All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"DIA" 2007 Obituary


DIAMOND  DIAPER  DIAS  DIAZ 

DIAMOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-07 published
BURSTON, J. Margaret
On Wednesday, June 6, 2007. Maggie BURSTON, composer, activist, healer, and counsellor, beloved wife of Ben BURSTON. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Varda and David FENTON of Peterborough, Daniel BURSTON and Sharna OLFMAN of Pittsburgh, and Jonathan BURSTON of Stratford. Dear sister of the late Leah NEWMAN, Miriam COHEN, Eddie DIAMOND, and Esther BAROUH. Devoted grandmother of Adam, and Gavriela. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, June 8, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Community Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 575 Avenue Road #601, commencing Sunday, June 10 daily from 2: 00 p.m. If desired, donations may be made to the Maggie Burston Memorial Fund for the Allergy and Environmental Health Association and the Givat Haviva Education Fund Israel c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324. At both the Funeral Service and the Shiva you are respectfully requested to refrain from wearing any scented grooming products.

  D... Names     DI... Names     DIA... Names     Welcome Home

DIAMOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-17 published
She cherished them all
By Val ROSS, Page R1
Bluma APPEL gave advice to so many people in the arts - from producers to mere reporters - she couldn't possibly remember all their names. No matter, to the Toronto-based philanthropist who died on Sunday of lung cancer at the age of 86, everyone was "dear."
That endearment even applied to the trainload of comedians whom APPEL and Byron BELLOWS, her personal assistant and long-time friend, joined en route to the annual Canadian Comedy Awards in London, Ontario
"I don't think she missed an awards," says Mark Breslin, comedy impresario.
APPEL helped to establish the awards, started in 2000, and supported a $10,000 bursary for emerging comics; as with all of her widely dispersed acts of philanthropy, the amount wasn't huge, but the impact was.
"It's the only time I can think of," Breslin says, "that anyone from the Canadian establishment took comedy seriously."
Establishment? Emerging from a hard-working, Montreal Jewish family, Bluma LEVITT entered the philanthropy world thanks to what she called "indulgence" from her husband, entrepreneur-millionaire Bram APPEL.
In her early adulthood, she tried her hand at so many ventures - women's suit designer, political adviser, investor in theatre projects - that she seemed confident about knocking on any door.
"We've been in her apartment on Hazelton Avenue [in Toronto's Yorkville district] when she's gone to her phone and called the Prime Minister's Office to find out about support for one of our tours," says Marshall Pynkoski, co-artistic director of Opera Atelier.
APPEL was an early supporter of his 22-year-old company, he says, because "she was looking to invest in people and organizations where her money would make a difference, it would make a return. She was very much Bram's wife."
Over the years, she became Opera Atelier's most influential patron, and not just in financial terms: She restructured the board, and shook down other patrons. "From the minute she gave, she felt she could ask other people. She told us, 'You identify givers, then you encircle them.' " Pynkoski did not realize that two weeks ago, when she wrote a $25,000 cheque that wiped out the company's deficit, it would be one of her last acts.
APPEL was a woman of strong opinions. Last December, when Canadian Stage was planning to mount a production of My Name Is Rachel Corrie (a play about the young antiwar protester who was crushed by an Israeli Defence Force bulldozer,) APPEL's was one of the loudest voices warning of the play's potential anti-Israeli effect on public opinion.
Few were surprised when Canadian Stage, whose main venue is the Bluma Appel Theatre, cancelled the production. "She would never fail to tell me if she loved or hated something," says Marty Bragg, the company's artistic producer. "But she was one of us. Her second sentence to me the day I met her was, 'Don't ever forget, Marty, I'm a producer too.' "
Producers are people who put talents and money together, and at this she excelled. She was breakfasting with Friends in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario, in 2002, Bellows recalls, when the group learned that Willowbank, a stately home built in 1834, faced demolition. American descendants of the owner wanted to save it, but could not get charitable status in Canada.
"Bluma said, 'Give me your cellphone,' " Bellows says. "She called lawyers, and in a week we'd launched American Friends of Canada."
Willowbank was saved, and is now the home of the School of Restoration Arts (the only one in North America), which offers courses in architectural heritage preservation.
A former art student, APPEL was keenly interested in the Ontario College of Art and Design. Two years ago she launched an annual design scholarship. "Her generosity was personal," Ontario College of Art and Design president Sara DIAMOND says. "She came to the students' shows, she was involved. We all thought she'd be around for a long time."
Helen BURSTYN is chair of the Ontario Trillium Foundation, the last board on which APPEL served. "She gave away hundreds of thousands of dollars, but she was careful," BURSTYN says. "She helped by telling people, in effect, 'You'd better not miss this, it's special.' And she was wickedly funny."

