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"BOO" 2007 Obituary


BOOAST  BOODY  BOOKMAN  BOOM  BOOMER  BOONE  BOORNE  BOOS  BOOSE  BOOTH  BOOTHMAN 

BOOAST o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
BOOAST, Thelma
In loving memory of a dear wife, mother and grandmother Thelma who passed away January 8th, 1987. Deep in our hearts you will always stay, Loved and remembered every day. Deeply missed by husband Gord, daughter Saranne and husband Jim, granddaughter Kim and husband George.

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BOODY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-06 published
BOODY, David Gordon
Unexpectedly, in Toronto, on Wednesday, October 3, 2007. Husband of Margarita. Loving father to Matthew Christopher and Lois Cristina. son of Helen and the late Gordon. David will be missed by his brother and sisters Joan (Augusto) MEDINA, Anne (George) HORWOOD, Lois HOUSTON, Ken (Nancy) BOODY, Florence (Cameron) HUNTER, and Jane ARMSTRONG. He will be fondly remembered by 15 nieces and nephews. A private family service was held. Interment Glendale Memorial Gardens. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 416-231-2283. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be greatly appreciated.

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BOOKMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-06 published
HERMAN, Carl Joseph
Passed away peacefully September 4, 2007 at home in his 85th year. Husband of Fran, father of Ted, Rob (Shelley), Eve (Michael) brother of Shoshana COLE (the late Doctor Lou COLE,) the late Ted HERMAN and the late Louis HERMAN (Miriam BOOKMAN;) grandfather of Leah and Jenna. Former teacher at Etobicoke Collegiate Institute. He will be missed and remembered with a smile. He leaves us all with wonderful memories of a great fun man. Memorial Services will be held at a later date. Family and Friends welcome to visit at 495 Oriole Parkway between 2: 00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m., until Sunday, September 9, 2007. Anyone wishing to make a donation can contribute to the Herman Children's Fund of the Canadian Music Therapy Trust Fund 416-535-0200.

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BOOM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-12-20 published
BYERS strummed a happy tune
By Randy RICHMOND, Sun Media, Thurs., December 20, 2007
The people of the street gathered for a Christmas party and Sean BYERS was there, of course.
Eating platefuls of food, making people laugh, he won the Christmas carol trivia contest at the party run by Streetlight.
Each player got more points for singing the answers and even more points for getting everyone to sing along.
"Sean got everyone singing," remembers Gil CLELLAND, the director of Streetlight ministry.
When CLELLAND went home that night, Tuesday, December 11, he thought of the joy at the gathering.
"I thought maybe this is that peace that we all hear about at Christmas," he said.
Then came Wednesday.
"And I thought, where is that peace today? I asked God. Where are you? What happened?"
What happened?
BYERS left the party and went to a Unity Project crash bed that night.
Sometime the next morning he left the shelter, then snuck back in. A worker found him in a locked bathroom.
Maybe BYERS, 28, took his own life. Maybe it was an accident. The needle never cares.
The death of the engaging young man has rattled the street to its supposedly hardened core. More than 100 people, from the homeless to the workers helping them, gathered at the Central Library this week to remember.
"Sean was a really awesome guy," said Trevor JOHNSON, a transition services manager at Youth Action Centre.
"He was generous, very well spoken, very well read, intelligent. He struggled at times and made mistakes."
It's hard to pinpoint where and when the struggle began, his mother, Myra GARNETT, told The Free Press. There were problems at home that hit her son hard, she admitted.
"He was a very, very thoughtful boy."
Although he was identified as a gifted pupil in Grade 1, BYERS struggled later in school and by 15 had dropped out and left home. He took the roads so many lost boys take, sometimes turning to drugs and petty crime that led to jail, sometimes trying to make it, getting a job and treatment for his growing addiction.
No matter which way he turned, he played guitar or sketched, and cared for others.
"No matter how much pain he was in, he would see someone else and reach right through his pain to theirs," GARNETT said.
JOHNSON joined the Youth Action Centre about 10 years ago and met BYERS, who was doing volunteer work. BYERS would make ends meet by busking at the market or on weekend nights outside the bars on Richmond Row.
The memorial service was held at the library because he loved books so much, JOHNSON said.
"Give him his coffee, his paper, a smoke and his guitar and he was a happy guy."
BYERS always put on a smiling face to the world. But when he was really down, he took his guitar to the park and played, JOHNSON said.
BYERS and a few other young men his age all became hooked on the needle and hung around together.
One of those men was Jay DUCKWORTH, a Saint Thomas resident, who died December 8. He, too, was remembered this week.
"Although they struggled with self-medicating, they had strong spirits," Jim WATKIN, executive director of the London Harm Reduction Coalition, said at the service.
"You would see it in their eyes. That is what we need to remember. It is not about shame or guilt. We need to get rid of that. We need to let our spirits flourish."
The world looks at the Seans and the Jays as addicts and nothing more, said Matti PAQUIN, once an addict and now a worker at the Unity Project shelter.
"I loved those two boys. They were good people who tended to do drugs."
But their deaths must serve as a warning, others said at the memorial service.
"I cared for these guys for a long time. I hoped a miracle would happen and these men would excel," said Lawrence BOOM of Street Connection, a drop-in centre. "We have to come to terms with this. We have to start looking at drug addiction as an illness, not a weakness."
Over the next few months, city council will wrestle with questions of where to spend this year's budget. The city's community services department wants politicians to spend more money helping the homeless and the addicted.
The people of the street think the government should do more to help as well. In the meantime, they will continue to help each other the best they can. They will gather.
"I think that is where the peace is today," CLELLAND said, his voice breaking with grief at the memorial service.
"The peace we seek at Christmas is that in these tough moments we don't leave each other alone. When we say, 'I need you in my life right now.' "
Who To Call
If you need help:
Youth Action Centre: 519-434-6500
Street Connection: 519-438-7300
Streetlight (Youth for Christ) 686-0093
If you or someone you know is suicidal:
- Distress Centre (24 hours), 667-6711, 667-6600
- London Mental Health Crisis Service (24 hours), 519-433-2023
- Canadian Mental Health Association, 519-434-9191
- Mother Reach Postpartum Depression Line, 519-672-4673

