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"GOD" 2007 Obituary


GODDARD  GODFREY  GODIN  GODMAN  GODSELL  GODWIN 

GODDARD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-10 published
WATERTON, Bernard Owen
(Veteran of World War 2)
Passed away at the South Bruce Grey Health Centre, Durham on Thursday, August 9th, 2007. Bernard Owen WATERTON, of R.R.#3 Durham, in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of the former Joyce GODDARD. Loving father of Janet and her husband Jim MANN of Owen Sound, and Paul WATERTON and his wife Teri of Durham. Fondly remembered by his grandchildren and great-grandchildren: Jesse, Kelly and Charlie, Julie and Jeff, and Jill, Travis and Marley. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Anglican Church, Durham on Sunday, August 12th at 2 p.m. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements entrusted to the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham.

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GODDARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-14 published
COXON, Howard Woodrow
Howard died peacefully in his sleep at the family farm, in his 92nd year, on Sunday, July 8th, 2007. Pre-deceased by his wife Paula, loving father to Marcus, Brian, Graeme and Carol. Father-in-law to Jonna and Bruce and grandfather to Sara-Katherine, Hanna, Sam, William and Nicholas. Loving brother to Jean Richmond WATSON and brother-in-law to Margot and Roberto GUALTIERI and uncle to Eric, Inger and Domenic. Loving partner to Helga GODDARD. Howard was very connected to his roots in Mexico, where he was born, in Tampico, in 1915. Returning with his parents to England, Howard went on to receive an M.A. in History from Cambridge. Howard left the United Kingdom after World War 2, having served in the Royal Air Force as Squadron Leader, and with a spirit of adventure, arrived in Ottawa, where he married Paula PETERS in 1950. Finding Canada exciting and full of promise, Howard began his career with Imperial Oil Ltd. in Toronto, and subsequently moved to British Columbia, where he encountered some of the greatest challenges of his career. Howard moved back to Toronto, and then to New York City in 1967, where he worked as Deputy Vice President of Marketing, Exxon Corporation, until his retirement in 1975. In 1979, Howard and Paula settled in Northumberland County, Ontario, on the farm chosen by Paula to be the family gathering point and base for their many travels in retirement. A man of great integrity, his wisdom, constancy, patience, and commitment will be greatly missed by all of us who knew and loved him. A remembrance gathering for Howard was held at the farm on July 12th. Condolences received at www.MacCoubrey.com.

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GODFREY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-02 published
HARVEY, Gladys “Glady” Elizabeth (née GERARD)
Retired from Scarrow's Shoes, Owen Sound. Formerly of Peterborough, Toronto (1943-1955), Bayview Village (1955-1967), Owen Sound (1967-1985), Mississauga “Streetsville” (1985-1994), and finally, Peterborough. Peacefully, with her family at her side, on Tuesday, July 31, 2007 at Peterborough Regional Health Centre Hospital Drive, in her 92nd year. Gladys, ex-wife of Herbert A. HARVEY. Loving mother of Linda-Jayne “Jayne” HARVEY of Victoria, British Columbia and the late Gerard A. HARVEY (surviving wife Elizabeth.) Grandmother of Jennifer and Nicholas. Sister of the late Alma A. GERARD. Dear cousin of Helen GODFREY of Peterborough and her daughter Brenda MESSERVEY. She will be missed by many Friends. Visiting will be held at Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 356 Rubidge Street, Peterborough on Friday, August 3, 2007 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon, with a funeral service to follow in the chapel at 2 p.m. Interment Little Lake Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer's Society of Peterborough would be appreciated by the family.

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GODFREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-24 published
GODFREY, Frank
Passed away on Sunday, July 22, 2007 at the age of 80. Survived by his loving wife Gwen of 56 years, one daughter Elizabeth GODFREY- DROUGHT (Brenton) of Winfield, two sons, Dan GODFREY (Irene) of Langley, Robert GODFREY (Dawn) of England and five grandchildren, Shannon, Joshua, Megan, Casey and Ciran. The family wishes to express their sincere thanks to the home care team and nurses and a special thanks to Doctor Tim Murphy. Funeral Mass will be celebrated Saturday, July 28, 2007, 1: 00 p.m., at St. Edwards Roman Catholic Church, 11123 Okanagan Centre Road E., Winfield, British Columbia. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Central Okanagan Hospice Association, #202-1456 St. Paul Street, Kelowna, British Columbia V1Y 2E6 or Canadian Diabetes Association, #204-1755 Springfield Rd., Kelowna, British Columbia V1Y 5V5. A gift, in living memory of Frank GODFREY will be made to "Holding Hands for Hospice" by Springfield Funeral Home. 250-860-7077. Condolences may be sent to the family by visiting www.springfieldfuneralhome.com

