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"CHE" 2007 Obituary


CHEATLEY  CHECHALK  CHEGAHNO  CHEN  CHENEY  CHEPESIUK  CHERREY  CHERWAIKO  CHERY  CHESHIRE  CHESLEA  CHESLOW  CHESNEY  CHESNIE  CHESNUT  CHESSELL  CHESTER  CHESTNUT  CHESWICK  CHEUNG  CHEVALIER  CHEVRIER 

CHEATLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-06 published
CHEATLEY, Michael Donovan (February 14, 1942-June 30, 2007)
Michael died peacefully at Saint Paul's Hospital in Vancouver. Survived by daughters Barbara CHEATLEY (and Mike VAN BENNEKOM) of Toronto and Stephanie CHEATLEY (and Aman DHANJI) of Vancouver. All of his family and Friends who love him dearly, including his Canada Customs and Revenue Agency co-workers, the lunch bunch at Shenanigans, colleagues at the Vancouver Aquarium, his Friends at the Palisades and his college buddies from the Bytowne Inn in Ottawa will all miss him. Michael opened our eyes and let the future in with insights on trends, popular culture and the political climate of the day. He was an information junkie. He took and shared all information with a grain of salt and a healthy dose of dry wit. Michael retired at age 60 to indulge his passion for travel. We hold him in our hearts and thoughts as he continues on his great journey. A celebration of life will be held this Friday, July 6th at the Vancouver Aquarium in Stanley Park from 8: 00 p.m.-11:00 p.m. in the Beluga room. Please join us in honouring his life and to share memories of his wonderful sense of humour, intelligence and generosity. Memorial Donations in Michael's memory may be made to the Vancouver Aquarium.

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CHECHALK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-24 published
SOUTHERN, Stanley William (June 8, 1922 to July 21, 2007)
(Long-term employee of Stelco, World War 2 veteran)
It is with great sadness the family announces the passing of Stanley, surrounded by his family, at Village of Tansley Woods, Burlington. Beloved husband of Helen (née CHECHALK) for 59 years, devoted father of Patricia Helen SOUTHERN (Gilbert MALLETTE) and Judith Ellen PEKRUL (Dieter PEKRUL) and grandpa of Ria Annelise DEDOOD (Joshua BARON) and Deandra Elise PEKRUL. Predeceased by his parents William SOUTHERN and Alice Flora WILSON and brothers Howard and Frank. Survived by his sister Mable PRINGLE of Peterborough and 19 nieces and nephews. Resting at P.X. Dermody Funeral Home, 1919 King Street East, Hamilton. Friends may call 2-4 and 7-9 on July 24. Funeral mass at St. Eugenes Church, 232 Queenston Rd., at 10: 00 on July 25. Interment to follow at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery, Burlington. In lieu of flowers, donations to Alzheimer Society, the Salvation Army or Parkinson Society are appreciated.
'You are greatly missed.'

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CHEGAHNO o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-06 published
NORRIS, Thomas Garner
Suddenly at his home Monday afternoon June 4, 2007. Tom NORRIS of R.R.#2, Wiarton in his 69th year. Beloved husband of the former Gail PERKINS (née DOWNS) and the late Beth YOUNG. Loving father of Kim and her husband Huss CHEGAHNO of Wiarton, Sandi and her husband Jerry AHRENS of Mitchell, Jennifer and her husband Mike DAIGLE of Brampton, Leanne and her husband Rob CHRISTIE of R.R.#1, Hepworth and son-in-law Scott ROBINSON of Burlington. Proud Poppa and Grandpa of ten grandchildren; Matthew, Kyla, Jeffrey, Joshua, Jared, Jordan, Lucas, Aidan, Kady and Alisa. Dear son of Anne ROUSE of Wiarton. Dear brother of June KREUTZWEISER of Wiarton, Barry NORRIS and his wife Brenda of Elmira, and Becky and her husband Bob McCARTNEY of R.R.#3 Hepworth. Brother-in-law of Joan NORRIS of Wiarton and Brenda ROUSE of London. Also survived by several brothers and sisters-in-law and nephews and nieces. Predeceased by his brothers Jerry NORRIS and Bev ROUSE, daughter Lisa PERKINS- ROBINSON, grand_son Michael DAIGLE and brother-in-law Al KREUTZWEISER. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth Wednesday evening from 7 to 9 p.m. and Thursday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted from Saint Paul's Presbyterian Church, Wiarton Friday afternoon at 2: 00 p.m. with Rev. David LEGGATT officiating. Interment Bayview Cemetery, Wiarton. Memorial contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society, Wiarton Hospital or Easter Seal Society would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Tom by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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CHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-13 published
SAGMAN, Sadok (Febrary 2, 1927-January 7, 2007)
Passed away peacefully in his 80th year, at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal. Devoted husband of Carmina Araujo SAGMAN. Beloved father of Sara and Ruth, Uri (Sandra), Doron (Yolanda), and Shaul. Grandfather of Gabriel, Reuben and Nathaniel; Aaron, Joel and Evan; Irene and Christine, Daniel and Stephanie. Survived by his brother Ezra. Predeceased by his parents, Flora and David SAGMAN, his brothers Eliyahu and Chaim, and by his first wife, Arlette Politi SAGMAN. Reflecting his Biblical name, meaning "the righteous," Sadok believed in justice and dedicated himself to the values important to him: family and education. The second of four brothers, he was born and raised in Baghdad. In the 1940s, after his family was forced to flee Iraq, he fought for the new State of Israel. In Israel, Sadok married Arlette POLITI, studied economics at the University of Tel Aviv, and became a banker. In 1966, seeking greater opportunities, he emigrated with his young family to Canada, where he worked as an economist for the Federal Government in Ottawa and established himself as a chartered accountant and subsequently as a real estate entrepreneur in Montreal. After the sudden death of his first wife in 1969, he raised three sons alone and later also cared for his aging parents, who joined the household. In 1979 Sadok married Carmina ARAUJO, whom he cherished, and enjoyed a new round of fatherhood with his adored daughters Sara and Ruth. With these blessings came renewed energy and purpose. Throughout his life he remained disciplined, active and optimistic, a fighter to the end. He was truly a self-made man, whose remarkable focus and determination will continue to inspire. The family is grateful to the caring staff of the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, with particular thanks to Doctor Harvey Chang of the Palliative Care Unit, and also to Doctor Paul GREIG and Doctor Eric CHEN of the University Health Network in Toronto. A memorial service was held on January 7 in Montreal. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Jewish General Hospital Foundation, (514) 340-8251 or www.jgh.ca

