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"EAS" 2007 Obituary


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EASON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-20 published
MacDONALD, Katherine Constance (née MacLEOD)
92, Halifax, passed away on September 17, 2007, in Saint Vincent's Nursing Home. Born in Taiwan in 1915, she was a daughter of Rev. Duncan and Constance (EASON) MacLEOD. She is survived by sons, Ian (Jane,) Fredericton, New Brunswick; Edward (Jane HENSON), Halifax; daughters, Sharon, Halifax; Carol (Russell) HAZELDEN, West Dover; son-in-law, Bill PLASKETT, Halifax. Also surviving are grandchildren, Andy (Circe) and Jennifer MacDONALD, Joel (Rebecca KRAATZ) and Anna PLASKETT, Andrew and Russell HAZELDEN, and Katie MacDONALD; numerous nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband, Robert Murray MacDONALD; sister, Ruth; brothers, Donald, Ian and Bonar MacLEOD. She came to Canada (Manitoba) at the age of 11 and later attended high school and university in Toronto, graduating with a B.A. from Victoria College, University of Toronto in 1937. She entered nursing and graduated as a Registered Nurse in 1941 from Toronto General Hospital where she met her husband, Bob, when he was a visiting medical officer serving in the Royal Canadian Navy during the Second World War. Settling in wartime Halifax, she quickly involved herself in church and community life. Because of her unique background, she had a special connection with members of the Chinese community. For 25 years she served as the honorary president and advisor of the Dalhousie Chinese Students' Society, which originated in her home. She had been a member of the Chinese Society of Nova Scotia since its inception in the 1970s. She served in leadership and executive positions in many organizations over the years. At St. Matthew's United Church, she was a founding member of the Ross Auxiliary, United Church Women, ran a children's mission band, started up the Sunday nursery, served on a committee to support a Vietnamese family, and volunteered at the St. Andrew's Church Sunday suppers. She also served for a time on the selection committee of Pine Hill Divinity College, interviewing candidates for the ministry. In the late 1940s and early 1950s she was very active with the Young Women's Christian Association as a board member and chair of the world service committee and gave occasional radio talks. She was a founding member of Women for Music, the Dalhousie-Kings Reading Club and the Halifax Canadian Federation of University Women. She served in Home and School Associations at the elementary, junior and senior high levels, and was often asked to give slide talks to classrooms on international topics. Over the years, Katherine canvassed for a number of charities, drove for 10 years for Meals on Wheels, kept up her contacts with Toronto General Hospital alumnae, and was a member of the Clan MacLeod Society. She met weekly for decades with a group of close Friends (the 'bag-lunch ladies'). She took an active interest in her husband's professional life at the university and together they hosted faculty and students, and participated in the International Students' Association. In the early days of the Indo-Canadian Society, she was invited to join the organization as an executive member. She took a refresher course and returned to nursing for a time in the 1970s. Whenever she and Bob traveled internationally, they visited former colleagues and students and Katherine maintained those Friendships worldwide. Katherine lived a rich life of service and will be missed by family and Friends. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, September 22, at 10: 30 a.m. in St. Matthew's United Church, 1479 Barrington Street, Rev. Ross Bartlett officiating. A family burial will be held at a later date in Hardwood Hills Cemetery, Sydney. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The Katherine and Robert MacDonald Scholarship, c/o The School of Nursing, Dalhousie University or any charity of choice. Heartfelt thanks to the staff of Saint Vincent's, the QEII, the Bedford Berkeley and Doctor Marilynne Bell. E-mail condolences may be sent to: condolences.snow@ca.ns.aliantzinc.ca

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EAST o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-03 published
JESSON, Lenora "Nora" Caroline Elizabeth (née EAST)
Mrs. Lenora (Nora) Caroline Elizabeth JESSON, age 94, of Kitchener passed away peacefully at the Grand River Regional Hospital on Monday October 29, 2007. Born in Stratford, daughter of the late Percy EAST and the former Ida COPP. Nora and her husband Bert lived in Stratford until moving to Goderich in 1961 and then to Kitchener in 1977. Beloved wife of the late Barrett (Bert) JESSON whom she married on August 10, 1935 and who predeceased her on February 23, 2004. Loving mother of Donald JESSON of Abbotsford, British Columbia. Grandmother of Troy and Tracy. Also survived by nieces Elizabeth BROWN and Nancy COOK, nephew Ron BROWN. Predeceased by daughter-in-law Ethel JESSON, sisters Irene and Hazel, brother Clarence. A Graveside was held at Avondale Cemetery, Stratford. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or to the Canadian Cancer Society through the W.G. Young Funeral Home, Stratford. wgyoungfuneralhome.com