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GODFREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-27 published
PARKINSON, Margaret
Surrounded by people who loved her, on Thursday, July 26, 2007 at Mount Sinai Hospital. For 58 years the beloved partner of Richard David PARKINSON and mother of David (Susan,) Linda CASEY (Michael), Nancy GODFREY (David), Bruce (Karen SEARLE) and Donald (Wendy). Cherished 'Grandy' to Jennifer, James, Nicole, Stephanie, Callum, Neil, Emma, Abby and Shawn. Loving Great-grandmother to Rene. Passing away in her 82nd year, Margaret will be remembered for her strength, humour, intelligence, dignity and devotion to family and Friends. Margaret's family wishes to express its gratitude to the staff of Mount Sinai Hospital and Sunrise Senior Living of Unionville, with special thanks to Ezmena and Roberta, who brought sunshine, love and laughter to Margaret's last days. Visitation will be held Friday, July 27,5-8 p.m. at Pine Hills Cemetery, 625 Birchmount Road, Toronto. Memorial Service at same location Saturday, July 28, 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated.

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GODFREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-02 published
FRASER, Katharine Mary (née LYTLE)
At Woodingford Lodge, Woodstock on Tuesday, July 31, 2007, Katharine Mary FRASER (née LYTLE) of Woodstock and formerly of Toronto, in her 89th year. Wife of the late Philip FRASER (1985.) Much loved mother of Sue JONKER of Woodstock, Lucy FRASER of Chilliwack, British Columbia, and the late Simon FRASER. Grandmother of Vikki, Nick, Marcy, Morgan, Jeff (Jen), Myles, and Bronwyn, and great-grandmother of Katherine and Noah. Also survived by her brother William LYTLE of Toronto, and predeceased by her sisters Anne LYTLE and Esme GODFREY. " Tad" will be remembered for her wonderful sense of humour, her appreciation of The New Yorker (especially the cartoons), and her commitment to social justice and environmental causes. A family service will be held in Toronto with cremation followed by interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to Doctors Without Borders or The Owl Foundation would be appreciated and may be made through the Smith-LeRoy Funeral Home, Woodstock (519) 537-3611. Personal condolences may also be sent at
www.smithleroy.com
"Cast a cold eye on life, on death. Horsemen, pass by."

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GODFREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-02 published
HARVEY, Gladys Elizabeth " Glady" (née GERARD)
Retired from Scarrow's Shoes, Owen Sound. Formerly of Peterborough, Toronto (1943-1955), Bayview Village (1955-1967), Owen Sound (1967-1985), Mississauga "Streetsville" (1985-1994), and finally, Peterborough. Peacefully, with her family at her side, on Tuesday, July 31, 2007 at Peterborough Regional Health Centre Hospital Drive, in her 92nd year. Gladys, ex-wife of Herbert A. HARVEY. Loving mother of Linda-Jayne "Jayne" HARVEY of Victoria, British Columbia and the late Gerard A. HARVEY (surviving wife Elizabeth.) Grandmother of Jennifer and Nicholas. Sister of the late Alma A. GERARD. Dear cousin of Helen GODFREY of Peterborough and her daughter Brenda MESSERVEY. She will be missed by many Friends. Visiting will be held at Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 356 Rubidge Street, Peterborough on Friday, August 3, 2007 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon, with a funeral service to follow in the chapel at 2 p.m. Interment Little Lake Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society of Peterborough would be appreciated by the family.