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CHENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
The hurtin' life of a Milton man
By Peter CHENEY, Page M1
Wayne CHAPMAN's final stage was a warped square of plywood on the roof outside his $110-a-week rented room. He would strum his guitar, look out over the rooftops of Milton, and remember the glory days when he played with the legendary Stompin' Tom Connors.
Last week, Mr. CHAPMAN's guitar was placed in his casket, a final tribute to a man whose life exemplified the hurtin' ethos of country, the music he loved the best. Long divorced, the 52-year-old lived in a boarding house with 14 other men, many of them down on their luck. His previous residence was a room above a tavern. Mr. CHAPMAN worked as a custodian at a car-parts plant, cleaning the cafeteria and changing toilet-paper rolls.
"He didn't have much," said Ken MURRAY, the superintendent of the boarding house. "But he was a good guy."
Like Stompin' Tom, whose experiences included hard labour, abandonment and poverty, Mr. CHAPMAN was a genuine country music character, informed by heartache and loss. His possessions were limited to a few guitars and some beaten furniture. He had lived for a while in Georgetown, but moved to Milton after he was targeted in a series of robberies. His entertainment consisted of buying a case of Molson Canadian to drink with Friends. He rode to work each day on a hand-me-down mountain bike he called "The Dirty Dawg."
In Milton, he lived in a single room, where he cooked his meals in a microwave and washed his dishes in a shared bathroom. Unlike Mr. Connors, who lives in a comfortable home in a nearby township, Mr. CHAPMAN had never made enough to escape the endless cycle of low-paid day jobs. But to country music insiders, his time on stage with Mr. Connors meant that he had been validated, if not financially rewarded.
Mr. CHAPMAN's death was a strange one. On August 23, he came home from work, and went out on the roof with his guitar and a few beers.
His second-floor room was one of the hottest in the house. He liked to escape the heat by stepping out onto the roof through his window, where he would play Stompin' Tom and Johnny Cash tunes on his weathered acoustic guitar.
This day, he was joined by one of his housemates, who shared a beer with him. It was late afternoon, and the weather was perfect. The roof was the size of an average room - it was a poor man's deck, with a flat black top and no railings. As usual, there were a few yellow-jacket wasps buzzing around. The insects had built a nest inside a crack in the building's brick wall, and had defied the superintendent's extermination efforts.
Mr. CHAPMAN hated the yellow jackets. Just weeks before, he had jammed a stick into the nest, against the superintendent's recommendation, checking to see if a recent spraying had killed them off. It hadn't. Now he was in a fighting mood. He fetched a fly-swatter and began swinging at the wasps. It was a bad idea. He had unwittingly triggered the wasps' defence mechanism, and countless more poured out of the nest to help their embattled fellows.
Mr. CHAPMAN soon found himself in a full-on battle, walking backwards and using his swatter to try to fend off the growing insect horde. In the room below, Mr. MURRAY heard his footsteps on the rooftop. "Jesus," he thought. "I told him to stay out of there."
There was a thud. Consumed with his battle with the wasps, Mr. CHAPMAN had stepped off the edge of the roof and fallen six metres to the pavement. He was rushed to the Milton hospital, then airlifted to Saint Michael's in Toronto. He died of his injuries and a forensic autopsy was performed the next day. His death was ruled accidental.
"It's a very sad case," said Detective Murray DRINKWALTER of Halton Regional Police.
It was the end of a sad life, whose highlight was a 1985 appearance on a Stompin' Tom Connors album called Stompin' Tom Is Back to Assist Canadian Talent. Mr. CHAPMAN contributed two songs (My Home Town and The Bars of Vancouver) and was pictured on the cover, dressed in black jeans and a Stetson.
The album was propped on his coffin this week at his small funeral in Erin, Ontario Among the visitors at the funeral home, according to locals, was Stompin' Tom, who dropped by to pay his final respects to a fallen musical comrade. Also there were his mother and some of his brothers and sisters. The family, along with Mr. Connors, declined to talk about Mr. CHAPMAN, but others filled in a few of the blanks.
According to Fred WHITE/WHYTE, his supervisor at the car-parts plant, Stompin' Tom entered Mr. CHAPMAN's life when his father took in the iconic singer many years ago during a dark period.
"He came home one day, and there was this tall, skinny guy," said Mr. WHITE/WHYTE. "It was Stompin' Tom."
Mr. CHAPMAN went on to perform occasionally with Mr. Connors, and never stopped talking about how amazing it was to play with a genuine musical legend. "To him, Stompin' Tom was the second coming of Jesus," said Mr. MURRAY. "He loved him."
"A lot of musicians would give anything to play with Stompin' Tom," said Duncan FREMLIN, a guitarist who used to tour with Mr. Connors. "He's the real thing."
His thoughts were echoed by Bob McNIVEN, a guitarist who toured with Mr. Connors in the early 1980s. "Stompin' Tom is a legend," he said. "To play with him was an accomplishment." Mr. McNIVEN, who now works for Statistics Canada but still plays in a country band called Whiskey Jack, has never forgotten the talent and commitment that Mr. Connors brought to his performances.
"He really meant it. He'd be singing, and there were tears running down his face. You'd look out into the audience, and they were crying too."
Although he didn't know Mr. CHAPMAN (hundreds of musicians have toured with Mr. Connors's various bands,) Mr. McNIVEN said he felt a pang of recognition when he heard about the death last week. "He played guitar with Stompin' Tom. I played guitar with Stompin' Tom. In some way we were brothers. We drank from the same cup."
Back at the rooming house where Mr. CHAPMAN died, Mr. MURRAY also reflected on his companion's life and times. "He didn't have a mean bone in his body," said Mr. MURRAY as he drank his fourth tumbler of Silk Tassel scotch. "He was a good guy. But he should have left those wasps alone."
Mr. MURRAY, now 66, spent about 30 years as a professional country musician, playing in clubs and bars and, briefly, for a Montreal-based television show. Like Mr. CHAPMAN was, he's divorced and lives alone with his dusty musical equipment.
"I'm a has-been," he says. "We're all has-beens here.
"Here's to Wayne."

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CHENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
CHENEY, Stuart S.
(Former President of Kroehler Mfg Co Ltd)
Age 91, died peacefully October 26, 2007. Beloved husband of Vivian WHITHAM for 68 years. Surviving, brother Bryce of Ottawa. Loving father of Janne and Ross; Kirk; Neil and Carol; Chris and Jim; six grandchildren.
As expressions of sympathy memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Victorian Order of Nurses through the W.G. Young Funeral Home, Stratford. wgyoungfuneralhome.com

