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"ERI" 2007 Obituary


ERICHSEN  ERICKSON  ERICSON  ERIKSEN 

ERICHSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-07 published
COLE, Isa Erichsen " Dale"
Died peacefully surrounded by her family on February 1 2007. Loving mother of Zoe, Paul, Oliver and Tinsy. Grandmother of five and Great-grandmother of two. Isa grew up in Forest Hill in Toronto and loved spending her summers at the family cottage in Go Home Bay owned by her grandparents, Frank and Isa (McCURDY) ERICHSEN- BROWN. She raised her family while living in New York City, Amsterdam (Holland), Lillehammer (Norway), Paris (France), 5 other states in the U.S., Kwajalein (South Pacific) as well as back in Toronto. For a time she was a newspaper reporter, and was the host of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's 'Thursday Noon on the Square' radio show in the 1970's. A unique and innocent soul, her love, wisdom and courage were inspiring and will be missed. Gathering in her honour planned for July 14th 2: 00 p.m. at the Vineyard in Beamsville. Lets celebrate her life as she would have wished, with love and great stories. A postboard will be setup for messages at the gathering, please email to rdrotos@yahoo.ca for details call 905-563-3575.

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ERICKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-13 published
SWENSON, Bernard " Ben"
Veteran World War 2. Retired Businessman
Passed away at Good Samaritan Seniors Complex, Alliston, Ontario on Monday, June 11, 2007, in his 92nd year. Beloved husband of Lois PINGLE of Alliston, Ontario Loved father of Larry SWENSON and his wife Barbara Jane of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Sharon SWENSON of Toronto, Ontario, Debbie and her husband Tom HOGARTH of Windsor, Ontario Loving grandpa of Stephanie and her husband Andrew JONES, Samantha SWENSON, Alex and her husband Gord HARTLEY, Ainsley and Madison HOGARTH. Dear brother of Mary and her husband George HAIG and predeceased by Oscar SWENSON, John SWENSON, Sophie ERICKSON, Carrie PEARSON and Ingla GROOME. Dear brother-in-law of Edith BURR, Phyllis McROBBIE, Ann SPICER, Bruce and Donna PINGLE. Ben will be fondly remembered by his nieces, nephews and Friends. Resting at W. John Thomas Funeral Home, 244 Victoria Street, E., Alliston on Wednesday, June 13, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, June 14, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. If so desired, memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated.

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ERICKSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-19 published
McIVOR, Frances Elaine (née KOCH)
'Fran' was born December 5, 1940 in Flin Flon, Manitoba, a daughter to Ruth (née ERICKSON) and Alfred KOCH and sister to Elfreyda and her husband Alex MORRICE of Brooks, Alberta.
Fran passed away peacefully and in the company of her family on Friday, June 15, 2007, in Meaford, Ontario in her 67th year.
She was the dear and beloved mother of David and his wife Deneen of Loretto, Ontario, Erin and her husband Darrell DENNIS of Clarksburg, Ontario, Paige of Christie Beach, Ontario and Drew and his wife Megan of Guelph, Ontario.
She will be the fondly missed Nana of her grandchildren Maxwell, Madelaine, Benjamin, Ava, Cole and Naomi.
A private family service, officiated by Reverend Doctor Brian GOODINGS, was conducted on Monday, June 18, 2007 at the Ferguson Funeral Home in Meaford with cremation following.