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GODFREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-11 published
MITCHAM, Elsie Isabelle (née GODFREY)
With great sadness we announce the passing of our beloved Mother at Extendicare Kawartha Lakes in Lindsay, Ontario on September 5 in her 87th year. Loving wife of the late Fred MITCHAM, cherished Mom and Nana of Marilyn, Don, Scott and Meghan VAN WYCK and Donna, David (MORTON,) Lindsay and Lauren (KINNEAR,) Parker and Corrie (MORTON,) Great-Nan to 4 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by sisters, Lillian, Trudy, Beth, Gene and brother, Reg.
A Memorial Service will be held at Humber Valley United Church, 76 Anglesley Blvd., in Etobicoke on Sat., September 22 at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a donation may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation by contacting Wise Choice Funeral Home at 1-888-299-9058.
The family extends grateful appreciation to the staff at Extendicare and ParaMed, for their care of Mom during her final days, and their support to our family during this difficult time.

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GODFREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-20 published
He was the voice of the Blue Jays and 'a producer's dream'
Blessed with a rich voice and split-second timing, he covered Toronto's major-league baseball team for decades. Over the years, he also manned microphones for ABC, NBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation,
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, with files from Canadian Press, Page S8
Toronto -- Don CHEVRIER had two things going for him. He was born with one of them; he learned the other.
The deep voice booming out from his 6-foot-2-plus frame made his life easier as a sports announcer, and he came to use it like an instrument. And he had split-second timing, which is essential in live television. That was a trick he learned. When the word came from the control room to stretch a broadcast, he could keep talking without losing a beat. If things had to be shorter, he could do language arithmetic in his head and cut words on the fly.
"His great gift was that wonderful deep voice, but he also knew how to use it," said Tom McKee, who first worked with Mr. CHEVRIER as an announcer covering the Toronto Blue Jays, and then as a producer who called the shots from the control room.
"Chevy was a producer's dream. When you asked him to shave seven seconds off, he could do it without the audience ever knowing. If you needed some fill, he added as much time as you wanted. He was unique," said Mr. McKee, who directed Mr. CHEVRIER for about 10 years.
On April 7, 1977, he became the announcer on the first Toronto Blue Jays broadcast. The game was one of the most interesting he ever called. Not only was it the start of major-league baseball in Toronto, but it snowed that day at the old Canadian National Exhibition stadium.
Then the Blue Jays beat the Chicago White Sox 9-5, and an excited Mr. CHEVRIER described two home runs by Doug Ault that helped win the game. The rest of the season was nowhere near as thrilling, as the Blue Jays finished in last place.
Jays president Paul GODFREY described Mr. CHEVRIER as one of the pillars of the organization's early days. For one thing, he managed to make the games more exciting than they really were in that inaugural season. "When the team loses 100 games in its first year, the television broadcaster has to make sure the fans keep coming back, even though they were outclassed by most of the opposition," he said.
Mr. CHEVRIER went on to broadcast Blue Jays games until about 1990, returning from time to time to make guest appearances. By all accounts, his last Jays broadcast was made for CTV in 1996.
Don CHEVRIER was raised in Edmonton. Despite a lifelong fascination with sports, he was never much of an athlete, by his own admission. "I decided when I was 15 there was an easier way to earn a living than by running up and down a field or skating in a rink, so I became a sportscaster," he once told The Globe and Mail.
He started broadcasting while still a teenager, describing the action of live high-school sports on the radio. Neighbour Robert Goulet, the future Broadway star, helped him land his first real job, with radio station CJCA in Edmonton, where he was paid about $30 a week to write the sports program and announce scores.
For a while, he had plans to attend university but somehow stayed glued to the microphone. "The manager of the station talked my mother out of it, saying, 'He'll learn far more on the job here with us if he goes full-time than he would at college.' He was exactly right," Mr. CHEVRIER once said. "I wasn't quite 17 when I started. I got $125 a month to start and when I went full-time I got $225, and thought I had all the money in the world."
By the time he was 20, he was the voice of the Canadian Football League's Edmonton Eskimos, doing play-by-play for home games.
After Edmonton, Mr. CHEVRIER began the wandering minstrel act of the young broadcaster, jumping from station to station and city to city in pursuit of bigger paycheques and a bigger market. He worked at CFRA in Ottawa, where along with doing daily sportscasts he called live coverage of the Ottawa Roughrider games.
His next stop was CJAD in Montreal, where he was given the rather grand title of sports director. It was a fancy job description for announcer.
In 1966, Mr. CHEVRIER joined Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto, working in radio and then television. The next year, he became a front-line network sportscaster and never looked back. He was 29 and making $60,000 a year, a phenomenal amount of money at a time when Statistics Canada put the average annual male salary at $5,334.
The bulk of Mr. CHEVRIER's earnings came not from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, but from ABC in the United States, where he was the anchorman on the weekend radio show, World of Sports. He commuted to New York, leaving Toronto every Friday night and arriving home before midnight on Sunday.
At ABC, Mr. CHEVRIER didn't do play-by-play, the kind of work he liked best. Instead, he was the anchor of five-minute segments, talking to sports personalities and reporters in the studio or on the phone. Every weekend, he did doing 22 separate segments. It was hard work and he earned his money.
By 1970, he was doing play-by-play commentary for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television games in the eastern division of the Canadian Football League.
When the Olympics were in Montreal in 1976, he served as the commentator for boxing events, including the gold-medal win by (Sugar) Ray Leonard. He also worked with renowned American sportscaster Howard Cosell.
Over the years he covered every sport imaginable, including synchronized swimming. (He joked to one of his colleagues that in general, swimming wasn't difficult - you just had to put one arm in front of the other.) If he had one disappointment, it was that he never got to do Hockey Night in Canada - for sports broadcasters, the biggest job in the country.
By all accounts, his punishing schedule and peripatetic, sportscasting lifestyle put a strain on personal relationships. Along the way he met a young woman named Donna, and fell in love. They married, but later divorced.
He also had few hobbies outside of sports. Unlike many of his colleagues, he seldom played golf. Chevy, as he was known to his Friends and his fans, did love to visit Las Vegas to play the slot machines. "He actually won a lot of money in Vegas," said a friend.
In 1992, he retired and moved to Florida, but liked to keep his hand in broadcasting. At first, he hoped to land an on-air spot for the Tampa Bay Lightning when they were an expansion team in the National Hockey League. It would have been an easy commute his home in Palm Harbor was just a half-hour drive from Tampa. Instead, he became one the first announcers to cover the games of the Ottawa Senators, which was also new to the league. It turned out to be a much longer commute.
Semi-retirement suited him. Even though he went without full-time gigs, he had always been a hustler and managed to make a good living. He resumed his old association with ABC radio and the network put a special line into his house that allowed him to broadcast from there -- to listeners, it sounded as if he was in a studio. He did much the same work he had done in New York 25 years earlier, but without ever leaving home.
"He was making more money working weekends than he did full-time back in Canada," said friend and colleague Steve Armitage.
Mr. CHEVRIER's great voice and fluid commentary, along with his connections in sports broadcasting, meant his name was always on the radar when someone was needed. In 2002, he was back broadcasting at the Olympics. "He made a comeback of sorts in television," said Mr. Armitage, a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation sportscaster based in Vancouver. "Don was NBC's curling commentator at Salt Lake City. They didn't realize curling would be so popular." Many colleagues credit Mr. CHEVRIER's commentary for that popularity.
Four years later, he returned to NBC to cover curling at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin. The network was planning to use him again at the 2010 Games in British Columbia.
Donald Barry CHEVRIER was born in Toronto on December 29, 1937. He died on December 17, 2007, in Florida of complications from a blood condition. He was 69. He is survived by son, Jeff, and daughter, Melanie.