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CHENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-26 published
The humble legend
'He was one of the last of the giants, but his music and contributions will be eternal.' Jazz impresario Quincy Jones 'He was a regular on the French stage, where the public adored his luminous style.' French President Nicolas Sarkozy 'He was the kindest, gentlest, most forgiving person on the face of the earth.' Senator and jazz pianist Tommy Banks
By Peter CHENEY, Page A1
Mississauga -- The street is pleasant but ordinary, and so is the house, a two-storey monument to the forgettable architecture of the late 1960s. There's a two-car garage, a neatly kept lawn and a driveway flanked by a pair of coach lamps. But look closer, and you realize that this is a very special house indeed.
There is a windowless brick addition that looks like a military command centre, and on the front door, carved into the wood so subtly that you might miss it, is the face of one of the world's most famous and respected musicians - jazz legend Oscar PETERSON, once described as "the maharaja of the piano."
Mr. PETERSON, who died this weekend at 82, put Canada on the world musical map and helped forge a new era in race relations. Yet he spent much of his life in a world drawn straight from The Brady Bunch, a universe of suburban tract homes, strip malls and winding avenues with names like King Forrest Drive and Friar Tuck Boulevard.
Although his choice of neighbourhoods surprised many, Mr. PETERSON loved Mississauga. "He felt at home there," said his niece, Sylvia SWEENEY. "It was his world."
Mr. PETERSON's house was tweaked to his special needs. There was a soundproof brick studio that held his Bosendorfer grand piano and multitrack recording suite. The bay windows that faced the street were replaced with opaque glass blocks, to prevent the curious from spying. But this was not the home of a star.
"All he wanted was an ordinary life," Gene LEES, who authored a biography of Mr. PETERSON, said. "He wasn't a celebrity show-off."
To those who knew him best, Mr. PETERSON's address was the result of his love-hate relationship with Canada and its approach to visible minorities. The musician chose Mississauga in the early 1970s after being snubbed by a landlord in Toronto's wealthy Forest Hill neighbourhood who refused to rent to him because he was black.
In the suburbs, Mr. PETERSON found a new, more open society. Although it was largely white, Mississauga seemed more amenable to change, if only because it lacked the crushing social history of downtown Toronto, still a White, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant bastion at the time.
"I think it was a case of not being rejected," Ms. SWEENEY said. "In Mississauga, he got a chance to know his neighbours and build a history together."
Mr. PETERSON, the son of a railroad porter, was a musical icon by the time he reached his mid-20s. He learned to play the piano from his sister Daisy (who went on to become a world-renowned music instructor) and dazzled fans around the world with his impeccable technique and musical imagination. But in Canada, where blacks were still a tiny minority, Mr. PETERSON felt himself largely shut out by a white-dominated musical and cultural establishment that controlled access to key venues - particularly the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which Mr. PETERSON loathed until the end of his life.
Mr. PETERSON played a critical role in the battle for equal rights, using his professional stature and personal dignity to help erode long-standing barriers. Mr. LEES, a former Hamilton Spectator reporter who went on to become the editor of a music magazine and Mr. PETERSON's biographer, met him in 1951, when Mr. PETERSON was caught up in a racial dispute. Mr. LEES was assigned to cover the story when a Hamilton barber refused to cut Mr. PETERSON's hair because he was black.
Mr. LEES came away impressed by Mr. PETERSON's strength of character, and by his humanity. Although he pursued the complaint against the barber because he was offended by the man's prejudiced attitude, Mr. PETERSON later spoke on the barber's behalf when Hamilton city officials moved to revoke his business licence.
"He was never a nasty guy," Mr. LEES said. "And he believed that the point had been made. He was angry about what had happened, but he didn't want to destroy the man. He said: 'This is Canada. Here, the law is on my side.' "
His long Friendship with Mr. PETERSON and other black jazz greats gave Mr. LEES an inside view of the rejection they faced - even though they were wealthy and famous, many experienced racism in its cruellest, rawest form. He remembered how Mr. PETERSON was threatened by redneck Southern sheriffs, and how the manager of a Ritz-Carlton hotel in the 1960s tried to stop him from performing, saying, "That nigger isn't coming into this hotel."
Mr. PETERSON fought racism on several fronts. In the early 1970s, he lobbied to have more minorities on television shows and advertisements, in the belief that white-dominated media marginalized other cultures.
"He thought that kids got their view of the world from what they saw on television," Ms. SWEENEY said. "He was way ahead of his time."
Mr. PETERSON married four times. His first wife was black. The others were white. This surprised Mr. LEES, who believed that Mr. PETERSON had rejected mixed marriage - he had told his biographer that unions between blacks and whites demanded "incredible intellectual unselfishness."
When Mr. LEES asked Mr. PETERSON about his apparent about-face, the musician listened patiently, then explained that Mr. LEES had failed to understand him: "I didn't say I was against it," he said. "I just said it was hard."
To his neighbours in Mississauga, Mr. PETERSON was a compelling figure, an unpretentious, decent man who happened to be a world-renowned musical genius.
"He was very gracious," said Renneth BEGBIE, a retired school teacher who lived next to Mr. PETERSON for 22 years. "So is his family."
Mr. PETERSON wore his fame lightly, Ms. BEGBIE said. He and his wife sent her a Christmas card each year, and apologized for the mess when they landscaped their yard. In return, she treated Mr. PETERSON as he wished - like anybody else.
"That's just common sense," she said. "He was my neighbour. People need to be respected and appreciated for who they are. If Julia Roberts lived next door, I'd do the same thing."
Award highlights
Oscar PETERSON accumulated about 100 awards, prizes and honorary degrees, eight Grammys and two Junos.
1972: Officer, Order of Canada.
1978: Inducted, Juno Hall of Fame.
1984: Companion, Order of Canada.
1992: Governor-General's Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement.
1997: Grammy for Lifetime Achievement and an International Jazz Hall of Fame Award.
1999: Praemium Imperiale Award, the Nobel equivalent for the arts.
2000: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization International Music Prize.

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CHEPESIUK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-01 published
CHEPESIUK, Martin Wm., M.D.
August 1, 2003.
Treasured forever in our memories.
Anna, Bill, Martin, family and Friends.

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CHERREY o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-02 published
WILSON, Maretta Veronica (formerly TASKER, CHERREY, née MacLEAN)
Maretta Veronica WILSON (née MacLEAN,) of R.R.#2, Connecticut, passed away peacefully at Groves Memorial Hospital, Fergus, on Saturday, October 20, 2007 in her 74th year.
Beloved wife of Stuart WILSON, the late Donald TASKER (1987) and the late Russell CHERREY (1993.) Loving mother of Richard CHERREY and his wife Diane of Walkerton, Raymond CHERREY and his wife Ruby of Hanover, Kathy WINFIELD and her husband Carl of New Hamburg, Bonnie SIMPSON of Breslau, Lynda TALBOT and her husband Greg of Durham, Michael TASKER and his wife Valerie of Alma, Dan TASKER and his wife Jessica of Arthur, Jack TASKER and his wife Corina of Waterloo and Kelli HILL of Harriston.
Stepmother of Rob WILSON and his friend Crystal of R.R.#2, Conn and Christine WILSON and Ray of Winchester.
Fondly remembered by her 22 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren.
Sister of William REAMAN and his wife Marilyn of Port Dover.
The family received Friends at the Heritage Funeral Home, Drayton on Monday, October 22, 2007. Rev. Dave TIESSEN conducted the Funeral Service in the Community Mennonite Fellowship Church, Drayton, on Tuesday, October 23, 2007 at 2 p.m. Interment Drayton Cemetery.