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BOOMER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-27 published
BELL, Alzina Pearl (née MELLON)
After a long illness, Alzina went peacefully, with her family at her side at Lee Manor on Sunday June 24, 2007. “Alley” BELL (née MELLON) of Owen Sound in her 84th year. Predeceased by her husband Frederick Earnest BELL, son Lorne Wayne BELL, son Frederick BELL, grand_son Timothy BELL, great-grand_son Kyle BELL and eleven brothers and sisters. The loss of Alzina will be greatly mourned by her children Diane (Barry) SCHONAUER, Jim (Joanne BOOMER) BELL and Harry BELL all of Owen Sound and her brother Egbert (Marg) MELLON of Prescott. Alzina will be sadly missed by 15 grandchildren, 44 great-grandchildren and 5 great-great-grandchildren. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home 519-376-3710 for visiting on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Friday morning at 11 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Arthritis Society would be appreciated.

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BOONE o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-11-21 published
WHEELER, Carol Elizabeth May
At the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital on November 17, 2007 in her 64th year. Carol of Wasaga Beach. Loving wife of Wayne for 27 years. Dear mother of Ryan HOBEN. Carol will be sadly missed by her step-children Maureen LEMOINE, Karen BOONE, Kimberlee WATKINSON and their children. Survived by two brothers Gordon CALLAHAN (Margaret) and Arnold CALLAHAN (Elsie) and their families. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to the Watts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Wasaga Beach. 705-429-1040
Page 17