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EAST o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-09 published
GOFF, Marguerite L.
Peacefully at her residence on Sunday, January 7, 2007, surrounded by her family, Marguerite L. GOFF of London in her 88th year. Beloved wife for 67 years of Charles GOFF and dearly loved mother of Cheri (Joseph) PITTMAN and Karen (Gerry) BLACKWELL of London and Jim GOFF of Strathroy. Predeceased by a daughter Joyce Marie EAST. Loved mother-in-law of Arthur EAST of London. Marguerite will be sadly missed by 5 grandchildren, 8 great-grandchildren and 6 great-great-grandchildren. Predeceased by a sister Lorraine and brother Ralph. Friends will be received at the Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel 1997 Dundas Street, E. (at Wavell) London on Friday, January 12, 2007 from 12: 30-1:30 p.m. where the Funeral Service will be held at 1: 30 p.m. with Rev. Jim EVANS officiating. Interment Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Donations to the charity of choice gratefully received. McFarlane and Roberts Funeral Home, Lambeth 519-652-2020 in care of arrangements.

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EAST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-16 published
FROST, John James
Born August 10, 1947. Passed away while playing squash on Thursday, June 14th at the age of 59. Much loved by his wife Robin KINGSMILL, and family: Brenna FROST, Kim AGAR, Jim and Wendy FROST, Max and Frances FROST, Karen and David BARRETT, Patti and Mike EAST, Carol KINGSMILL and Dave POLE, and kindred sporting spirit Ruth KINGSMILL. Friends may call at Neweduk Funeral Home, (1981 Dundas St. W. Mississauga) Monday, June 18th 7-9 p.m. A memorial service will be held in the chapel on Tuesday, June 19th at 10: 30 a.m. If desired, memorial donations can be made to World Wildlife Fund, 245 Eglinton Ave. E. Suite 410, Toronto, Ontario M4P 3J1.

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EASTEP o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-19 published
HUDDLE, Shirley Mae (née SPENCER) (June 14, 1934-October 18, With grace and dignity Shirley Mae HUDDLE (née SPENCER) went to be with her Lord on October 18, 2007, at Lisaard House, Cambridge. Beloved wife of David HUDDLE of Waterloo; cherished mother and best friend of Cheryl HARNACK and her husband Tony, of Annan, Ontario; Kenneth COULL and his wife Karen of Cambridge; devoted Mom of Jessica at home, and her fiancé Rick EASTEP of Elora proud Nana of Shelley COTGRAVE and her husband Mark of Newmarket and Shannon HARNACK of Owen Sound. Special Nana to great-granddaughter Brooklyn Mae COTGRAVE; dear step-daughter of Reta SPENCER of Cambridge; loving sister of Kenneth SPENCER and his wife Lorna of Cambridge and Florence SMITH and her husband Jack of St. George. Predeceased by her father Henry SPENCER (1987,) mother Florence SPENCER (née HEATH) (2006) and sister Marilyn ELVIN (2003.) Shirley will also always be remembered by her nieces, nephews and many Friends. Friends are invited to share their memories of Shirley with the family during visitation at the Erb and Good Family Funeral Home 171 King Street South in Waterloo on Sunday, October 21, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service to celebrate Shirley's life and faith will be held at Waterloo Pentecostal Assembly, 395 King Street North, Waterloo, on Monday, October 22, 2007 at 11 a.m. with Pastor Marshall EIZENGA officiating. Following the service, Friends are invited to join the family in the Church Fellowship Hall for refreshments and a time to visit. Interment in Parklawn Cemetery, Cambridge. Condolences for the family and donations to Lisaard House, cancer hospice, Cambridge, can be arranged through the funeral home - 519-745-8445 or www.erbgood.com In living memory of Shirley, a tree will be planted through the Trees for Learning Program by the funeral home.