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GODFREY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-21 published
GODFREY, Mary Elizabeth (née MORIN)
Passed away peacefully with family at her bedside after a courageous battle with cancer on December 19, 2007, at the age of 86, at West Oaks Long Term Health Care Facility, where she resided since August 2007. Beloved wife of the late Gordon M. GODFREY, P.Eng. (mining), June 2, 1973. Devoted and loving mother of Gordon (Carol), Elizabeth EVERARD (Michael), Patricia, John (Vicki). Cherished nana to Ryan (Erin), Colleen, Steven, Kevin (Alaina), Dylan and Patrick. Born March 13, 1921 in Toronto to Harold (Harry) MORIN and Mary (Molly) (née BOURKE.) Predeceased by her two sisters Margaret PEACOCK and Katrine CURTIS. Mary lived in Timmins until 1956, before moving to Elliot Lake where she resided until 1967. For the last 29 years, Patricia lived with Mary in Oakville. Mary's joy for travel took her around the world. Cruising, accompanied by her daughter Patricia, was a favorite pastime over the last 15 years. Mary is fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews in eastern and western Canada, especially Margaret Ann ANDES, her Friends, neighbours and life long friend Mary (Everard) LAST also from Timmins. Mary lived a quiet life dedicating time to enjoy her family. According to her wishes, only immediate family will preside at the cremation at Glen Oaks Crematorium, Oakville followed by a private interment at Spring Creek Cemetery, Clarskson, Ontario. A memorial service celebrating her life to be held in spring, 2008. Her family thanks Doctor Debra FELDMAN and Staff on the 3rd floor, East and West Wing, Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital as well as Doctor Ling HUANG and the staff at West Oaks Long Term Care Home for providing wonderful care, compassion and support to Mother and her family. We also express our deepest gratitude to Patricia, daughter and life companion for her devoted care giving to Mother in her final years. Mother's courage, strength, wisdom, unselfish ways, wonderful sense of humour, will live on in our hearts. Your family is so proud and blessed to have you as our beloved Mother. Donations if desired may be directed to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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GODIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-15 published
NUTTALL, Orland
At the Southampton Care Centre on Saturday, October 13th, 2007 at the age of 84 years, Orland NUTTALL of Port Elgin. Husband of the late Margaret McGILLIVRAY and the late Jeannine CHARPENTIER. Father of Larry of Waterloo and Gary and his wife Ellen of Etobicoke. Grandfather of Fraser, Spencer and Heather. Brother of Margaret LEIGHTON, Mima and her husband Mac McGILLIVRAY, Les and his wife Muriel, Wallace, Sherwood “Bud” and his wife Leona, Shirley and her husband Carm SWEIGER, Marlene and her husband Harvey DAVIDSON, Don and his wife Eleanor, and Alexina and her husband Mike ATKINSON. Stepfather of Norman DESMARIAS, Raymond DESMARIAS, Leo DESMARIAS, and Rita GODIN. He is predeceased by his sister Lenore KING. Friends may call at the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin, (Town of Saugeen Shores) from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. on Monday. Funeral services will be conducted in the chapel on Tuesday at 1: 00 p.m. with the Rev. Robert WIDDOWSON officiating. The Royal Canadian Legion Branch #340, Port Elgin will hold a memorial service in the funeral home on Monday evening at 6: 45 p.m. Interment Resurrection Cemetery, Oshawa. Memorial contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Arthritis Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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GODIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-29 published
'Country gentleman' doubled as the gravel-voiced Nose of Algonquin
Disarmingly direct, he kept a close eye on his resort's decorum and his campers' secrets
By Charles OBERDORF, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
For 30 years, most people met Eugene KATES as the proprietor of Arowhon Pines, the luxury resort in Ontario's Algonquin Park. Although sometimes disarmingly direct, he had the manners and style of what an earlier generation called a "country gentleman." In charge but at ease, he made a very reassuring host.
Mr. KATES's gentlemanly side often came as a revelation to the two generations of summer campers, more than 5,000 children and adolescents, who knew him in the 30 years before 1975 as the fearsome, gravel-voiced autocrat who owned and ran Camp Arowhon, two lakes away from "the Pines."
Seth GODIN, a former Arowhon camper and counsellor who is now a widely read marketing guru, wrote recently that, "In an age of 'the customer is king,' Eugene was an anachronism. He never said things to make people happy, didn't sugarcoat his point of view and didn't compromise. He stood up to the government, to rangers, to staff and even to his customers, the parents. He wasn't afraid to tell you what he thought, and it didn't take long to guess what he expected."
Behind his back, campers called him The Nose. That hurt, but as his daughter Joanne, now Arowhon's camp director (and in winter, this newspaper's restaurant critic), tried to tell him, it was really a backhanded compliment. Although he rarely dealt with campers individually - that was the counsellors' job - he always seemed to know everything that went on, including each child's most embarrassing secrets. The full phrase was "The Nose knows."
And so he did. When two counsellors-in-training got caught smoking marijuana, Mr. KATES immediately began arranging to send them home. Not an easy decision; one of the two was very popular and also a close relative. Within hours, one senior counsellor had begun organizing a resistance: "If those two have to go home, we should all quit."
Mr. KATES called a staff meeting for 11 p.m. His decision was final, he said, adding that he had heard talk about quitting. "I'm going into my office now," he said. "If any of you want to leave, meet me there and we'll do the paperwork." No one took him up on it.
However, he was less hard-hearted than his young charges thought. His second wife, Helen, remembers a pale yellow bathrobe in which he would patrol the grounds when he thought some campers were staying up too late. Helen, new and conscientious, took a walk herself one night, caught a boy in one of the girls' cabins and marched the miscreants to the director's cabin. Later, he told her gently that the idea wasn't really to catch anyone. It was enough that campers saw the yellow bathrobe and got scared back to where they belonged.