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BOORNE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-03 published
son may have been target
Police make arrest in woman's death
By Raveena AULAKH and Timothy APPLEBY, Page A8
Toronto -- Jean SPRINGER may have been shot down when she tried to protect her youngest son from a friend who showed up at her front door with a gun, according to a Toronto police source.
Ms. SPRINGER, 60, was killed on New Year's Day by a single bullet that struck her in the face. She was pronounced dead at Sunnybrook hospital, becoming the city's first homicide victim of 2007.
Heavily armed officers arrested 26-year-old Altaf IBRAHIM 12 hours later in his basement apartment in Scarborough, a few minutes drive from the SPRINGER home. He is charged with first-degree murder, a charge that implies the killing was planned.
A police source said last night that the gunman may have been looking for Ms. SPRINGER's youngest son Antoine, also 26, when he arrived at the SPRINGER home in the Malvern neighbourhood about 2: 30 p.m.
"It looks like there was some kind of dispute between the two young men and Ms. SPRINGER got between and got shot," a police source said.
The accused is said to have known Ms. SPRINGER's youngest son, who along with an older brother was in his mother's Snowball Crescent home Monday as she prepared New Year's Day dinner.
"They grew up together, at least from their teen years," said Detective Gary GRINTON of the Toronto homicide squad.
Mr. IBRAHIM lives alone in an apartment on Brimorton Drive. He was arrested about 2 a.m. yesterday without a struggle. Clad in orange prison garb, he appeared briefly in court in Scarborough yesterday and was remanded in custody. Police were still seeking the handgun allegedly used to kill Ms. SPRINGER, known locally as "Auntie Jeannie."
"You have what I believe was a truly innocent woman just going about her business," Det. GRINTON said of Ms. SPRINGER, widely described as an exemplary citizen, devoted parent and regular worshipper at the Malvern Methodist Church. "It's shocking."
Neither Mr. IBRAHIM nor any members of the SPRINGER family have criminal records. And if there was any animosity before Monday's shooting, it had not been manifest in the shape of threats or any physical altercations, Det. GRINTON said.
Nor were any gang affiliations involved, he said. "None whatsoever."
He dismissed a news report that said the gunman yelled "Happy New Year," as he opened fire, but agreed that because Ms. SPRINGER let him into her home, she likely perceived no threat.
Beyond stating that postshooting 911 calls were received from several neighbours, as well as from within the SPRINGER home, detectives would not say what led them to charge Mr. IBRAHIM so quickly.
Yesterday, at the three-unit house where Mr. IBRAHIM has lived since last summer, few neighbours seemed to know much about the basement apartment's tall, solitary occupant, who would sometimes step outside for a cigarette but mostly kept to himself.
"He moved in when the new owner bought the house," said George BOORNE, who lives across the street and saw the 2 a.m. arrest. "But I never saw him around."
At the SPRINGER home yesterday, Friends and neighbours voiced shock and sorrow at the brutal death of a woman described as a popular pillar of the community who often helped organize local events.
"I met her on New Year's Eve at the home of one of our sisters, we had a good time," said Norma McKENZIE, who had known Ms. SPRINGER at the Malvern Methodist Church for 10 years.
Ms. McKENZIE described the family of four as God-fearing, close-knit, regular church-goers. "Antoine was part of my team at Ford company and we worked well together."
Other worshippers concurred in praising Ms. SPRINGER's devotion to family and church.
"She was closely involved with the church," said Sandra LECKY, church secretary. "We know where she is today -- there was no victory here."
Church staff brought in extra chairs yesterday evening as mourners packed in to pay their respects. Those in attendance hugged and consoled one another, occasionally rising in songs.
Reading from a statement prepared by Ms. SPRINGER's family -- most attended the service but did not want to speak to reporters youth pastor Marlon MITCHELL described her as "… quiet, charming, intelligent and very much understated in manner. She had style and flair, but all of it counted for nothing compared to how much she celebrated her relationship with God through Jesus Christ."
Ms. SPRINGER was born in 1946 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. As a student, she won a scholarship to a grammar school for girls and eventually earned a teacher's diploma. She arrived in Canada in the late 1960s, and initially continued teaching primary school. However, she soon switched jobs, becoming an accountant. Self-employed, she stayed in that line of work until her death.
But it was her religious faith that stood out above all else, Friends said yesterday. Indeed, it is that faith that now allows her family to bear no grudges against the man accused of stepping into her home and taking her life.
"Today we mourn her loss, but our faith calls on us to forgive others [as] God has in Christ forgiven us," Mr. MITCHELL read from the family's statement yesterday. "Jean had a forgiving spirit and we are sure that she would want us to forgive whoever has committed this senseless act."

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BOOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-28 published
OSBORNE, Frederick
After a courageous battle with cancer, Frederick OSBORNE of Richmond Hill died on July 25, 2007, at Hill House Hospice. He was the devoted husband of Florence WOLFF. Chelsea, his yellow lab, will miss his master's tender loving care. Fred was predeceased by his parents and brothers Ralph (Medicine Hat) and George (Edmonton). He is lovingly remembered by sisters Phyllis OSBORNE (Medicine Hat,) Grace LIPPET (Medicine Hat,) sisters-in-law Mildred BOOS (Waterloo) and Nina OSBORNE (Edmonton,) many nieces and nephews, special Friends Ken and Nola MOTT (Waterloo) and many people whose lives he touched. As a faithful employee of Weston Bakeries for 44 years, Fred was the General Manager of Weston Bakeries in Kitchener, Montreal, Toronto and Orillia. A special thank-you to Doctor Matilda NG, Doctor Brian BERGER and the staff at Hill House who helped Fred make is journey peacefully with dignity. At Fred's request, he has been cremated and there will be no service. Donations to Hill House Hospice, 36 Wright Street, Richmond Hill, Ontario L4C 4A1 would be appreciated.
How 2 letter Surnames like NG work in OGSPI

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BOOSE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2007-05-30 published
SMITH, Charles Abraham
Peacefully, at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital, on Thursday, May 24, 2007, Charles Abraham SMITH of Strathroy, in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Marie (FIELD) SMITH. Loving father of Rev. Mary Ellen (Brad) BARCLAY of Saint Thomas, Randy (Marie) SMITH of Kerwood, Gayle (Keith) McLEOD of Strathroy, and Bill (Marian) SMITH of Strathroy and grandfather of Yvonne and Brian WIGBOLDUS, Ian and Tracy BARCLAY, Josh, Lisa, and Bruce HOLMES, Steven, Annette, Leanne, Michelle, Tamara, and Wesley, Candice and Reanne. Also survived by 8 great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Edna KORZYNSKI, Marian WAGNER, and Bob Haggith. Visitation was held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy, on Sunday, May 27 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where a funeral service was held on Monday, May 28 at 1 p.m. with Rev. Steve BOOSE officiating. Interment in Oakland Cemetery, Glencoe. A Masonic service was held Sunday evening at 6: 30 p.m. under direction of the Napier Masonic Lodge. Donations to the Strathroy Hospital Foundation would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Charlie.