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CHERWAIKO o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2007-11-16 published
CHERWAIKO, Anthony " Tony"
Peacefully at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital on Monday November 12, 2007 in his 72nd year. Tony, loving husband to Elsie of 47 years. Dad will be forever remembered by his children Tim of Mississauga, Trevor (Jean) of Georgetown and Tracey MEYER (Paul) of Coboconk. Dear Grandpa of Aaron, Courtney, Brady, Cameron and Kealyn. Tony is survived by 3 sisters Olga BRACK of Wasaga Beach, Lena WASYLNCHUK (Nestor) of Dundalk and Rose HAMANN of Minnesota and one brother Joe of Mississauga. Predeceased by 3 sisters and 3 brothers. Tony's memory will forever be cherished and my love for him will never fade. Friends may call at the Watts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 132 River Road East Wasaga Beach (1 block East of Main Street) 705-429-1040 Wednesday November 14, 2007 from 7-9 p.m. and Thursday November 15, 2007 from 12-2 p.m. Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel Thursday November 15, 2007 at 2 p.m. Donations to the Royal Victoria Hospital Oncology or the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital would be appreciated.
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CHERWAIKO o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-11-14 published
CHERWAIKO, Anthony " Tony"
Peacefully at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital on Monday November 12, 2007 in his 72nd year. Tony, loving husband to Elsie of 47 years. Dad will be forever remembered by his children Tim of Mississauga, Trevor (Jean) of Georgetown and Tracey MEYER (Paul) of Coboconk. Dear Grandpa of Aaron, Courtney, Brady, Cameron and Kealyn. Tony is survived by 3 sisters Olga BRACK of Wasaga Beach, Lena WASYLNCHUK (Nestor) of Dundalk and Rose HAMANN of Minnesota and one brother Joe of Mississauga. Predeceased by 3 sisters and 3 brothers. Tony's memory will forever be cherished and my love for him will never fade. Friends may call at the Watts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 132 River Road East Wasaga Beach (1 block East of Main Street) 705-429-1040 Wednesday November 14, 2007 from 7-9 p.m. and Thursday November 15, 2007 from 12-2 p.m. Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel Thursday November 15, 2007 at 2 p.m. Donations to the Royal Victoria Hospital Oncology or the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital would be appreciated.
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CHERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-22 published
SPENCE, Miriam
Passed away peacefully in her sleep on June 20, 2007 at York Central Hospital in her 86th year. She will be lovingly remembered by her sister-in-law Betty SPENCE, cousin Jean WATSON, nieces and nephews Wendy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Don), Deb MAARHUIS (Marty), Rick HAYES, Jan WAINRIGHT (Vic), Sue CHERY (Brian), Bruce SPENCE and David SPENCE (Ami.) " Auntie Mir" will be fondly remembered by her great nieces and nephews Rebecca, Ryan, Mark, Lesley, Chris, Kevin, Jeff, Jon, Shawn, Lisa and Jamie. Predeceased by her siblings Malcolm, Phylis, Bob, Elspeth, Catherine and Keith. Miriam taught for over 30 years, mostly in North York and was a member of R.T.O./ R.W.T.O. She leaves behind a network of wonderful and caring Friends who will miss her dearly. Friends may call at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge St. south of Steeles, at Goulding) on Monday June 25, 2007 at 10 a.m. A memorial service will be held in the funeral home chapel at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Drummond Hill Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to Canadian Cancer Society, Heart and Stroke Foundation or A.L.S. Society.
Condolences to www.rskane.ca

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CHESHIRE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-13 published
COULTER, Franklin Edgar (1915-2006)
Dr. Frank COULTER passed peacefully on December 10, 2006 after a brief stay in hospital in his 91st year. Beloved husband of the late Bernice COULTER (née CHESHIRE.) Loving father of Beverley SIDORCHUK, and Carol JOLIE (Phil.) Cherished grandfather of Jennifer WILLIAMS (Rick) and Dan JOLIE. Dear brother of Marilyn COULTER (Ed FRANTZKE) and the late Eleanor STREBE. Uncle Frank to many nieces, nephews and Friends. Doctor COULTER practiced dentistry for 46 years in West Toronto's Junction and was a long time summer resident of Sundridge, Ontario. A soft spoken gentleman, Frank will be remembered for his quick wit and gentle touch in dentistry. Cremation was chosen in accordance with his wishes. There will be a memorial open house at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere east of the Jane subway on Friday, January 19, 2007 between 1 and 3 p.m., followed by interment at Park Lawn Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or a charity of one's choice would be appreciated, in lieu of flowers.

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CHESLEA o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-05-30 published
ENDICOTT, Velma Olive
Passed away on Tuesday May 22, 2007 at Blue Mountain Manor, Stayner in her 88th year. Velma of Stayner, beloved mother of Doug (Ann) of Stayner and Elaine KUBOTA of Mississauga. Dear grandmother of Craig, Michael, Carol, Bradley (Wendy,) Kathleen (Howard ENROS) and Kristine (Jeff CHESLEA) and great-grandmother of Dylan and Cayln. Loving sister of Ralph TREBELL. Predeceased by her brother Clare TREBELL. Friends will be received at the Turner and Porter “Peel Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy 10 N of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 2 p.m. on Saturday June 2nd for a Memorial Service in the Chapel at 3 o'clock. Remembrances to the Simcoe - Muskoka Regional Cancer Centre, Royal Victoria Hospital Foundation, 201 Georgian Drive Barrie, Ontario L4M 6M2 would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements under the direction of Carruthers and Davidson Funerral Home, Stayner (705-428-2637)
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CHESLOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-03 published
GASEE, Lillian
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Lillian GASEE on Friday, August 31, 2007 at North York General Hospital. Lillian GASEE beloved wife of the late Henry GASEE. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Bob BAKER of Collingwood, Larry BAKER of Wyoming, and Jerry GASEE and Joan CHIN- GASEE. Devoted sister and sister-in-law of Irene and the late Dan CHESLOW, Anne and the late Sid TOPP, Mildred and the late Irving PERSOFSKY, and the late Mary and Dave KALNITSKY. Most adored grandmother of Marla BAKER and Brian SILVERSTEIN, and Jonathan BAKER. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Monday, September 3, 2007 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Adath Israel Synagogue section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation 1-888-473-4636.

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CHESNEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-01 published
STURGIS, Lillian Jean (formerly CHESNEY, née LAW)
Age 74 of Dresden passed away Saturday, December 30, 2006 at Chatham-Kent Health Alliance, Public General Campus. She was born in Chatham daughter of the late George and Nellie QUICK) LAW. Lillian was a member of Evangel Pentecostal Tabernacle, Dresden. Beloved wife of Bill STURGIS; loving mother of Debbie and Peter EPP of Dresden and Jeff Chesney and Carrie BROWNING of Dresden dear step-mother of Patricia and Doug VANDENBROEK of Huntsville and Paula and Al CECCACCI of Chatham; special grandmother of Kristen EPP of Toronto, Nicholas EPP of Dresden and Lisa CAMPBELL of Corunna; dear step-grandmother of William CECCACCI of Chatham. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by her first husband William CHESNEY (1986.) Friends will be received at the Thomas L. DeBurger Funeral Home, 620 Cross Street, Dresden on Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted from the Evangel Pentecostal Tabernacle, Dresden on Tuesday, January 2, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. with Rev. Robert ELKA officiating. Interment in Dresden Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made by cheque to Gideon Bibles or Teen Challenge. Online condolences and memorial contributions may be left at www.deburgerfuneralhome.com.