Eugene KATES was born in Toronto, the elder child and only son of Max KATES, a dentist, and his wife, Lillian. He grew up on Edgar Avenue in Rosedale, attended St. Andrew's College, Elm House School and Upper Canada College until his final school year, 1932-33, when he transferred to the University of Toronto Schools. At the university itself, he studied math, physics and chemistry. He then went for a short time to Rochester, New York to learn film editing, hoping to work in the industry.
But the Depression was cutting deeply into his father's income, and to eke things out, Lillian KATES determined to open a children's camp in Algonquin Park. She took over the lease on a bankrupt family campground, renamed it Arowhon (from Samuel Butler's utopian novel Erewhon - and "arrow"), and in 1934, signed up her first 60 campers, recruiting them through the sisterhoods of Reform synagogues within one day's drive of Toronto. Mr. KATES, then 20, dealt with logistics.
"The cabins had no lights, no running water," he later recalled. "There was a smelly central toilet system and a kitchen with a couple of old wood-burning stoves. To keep food cold, we had to cut ice from the lake in wintertime, carry it to the icehouse and pack it in sawdust. I was as much trouble as I was a value, but I installed a small 32-volt generator, which allowed a 25-watt bulb in each of the camper cabins. Almost every time there was a play, we would overload the generator and there'd be a mad rush up the hill to restart it while the camp waited in the dark."
In 1940, he and friend Tommy Walker joined the armed forces. He trained at Camp Borden and in 1941 was commissioned a second lieutenant with the 10th Armoured Regiment. By mid-1942, in England, he had been seconded to the Royal Air Force, interpreting aerial photographs and, it seems, spending many evenings at London's Savoy Hotel.
He always spoke fondly of his time in England, but hardly at all about later tours in Europe and North Africa, except to imply that what he witnessed there turned him forever against the idea of war. His last long conversation with his daughter was about the folly, as he saw it, of Canada's involvement in Afghanistan.
At war's end, he had a job offer in the British film industry but decided to help out for one season at the camp. The war years had left it with a staff more interested in having fun than in their charges, and his mother was giving it only partial attention, having also built and opened Arowhon Pines, for visiting parents.
"That season was so unsuccessful and so unhappy" he wrote, "that I had to come back to prove that I could beat it. I certainly had no experience as an educator, but I had trained men in the army and had become used to having my directions unquestioned. That first postwar year at camp hooked me on the life."
He abhorred the thought of running a babysitting service, though. He cleared a baseball diamond and an archery range, built stables and a riding ring, expanded the docks for canoeing, sailing and swimming. They could choose what skills to master, but they were expected to set goals, state them and meet them. "His philosophy," his daughter says, "was that the drive toward excellence and the pursuit of learning forged lifelong character - for both the child attaining the skill and the staff member teaching it."
He was also passionate about the wilderness, even though, as his son, Robert, an expert outdoorsman, points out, he never hiked in the bush, never paddled a canoe and hardly ever sailed. "But he loved Algonquin Park, loved being in business in Algonquin Park."
From the start, Camp Arowhon had been co-ed - one of the first such camps in North America. After the war, Mr. KATES set about diversifying it in other ways, reaching outside the Jewish community to replicate the rich mix of cultures he had experienced in the army. Soon enough, Arowhon was mixing not only Jews and gentiles, Americans and Canadians, but also campers from Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America.
His off-season life in Toronto went less well for a while. In 1949, he had married Ruth GROSS, Joanne and Robert's mother, but the pair divorced in 1962. In 1968, he married Helen DAY, an English-born businesswoman. In 1971, the two took over Arowhon Pines, the resort hotel, which had been fading under Mr. KATES's mother's management.
The hotel's lease then had only six years to run, and government policy called for an end to all private leaseholds in the park. Mr. KATES brought his full-bore energy and single-mindedness to bear on Queen's Park. "A park the size of Algonquin can't be the exclusive preserve of canoeists and backpackers," he argued. "Three hotels in a 3,000-square-mile park exclude no one."
The minister he addressed was impressed, and even more that the Pines had stayed solvent for 30 years with no liquor licence (guests bring their own) and operating only 18 weeks a year. Its lease was renewed, and the government was soon promoting it in its tourism brochures.
The KATESes set about upgrading on all fronts. As Mr. KATES put it with typical directness in a 1976 interview, "We're in the business of selling three things: a bedroom, a dining room and a setting. The setting is superb, but it's beyond our control, so we have to do our best with the other two." In 1987, Arowhon Pines was invited to join Relais and Châteaux, the very selective luxury hotel association.
By that time, it was already attracting guests from Europe. It has since seen them arrive from as far as Peru, Vietnam and Senegal. Mr. KATES delighted over the foreign guests, but when his staff was abuzz over serving Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell, William Hurt, Frances McDormand or Martin Short, he would ask, "Who?" And, while he fretted over decorum in the stately dining room, whenever hydro crews worked on lines to the camp or the hotel, they got invited to lunch, sweaty work clothes and all.
Until late in his 70s, he went skiing for three weeks each year in the Alps. In his 80s, he and Helen were beating couples 30 years his junior at doubles tennis. About five years ago, though, he was diagnosed with emphysema. Still, one afternoon in April, sitting in his Toronto garden with the management team, talking about reopening, he offhandedly said, "I don't know if 92 is the right time to retire."
He spent his final weeks in his cabin at the camp, amid the shouts and laughter of children. He died on the final day of camp, but not until after the last bus had left.
The Nose knew.
Eugene KATES was born in Toronto on October 14, 1914. He died at his cabin in Algonquin Park on August 21, 2007. He was 92. He is survived by wife Helen, children Joanne and Robert, and four grandchildren.