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EASTICK o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-25 published
FISHER, Dorothy Margaret (née LEPPARD)
With loving memories, the family announce the passing of Dorothy Margaret FISHER (LEPPARD) in her 88th year at Maple View Nursing Home on October 23rd, 2007. Dorothy was the beloved wife of Charles FISHER for 60 years. Mother to Faye FISHER and husband David GRAHLMAN, Sandra and Barry KEARNEY and Donna FISHER- POTTER and Tom POTTER. Proud Grandmother to eight grandchildren, Chris WEBBER (Amberley), Adam WEBBER, Kristina KEARNEY- RICHARDS (Mark), Colleen KEARNEY- JANSSENS (Jerry), Ryan EASTICK (Katherine), Kyle EASTICK (Jessica,) Graham and Garrett POTTER and great-granddaughter, Emma RICHARDS. Fondly remembered by Barry MOLE (Dorothy) and Jean GATEMAN and family. Dorothy was predeceased by her parents, Thomas and Margaret LEPPARD and her sisters, Laura McGIRR, Jean MILLER and Sadie HARBOTTLE. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (519-376- 7492) on Thursday evening from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A service to celebrate Dorothy's life will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Friday, October 26th, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Ed WAGNER officiating. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. Donations may be made to the Parkinson Society of Canada. Condolences received at brian@woodfuneralhome.ca. An elegant and multi-talented lady who loved her family, gardening, animals, music and art; Dorothy's final canvas is now complete.

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EASTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
LENNON, Marion Ellenor (née IRWIN)
Marion passed away peacefully in her 91st year at Chatham-Kent Health Alliance, Sydenham Campus in Wallaceburg on Wednesday January 3, 2007. Marion was predeceased by her loved husband Art (1986) and beloved son Dick (1976). She leaves her son Reg, sister Eileen EASTON and brother Ken IRWIN. Marion will be sadly missed by her nieces, nephews, great-nieces, great-nephews and dear friend Blanche Herman. Marion was born and raised in Toronto and moved to Dresden with her husband Art in the 1940's. They made Dresden their home and raised their two sons there. Marion was an avid bowler and mentor with Youth Bowling Council and loved her church and community. She gave much of her time and love to her community and she will be fondly remembered by many. Marion coached bowling for many years and in 1996 she was inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame in both Wallaceburg and Dresden. The family wishes to thank the staff at Sydenham Residence, Wallaceburg who provided kind and compassionate care to Marion in her final years. Visitation will take place at the Thomas L. DeBurger Funeral Home, 620 Cross Street, Dresden on Friday, January 12, 2007 from 6: 00-8:00 p.m. and Saturday, January 13, 2007 from 1:00-2:00 p.m. The funeral service will be held from the chapel of the funeral home on Saturday, January 13, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. with Rev. Andrew SONG officiating. Interment in Dresden Cemetery followed by a reception at St Andrew's Presbyterian Church, St. George Street, Dresden. In keeping with Marion's wishes, in lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation. Online condolences and donations may be left at www.deburgerfuneralhome.com

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EASTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-18 published
MacRAE, Dorothy Frances (née EASTON)
Unexpectedly, but peacefully of leukemia on Tuesday, July 17, 2007, at Etobicoke General Hospital at the age of 79. Beloved wife of the late Glen, loving mother of Larry and his wife Rose and Bruce and his wife Debbie. Dearest grandmother of Craig, Ryan and Darren. She will be fondly remembered and missed by her many Friends and family. A memorial service will be held at St. Philip Anglican Church, 31 St. Phillips Road, on Friday, July 20, 2007 at 11 a.m. Arrangements entrusted to the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 416-767-3153. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Dorothy's memory to the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada.