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CHESNIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-30 published
COOPER, Joanna
On Tuesday, November 27, 2007. Joanna COOPER, precious daughter of Debby CHESNIE- COOPER and Daniel COOPER. Devoted granddaughter of Henrietta CHESNIE. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Neri and Peter SLAN, and David COOPER. Loving aunt of Joshua and Adam. Loved niece of Brian CHESNIE, and Dorith COOPER and David REDGRAVE. Fondly remembered by Ana FERRARO. At Holy Blossom Temple, 1950 Bathurst Street, (Bathurst south of Eglinton) for service on Friday, November 30, 2007 at 12: 30 p.m. Interment Holy Blossom Memorial Park. Shiva 129 Edith Drive. Donations may be made to the Joanna COOPER Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324, www.benjamins.ca

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CHESNUT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
SAYERS, William Alexander (December 29, 1921-January 1, 2007)
After spending a wonderful Christmas at home with family and celebrating his 85th birthday, our beloved husband, father and grandfather, passed away peacefully at Riverview Health Centre on the morning of January 1, 2007. Bill will be deeply missed by his loving wife Kay of 52 years; daughters Pat BRENTNALL (Leonard) and Janet IRWIN (Drew;) sons Gordon (Sharon) and Glenn (Cathy) grandchildren Cole, Craig, Kaley, Andrea, Trent, Lee, Liam and Megan; brother Bob (Olive;) sister-in-law Lucy MOTTOLA; brothers-in-law Joe CANTAFIO (Louise), Till CANTAFIO (Lucille), Tony CANTAFIO (May) and Peter CANTAFIO; cousin Gaylene CHESNUT (Brian) and numerous nieces and nephews. Bill was born in Winnipeg on December 29, 1921, at the Victoria Hospital. He grew up on Garfield St. and at the age of 19, enlisted in the Royal Canadian Artillery, serving his country in World War 2. Bill and Kay settled in Fort Garry and raised their family. Bill was an employee of the Federal Government for 34 years until his retirement. His greatest enjoyment was to spend time with his family and Friends both at home and at the cottage on Engineer Lake. He loved to laugh and had a flair for story telling. Music was his passion and he was a talented musician capable of playing a variety of instruments. We will forever miss you, but will always cherish the memories of you laughing, singing and playing music. Special thanks to Gaylene and Brian, Barb and Dave Ahronson, Monika and Bill Gerullis for all your support. Our family would like to thank the staff at the Victoria Hospital 4 south and Riverview Health Centre 3 East for their kind care during these last weeks. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Manitoba Lung Association, 629 McDermot Ave, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1P6 or the Canadian Cancer Society, 193 Sherbrook St, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3C 9Z9. At Bill's request cremation has taken place and a private family service was held. Thomson 'In The Park' Funeral Home And Cemetery 1291 McGillivray Blvd, Winnipeg, Manitoba www.thomsoninthepark.com (204) 925-1120

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CHESSELL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-30 published
RICHARDS, Ronald William
Ron RICHARDS, loving husband of Eileen Heaver KEANE, of Meaford, passed away peacefully at Meaford Hospital on Saturday, July 28, 2007 at the age of 74. Dear father of Wayne (Jackie) of Hepworth, Karen (Doug) CHAPPLE, Gail (Terry) FISHER, and Diane (Greg) ELFORD all of Meaford. Step-father of Joan (Tom) CHESSELL of Ajax and Linda KEANE of Australia. Lovingly remembered by 13 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by parents Albert and Edith RICHARDS, brothers Jim, Al and Bev, a sister Marg ANDERSON and an infant son Brian. Survived by a brother, Gary (Deb) of Owen Sound. In keeping with Ron's wishes, cremation has taken place and a family funeral service will be conducted at the Ferguson Funeral Home in Meaford on Thursday, August 2, 2007 with interment of Ron's ashes to follow at Lakeview Cemetery. In lieu of flowers and as your expression of sympathy, donations to the Diabetes Association would be appreciated.

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CHESTER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-15 published
HUBERT, Cody Douglas
At his home in Brampton, on Wednesday, November 14th, 2007 at the age of 28 years, Cody HUBERT of Brampton and formerly of Port Elgin. Loving husband of the former Melissa PENNARUN. Dear son of Lynda HUBERT and her partner Rick ADAM/ADAMS of Port Elgin, and Doug HUBERT of Southampton. Brother of Kelly and her husband Mike MAHONEY of Port Elgin. He will be missed by his grandmothers, Ethel DOUCETTE of Drayton, and Edna HUBERT of Cambridge. Son-in-law of Mark and Debbie PENNARUN of Port Elgin. Brother-in-law of Lisa and her husband Steven FLOYD of London and Laurie and her husband Jamie MOORE of Burlington. Uncle of Ryan MAHONEY and Jordon MAHONEY. He is also survived by many aunts and uncles. He is predeceased by his grandfathers, Howard DOUCETTE and Lawrence HUBERT. Friends may call at the Port Elgin Missionary Church, corner of Green St. and Bricker St. from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9: 00 p.m. on Thursday, November 15th, 2007. Funeral services will be conducted in the church on Friday at 2: 00 p.m. with Pastor Mark CHESTER officiating. Memorial contributions to World Vision or Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Funeral arrangements in the care of the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 519-832-2222. Portrait and memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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CHESTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-13 published
NIHON, Robert Alexis
It is with infinite sadness that we announce that Robert Alexis NIHON, son of the late Alexis NIHON and Alice NIHON (née ROBERT,) passed away suddenly on the morning of August 10. 2007, at the age of 57. He is survived by members of his immediate family, his wife Carolyn, and his two sons, Robert II and Gregory, and his step-daughter Montanna CHESTER, his brother Alexis II (Cornelia,) his sister Claudette and many nieces and nephews. He will also be sorely missed by his countless Friends all over the world. Bob NIHON - as his Friends knew him - was often described as larger than life, and his kind and generous spirit will remain with us. Mr. NIHON engaged in diverse business initiatives as a merchant banker and entrepreneur. His successful stewardship of the real estate company named for his father, the late Alexis NIHON, has been well documented. His other successful ventures in all corners of the globe ranged from financial services to mining to real estate to technology. Notably, Mr. NIHON had recently assembled for his Family Office (Nihon Global Partners) an advisory Leadership Council comprised of many former world leaders and senior business leaders. Mr. NIHON was the Honorary Consul for Canada to The Bahamas from 1997 to 2006. He was also a member of the New York Stock Exchange in the 1980's. In 2002, Mr. NIHON was awarded Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II's Golden Jubilee Medal for his significant contribution to Canada abroad. Mr. NIHON was a philanthropist and as such very proud to support a vast array of charities in the Bahamas, Canada and abroad, especially those supportive of children and youth initiatives. Among others, he had been serving since 1987 as the Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Governor General's Youth Awards program for the Bahamas and as a Director of the Canadian Lyford Cay Foundation. Mr. NIHON was a tremendous athlete, with a great love of tennis and golf and, in earlier days, of broomball, racquetball, and squash. He was also a diver, a fisherman, and a yachtsman, and he was most in his element captaining Friends and family on the waters near his home in Nassau, Bahamas. He was also very proud to have wrestled in the 1968 Summer Olympic Games in Mexico City, and in the 1970 Commonwealth Games in Edinburgh, Scotland. Mr. NIHON was a loving and loyal father, husband and friend and this is how he will be celebrated, admired and remembered by all those who knew and loved him. The family will receive condolences at the J.J. Cardinal Funeral Home, 560 Lakeshore Drive, Dorval, Quebec, (514) 631-1511) on Sunday, August 12th from 7 to 10 p.m. and on Monday, August 13th, from 2 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 10 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday, August 14th at 11 a.m. at l'Église de La Présentation at 665 de L'Église, Dorval, Quebec. A Memorial Service will also be held in Nassau, Bahamas at a time and place to be communicated at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Governor General's Youth Award (Endowment Fund) for the Bahamas (c/o Mr. Graham Cooper, P.O. Box N-8160, Nassau, Bahamas, +1 242 322 2504).