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BOOTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
SMITH, Jean Ethel (BOOTH)
Peacefully at Rosewood Manor, Sarnia on Saturday January 6, 2007 Jean Ethel (BOOTH) SMITH of Sarnia passed away at the age of 83. Jean was a longtime member of Dunlop United Church. Beloved wife of the late Donald E. SMITH (2002.) Loving mother of Cheryl and Ian SHIELDS of Sarnia and Glenn SMITH of Toronto. Cherished grandmother of David, Michael and Scott SHIELDS. Dear sister of Cliff (Bud) BOOTH and his wife Joan of Peterborough, Ontario and Keith BOOTH and his wife the late Mary (2003) of Lakefield, Ontario. Sister-in-law of Gary SMITH and his wife Keitha of Kingston, Ontario. Jean will be remembered by nieces, nephew, cousins and many dear Friends. Jean will always be remembered for her wonderful baking and cooking, her many marvelous creations made with loving hands through her sewing, cross-stitch and knitting and for her great willingness to help anyone in need. The funeral service for Mrs. SMITH will be held at Dunlop United Church 757 Rosedale Ave. Sarnia on Wednesday January 10, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. Family and Friends will be received on Tuesday at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Sympathy may be expressed through donation to Dunlop United Church In Memorium Fund, Parkinson's Foundation or the Diabetes Association. Memories and condolences can be sent online at www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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BOOTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-09 published
BOOTH, Joseph " Joe"
A resident of R.R.#5 Dresden, passed away peacefully at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance on Monday, January 8, 2007 at the age of 81. Born in Beecher, Ontario., son of the late Willard and Maude (MURPHY) BOOTH. Joe owned, trained and drove standardbreds for over 50 years. He was a member of O.H.H.A., Standardbred Canada and the Dresden Legion Br. #113. Beloved husband of Edith (HARRISON) BOOTH. Loving father of Wanda and her husband Clark WOOLMAN of Dresden. Loving grandpa of Kelly and Mike SUTHERLAND, Joey WOOLMAN and Amanda WRIGHT. Sadly missed by great-grandchildren Alexis, Jade, and Clark. Dear brother of Ethel REID, Della McMILLAN, Peggie PAUL, Darlene WOOD, Mervel BOOTH, Fred BOOTH, James BOOTH and Doug SYMES. Predeceased by sisters and brothers Pearl KECK, Stella GURNEY, Eleanor McFADDEN, Bertha DENNIS, Leslie, Ernest and Arthur BOOTH. The Booth family will receive Friends at the Badder Visitation and Reception Centre, 679 North Street, Dresden on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, January 11, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. with Priest Ruth Ann HOYT of the Community of Christ, London officiating. Interment Dresden Cemetery. Donations may be made at the visitation centre by cheque to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Community of Christ, Wabash. Online condolences and donations may be left at our website www.badderfuneralhome.com. Arrangements entrusted to Badder Funeral Homes, Thamesville. "A tree will be planted in memory of Joe BOOTH in the Badder and Robinson Memorial Forest, Mosa Twp."

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BOOTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-10 published
BOOTH, Joseph " Joe"
A resident of R.R.# 5 Dresden, passed away peacefully at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance on Monday, January 8, 2007 at the age of 81. Born in Beecher, Ontario, son of the late Willard and Maude (MURPHY) BOOTH. Joe owned, trained and drove standardbreds for over 50 years. He was a member of O.H.H.A., Standardbred Canada and the Dresden Legion Br. #113. Beloved husband of Edith (HARRISON) BOOTH. Loving father of Wanda and her husband Clark WOOLMAN of Dresden. Loving grandpa of Kelly and Mike SUTHERLAND, Joey WOOLMAN and Amanda WRIGHT. Sadly missed by great-grandchildren Alexis, Jade, and Clark. Dear brother of Ethel REID, Della McMILLAN, Peggie PAUL, Darlene WOOD, Mervel BOOTH, Fred BOOTH, James BOOTH and Doug SYMES. Predeceased by sisters and brothers Pearl KECK, Stella GURNEY, Eleanor McFADDEN, Bertha DENNIS, Leslie, Ernest and Arthur BOOTH. The Booth family will receive Friends at the Badder Visitation and Reception Centre, 679 North Street, Dresden on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, January 11, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. with Priest Ruth Ann HOYT of the Community of Christ, London officiating. Interment Dresden Cemetery. Donations may be made at the visitation centre by cheque to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Community of Christ, Wabash. Online condolences and donations may be left at our website www.badderfuneralhome.com. Arrangements entrusted to Badder Funeral Homes, Thamesville. "A tree will be planted in memory of Joe BOOTH in the Badder and Robinson Memorial Forest, Mosa Twp."