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EASTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-06 published
EASTON, Edward Ronald " Ted"
It is with great sadness that Ted's family announces his sudden passing on December 4, 2007 at the age of 75. Cherished husband of Adrianne; loving father of Chris (Nancy) and Bryan; adored Papa to Kate, Megan, Tala and Payta. Will be sadly missed by his sister Joyce and brother-in-law Alex of Barrie and also by his brother Billy and sister-in-law Joan of Northern Ireland, and their families.
Ted was always an avid supporter of both Chris and Bryan; whether it was their sporting pursuits in hockey and tennis, their careers or their young families.
After retiring from International Business Machines Corporation in 1990, Ted enthusiastically pursued many hobbies, including golf and woodworking and he delighted in making gifts for his four granddaughters. His passion for woodworking leaves his family with many treasured memories.
Ted will be missed by his countless Friends, neighbours and extended family members. He will be remembered fondly as someone who would always go out of his way to help others.
A memorial service will be held at Central United Church, 131 Main Street, in Unionville on Friday December 7th at 3: 30 p.m. A reception will be held immediately following the service, at the church.
If desired, and in lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Ted's memory to the Heart and Stroke Foundation at 2300 Yonge Street, Toronto (416) 489-7100 or at
www.hsf.ca

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EASTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-18 published
ALLAN, Dorothy (formerly DOYLE, née HOYLAND)
Born in Sheffield, England, Dorothy died peacefully in her sleep on December 16, 2007 at Meighen Manor in Toronto. She was 87. A loving wife, she was predeceased by her first husband Ronald Edward DOYLE (father of her five children) and her second husband Donald Sutherland ALLAN. Beloved mother of Patti (Steve HASKELL) of Waterloo, Dorothy (John McGINN) of Stittsville, Kathy (John BLACK) of Cookstown, Michael DOYLE (Gaston COMEAU) of Crescent Beach, Nova Scotia and Pam DOYLE (Glen EASTON) of Toronto. Cherished Nanny of eight: Matthew (Brook) and Lindsay McGINN; Kate EMMERSON Kira, Alec and Michael BLACK; Megan and Drew EASTON. She is survived by her sister Joan VICKERS, a life long friend and support.
Widowed at an early age, Dorothy was a tremendous role model and inspiration to her young family. Throughout her life, as a mother and educator, she set an example of service. She was a teacher at Central Peel Secondary School in Brampton, Mimico High School, Silverthorn Collegiate and Humber College in Toronto. Dorothy and Don enjoyed sailing and lawn bowling at the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. They were also members of The Graduates Club and avid bridge players. The family would like to express their appreciation to the Davis Wing staff at the Isabel and Arthur Meighen Manor for the wonderful care provided for our mother. A celebration of Dorothy's life, followed by a reception, will take place Thursday, December 20th at 11: 00 a.m. at Turner and Porter Funeral Home, Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke, Ontario M9A 1B6 (416) 231-2283. For those who wish donations may be made in her name to your local Alzheimer Society.

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EASTWOOD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-02 published
FORD, Violet Ruth
In loving memory Violet Ruth who passed away January 2nd, 1997. To my best friend and dear sister If I knew 10 years ago today When I hugged you and said goodbye That it would be our last I never would have let you go. Always remembered, your sister Vicki and Bob EASTWOOD.

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EASTWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-05 published
MATTHEWS, Harold Smithson
(World War 2 Veteran, Prince of Wales Rangers; British Army Officer 5th Battalion)
Peacefully in Peterborough, January 1, 2007. Beloved husband of Frances Mary (née BELLEGHEM.) Loving father of Cyndy and her husband Jan PACHL, David and his wife Jody, and Tim MATTHEWS. Cherished grandfather of Rebecca, Jordana, and Jamie FRANCES. Brother of Jack (wife Jane) and the late Gordon. Brother-in-law of Berta HAMILTON (late husband Bill,) and the late Jack and Betty-Jane BELLEGHEM. son of the late Gordon and Agnes (née EASTWOOD.) A family memorial service was held at Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Peterborough.