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CHESTER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-04 published
MANDELL, Claire
In her 93rd year on Sunday, December 2, 2007 at Baycrest. Claire MANDELL, beloved wife of the late Max MANDELL. Cherished mother and mother-in-law of Sherry MANDELL- SHAPIRO and Garry SHAPIRO. Dear sister of the late Ida EDISON, Molly CHESTER, and Ethel SHER. Loving grandmother of Jeffrey GLICKMAN and Sharon BAR- DAYAN, Aaron and Joanne GLICKMAN, and Mitchell and Samantha GLICKMAN. Adoring great-grandmother of Sonny, Dylan, and Joel. At Temple Sinai, 210 Wilson Avenue for service on Wednesday, December 5th, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Mozierer Sick Benefit Society Section of Roselawn Cemetery. Shiva 73 Walmer Road. Memorial donations may be made to the Claire Mandell Memorial Fund c/o The Baycrest Foundation, 416-785-2875.

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CHESTNUT o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-09-12 published
STAINTON, Robert Harvey
Born January 16, 1932, passed away peacefully at his home in New Lowell on Friday, August 31, 2007. Beloved husband of Mary (née CHESTNUT;) son of Pitt and Lulu; Loving father of Linda and Ed, Heather and the late Boyd, Peggy and Brent, Rob and Jill, Trish and Mike. Robert will be lovingly missed by his grandchildren Justin, Natalie (Steve), Donovan, Jake, Lyle, Karl, Ryan (Fawne), Jessica (Derek), Megan, Ashley, Brittany, Braydon, Conner, Robbie, Hannah, Sam, Jodie and great-grandchildren Paul, Keira, Madison, Stone and Gage. Dear brother of Doug, Stew, Jessie and the late Ruth. A memorial service was held on Monday, September 3, 2007 at the New Lowell Legion at 3: 00 p.m. If desired, donations in Mr. Stainton's name may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Royal Victoria Hospital Regional Cancer Center. Please visit the on-line memorial book at www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com
Page 14

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CHESWICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-03 published
GILLING, Kathleen Margaret Ruth (formerly ENGLISH, née WESTMAN)
Kathleen Margaret Ruth GILLING (née WESTMAN, formerly ENGLISH), daughter of Thomas WESTMAN and Florence COLLETT of Ottawa and Toronto, died in Saint_John's, Newfoundland, on October 26, 2007.
She was predeceased by her husband Basil Redvers ENGLISH, Rector of the Church of St. Aidan, Queen Street East, Toronto (1960) by her husband Walter GILLING, Dean of Saint_James Cathedral (1990) by her daughter Margaret FRAZER, Curator of the Byzantine Collection, Metropolitan Museum, New York (1999); and by her seven Westman siblings: Winnifred, Florence, Viola, Arthur, George, Roberts, Evelyn.
A devoted student of art and art history, she taught at Western Preparatory School, Forest Hill, was head of the Art Department of Earl Haig Collegiate, and from 1964 to 1967 Associate Professor and head of the Art Department of Althouse College of Education, University of Western Ontario. In a long and spirited life spent largely in Toronto, she was active in support of the Georgina Houses of the Anglican Church, and greatly enjoyed duplicate bridge, golf, opera, ballet, theatre, and international travel.
She is survived by her son Christopher ENGLISH (Jean GUTHRIE,) Saint_John's, and grandchildren Katinka ENGLISH, Sudbury; Ellen ENGLISH, Halifax; Martha WORTH (Thomas) and Andrew FRAZER, North Carolina; Zoë CHESWICK (Dan,) Brooklyn; and great-grand_son, Rowan WORTH. Special niece Francess HALPENNY and nephew C. Robert SENIOR were generously supportive in her final years. In Saint_John's Mary Connors and Una Marsden gave the best of care.
Donations in her memory may be made to the Anglican Church of Canada, 60 Hayden Street, Toronto, M4Y 3G2. A memorial service will be held in Toronto later.

