taken over by Nancy and her husband, Glenn GOURLIE. After Retirement he continued to use his talents by creating beautiful woodwork and stained glass. He also continued to enjoy his antique cars and was regularly seen driving the mayor in Collingwood parades as well as many wedding celebrations. He was active on the First Baptist Church Property Board and enjoyed using his skills to repair the church whenever possible. During this time he also had the opportunity to love and enjoy his five grandchildren. He continued to enjoy an active life until his sudden passing December 21, 2006. Don's family would like to thank the medical staff, funeral home and all the many Friends and relatives who have shown their appreciation for Don and support for his family.
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