Deepest appreciation for donations to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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ERICSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-13 published
ERICSON, Doctor Richard V. (1948-2007)
After a long and difficult struggle with multiple health problems, our dearest Richard died October 2, 2007 at age 59. Richard enjoyed a long career making significant contributions as an eminent scholar in the fields of Sociology, Criminology and Law. He was appointed Professor of Criminology at the University of Toronto in 2004, and has served as the Director of the Centre of Criminology at that university since 2005. Between 1993 and 2003, Richard was Principal of Green College and Professor of Law and Sociology at the University of British Columbia. Prior to that he was Director of the Centre of Criminology and Professor of Criminology and Sociology at the University of Toronto. He held various visiting positions at Cambridge and Oxford Universities, including an appointment to All Souls College Oxford, as well as the University of Edinburgh, London School of Economics, University of Paris X, and Arizona State University. Richard was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada and a Canada Council Killam Research Fellow from 1998 to 2000. Over his career he made critical contributions to knowledge in areas as diverse as young offenders, police work, crime reporting by the media, risk and regulation, and insurance and governance. Richard's proudest achievement was the development of Green College at the University of British Columbia. Arriving at little more than a construction site in 1993, he embraced the role of builder, striving to create a positive, nurturing and creative environment where young scholars and faculty members from the university, and from around the world, could meet to share ideas and collaborate in scholarly pursuits. Enabling and watching young scholars grow in intellect and in personal confidence was his greatest pleasure. Richard's integrity, dedication and intellectual leadership will be sorely missed across the academic community of colleagues and students he so enjoyed and sought to serve. Our dearest Richard will be terribly missed by his loving family, to whom he always gave generously, and for whom he always sought to provide an enriching life: his wife of 38 years Diana, his son Royal Canadian Mounted Police Constable Matt ERICSON (LeeAnn), his brother John (Joyce), sisters Elizabeth and Kristine (Shabaz). He will also be missed by his extended family and many Friends across Canada and around the world. He lived fully and gave everything he had to give. A memorial service will be held in the Hart House Debates Room at the University of Toronto at 2: 00 p.m. Thursday, October 25th, 2007. In lieu of flowers please make a donation to the Richard V. Ericson Scholarship Fund. Details can be found at www.criminology.utoronto.ca/ericsonfund.doc

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ERICSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-19 published
Criminologist identified boredom as the policeman's greatest enemy
University of Toronto expert on crime and punishment took police officers to task for pushing too much paper, for doing little more than maintaining the status quo and for picking on 'pukers'
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
Is being a police officer boring? Consider the startling research on policing in Canada carried out in the 1980s by University of Toronto criminologist Richard ERICSON.
He found that the average number of reported crimes per police officer in Canada was 30 in 1962, rising to 45 in 1977 - or about one a week. He reported that officers on average spent about half their time on the job doing paperwork, and reporting to superiors about what they did with the other half.
He repeated what has virtually become an adage about police work - that the worst part of being a police officer is boredom. The police themselves, in his study, rated fewer than 7 per cent of incidents they dealt with as "exciting."
In a subsequent book, he examined what policing really is about in Canada and concluded that it is "concerned with the reproduction of order." In other words, maintaining the status quo.
To illustrate (and here he probably won few police Friends), he reported that a common diversion among officers was to pick on "pukers" - young males of lower socioeconomic background - and minorities of any sort. Patrol officers, Prof. ERICSON said, seemed to go out of their way to stop such people, run their names through the national database and look for ways of laying charges.
"The police sell themselves as crime fighters," Prof. ERICSON said in a 1984 interview, "but do not spend much time on this activity, per se." The bulk of the patrol officer's time was spent "doing nothing other than consuming the petrochemical energy required to run an automobile and the psychic energy required to deal with the boredom of it all."
Public Misinformed
Partly, he blamed a "relatively misinformed public" for buying into the belief that cops are around-the-clock crime busters.
"The general feeling is that crime is under the control of the government as long as you keep giving tax dollars," he said. The public's acceptance of this "creates a view among citizens that they should be deferential to the police."
A year-long study done by his department of an Ontario police force seemed to support that claim. It found "an amazing compliance" by more than 400 citizens, who dutifully turned over files to officers, remained in their presence even though not under arrest, and rarely objected.
Complaining can be risky. In 1981-1982, he found that about one third of all those who filed charges against Metro Toronto Police officers were taken to court by the municipality's lawyers for malicious prosecution. Only two were spared civil damages.
The time had come, he believed, for police officers to be treated just as human beings, with citizens "criticizing them, questioning them and resisting them."
A world-renowned criminologist who challenged assumptions, ruffled feathers and put U of T's Centre of Criminology on the map, Prof. ERICSON was described by colleague David Garland of New York University as "a serial specialist with the broadest of visions, a continually curious scholar who became expert in one field after another."
Indeed a polymath, he became authoritative in several fields relating to crime and society: Young offenders, detective work, policing, defendants in the criminal process, crime reporting in the media, risk, insurance and the regulation of financial institutions, and surveillance. Lauded by scholars around the world as creative, innovative, critical and highly rigorous - and by students as a warm, wise and nurturing teacher - Prof. ERICSON authored, co-authored or edited 17 books on crime and punishment, the first two when he was 27.