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CHEUNG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-22 published
RAWNSLEY, Fleur " Pat"
Passed away peacefully on Monday, September 17th at the age of 77, after a short but gallant battle with Leukemia. She will be deeply missed by Gordon her husband of 53 years and sorrowfully by sister Doreen and her husband Byron PEEBLES, in-laws Doris and Bob LYALL and Shirley DE FOE. Cherished aunt to Diane and Kalle, Larry and Martha, Pam and Tim, Dawn and Steve, Scott, Michael, Michelle and Tim. Cousins Bob, Marion, Tom and especially Betty and Barb who were so attentive. Known affectionately as Pat by family and Friends, she was blessed with an engaging personality, an infectious smile that would light up the room, a love for the written and spoken word, a delightful sense of humour, and an abundance of common sense. Special thanks to her oncologist Dr. Matthew CHEUNG, nurse John and the other caring and compassionate nurses in haematology at Sunnybrook Hospital. A celebration in her honour will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East). Please call funeral home for service dates and times. A reception will follow in the Bayview Room. If desired, in lieu of flowers, a donation to Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Oncology, 2075 Bayview Ave., Toronto M4N 3M5 in her memory would be appreciated. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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CHEVALIER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-10 published
ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Captain William T. “Smokey&rdquo
At the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound Thursday afternoon August 9, 2007. Smokey ELLIOT/ELLIOTT of Oliphant formerly of Thorold and Port Colborne in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Anne (GANTSCHNIG) and the late Joyce (ASTLES.) Dear father of Larry of Thorold, Bill (Dianne) of Sarnia, Wayne (Patti) of R.R.#3, Bayfield, Bryan (Lori) of Port Colborne and Bruce of Goderich. Loving grandfather of Dylan, Kyle, Bill, Matthew, John, Wendi, Laura, Taylor and great-grand_son Nick. Brother of Loreen CHEVALIER and Bob ELLIOT/ELLIOTT both of Port Colborne. Predeceased by his sisters Isobel COOK, Thyra SOUCY and brothers Jim and Steve ELLIOT/ELLIOTT. Smokey began sailing in 1943 with Scott Misener Steamships, served 26 years as Captain and retired in 1986 as Commodore of the Fleet. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated from Saint Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church, Wiarton Monday morning at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Balsam Grove Cemetery, Oliphant. Expressions of remembrance to the Wiarton Hospital or the Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound would be appreciated. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Smokey by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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CHEVALIER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-06 published
THIBERT, Eugene F.
77 years, of Tilbury, at University Hospital, London on Thursday, January 4, 2007. Beloved husband of Cordelia "Toby" (née BELAIR.) Loving father of Annette and husband Brian CURTIS. Dearest grandfather of Marie GAUDREAU and spouse Ian KELLY, Ben CURTIS and wife Julie, Jason CURTIS, and great-grandfather of Zachery KELLY, and Cameron and Ryan CURTIS. Predeceased by parents Anthony THIBERT (1977) and Marie (CHARRON) THIBERT (1972.) Dearest brother of the late Margaret CHEVALIER (1989) (Mid-1991,) the late George THIBERT (2003) (Cecile,) Alfred (Edna) THIBERT, the late Leo THIBERT (2001) (Marcella,) Theresa WATSON (Dave-1979,) James (Marcella) THIBERT, all of Tilbury, Marie LEVESQUE of McGregor (Andre-2001.) Dear brother-in-law of Orise TELLIER, the late Agatha CHOUINARD (2005,) Velina SHEEHAN, Jeanne THIBERT, Louise BROSSEAU, Carmelle GAGE. Eugene was owner and operator of Thibert's Abattoir in Tilbury from 1961 until 1983, and was Fire Chief of Tilbury from 1959 to 1992. Eugene was a member of Canadian Association of Fire Chiefs, Ontario Fire Chiefs Association, and Ontario Retirees, and was past president of Kent County Association of Fire Chiefs, and Essex County Association of Fire Chiefs. He was a member of Tilbury Knights of Columbus Third and Fourth Degree. Visitation at Reaume Funeral Home, 6 Canal St. W., Tilbury Saturday from 7-9 p.m., Sunday from 2-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Parish prayers 3 p.m. Sunday. Third and Fourth Degree Knights of Columbus prayers 8: 30 p.m. Sunday. Funeral service from the funeral home Monday, January 8, 2007 at 10 a.m., then to St. Francis Xavier Church, Tilbury for Mass at 10: 30 a.m. Interment at St. Francis Xavier Cemetery. Donations to Saint_Joseph's-Regional Mental Health Care London or Alzheimer Society appreciated.

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CHEVRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-20 published
CHEVRIER, Don (1938-2007)
It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden and unexpected passing of our father Don CHEVRIER. Don will be deeply missed by his sons, Malcolm, Tim, (Kathilee) and Jeff, (Brenda) and his daughter Melanie, (Bill) and his six grandchildren; Michael, Travis, Justin, Riley, Julia and Colin, as well as his former wife and close friend Donna. While Don was widely known for his distinctive voice, and his incredibly versatile broadcasting skills -- Don was a loving father and grandfather first and foremost. Classy and kind-hearted, witty and possessing great story telling skills and a great sense of humor, he was a private and conservative man who loved his family very much. He was also a very positive person, preferring to be upbeat and positive, even in the face of any of the usual problems people normally face from time to time in life.
Living in Florida, he loved his dog Barkley and was very tender and caring to us all, flying up to visit us in Canada as often as he could and always making the effort to stay in contact. With his daughter Melanie living nearby, Don always had an eye on the family in Canada especially when it came to Canadian winters! His sharp mind, smooth voice, extensive sports knowledge and above all -- his experience and professionalism kept him in demand professionally up until his passing. Dad, Grandpa, Don, we love you and our hearts are filled with profound thanks, respect, and the deepest sorrow for your passing. You will be remembered always.
Funeral and memorial services will be announced once arrangements have been made. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada and The Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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CHEVRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-20 published
He was the voice of the Blue Jays and 'a producer's dream'
Blessed with a rich voice and split-second timing, he covered Toronto's major-league baseball team for decades. Over the years, he also manned microphones for ABC, NBC and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation,
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, with files from Canadian Press, Page S8
Toronto -- Don CHEVRIER had two things going for him. He was born with one of them; he learned the other.
The deep voice booming out from his 6-foot-2-plus frame made his life easier as a sports announcer, and he came to use it like an instrument. And he had split-second timing, which is essential in live television. That was a trick he learned. When the word came from the control room to stretch a broadcast, he could keep talking without losing a beat. If things had to be shorter, he could do language arithmetic in his head and cut words on the fly.
"His great gift was that wonderful deep voice, but he also knew how to use it," said Tom McKee, who first worked with Mr. CHEVRIER as an announcer covering the Toronto Blue Jays, and then as a producer who called the shots from the control room.
"Chevy was a producer's dream. When you asked him to shave seven seconds off, he could do it without the audience ever knowing. If you needed some fill, he added as much time as you wanted. He was unique," said Mr. McKee, who directed Mr. CHEVRIER for about 10 years.
On April 7, 1977, he became the announcer on the first Toronto Blue Jays broadcast. The game was one of the most interesting he ever called. Not only was it the start of major-league baseball in Toronto, but it snowed that day at the old Canadian National Exhibition stadium.
Then the Blue Jays beat the Chicago White Sox 9-5, and an excited Mr. CHEVRIER described two home runs by Doug Ault that helped win the game. The rest of the season was nowhere near as thrilling, as the Blue Jays finished in last place.
Jays president Paul GODFREY described Mr. CHEVRIER as one of the pillars of the organization's early days. For one thing, he managed to make the games more exciting than they really were in that inaugural season. "When the team loses 100 games in its first year, the television broadcaster has to make sure the fans keep coming back, even though they were outclassed by most of the opposition," he said.
Mr. CHEVRIER went on to broadcast Blue Jays games until about 1990, returning from time to time to make guest appearances. By all accounts, his last Jays broadcast was made for CTV in 1996.
Don CHEVRIER was raised in Edmonton. Despite a lifelong fascination with sports, he was never much of an athlete, by his own admission. "I decided when I was 15 there was an easier way to earn a living than by running up and down a field or skating in a rink, so I became a sportscaster," he once told The Globe and Mail.
He started broadcasting while still a teenager, describing the action of live high-school sports on the radio. Neighbour Robert Goulet, the future Broadway star, helped him land his first real job, with radio station CJCA in Edmonton, where he was paid about $30 a week to write the sports program and announce scores.
For a while, he had plans to attend university but somehow stayed glued to the microphone. "The manager of the station talked my mother out of it, saying, 'He'll learn far more on the job here with us if he goes full-time than he would at college.' He was exactly right," Mr. CHEVRIER once said. "I wasn't quite 17 when I started. I got $125 a month to start and when I went full-time I got $225, and thought I had all the money in the world."
By the time he was 20, he was the voice of the Canadian Football League's Edmonton Eskimos, doing play-by-play for home games.
After Edmonton, Mr. CHEVRIER began the wandering minstrel act of the young broadcaster, jumping from station to station and city to city in pursuit of bigger paycheques and a bigger market. He worked at CFRA in Ottawa, where along with doing daily sportscasts he called live coverage of the Ottawa Roughrider games.
His next stop was CJAD in Montreal, where he was given the rather grand title of sports director. It was a fancy job description for announcer.
In 1966, Mr. CHEVRIER joined Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto, working in radio and then television. The next year, he became a front-line network sportscaster and never looked back. He was 29 and making $60,000 a year, a phenomenal amount of money at a time when Statistics Canada put the average annual male salary at $5,334.
The bulk of Mr. CHEVRIER's earnings came not from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, but from ABC in the United States, where he was the anchorman on the weekend radio show, World of Sports. He commuted to New York, leaving Toronto every Friday night and arriving home before midnight on Sunday.
At ABC, Mr. CHEVRIER didn't do play-by-play, the kind of work he liked best. Instead, he was the anchor of five-minute segments, talking to sports personalities and reporters in the studio or on the phone. Every weekend, he did doing 22 separate segments. It was hard work and he earned his money.
By 1970, he was doing play-by-play commentary for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television games in the eastern division of the Canadian Football League.
When the Olympics were in Montreal in 1976, he served as the commentator for boxing events, including the gold-medal win by (Sugar) Ray Leonard. He also worked with renowned American sportscaster Howard Cosell.
Over the years he covered every sport imaginable, including synchronized swimming. (He joked to one of his colleagues that in general, swimming wasn't difficult - you just had to put one arm in front of the other.) If he had one disappointment, it was that he never got to do Hockey Night in Canada - for sports broadcasters, the biggest job in the country.
By all accounts, his punishing schedule and peripatetic, sportscasting lifestyle put a strain on personal relationships. Along the way he met a young woman named Donna, and fell in love. They married, but later divorced.
He also had few hobbies outside of sports. Unlike many of his colleagues, he seldom played golf. Chevy, as he was known to his Friends and his fans, did love to visit Las Vegas to play the slot machines. "He actually won a lot of money in Vegas," said a friend.
In 1992, he retired and moved to Florida, but liked to keep his hand in broadcasting. At first, he hoped to land an on-air spot for the Tampa Bay Lightning when they were an expansion team in the National Hockey League. It would have been an easy commute his home in Palm Harbor was just a half-hour drive from Tampa. Instead, he became one the first announcers to cover the games of the Ottawa Senators, which was also new to the league. It turned out to be a much longer commute.
Semi-retirement suited him. Even though he went without full-time gigs, he had always been a hustler and managed to make a good living. He resumed his old association with ABC radio and the network put a special line into his house that allowed him to broadcast from there -- to listeners, it sounded as if he was in a studio. He did much the same work he had done in New York 25 years earlier, but without ever leaving home.
"He was making more money working weekends than he did full-time back in Canada," said friend and colleague Steve Armitage.
Mr. CHEVRIER's great voice and fluid commentary, along with his connections in sports broadcasting, meant his name was always on the radar when someone was needed. In 2002, he was back broadcasting at the Olympics. "He made a comeback of sorts in television," said Mr. Armitage, a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation sportscaster based in Vancouver. "Don was NBC's curling commentator at Salt Lake City. They didn't realize curling would be so popular." Many colleagues credit Mr. CHEVRIER's commentary for that popularity.
Four years later, he returned to NBC to cover curling at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin. The network was planning to use him again at the 2010 Games in British Columbia.
Donald Barry CHEVRIER was born in Toronto on December 29, 1937. He died on December 17, 2007, in Florida of complications from a blood condition. He was 69. He is survived by son, Jeff, and daughter, Melanie.