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BOOTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-05 published
WASHER, Thomas, B.Phe.
Peacefully, on Sunday, June 3, 2007, at Grove Memorial Community Hospital, Fergus, in his 81st year. Loving husband to Frances for 56 years. Devoted and caring father to Robert, Kevin and the late David. Dear brother of Betty WASHER of Mississauga, James WASHER of Athens, and Geraldine BOOTH of Deep River. Loving son to the late Gladys and Thomas. He will be dearly missed by his nieces, nephews, family, Friends, colleagues and former students. Thomas graduated from The University of Toronto (University College) in 1950, and was involved in Education for 38 years with the Etobicoke School Board of Education as a teacher, vice-principal, principal and superintendent. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday June 9, 2007 at 11 a.m. Interment Saint_John's Norway Cemetery. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Aphasia Institute, 73 Scarsdale Rd., Toronto M3B 2R2 416-226-3636. Please see www.turnerporter.ca for more information.

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BOOTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-08 published
RIMES, James R. " Jim"
Suddenly on Saturday June 2, 2007, aged 60 years. Beloved son of James RIMES and the late Alma RIMES. Devoted brother to Stephen, good friend to Maureen RIMES and nephew of Marjorie RIMES. A second father to Shaune and Jessica LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY and like a grandfather to Emma and Ella PORPURO and Sascha LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY. He will be sadly missed by his long time best Friends David LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY, Valerie BOOTH- BURCH and Patty WATTERS. A very special thanks to the bridge players and fishing and camping Friends for their great support.
Jimmy we will love you forever and you will never be forgotten. Thank you for always being there for everyone. Private cremation. There will be a gathering of close Friends, held at a later date. For those who wish, a contribution to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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BOOTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-10 published
MULHOLLAND, William "Bill" David Jr.
Died peacefully at home with his family on September 8, 2007, at the age of 81. He is remembered with love by his wife of 50 years, Nancy (née BOOTH;) children William David, Charles Douglass, James Andrew, John Alexander, Elizabeth Helen, Madeline Louise, Sarah Alexandra, Caroline Marie, and Bruce Henry; and grandchildren Matthew, Eric, Fiona, Samuel, Patrick, Veronique, Isabelle, Madison, Finny, William and Andrew. Born in Albany, New York 1926, to the late William David and Helen Elizabeth (FLACK) MULHOLLAND, Bill graduated from the Christian Brothers Academy in 1944 and immediately enlisted in the U.S. Army, where he was commissioned in the infantry and served in the Philippines until honourably discharged in 1946. He then completed his education at Harvard College (B.A. cum laude 1951) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A. 1952). Joining Morgan Stanley and Co. in 1952, he became a general partner in 1962 and spearheaded the then largest-ever sale of corporate securities to finance construction of the Churchill Falls hydro-electric project in Labrador. In 1970, he accepted the position of Brinco President and Chief Executive Officer, driving construction of the $1 billion hydro-electric plant to its successful completion ahead of schedule and under budget in 1974. In 1975, he moved to the Bank of Montreal where he served as President (1975-81), Chief Executive Officer (1979-89) and Chairman of the Board (1981-90). During his tenure, he led Canada's oldest bank into the modern era of financial services, orchestrated its expansion into the United States with the purchase of Harris Bank, and significantly improved the bank's performance, readying it for the intense competition of the emerging global marketplace. Bill was a champion of excellence and believed strongly in the importance of ethics, setting a clear standard in all of his business undertakings and consistently delivering this message publicly, especially to business students. He contributed actively to many organizations, including Saint Mary's Hospital, Montreal Symphony Orchestra, Memorial University, Queen's University, Atlantic Brücke, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Foundation, the Canada Olympic Trust, Saint Michael's College Foundation, L'École des Hautes Études Commerciales, the Hudson Institute, and the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews. He served as a Director of numerous companies, including Upjohn, Standard Life Assurance, Canadian Pacific Railway, and Kimberley-Clark. In recognition of his public service, he was awarded honorary doctorates by Memorial University (1972) and Queen's University (1988), as well as Israel's Prime Minister's Medal (1987) and the Knight Commander's Cross (Badge and Star) Order of Merit from the Federal Republic of Germany (1989). On his retirement, Bill was able to realize a lifelong passion, working with his wife Nancy, son James and daughter-in-law Elke to build one of the premier Hanoverian stud farms in the world, Windswept Farm. Friends are invited to join the family for visitation from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 11, at the J.S. Jones and son Funeral Home, 11582 Trafalgar Rd, Georgetown, Ontario. A funeral mass will be held at Holy Cross Church (224 Maple Ave.) in Georgetown, Ontario at 10: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 12. Followed by a reception at his residence Windswept Farm 8th line Georgetown, Ontario, Canada. In lieu of memorials, donations to the Parkinson's Society of Canada - Ontario Region (416 227-9700) are welcomed with gratitude. Bill will be interred in the United States with full military honours in recognition of his service to his country.