"He was a sociologist who took criminology as his chosen specialty but who had an expansive view of what criminology should be and whose work transformed the scope of that discipline," eulogized Prof. Garland, who is considered the English-speaking world's top criminal theorist. "He paid attention to complexity and to detail. His research projects were large, ambitious undertakings intended to address big theoretical questions."
Prof. ERICSON was educated at the Universities of Guelph and Toronto, and received his doctorate from the University of Cambridge. Most of his career was spent at U of T's Centre of Criminology, where he became director in 1992. For a decade, he was the first principal of Green College and professor of law and sociology at the University of British Columbia, and then won an appointment as professor of criminology at Oxford University, where he was a fellow of All Souls College, among other foreign postings. He returned to University of Toronto in 2004.
His work may have been big and theoretical, but it had real-world relevance. He was known for offering a shocking new vision of police work in which data gathered by law enforcement using surveillance and other technologies is not only not protected, but brokered to other institutions.
Links To Insurance
The police, he noted, have become information dealers to insurance companies and health-and-welfare organizations whose operations are based on knowledge of risk. These institutions, in turn, influence the ways in which police officers think and act.
"It's fairly obvious, as any homeowner who's had a break-in knows," explained Mariana VALVERDE, acting director for the Centre for Criminology. "The only reason you call the police is to get a report that you can then submit to the insurance [company]. You don't actually expect the police to really find your lost CD player."
It wasn't that Prof. ERICSON had broken new ground. "It's just that nobody studied how it works, and the tremendous importance the police have by way of generating information for all sorts of agencies," Prof. VALVERDE said. "He put the work of police forces in broader context."
Prof. ERICSON also conducted the first major sociological study of the insurance industry, examining how it controls our institutions and daily lives in ways that are largely invisible, and how it functions as a kind of government beyond the state.
One alarming conclusion was that there's a lot less certainty than people may think in the insurance business - the very industry that is charged with transforming uncertainty into manageable risk.
Post 9/11 security measures, he argued, include disturbing new forms of "counter law" or "law against law," which criminalize not only those who actually cause harm, but also those merely suspected of being harmful.
Words such as vandalism are always being applied to youngsters breaking windows but almost never to "large corporations polluting the atmosphere… which in the aggregate is far greater."
Critical Of Media
And there's the matter of how the media report crime. After six months of studying how three Toronto newspapers - including The Globe and Mail - covered some high-profile sexual assaults in 1982, he found the news outlets rarely questioned the prevailing belief that it was up to women to curb their activities if they wanted to avoid sexual attack.
The articles presented a central image that sexual assault "was best controlled by having women take precautions that restricted their freedom," the study said.
"By locating the problem with the victim and by not questioning the cultural and social structures in general, and gender relations in particular, the news accounts functioned to acknowledge the existing order of values and social relations which perpetuate the subordinate place of women. The newspapers arguably perpetuated the views that it is something women do that contributes to attacks."
He rejected the old saw that journalists are mere observers. "I don't see the media as being in any way outside the process they are reporting on. The reporters, in the way they use sources, are active players. They don't reflect reality, they help to constitute the reality."
It seems incongruous that someone who tackled such bold subjects was described as not especially outgoing, often to the point of shyness. And despite being critical of police, his own son became an Royal Canadian Mounted Police officer. "It was a very proud moment in Richard's life when Matthew was sworn in," Prof. VALVERDE noted. "So it's not as though he disrespected police, or didn't have an understanding of [their] day-to-day realities. I think his sympathies were always with the rank and file."
Don't tell that to the Peel Regional Police force on Toronto's western flank.
Perhaps the biggest stink Prof. ERICSON raised was in one of his books, Making Crime: A Study Of Detective Work, in which he accused the police he was observing of routinely forging, or "left-handing" the signatures of justices of the peace on search warrants.
Force Not Named
The force he observed was unnamed in the book (though he dropped one juicy hint by mentioning 19th-century British prime minister Robert Peel in the first sentence). Peel Regional Police revealed it was them, and went on the offensive.
"It wasn't a big deal because at that time, even when real signatures were placed on warrants, the warrant approval process accomplished little," recalled colleague Anthony Doob. "That was Richard's point: Real signatures, fake signatures… it didn't matter."
It did to police in Peel, who called the book "a crock of garbage" and said the force "seriously questions Prof. ERICSON's bias in policing." They also found evidence they said totally contradicted his allegations.