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GODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-19 published
ASLING, Joseph Louis
Born March 9, 1952, to John and Viola (née GODMAN,) Joe died peacefully, December 17, 2007, surrounded by his family, after a year-long battle with cancer. Joe leaves his wife of 34 years Doreen, his sons Matthew and Stephen, and his grandchildren Emily and Joseph. His family would especially like to thank Doctor Andre Bedard for his compassionate care. A memorial service to celebrate Joe's life will be held at the Stroud Curling Club in Stroud, Ontario, on Saturday, December 22, 2007 at 2: 30 p.m. In Joe's memory, donations to the Simcoe - Muskoka Regional Cancer Centre would be appreciated.

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GODSELL o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-07-04 published
GODSELL, Henry John " Harry"
Suddenly on Tuesday June 26, 2007 at the General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood in his 84th year. Harry of Wasaga Beach, dearest husband of Doris for 53 years. son of the late Harold and Janet GODSELL. Dear brother of Loretta JACKSON of Stayner. Cherished uncle of Wayne, the late Dennis, Martin, Ken (Karen), Gary, Myrna (Joey), Karen (Val) and Marion (Colin). Harry will be dearly missed by his many, many Friends. Friends were received at the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, 7313 Highway 26, Stayner (705-428-2637) from 6-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service was held in the Chapel on Friday June 29, 2007 at 1 o'clock. Cremation with interment St. Patrick's Cemetery, Stayner. Remembrances to the Canadian Wildlife Federation, 350 Michael Cowpland Drive, Kanata, Ontario, K2M 2W1 would be appreciate by Harry's family.
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GODSELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-22 published
OLIVER, Reverend Stephen M.
(Former Rector of Saint Margarets Anglican Church, North Toronto and St. Davids, Hardington; World War 2 Naval Veteran)
Peacefully on Thursday December 20, 2007 at Sunnybrook Hospital in his 84th year. Survived by his loving wife, Valerie HUME- OLIVER. Dear father of Stephen (Dr. Jenny TURNER) of Gurnsey; Philip (Mary NOBLE); Peter (Rose ZANETTI) and Susan (Jim GODSELL)and grandchildren Kate, Becky, Julia, Vicky, Diane, Genevieve, Emily, Alexandra and Oscar. Lovingly remembered by his brother Paul and his wife Marion of Bobcaygen and niece Eden (Scott FAIRLEY) and nephew Mark OLIVER of Vancouver. Fondly remembered by Marion Harris. Friends my call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (2 stoplights west of Yonge St.) on Thursday December 27, from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Friday at Saint Margarets Anglican Church, North Toronto, 53 Burnaby Blvd. (one block north of Eglinton and Avenue Rd.) at 1: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a donation to Saint Margarets Anglican Church Memorial Fund would be appreciated.