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BOOTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-12 published
Headstrong Chief Executive Officer saved Churchill Falls and rescued the Bank of Montreal
An emergency boss who took over after a plane crash wiped out everyone else, he brought the power project in on time before moving to a troubled Bank of Montreal, where he ruthlessly cleaned house
By Gordon PITTS, Page S8
Besides banking and family, William MULHOLLAND's grand passion was raising Hanoverian riding horses, which, according to one of his nine children, are "headstrong, able and smart." Those adjectives can just as easily be applied to her demanding father, said Caroline VAN NOSTRAND.
Those traits helped propel Mr. MULHOLLAND, a U.S.-born outsider, into one of Canada's most exciting and controversial management careers. He was the emergency boss who came in to save the massive Churchill Falls power project in Labrador. Then he turned around the Bank of Montreal, Canada's oldest bank, and as a financial-services innovator helped change the country's banking industry.
As an agent of change at the lacklustre Bank of Montreal, he fired executives who didn't measure up, winning a reputation as a tough, uncompromising boss. He tightened credit policies, led technological innovation and bought a Chicago bank in a far-sighted move that anticipated a North American market. He helped lead the Canadian commercial banks' march into investment banking with the purchase of brokerage Nesbitt Thomson.
Like many turnaround managers, he was accused of staying too long as Chief Executive Officer and losing touch with a rapidly evolving industry. Yet he reached down into the ranks to develop a new generation of Bank of Montreal leaders that included future Chief Executive Officers Matthew Barrett and Anthony Comper.
He was a complicated man who was seen as remote, autocratic, introverted and eccentric, but he was regarded as brilliant for some of his strategic moves. He could become deeply absorbed in detail and alarmingly inattentive to people's feelings. In describing him, Friends often fall back on that old cliché: "He did not suffer fools gladly."
"My father was not always easy," said Ms. VAN NOSTRAND, who lives in Toronto. "He had exacting standards and he upheld them for himself and expected others to do their best to get that same quality.
"But you can't mistake that for a lack of true caring and love and a huge commitment to family."
Still, for all his high standards and strategic thinking, Mr. MULHOLLAND's own career was almost haphazard, the product of tragic circumstances, timing and managerial agility.
He was born in Albany, New York the son of a civil servant who became New York's director of parks. Even at birth, he had a Canadian connection - his maternal great-grandmother was a French-Canadian from Trois-Rivières. He attended Christian Brothers Academy, a Catholic military school in Albany, where he became an expert rider, marksman, and fly fisherman -- interests he pursued throughout his life.
He graduated from high school, joined the U.S. Army during the Second World War and trained as a weapons instructor before being posted to the Philippines. After discharge, he entered Harvard College, got his B.A., then earned an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, while working in the summers as a park ranger.
He then parlayed a social connection with the financier Morgan family to join the investment banking house Morgan Stanley and pursue a career on Wall Street.
He married the daughter of a family friend, Nancy BOOTH, on June 22, 1957. Their rearing of nine children (four daughters and five sons) has been attributed by his wife to the consequences of a union between an Irish Catholic and a Free Methodist.
Mr. MULHOLLAND thrived in investment banking. One of his clients was Brinco, a Montreal firm of British-Canadian origins that was building the $1-billion Churchill Falls hydro project. He placed a $500-million bond issue for the company - at that time, a record sale of securities by a corporation.
But on November 11, 1969, Brinco's executive jet crashed, killing six members of its senior team, including the president and finance vice-president. The company was leaderless at a critical juncture in the Churchill Falls project. Mr. MULHOLLAND "was the last man standing who knew what it was all about," said Richard O'HAGAN, who was later his public-affairs specialist at Bank of Montreal.
In January, 1970, at the age of 43, he moved to Montreal to become Brinco's president and Chief Executive Officer. He also joined the board of the Bank of Montreal, which was the principal commercial banker for the Churchill Falls project. He brought the project in five months ahead of schedule and under budget.
Ron SOUTHERN, the Calgary-based head of Atco Ltd., was supplying Brinco with housing for its Churchill Falls work force. He was also negotiating to build housing factories in the Soviet Union and invited Soviet president Alexsei Kosygin to tour his facilities in Montreal. Mr. MULHOLLAND agreed to provide testimonials for the Atco products, and impressed Mr. SOUTHERN with his ability to hold his own in intense geopolitical discussions.