As Prof. Doob recalled, one Wednesday afternoon in August, 1980, two senior police officers visited the centre "and delivered what we saw as a serious threat to get additional details about activities described in the book. After Richard refused to answer most of the questions that were put to him, we made the decision that in order to protect the identity of the police officers he had observed, his data had to be placed somewhere secure."
That somewhere was in the attic of Prof. Doob's ex-wife's grandmother's cottage in rural New Hampshire. And Prof. ERICSON, despite the intimidation, stood his ground. "I'm not revealing sources," he said, "and if I did, I might as well pack in my books."
Richard Victor ERICSON was born in Montreal on September 20, 1948. He died in Toronto on October 2, 2007, after succumbing to multiple health problems. He was 59. He leaves Diana, his wife of 38 years, and their son Matt. He also leaves his brother John, and sisters Elizabeth and Kristine.
A memorial will take place at University of British Columbia's Green College on Friday, November 23, at 2: 30 p.m.

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ERIKSEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-07-11 published
WHEELER, Doctor Douglas K.
It is with great sadness we announce the passing of Doctor Douglas K. WHEELER of Dundalk on Thursday, July 5, 2007 at home with his family. Loving husband of Kim, devoted father of Caitlynn and Lucas, master of Garfield and Odie. Doug will be missed by his sister Betty CURRAN of Petrolia, his sister-in-law Grace WHEELER of Sarnia, mother and father-in-law Jo and Ron EADY of Niagara Falls, sister-in-law Sandee (Tom) GAYLOR, brother-in-law Bill (Kern) EADY, nephews Mike (Jill,) Marty, Matt, Mitchell and Ryan, nieces Tracey and Michelle, great-nephew Justin, great-nieces Jessica, Natasha and Victoria. He was predeceased by his parents Fred and Florence (ALLINGHAM) WHEELER, his brothers Ed, Charles and Ralph WHEELER and brother-in-law Ken CURRAN. Doug's patients were his first priority but he did find fime for his boat in the summer, his snowmobile in the winter and the cottage year round. He was a fan of hockey and was passionate about his role as trainer for the Dundalk Storm Minor Hockey Team. He loved travelling, was a scholar of history, and could be persuaded to play the occasional game of cards. Friends called at the McMillan and Jack Funeral Home, 291 Main St. E., Dundalk on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service was conducted on Monday, July 9, 2007 at 11 a.m. at the Dundalk United Church, Main Street, Dundalk with Rev. Janet ERIKSEN officiating. Pallbearers were Marty CURRAN, Michael CURRAN, Matthew CURRAN, Bill EADY, Tom WOOD, Tyler BRICK. Interment followed at the Dundalk Cemetery. Those who wish may make memorial donations to Centre Grey Hospital, Markdale - Building Fund; Dundalk Mihor Hockey or the charity of your choice.
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ERIKSEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-07-25 published
WHEELER, Doug
The family wishes to express their sincere thanks to Friends, relatives, neighbours and patients for their many acts of kindness, food, cards, floral tributes and donations following the loss of their beloved Doug. Special thanks to Rev. Janet ERIKSEN for her words of comfort; Audrey OLDFIELD for her gift of music the United Church Women for the luncheon served; the McMillan and Jack Funeral Home for their guidance and support; Kim and Michelle for their continued commitment to our patients and to Dr. WINFIELD, the physicians and staff of Markdale Hospital for their wonderful care and making it possible for Doug to come home. Your care and support is greatly appreciated and will be remembered always. Caitlynn, Lucas and Kim.
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ERIKSEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-08-08 published
KEATING, Mary
We would like to say thank you to the people who gave donations to charities and also for flowers and to all the people who sent sympathy cards at the time our of our mother Mary's death. Thanks also to the pallbearers, flower bearers, Mary Nicholls for the comforting music, Rev. Janet ERIKSEN for the beautiful celebration of life service and to Tammi DAVIS for the beautiful eulogy for her grandmother. Once again thanks to Norman JACK for all his help and kind words at the time of our mother's death.
- Gwen and Arlene and families
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ERIKSEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-08-29 published
KEATING, Mary Celena (née WILTSHIRE)
Mary Celena (WILTSHIRE) Keating passed away at Grey Bruce Health Services on Tuesday, July 3, 2007 in her 91st year.