  D... Names     DI... Names     DIA... Names     Welcome Home

DIAMOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-01 published
DIAMOND, Edward

  D... Names     DI... Names     DIA... Names     Welcome Home

DIAMOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-18 published
'Brilliant alchemist' inspired Toronto and its artists
Conductor's determination transformed the Canadian Opera Company - and made its new home a reality, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
Everything about Richard BRADSHAW was big: his personality, his intellect, his appetite for ideas and experience, his ambition, his optimism, his heart and his faith in God. He lived in Toronto for fewer than 20 years, but his impact was huge. His vision and determination built the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, one of the world's very best theatres for ballet and opera, both acoustically and architecturally. He transformed a regional opera company into an internationally recognized one; he gave us our first full production of Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle he pushed the artistic boundaries of who should direct and perform opera. He made opera the hottest ticket in town.
Tall, grey-haired and bold, with florid cheeks and eyes encased in black Buddy Holly glasses, Mr. BRADSHAW was both an artist who could inspire his musicians and an entrepreneur who could sell his vision. Asked in an interview which came first during what he liked to call "the 30 years war," making music or building an opera house, he replied: "In the middle of the night, I worry about money. When I get up in the morning, I look forward to conducting."
Writer Margaret Atwood captured that dual capacity in an e-mail message from Scandinavia. "Richard BRADSHAW was one of a kind. He was passionate about the work itself - whatever it might be - and set the highest standards for it. But he was playful and innovative as well, and a joy to work with. We saw the premiere of The Handmaid's Tale in Denmark together - and I could just hear him thinking about how he would do it if he could get it to Toronto - which he did, triumphantly. His specialty was making silk purses out of the sow's ears handed to him time and time again by our mingy politicians. Nobody could make two cents stretch as far as he could.... The best tribute to him will be to try to match his commitment to excellence, and his grand vision of what we can be - as opposed to what we sometimes all too drearily are."
Richard James BRADSHAW was born in Rugby in the British Midlands, the only child of Alfred James BRADSHAW, an accountant, and his wife, Florence Mary (DUNKLEY.) When Richard was quite small, the family moved to Higham Ferrers in Northamptonshire. From his father, an amateur musician and a dedicated rereader of Charles Dickens, he inherited a love of literature. His mother passed on her acutely sensitive ear - he once scored 100 per cent in an aural exam.
When Richard was 8, his parents took him to a piano performance of Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro, and it stuck as his earliest musical memory. As a boy, he was also learning to play the piano and the organ. By the time he was 12, he had a paying job playing the organ at the local church. Two years later, he took at least symbolic steps toward his career goal when he conducted a rehearsal of Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony with the Kettering Orchestral Society. But music was not his entire life. He loved sports, especially cricket and rugby, and collected stamps and indulged in the peculiarly British pastime of trainspotting.
To please his accountant father, who wanted him to have a broad educational background, he studied English literature at the University of London, graduating with an honours degree in 1968. At the same time, he was continuing his musical education, playing the harpsichord, organ and even the flute and studying conducting privately with Sir Adrian Boult.
After university, he returned home and founded Music at Higham, serving as its musical director for four years. Then, with his entrepreneurial juices flowing, he moved back to the capital and founded the New London Ensemble and conducted the Saltarello Choir from 1972 to 1975. He said later (in a Toronto Life profile) that these years were "among the most wonderful" in his life because there was government money for the arts, and he felt, with the confidence of youth, that he "could do anything."
What he needed, though, was a boost so that he could work with a major orchestra. That came in the usual way: a combination of luck, talent and chutzpah. A musician friend's father heard him and introduced him to conductor Sir Colin Davis, who was intrigued enough to attend one of Mr. BRADSHAW's rare London concerts. Sir Colin then called the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, which had already declined to hear Mr. BRADSHAW conduct, and secured him an audition. Mr. BRADSHAW won a fellowship to work with the prestigious orchestra and went on to Glyndebourne in 1975 as the chorus director of its opera festival. That was where he made another fortuitous connection, with administrator Diana HEPBURNE- SCOTT. They were married on June 30, 1977. In many ways, she was Mr. BRADSHAW's antithesis - shy, intensely private - but also his steadying counterbalance - ironic, stalwart, commonsensical. It was an extremely rare rehearsal or performance that didn't find her quietly sitting in the audience, listening and watching intently.