It was the beginning of a Friendship that was cemented in the mid-1970s, when Mr. SOUTHERN opened his Spruce Meadows equestrian centre near Calgary. Mr. MULHOLLAND attended the first major equestrian event, impressing Mr. SOUTHERN with his own riding skills. Each year, he would take a long country ride on the morning of the big event.
With Churchill Falls complete, Mr. MULHOLLAND was recruited to become the Bank of Montreal's president in 1975. He found another organization in crisis mode. "It took him about a year to get a grip on the bank, but he was a bulldog and he got it done," Mr. SOUTHERN said.
The new banker became immersed in Bank of Montreal's liquidity problems and cost-control challenges, as well as its struggles to move from manual systems to the computer age. After the incumbent Chief Executive Officer retired, he took the top job in January, 1979, adding the chairman's role 2½ years later.
He was involved in hiring Mr. O'HAGAN, who had served in the Prime Minister's Office under another eccentric legend, Pierre Trudeau. Mr. O'HAGAN recalled how his job interview with Mr. MULHOLLAND stretched to more than two hours, until he finally telephoned his next interview party to beg forbearance. Mr. O'HAGAN was fascinated by this brilliant, obsessive man and joined the Bank of Montreal team.
That extended interview was a harbinger of the MULHOLLAND style. He was notorious for unpredictably long meetings, forcing managers to queue up for hours, awaiting audiences that lasted long into the evening.
He was determined to weed out the perceived dead wood that had allowed the bank's problems to build. In his zeal to cleanse the ranks, he was accused of creating a demographic crisis in the bank. One unidentified manager told Report on Business magazine in 1989 that "an entire generation of management has been cremated."
"Those judgments were not made whimsically - they were made on the basis of performance," insisted Grant REUBER, the bank's president during the MULHOLLAND era. "I don't think he relished letting people go, but if they hadn't measured up and they hadn't recovered, they probably didn't survive."
Jeff CHISHOLM, a retired Bank of Montreal executive, said he never saw this side of his former boss - Mr. MULHOLLAND simply demanded honest answers from his managers. He said his positive traits never came to light because the Chief Executive Officer did not really care what critics thought of him.
Mr. MULHOLLAND also pulled off a deal that transformed the bank: the 1984 purchase of Harris Bank, a U.S. Midwest regional powerhouse based in Chicago. Some critics have contended that once the deal was done, the bank didn't really capitalize on its new U.S. platform - but at minimum, Mr. MULHOLLAND created the potential platform.
"He had a vision about what was going to happen to the North American economy and to financial services within North America," said Mr. Chisholm, a former Harris Bank executive who joined Bank of Montreal.
Later, Mr. MULHOLLAND moved quickly on the deregulation of Canada's financial industry by acquiring Nesbitt Thomson, the foundation of today's Bank of Montreal Nesbitt Burns Inc., the bank's investment subsidiary.
Whether he stayed too long is much debated; it's a common problem with strong leaders in politics and business. But Mr. MULHOLLAND's saving grace was to leave the bank in good hands.
Mr. Barrett, his successor, was a charming people person who provided a sharp contrast with his more aloof predecessor. Mr. MULHOLLAND "knew he was not Mr. Popularity with everybody," Mr. O'HAGAN said. "He recognized there would be a contrast and that Barrett's personal style would register differently. I think that was part of the reason he chose him."
Mr. Barrett, now retired from banking, said in an e-mail message that "Bank of Montreal shareholders and employees owe a debt of gratitude to Bill for stepping into the bank at a difficult time in its history. Those that succeeded him benefited greatly from his legacy.
"He once joked that he built the Stradivarius that others played beautifully. I certainly agree with that."
After he retired in 1990, Mr. MULHOLLAND had time to focus on family, horses and his beloved Windswept Farm near Georgetown, west of Toronto. He worked to develop the Hanoverian breed in Canada.
But in recent years, Parkinson's disease took its toll. At the MULHOLLANDs' 50th wedding anniversary party in early July, Friends felt he almost willed himself to attend. It wasn't long afterward that he was admitted to hospital.
William MULHOLLAND was born in Albany, New York on June 16, 1926. He died of complications from Parkinson's disease and other medical problems at his home near Georgetown, Ontario, on September 8, 2007. He was 81. He is survived by his wife Nancy, nine children and 11 grandchildren.