Mary was born on December 22, 1916 to Sam and Katie (ARMSTRONG) WILTSHIRE. She got her education at S.S.#8 Proton School. On October 18, 1939 she married Mel KEATING and they settled down farming on the 16th Concession, Proton. In 1942 a daughter Gwen arrived and in 1945 another daughter, Arlene, completed the family. Later in life Mel and Mary retired to Dundalk. Mel passed away on April 4, 1992.
Mary was involved with the United Church Women of Bethel and later became a lifetime member. She was also involved with the Dundalk Senior's Club, she also helped organize senior trips. She became a lifetime member of this club too. She loved to quilt and knit and was an avid card player. She loved to be involved with her family and kept up to date with her great-grandchildren's achievements.
Mary was the loving wife of the late Mel KEATING. Cherished mother of Gwen and Arlene (Art) LOVE. Devoted grandmother of Tammi (Todd) DAVIS, Heather (Brian) GRACE and Paul (Terri) GREENSIDES and a very proud great-grandmother of Stephanie, Natalie, Bradley, McKenzie, Jaime, Mark, Dawn, Liam and Caleb. She is survived by two sisters-in-law, Joyce KEATING and Anne KEATING. She was predeceased by her parents Sam and Katie (ARMSTRONG) WILTSHIRE, two brothers Earl (Erma) and George WILTSHIRE and son-in-law Donald GREENSIDES and several sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law.
The family received Friends and family on July 5 from 10: 30 a.m. to 12 followed by the funeral.
Rev. Janet ERIKSEN very fittingly gave a Celebration of Life service and Tammi DAVIS' gave a beautiful eulogy for her grandmother. Mary NICHOLLS played some beautiful music during the funeral. The pallbearers were Todd DAVIS, Brian GRACE, Paul GREENSIDES, Bradley ACHESON, Dan and Rob LOVE. The flower-bearers were Heather GRACE, Stephanie and Natalie ACHESON and Janice LOVE.
Interment took place at Dundalk Cemetery.
"Dear Mom, you are not forgotten, though on earth you are no more. Still in memory you are with us, as you always were before."
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ERIKSEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-19 published
ROCKETT, George
Thank you to all our family, Friends and neighbours for your support, floral tributes, donations and for attending the memorial service for the life of George ROCKETT. Special appreciation to Rev. Janet ERIKSEN of Dundalk United Church for the comforting service. To the Dundalk United Church ladies for the lunch provided, and to the staff of McMillan and Jack Funeral Home for their kindness.
- Dawn, Lisa, Tony and Kim.
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ERIKSEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-10-24 published
ACHESON, Lorne Victor
On August 1, 2007, a funeral service was held to celebrate the 86 year life of Lorne Victor Acheson who passed away suddenly on July 28, 2007.
Lorne was born and raised on a farm in Proton Township and as a boy, he attended S.S.#2 School sometimes known as the "Acheson School" until old enough to work on the farm. In 1942, he, along with his father, Stanley ACHESON, took over a live-stock trucking business that Lorne would continue to operate for 54 years.
On July 7, 1951, Lorne married Roma CHANDLER who had moved to the area as a high school mathematics teacher. Having been raised in the rather nomadic home of a United Church minister, Roma often commented that she never really had a permanent home until she met and married Lorne and adopted Dundalk as her home. Lorne and Roma raised a family of four children: Edward (Ted), Kenneth, Elizabeth (Beth), and Joyce. Roma passed away on November 24, 1979 after a lengthy battle with cancer and Lorne was to continue his life's journey on his own.
He continued on his own but definitely not alone While he kept busy at his trucking business, he also volunteered for years with the Dundalk Agricultural Society, as well as maintaining his involvement with the Dundalk Lions Club up until the time of his death. In his later years, he became a' "special friend" with Doris LANGDON and together they enjoyed two sets of in-laws, cousins and grandchildren. "Aunt" Doris was certainly the tonic that added years to his life.