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GODWIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-02 published
LEPPARD, Leon Bruce
Peacefully at home on December 20th, 2006, in his 100th year. Beloved husband of the late Jean KINNEAR; loving father of Libby BURTON (Merrill,) Mary TOWNLEY (John;) dear grandfather of Caroline GODWIN (Kevin), Edgar BURTON (Liz Smart), Peter BURTON, John TOWNLEY, William TOWNLEY (Nathalie) and Christina TOWNLEY (Chris VINCENT;) adoring great-grandfather of Jeanne GODWIN. Doctor of Physics (Göttingen and U of T, 1933); senior radar officer serving in the Mediterranean aboard HMS Queen Elizabeth Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve Commander, Ottawa and Halifax; senior officer with the Radiation Protection Unit of Ontario's Department of Industrial Hygiene and Atomic Energy Canada. Active member for 60 years of Trinity-Saint Paul's United Church. Lover of music, supporter of the arts, humanitarian, linguist and English scholar, with an impish wit and an impeccable turn of phrase. Our heartfelt thanks to Carmelita and all his caregivers, and to Doctor Sydney Smart for his compassionate support. A memorial service will be held on Friday, January 5th, 2007, at Trinity-Saint Paul's United Church, 427 Bloor Street West at 11 a.m.. If desired, donations may be made to Trinity-Saint Paul's United Church or to a charity of your choice.