That same year, he was invited to join the San Francisco Opera as resident conductor, a position he held for the next dozen years, mostly under Kurt Herbert Adler as general director. Mr. Adler, a Teutonic maestro who controlled every aspect of the company, from costumes and sets to maintenance budgets, was a grandiose influence on Mr. BRADSHAW. While working at San Francisco Opera, Mr. BRADSHAW often accepted appointments as a guest conductor, which is how he first came to the Canadian Opera Company in Toronto in 1988, to conduct Tosca.
In 1989, he was hired as the Canadian Opera Company's chief conductor and head of music, arriving just in time to see the elaborate plans to build a ballet and opera house in midtown Toronto jettisoned by the provincial government because of cost overruns and fundraising shortfalls. He was promoted to artistic director in 1994 after the abrupt and choleric departure of Brian DICKIE, the man who had hired him four years earlier, and was named general director in January, 1998, making him the first musician to lead the Canadian Opera Company since Ettore Mazzoleni in the late 1950s.
He conducted more than 60 operas during his tenure with the Canadian Opera Company and kept up a steady off-season life travelling around the world as a guest conductor. While he was criticized for not putting more Canadian operas on the stage - he refused to compromise his musical standards to nationalist fervour - he did commission at least two homegrown operas, The Golden Ass and The Scarlet Princess. Meanwhile, he continued the composer-in-residence program established by predecessor Lotfi Mansouri and spiced up the lineup of crowd-pleasing operas such as Carmen, The Barber of Seville and Rigoletto with edgier modern offerings, including Bluebeard's Castle, Salome and Jenufa. He also persuaded talented and innovative directors from film and theatre to work in opera.
Mr. BRADSHAW was "so passionate" about such provocative and novel approaches to presenting both new and classical work, according to film director Atom Egoyan. After seeing Mr. Egoyan's Exotica, Mr. BRADSHAW approached him about directing Salome.
"He was a brilliant alchemist who was able to put together designers and directors and singers. That was his craft," Mr. Egoyan said yesterday between preproduction meetings for his next film, Adoration. "And then he was able to respond to the production and colour the orchestra to accommodate the vision he is seeing on the stage. He was the glue that put it all together."
Salome and François Girard's production of Oedipus Rex with Symphony of Psalms (which won eight Dora Mavor Moore awards in 1997) attracted younger audiences, and Mr. BRADSHAW's decision to take productions such as Robert Lepage's double bill of Bela Bartok's Bluebeard's Castle and Arnold Schoenberg's Erwartung to the prestigious Edinburgh Festival won the company international acclaim that resounded in the box office back home. He would return to these directors when he undertook his audacious scheme to present a full Ring Cycle -- all 17 hours of it -- in 2006 to coincide with the opening of the opera house.
Journalist Barbara Amiel, a devotee of Wagner, has seen the Ring Cycle in Bayreuth, Munich, London and Berlin, among other places. "Musically, BRADSHAW's Toronto Ring matched any of them and in places, exceeded some," she said in an e-mail message this week.
"To do this with any orchestra would be magnificent. To do this with a Canadian orchestra that essentially had to learn a new language is a miracle," she said. "He sweated musicality and that orchestra he loved mopped it up. All the young musicians he laboured over and encouraged (they look like none of them have seen the other side of 30) are as much his monument as the bricks and glass of his opera house."
And it very definitely was his opera house. Architect Jack DIAMOND has been widely praised for designing an auditorium that has glorious acoustics and ambience and a building that embraces audiences and the city, but it was Mr. BRADSHAW's vision and grit that made it happen.
"What was extraordinary about Richard was his relentless optimism," said Kevin Garland, former executive director of the Canadian Opera House Corp. and now executive director of the National Ballet of Canada. "He never gave up and never stopped being determined that it would happen and never stopped badgering governments to make sure that they knew it was important to support the arts."
Richard James BRADSHAW was born in Rugby, England, on April 16, 1944. He died in Toronto of a heart attack on August 15, 2007. He was 63. He is survived by his wife, Diana, two children and extended family.
A day in the life
There must have been times when Richard BRADSHAW was in resting mode, but they aren't on record. In 2003, I shadowed him for a day that began before 9 a.m. with a planning meeting for the Ring Cycle, followed by a press conference to announce the new season, a lunchtime lecture at which he twisted a few fundraising arms, a Bay Street meeting with architect Jack Diamond before the Canadian Opera Company board's building committee, a quick trip home for dinner, during which he snatched time to play Bach's Goldberg Variations on the piano before heading to the Hummingbird Centre to oversea a rehearsal of A Masked Ball that lasted until almost midnight, when he headed home for a stack of paperwork and a large Scotch before climbing into bed. The next day, he was at it again, except he also conducted the orchestra at the dress rehearsal of Jenufa.