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CHEVRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-24 published
Curling a constant in CHEVRIER's diverse broadcasting career
By Bob WEEKS, Page S4
Most of the obituaries of legendary broadcaster Don CHEVRIER, who died this week, pointed out he was the play-by-play man of the first broadcast of Blue Jays baseball. There were also numerous references to his work with the Ottawa Senators, in boxing and at the Olympics.
But if the truth be known, Canadians probably remember CHEVRIER best for his work on curling.
Chevy started his curling work in 1972 at the Brier in Saint_John's, alongside Don DUGUID, who had just come off back-to-back Canadian and world championship victories. The two were inseparable on curling broadcasts for the next decade, becoming icons in the sport.
The partnership extended beyond their work. They remained fast Friends long after the red light went out, and DUGUID was hit hard by the sudden passing.
"I'm pretty shattered," he said from his home in Winnipeg. "I played golf in Florida about a month ago and Chevy came over for dinner. He was fine then."
CHEVRIER had been battling a blood disorder but DUGUID said that the cause of his death was still undetermined.
On air, DUGUID learned what so many other colour commentators came to know over the years. "He was just masterful," DUGUID said. "He had impeccable timing. The producer would tell him he had 25 seconds until a commercial and he'd fill 25 exactly."
DUGUID also praised his tremendous memory; CHEVRIER could come up with the most unusual statistic or memory with instant recall.
Back in 1972, events such as the Brier weren't given the wall-to-wall coverage they are today. DUGUID and CHEVRIER would call the last two games of the round robin - there was no playoff at that time - and also provide a 15-minute recap that aired late at night during the week.
The two also worked together on the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Curling Classic, a popular made-for-television program that showed condensed, taped games on a weekly basis.
CHEVRIER not only called the biggest curling games, but he played the sport, joining a team with Canadian Football League legend Russ Jackson and curling entrepreneur Doug Maxwell at the Humber Highland Curling Club in Toronto.
When he left Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, CHEVRIER didn't leave curling. In 1986, TSN took to the air and curling was a large part of its programming. CHEVRIER got the call to work some of those events including the '86 Mixed, where he teamed up with Ray Turnbull, who was making his television debut. Like DUGUID, Turnbull marvelled at CHEVRIER's talent.
"He had vocal cords to end all vocal cords," Turnbull recalled. "You could hear that voice all over the rink."
Turnbull recalled that first event, played at Toronto's Bayview Country Club, where he was the subject of a rookie initiation, instigated by CHEVRIER.
"We were standing on the ice at Bayview in front of the camera, about to go live. The red light goes on and Chevy starts into his intro. I was listening to him and trying to think of what I was going to say. All of a sudden he stops, looks at me and says, 'Ah [screw] it Moosey, you do this,' " said Turnbull, who is known in curling circles as Moosey.
"I went white. I assumed we were on live. But it was a setup - the guys were having one over on the rookie."
After moving to the United States and covering everything from title fights with Howard Cosell to the Kentucky Derby, CHEVRIER was reunited with DUGUID to call curling for NBC cable at the 2002 and 2006 Winter Olympics. In Turin, the duo called a whopping 26 games, 15 of them live and gained an almost cult following in the United States.
While DUGUID was mourning the loss of his good friend, he also provided an update on another curling-broadcast legend, Don Wittman, who replaced CHEVRIER and continued on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's coverage until this year. Wittman is battling cancer at his home in Winnipeg.
"He's very upbeat," DUGUID said. "It's a struggle, but he's staying positive."
Just as CHEVRIER was, Wittman is as versatile a broadcaster as there is, providing the call for everything from Donovan Bailey's gold-medal sprint and the famous brawl at the 1987 world junior hockey championship.
But for curling fans, both of them are always going to be best known for their work calling rocks and brooms.

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