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GODWIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-05 published
DE WEERDT, Linda Anne (née HADWEN)
Died on Wednesday, September 19th, 2007 at Braddan Private Hospital in Vancouver, British Columbia. She joins her husband Mark, beloved mother Aulden HADWEN and father Isaac Seymore Andre and brother John Gaylard. She is survived and remembered by her 4 sons, 11 grandchildren and her brother: son Simon and his children Anthony, Clair, Benjamin and Angela, son Murray and his children Ina and Isaac, son David and his daughter Kyela, son Charles and his children Julia, Marc, Alain and Chloe, and by her brother Theodore. Anne lived a passionate life marked by kindness and generosity to others, by life-long commitment to and support of her mother, children, husband and beyond these, to her community. She was born in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan on December 4, 1924 and grew up in Toronto. She greatly admired her father Isaac Seymore Andre HADWEN, the pioneering Canadian veterinary scientist, and her mother Alden (neé GODWIN,) a true lady of great gentility. Linda Anne was from her earliest days fiercely independent, not one to accede to any suggestion that a girl could not do something. She excelled at climbing trees. In the 1930s with parents she traveled Ontario to Vancouver Island in a Model-T, before the TransCanada Highway was built. She loved the colour red, and loved to dance. The Son's of the Pioneers' "Cool Clear Water" was one of her favourite songs. She served in the Women's Royal Naval Service during World War 2, and after the war helped restore Berlin. She studied painting in London and Paris. She had graduated from St. Clement's School in Toronto, then completed a degree in Occupational and Physical Therapy. In 1955 she met Mark DE WEERDT. They married in 1956, and raised four sons in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories and then later in Vancouver, British Columbia. In Yellowknife, Anne was among those who helped found the Abe Miller School for people with developmental disabilities. She worked as an Occupational Therapist, and later, served as Executive Director of the Canadian Red Cross in the Northwest Territories. At 65, she returned to university for her Master's degree in Educational Psychology. Anne was the sort of person who would meet you one day, and take you cranberry picking the next. She loved to sing. She could whistle 12 different birdsongs. She would ride her bicycle in a dress, Judge's wife or no. She made the best ever English Plum Pudding. She did everything she could for her children, though she never thought she had done enough. It was, Mom; it was so much more than enough. Her strong legacy will endure in the warmth, creativity, courage and kindness passed through her to her children, grandchildren and theirs. She dared, and lived. A service to celebrate the life of Anne will be held Friday, October 5, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Church of Saint_John the Evangelist, 154 Somerset Street W., Ottawa, Ontario. All are welcome.

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