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EASTWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-29 published
Jack MATTHEWS, 79: Educator
Influenced by a sabbatical year spent teaching at Gordonstoun School in Scotland, he saw education as a period when students should spend as much time outdoors as they do indoors
By Alicia PRIEST, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
Victoria -- Jack MATTHEWS believed that education - the right kind of education - was the world's last great hope. An Ontario private school headmaster steeped in British boarding school traditions, he left a secure post at a time of great uncertainty to become the founding director of British Columbia's Lester B. Pearson College. Later, he went on to develop the Trent University International Program.
Education under his watch meant spending as much time outdoors - sailing, star-gazing and debating philosophy around a campfire - as indoors. Students adored him for his open mind and for his unflappable faith in what they could do.
To know Mr. MATTHEWS, it helps to know a bit about Pearson College and the global educational movement that spawned it. One of 12 United World Colleges on five continents, PC, as the school is called, is huddled on a forested bay about 30 kilometres west of Victoria on Vancouver Island. Inspired by its namesake - former Canadian prime minister and 1957 Nobel Peace Prize recipient, Lester B. Pearson - the college offers an international baccalaureate diploma for 200 students from about 100 countries. Students are selected on merit alone and attend on full scholarship. Pearson aims, like all United World Colleges, to promote international goodwill by bringing together young people from every possible religion, race and political persuasion in a community of respect, service and outdoor activity.
Raised in Peterborough, Ontario, Mr. MATTHEWS was the youngest of three boys. His father, Gordon MATTHEWS, ran a meat-packing company. His mother, Agnes EASTWOOD, was a homemaker. A close, active and conservative family, they spent summers on Chemong Lake in Ontario cottage country. Competitive sailing, swimming and canoeing became an integral part of young Jack's being, and his love for wind and water would take him far and years later inspire his own children (son Tam MATTHEWS crewed on three Canadian Olympic sailing teams).
In the 1940s Mr. MATTHEWS' two older brothers went to war, while he, because of age, sought adventure closer to home. A natural athlete, he played football and basketball at Western University where he studied sciences, planning a career in medicine. But after graduation he completed a second degree in business, aiming to work in his father's company. In 1951, he married his high-school sweetheart, Jane GILLESPIE. The following year, their son Angus was born. Two years later, he was asked to teach one session of chemistry and coach football at nearby Lakefield College School - a private boys' school then known as The Grove. Dynamic, energetic and devoted to his charges, he stayed stay on and subsequently obtained a teaching certificate. In 1955, his son Tam arrived.
The pivotal moment in Mr. MATTHEWS's professional life came in 1963. While on sabbatical from Lakefield to teach at Gordonstoun School in Scotland, he met the school's founder, the German educational philosopher Kurt Hahn. A fierce critic of the Nazis, Mr. Hahn had fled Germany in the 1930s and had gone on to establish the Outward Bound Schools, the Duke of Edinburgh's Award and the United World Colleges movement. At the time, there was only one United World College - Atlantic College - in Wales. Distressed by the devastation wrought by two world wars, Mr. Hahn believed that people in their formative years would learn to see others as individuals rather than as aliens or adversaries if they faced mental and physical challenges together. It was a philosophy that Mr. MATTHEWS came to fully embrace.
Although he returned to Lakefield the next year and was immediately appointed headmaster, Mr. MATTHEWS remained bound to the idea of promoting world peace through education.
Soon thereafter, he became enmeshed in discussions about where and how to establish a United World College somewhere in North America. Prominent United World College committee members included Canadian Senator Donald Cameron, Mr. Pearson and Lord Mountbatten, war hero and member of the Royal Family. Lord Mountbatten also served as president of the United World College organization. Without knowing how the college would come about, they chose Mr. MATTHEWS as designate headmaster. That decision, says retired Canadian senator John Nichol, proved instrumental in ensuring PC's success.
"If you wanted to make a movie about this kind of educational institution, regardless of the plot, and you went to central casting to pick the director, you'd pick Jack," says Mr. Nichol who became Pearson College's chairman of the board. "He was strong. He was wise. He was fair. He was theatrical. He loved his role with the students and he was intellectually and physically courageous."
The following year - in 1971 - Mr. MATTHEWS resigned from Lakefield to devote all his energy to United World College efforts. It was a risky move. No funding, let alone a location for the college, had been secured. At one stage, it came perilously close to being set up in the United States.