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BOOTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-10 published
BOOTH, Philip James (1937-2007)
Peacefully, at Wyndham Manor Long Term Care Centre in Oakville, Ontario on October 7, 2007 at the age of 70 years. Beloved husband and best friend for 42 years of Mary. Loving father of Catherine (Karl), Maggie (Winslow) and Caroline (Christian). Grandfather of Isaac, Kaleb, Chloe and Thomas. Dear brother of Julian and uncle of nieces. Will be missed by other relatives and Friends in Canada and England. Philip graduated from the University of Oxford in 1959. He was a teacher at the Polyvalente Macdonald Cartier High School in St. Hubert, Quebec from 1970 until his retirement in 1997. Prior to 1970, he taught in England, Switzerland and Africa. Family will receive visitors in the Ward Funeral Home, 109 Reynolds Street, Oakville on Friday, October 12, 2007 from 11: 00 a.m. until service in the chapel at 12:00 noon. Cremation to follow. As an expression of sympathy donations to the Alzheimer's Society would be appreciated by the family and condolences may be sent to philip.booth@wardfh.com

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BOOTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-22 published
CAMPBELL, Dorothy Lillian
On Friday, October 19, 2007, at West Park Long Term Care Centre, in her 99th year. Predeceased by her husband Millard B. CAMPBELL, her brother Fred G. NORTON, her daughter Janet CAMPBELL- BOOTH (Doug BOOTH,) and her daughter-in-law Audrey CAMPBELL (Ross.) Loving mother of Marilyn (Alex PATHY,) and Ross, loving grandmother of Barbara, Carolyn, Diane and Bradley (Margaret). Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Road (north of Lawrence), Weston, on Monday, October 22, 2007 from 12-1 p.m. until the funeral service in the chapel at 1 p.m. Private interment. In lieu of flowers, donations in Dorothy's name may be made to Canadian Mental Health Association. The family wishes to express sincere thanks to Mila for her caring, compassion and gentle touch over many years, and to the staff of Mulholland House (West Park).

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BOOTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-03 published
AMBROSE, Cherry (née BOOTH)
We mourn the loss of our dedicated nurse, eldest sister, loving mother, mother-in-law, and grandmother, dear friend and beloved wife. With her singular genius for helping others in times of need, Cherry has helped untold Friends, family and strangers at times when no one else knew what to do or say. Her genius for helping others was matched by the seemingly endless wealth of quilts, sweaters, and tapestries she used to express her love of others with colours and textures that comforted. We will miss her dearly as we move into the cold Canadian winter, for the first time on our own. Cherry is deeply missed by her husband John, daughter Robin and her husband Eric, grand_sons Martin and Daniel, siblings Jim BOOTH, Margaret BOOTH, Ann HANHAM, Heather MAHON, and Terry NEUDORF and their families. The Guelph General Hospital palliative team of doctors and nurses of 7E rose to the occasion and gave Cherry the most professional and compassionate care. Family will receive Friends at the Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (519-822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com), on Monday (2-4 and 7-9 p.m.). A memorial service will occur at 2: 00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 4, 2007 in the chapel. In lieu of flowers, Cherry requested that donations be directed to the Stephen Lewis Foundation "Grandmothers to Grandmothers Campaign", 260 Spadina Avenue, Suite 501, Toronto M5T 2E4.
(www.stephenlewisfoundation.org/ donate_online.htm - indicate for Cherry Ambrose).

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BOOTHMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-13 published
Trooper died doing what he believed in
By Jered STUFFCO, Canadian Press, Wed., June 13, 2007
Clarington -- Trooper Darryl CASWELL's family was waiting for a phone call from half a world away Monday to mark his brother's birthday at the family home in this quiet bedroom community east of Toronto.
Instead came the knock at the door that every military family dreads, and the terrible news that CASWELL had become the 57th Canadian soldier to die in Afghanistan when his vehicle struck an improvised explosive device.
"He was going to do all he could to call," stepmother Christine CASWELL said yesterday.
"It wasn't the call we were expecting."
CASWELL had six weeks left in Afghanistan before he was set to return home, she added.
"He was due to come back on his birthday on the 31st of July," she said. "He was so young, he had so much to do and (so much) he wanted to do."
CASWELL, 25, was a member of the Royal Canadian Dragoons, based in Petawawa. He was deployed with Reconnaissance Squadron from the 2nd Battalion of the Royal Canadian Regiment battle group.
He was riding in the lead vehicle in what the Canadian Forces call a combat logistics patrol -- a perilous mission that involves restocking forward operating bases and soldiers in the field with everything from ammunition and equipment to rations and water.
CASWELL had been serving in Afghanistan since January, his stepmother said. "He was doing what he wanted to do and what he believed in."
The convoy was en route to the district of Khakriz in northwestern Kandahar province when it struck the improvised explosive device an ever-present threat in Canada's ongoing battle with Taliban insurgents in Afghanistan.
CASWELL was helping to provide security for the convoy as it travelled along a secondary road 40 kilometres north of the city of Kandahar when it was struck.
Over the course of the day, a Facebook page created in CASWELL's memory continued to grow with expressions of grief and condolence from Friends, many of whom were former high school classmates.
"I was in my kitchen making coffee when I heard the name over the news," wrote Pippa BOOTHMAN, a university student in London, who said the news left her heartbroken.
"I have only seen Darryl a few times since high school, however those are moments that never go away… Live, love (and) laugh is what Darryl did."
Another high school friend, Michelle RICHARD, expressed support for those Canadians who are willing to put their lives on the line for the sake of their country.
"How sad it is… we are so blessed to have people like him willing to stand up and protect us every day. And too often we lose them," she wrote.

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