Reverend Janet ERIKSEN officiated a service that was held in a packed church on a beautiful late summer day. Reverend Janet delivered the eulogy. Gospel readings were done by Lorne's granddaughters Olivia and Holly ACHESON. Olivia remembered a story of Grandpa, when learning that Olivia was going to England to study Archeology, telling her that there were lots of potatoes in Badjeros that needed digging. Jim DOLMER shared memories of "Uncle Lorne" when Jim was growing up and Janine GOSTICK shared her memories of "Grandpa." Ian LEITH played a lovely rendition of "Whispering Hope", Lorne's favourite gospel tune. Pallbearers were grand_sons Ted CLARKE, Allan CLARKE, Robert CLARKE, Jesse ACHESON, Steven GOSTICK, Kevin ACHESON, and Ryan ALDCORN. Flowerbearers were granddaughters Olivia ACHESON, Holly ACHESON, Melissa ACHESON, Heather ACHESON, Janine GOSTICK, Jackie CLARKE, Carlene ALDCORN, Randi ALDCORN, and Emily PHILLIPS. Special music was provided by Mary NICHOLLS, Dundalk United Church Choir, and Ian LEITH.
It is very hard to capsulize 86 years in a few paragraphs. A brief summary was included in the funeral service bulletin, simply titled:
Our Dad
A simple man in the best sense of the description. A humble man. A kind, loving and caring husband and father. A man who wanted only what he needed and needed little. Born and raised on a farm during the Depression, he was blessed with an inherent humility that, over his lifetime, became a more rare trait in people. Obviously we have no recollection of him as a youngster, only stories heard.
He loved the farm life. As hard-scrabble a life as it seems to us, he took pride (the little he had) in a job well done. He loved a new-born calf, a fat steer, a "hot" market, a fast trotter, and the smell of alfalfa curing in the windrow.
He loved his community and never yearned to move on to better opportunities elsewhere but rather to help improve the community he was in. As somewhat of a creature of habit, he loved his special places and routines. Anyone who knew him always knew where he could be found. Early mornings in his later years would find him at the Highway 10 Breakfast Club. On Sunday morning, he could be found in the same pew down to the left of the minister. On Tuesday morning he could be found at the Keady Auction Market in the same seat down to the left of the auctioneer. Just as he had been during his fifty-four year career as a live stock trucker, he continued to be a "morning person" in his retirement. He loved his church as any devout Christian would. Most of all, he loved his family. He loved family gatherings with a Sunday afternoon picnic on the front lawn. He loved his parents, his siblings, his wife, his special friend and her extended family and he loved us. He loved his many Friends that he met along the way. If you are reading this, should know that you were one of them.
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ERIKSEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-12-19 published
NEUMANN, Siegfried
We would like to say a sincere thank you to everyone who expressed their sympathy at the time of our sudden loss of Siegfried. Thank you to all our Friends, family and neighbours for your floral tributes, cards, visits, food, phone calls, and donations to charities. Special thanks to the Emergency Medical Services Team and Dundalk Fire Department for their very quick response and dedicated efforts. To our weekend neighbours Ed and Carol PALOZZI, words cannot describe our gratefulness for your support that night. To Rev. Janet ERIKSEN and Norm JACK for your professional, patient, and compassionate service at this very difficult time. To the United Church Women for preparing and serving lunch following the service. A kind thank you to Rhonda at ABC Flowers for that extra effort you do for us. Thank you to Muriel GILLIES for finding an answer for the many questions she was asked. Your kindnesses and support at this time is greatly appreciated.
- Francis NEUMANN, Liane and Tom GILLIES, Tina and Paul LISANTI, and Families.
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ERIKSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-22 published
NEWMAN, Eva Martha (née CAMPBELL)
Passed away peacefully at Aurora Resthaven on Friday, December 14, 2007 in her 94th year. Formerly of Amica, Markham and of North York. Eva, beloved wife of the late Donald NEWMAN. Devoted member of Douglas (Margaret) of Niagara-on-the-Lake; David of St. Catharines Nancy (Ralph ERIKSEN) of Aurora. Proud grandmother to Don (Heather MOLINA); Andrew (fiancée Tessa KING); Pamela (Gerard) PERREIRA Jamie; Doug; and Bethany. Loving sister to Alice IRVINE; Elsie CLARK; Pearl (Bob) MacLEOD; Bob (Gwen) CAMPBELL; and predeceased by Ken CAMPBELL; Jean CURTIS; and Bill CAMPBELL. Eva will be fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. The family is appreciative of the care by the staff of Aurora Resthaven. A family celebration of Eva's life will take place at a later date. Arrangements entrusted to Thompson Funeral Home, 905-727-5421, Aurora.

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