Mr. MATTHEWS once described the tension in the room during one critical meeting in Britain where that choice was made.
"Lord Mountbatten," he recalled, "had an unusual way of running a meeting, but in his mind it was completely democratic. He listened to what everyone said, arrived at his own decision for action, and stated that decision in a most forceful way. He then paused for 30 seconds and, unless someone objected, he assumed it to be a unanimous decision."
After an enthusiastic presentation by the American committee, Lord Mountbatten turned to Mr. MATTHEWS and said, "Jack, I want you to run the school in Vermont for five or 10 years and then you can start the school in Canada. Now, that's all decided."
A 30-second pause followed, at the end of which Mr. MATTHEWS declined. "I am going to be headmaster of the Canadian college."
His decision was immediately seconded by then high commissioner for Canada Jake Warren who spoke on behalf of Mr. Pearson. Lord Mountbatten acquiesced.
Over the next two years, Mr. MATTHEWS, Mr. Pearson and others struggled to construct a unique educational institution from scratch. That meant raising funds to buy a site, build a campus, find faculty, and provide full scholarships for students from around the world. In the midst of these efforts, in late 1972, Mr. Pearson died. However, his death helped to spur the college's development because it became a way to honour his memory.
"Dad tapped into an enthusiasm for Canada when he tapped into Mike Pearson's Friends," son Angus MATTHEWS says.
As founding director, Mr. MATTHEWS scrambled to find instructors capable of teaching English-as-a-second-language, French, German, Spanish and Mandarin Chinese. But languages were just the basic requirements. They also needed people who were sailors, scuba divers, foresters, marine biologists, mountain climbers, musicians, dramatists, artists and who, above all, were willing to live in an intimate multicultural village where they would be called on by students day and night. After advertising in newspapers worldwide, he received 2,700 applications for 12 positions. The college opened in 1974, and for the next 10 years Mr. MATTHEWS moulded a campus culture far removed from his White, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant roots - no uniforms, no prefects and few rules.
"It was a freeing up of the traditional British boarding-school regime," says former PC secretary, Judy Scott, who recently retired after 33 years. Yet, Ms. Scott says, Mr. MATTHEWS "tried to instill in the students a respect for one another and for human kind&hellip quite a challenge when you are 16 and 17 years old."
The first few years were a mixture of chaos, exhilaration, near-disaster and triumph. There were floods, fires and fierce winter storms, but Mr. MATTHEWS loved a challenge and expected others to do likewise. Confident and calm, he rarely lost his temper.
For all that, University of Montreal professor Patrice Brodeur, a PC graduate of 1981, recalls one winter day when the headmaster went ballistic. Along with some other Western students, Mr. Brodeur had decorated a Christmas tree in the common room and, in jest, hung it upside down. Mr. MATTHEWS crossed the campus in record time.
"We had trespassed the line of the acceptable in terms of youthful experimentation," says Prof. Brodeur, who teaches religion. "Jack was firm and clear that respecting each other's symbols was part of learning how to practice international understanding, starting with our own culture."
Despite the obvious satisfaction he enjoyed from steering PC safely through stormy seas, Mr. MATTHEWS served for just 10 years. Years later, Angus MATTHEWS recalls why: Sitting in his office one day, his father saw four animated first-year students coming his way. They burst into his office and excitedly proposed something they wanted to do at the college.
"That's a great idea," he replied. "But we tried that three years ago and it just didn't work." The students seemed to accept his decision and left, yet their body language had totally transformed. He leapt out of his chair, ran out the door and brought them back.
"You know, that didn't work three years ago and the reason it probably didn't was because you weren't here to make it work," he told them. "Let's give it a try."
That night he told his wife that it was time to move on. "I'm in a pattern," he said. "I'm starting to not see the new things."
In 1984, Mr. MATTHEWS returned to Ontario and for the next seven years helped to develop the Trent University International Program. From there, he officially retired but kept involved by becoming a board member of the Canadian Canoe Museum in Peterborough and worked toward its opening on July 1, 1997. Happier outside than in, he raced sailboats until a few years ago when failing health shut the door of his favourite classroom - the rivers, lakes, mountains and seashores of Canada.
Jack MATTHEWS was born in Peterborough, Ontario, on April 6, 1928. He died peacefully in his sleep in Lakefield, Ontario, on September 7, 2007. He was 79. He is survived by his wife, Jane, and by sons Angus and Tam. He also leaves numerous grandchildren.

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