  D... Names     DI... Names     DIA... Names     Welcome Home

DIAMOND - All Categories in OGSPI

DIAPER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-18 published
DIAPER, Edwina Doris Louise
Peacefully, after a brief illness, on 12 June 2007, in Portsmouth, England, aged 82. Born in Portsmouth on 10 June 1925, Edwina trained at Salisbury Teachers' College after the war and later graduated from Queen's University (B.A. and M. Ed.). World traveller, cat-lover, and keen gardener, she had a long and eclectic career as a teacher, first in England, then in Ottawa, at various schools in the Kingston area, as Education Officer at the Prison for Women, and overseas in Zambia, in London, as well as in Nigeria and Lesotho. Edwina is survived by Dennis, her husband of 58 years her children Oriel (George MacLENNAN) in Halifax, Megan (David CAMPBELL) in Kingston, Charles (Carol PARKIN) in Glasgow and Mark (Birgit EGGERS) in Berlin; her granddaughters Georgia CAMPBELL, Charlotte EGGERS, and Emilia EGGERS; and her nephew the Rev. Clive CLAPSON (Katie CLAPSON) and her great-nieces Lucy CLAPSON and Cecilia CLAPSON in Scotland. She was predeceased by infant twin grand_sons Benjamin and Daniel CAMPBELL in 1985. A memorial service and interment will take place at noon on 19 July 2007 at the Church of the Resurrection in Drayton, Portsmouth, England, with a reception to follow. In Edwina's remembrance, donations may be made to Domino Theatre in Kingston, to Oxfam Canada, or to the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.

  D... Names     DI... Names     DIA... Names     Welcome Home

DIAPER - All Categories in OGSPI

DIAS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-02 published
GERRARD, William " Bill Faux"
(Veteran of World War 2)
Eighty-three years young, Bill passed away peacefully on December 31, 2006. Predeceased by his wife Yvonne of 51 years (1997). Bill is remembered always for his generosity of spirit, and calming influence on all. His legacy extends through his sons Greg and Andy, daughters-in-law Sandy and Janice, grandchildren Matthew, Amy, Nathan, Simon, and great-granddaughter Megan. The family wishes to express appreciation to Doctors BROWN and BAYLEY and R.N. Antoinette DIAS at Princess Margaret Hospital. The family will receive Friends at the Scott Funeral Home 'Brampton Chapel', 289 Main St. N., Brampton, (905-451-1100) on Wednesday, January 3rd from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, January 4, 2007 at 10 a.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Palliative Unit are appreciated. You are invited to sign Bill's Book of Condolences at www.scott-brampton.ca

  D... Names     DI... Names     DIA... Names     Welcome Home

DIAS - All Categories in OGSPI

DIAZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-04 published
Housekeeper's death at Mississauga mansion treated as foul play
By Omar EL AKKAD and Jessica RAFUSE, Page A15
The death of Jocelyn DULNUAN, a Filipino-born, 27-year-old housekeeper found inside a multimillion-dollar mansion on Monday, is likely the result of foul play, Peel Regional Police say.
That sums up just about everything homicide detectives are willing to say.
"The location was targeted for a specific reason that I am not prepared to comment on today," Inspector Norm ENGLISH, head of the homicide bureau, said yesterday at a terse news conference.
"I do believe, though, that there was property taken from the residence, however this needs to be determined after doing a proper walk through with the homeowners," he said.
Ms. DULNUAN came to Canada last year on a work visa and worked as a nanny in various locations across the Greater Toronto Area before moving into the massive Mississauga home as a housekeeper, Insp. ENGLISH said.
Both Ms. DULNUAN and the home - estimated to be worth more than $10-million - may have been targets, he said, adding that Ms. DULNUAN's mother, who lives in Hong Kong, has been notified of her daughter's death.
But as to what condition Ms. DULNUAN's body was in, the cause of her death, what items were taken from the home and a host of other questions, Insp. ENGLISH would only reply: "I'm not prepared to discuss that."
Peel police spokesman Constable Adam MINNION said homicide detectives can sometimes choose to withhold information so as to not compromise an investigation. "If [homicide detectives are] reluctant to provide information, they must have their reasons," Constable MINNION said. "Every situation's different. There must be something they've seen there."
Police received a 911 call around 5 p.m. on Monday from one of the homeowners inside the home. The homeowners, Vasdev (Dave) CHANCHLANI and his wife Jayshree, were not home at the time of the incident, Constable MINNION said.
Police have not yet publicly named any suspects.
At several Toronto churches with strong Filipino followings, no one recognized Ms. DULNUAN by name or photo yesterday.
She was also not registered with Intercede, a group that advocates for the rights of domestic workers and caregivers.
"We've been getting calls all day," said counsellor Columbia DIAZ, who is hoping to use the agency's contacts to get in touch with Ms. DULNUAN's Friends. "A lot of Filipina maids are worried and want to know more, but there's not much that we know."
Ms. DIAZ said many caregivers and domestic workers prefer to work in populated areas instead of secluded homes with limited contact with the outside community.
Jo ACUNA, owner of Brampton-based Sunrise Placement Services, said live-in nannies tend to apply for a work permit under the federal live-in caregiver program.
The program stipulates that such employees must work in a private home and be provided a private, furnished room within that home.
Ms. ACUNA said the largest portion of such workers arrive from the Philippines, usually after first working in Hong Kong.
A representative from the Philippines consulate in Toronto said the consulate has been in contact with Ms. DULNUAN's mother, who is trying to arrange the transportation of her daughter's body back home.

  D... Names     DI... Names     DIA... Names     Welcome Home

DIAZ - All Categories in OGSPI