McCARDLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-26 published
McBIRNIE, John Edward
By Gaelah McBIRNIE, Page L10
Brother, husband, father, grandfather, surgeon, music lover, friend. Born November 14, 1922, in Hamilton, Ontario Died April 7 in Alliston, Ontario, of a stroke, aged 84.
Dad was an impressive figure. As a little girl, I vividly recall his imposing presence; the deep voice, the towering bulk, the distinctive sound of his large sandaled feet crossing the driveway in the summer. He presented a stern exterior, but underneath was a beautiful man with a heart of gold.
John McBIRNIE was the eldest of three children born to Norman William and Sarah Winifred (McCARDLE) McBIRNIE.
John attended Davisville Public School, then North Toronto Collegiate for his high-school years. His aspiration for medicine led him to the University of Toronto.
John spent time during his medical studies in San Diego, California., and it was there he married Nadine BEARDMORE on December 2, 1948.
They lived in Toronto while John was completing his internship, and during this time their four children were born.
John was soon offered the position of chief of surgery at Port Colborne General Hospital in Ontario.
He liked the town and the job appealed to him, so in 1955 the family moved to a beautiful, white house on the lake, across from the hospital.
The sight of John walking to work in the winter, characteristically wearing his hospital whites and sandals, was a familiar one in town.
In 1973, John remarried to Patricia Arnold CORLESS; he continued at the hospital and ran a private practice until 1980.
At this time, he and Pat moved back to Toronto where he became an associate staff member at several hospitals, assisting with neurosurgery until he retired in 1999.
John was passionate about the arts, particularly music. Although he did not play an instrument, he had an exceptional ear and loved jazz.
John frequently drove to Buffalo to listen to musicians play. After befriending the likes of such jazz giants as DIzzy Gillespie, Junior Mance and Chick Corea, he would invite them back to the house in Port Colborne for Sunday afternoon chili parties and jam sessions.
The pride and joy of John's personal life was his farm near Mansfield, Ontario, which, over the years, became his sanctuary. His love of nature and solitude was evident from his attachment to this secluded piece of land and by the periods of time he spent there (with his dog, Chandler, and in the company of his colleague and friend, Griff PEARSON.)
It was at the Stevenson Memorial Hospital in Alliston, Ontario, where John suffered a massive stroke; it was there that he spent his last days, surrounded by the people closest to him and from whom he drew comfort.
Gaelah McBIRNIE is John's daughter.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

MCARDLE - All Categories in OGSPI

McCARNEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-17 published
MacFARLANE, Ross
On Tuesday, October 16, 2007 of cancer in his 58th year at his beloved cottage. Survived by his loving wife Kathy, daughters Patricia (Christopher) BENNETT and Jennifer (Joshua) BRANSFIELD and granddaughters Ashley, Abigail and Hailey. He will be lovingly remembered by his father Ronald M. MacFARLANE, sisters Frances (John) HARDING and Gillian (Neil) McCARNEY and their families, mother-in-law Patricia MORDEN and sister-in-law Anne (Brian) MORDEN- MAYES. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, (Hwy. 10 north of Queen Elizabeth Way), from 6-9 p.m. on Wednesday and Thursday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Friday, October 19 2007 at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow with interment in Wellington, Prince Edward County. If desired, donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

MCARNEY - All Categories in OGSPI

McCARROLL o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2007-09-14 published
Wasaga man stabbed, friend faces murder charge
Twenty-nine year old Roger HALVORSON was stabbed in the upper body before being found outside the Riverboat Resort Saturday, police say.
And a 23-year-old Wasaga Beach man accused of second-degree murder in connection with his death was set to appear in a Barrie courtroom Thursday.
Police responded to a 911 call Saturday morning made by Riverboat Resort manager Nick SINGH.
SINGH said he found HALVORSON laying in the parking lot of the motel located at 280 River Rd. E. at 8 a.m.
He said in an interview Tuesday, that at first he thought HALVORSON had passed out.
"He was transported to hospital and later passed away as a result of the injury," said Ontario Provincial Police Const. Mark Kinney.
According to SINGH, HALVORSON was staying temporarily at the Riverboat. He had been there only a few days and was renting by the week. The motel is known for having long-term tenants.
SINGH said HALVORSON and friend Noah COUTTS, also of Wasaga Beach, went out the night before and that they had been drinking. They returned sometime Saturday morning.
It was COUTTS, 23, who was later charged with second-degree murder.
SINGH said police cleared the scene Monday.
Ontario Provincial Police Criminal Investigation Branch Detective Inspector Dave QUIGLEY is leading the investigation into HALVORSON's death.
Police are not releasing many details about the crime or an autopsy conducted Sunday.
The same parking lot was the scene of the October 20, 2002 beating death of 20-year-old Rahim PREBTANI. Michael Gordon McCARROLL was found guilty of second-degree murder and is serving a life sentence for the death of PREBTANI.
His co-accused, James Luke SMITH, pleaded guilty to manslaughter and was sentenced to two years less a day.
Page 8

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

MCARROLL - All Categories in OGSPI

McCARTER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-17 published
McNABB, Lynda (née McCARTER)
Peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Monday, July 16, 2007. Lynda McNABB (née McCARTER) of Owen Sound in her 65th year. Beloved wife and friend of Doug McNABB. Loving mother of Dwayne of Calgary, Dayna McCARTER of Owen Sound and Trianna and Mark of Hepworth. Sadly missed by three grandchildren Melissa, Corey-Lyn and Ty. Also survived by her sister Pat METZGER of Barrie along with many nieces, nephews, her extended family and Friends. A celebration of life will be announced at a later date. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated and may be made through the Tannahill Funeral Home 519-376-3710.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McCARTER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-23 published
McNABB, Lynda (née McCARTER)
Peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Monday, July 16, 2007. Lynda McNABB (née McCARTER) of Owen Sound in her 65th year. Beloved wife and friend of Doug McNABB. Loving mother of Dwayne of Calgary, Dayna McCARTER of Owen Sound and Trianna and Mark of Hepworth. Sadly missed by three grandchildren Melissa, Corey-Lyn and Ty. Also survived by her sister Pat METZGER of Barrie along with many nieces, nephews, her extended family and Friends. A celebration of life will be conducted in the chapel of the Tannahill Funeral Home 519-376-3710 on Wednesday afternoon at 1 o'clock with Doctor Brad CLARK officiating. Visitation from 11 a.m. until service time. Interment, Greenwood Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McCARTER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-11 published
HESLINGA- SAAKJE " Sarah" (DEJONG, née IEDEMA)
Of Caressant Care Nursing Home, Saint Thomas, on Wednesday, January 10, 2007, at her late residence, in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late Jacob HESLINGA (December 9, 1999) and dearly mother of Jacob F. and his wife Ethel HESLINGA of Saint Thomas, Elizabeth and her husband Bill SNETSELAAR of Saint Thomas, Frederik and his wife Mary HESLINGA of Mount Hope and Effie and her husband Frank LATTANZIO of Saint Thomas. Loved grandmother of Ryk and his wife Lisa SNETSELAAR, Joni and her husband Kevin KERVIN, Duane and his wife Leigh HESLINGA, Glen and his wife Pamela HESLINGA, David and his wife Hannah HESLINGA, Maria and her husband Lenny MALLETT, Daniel and his fiancée Amanda SAYER, Angela and her husband Shawn ABEDIN, Sara and her husband Robert McCARTER, Frank Robert and his wife Krista LATTANZIO and Michael LATTANZIO and friend Kalely GLEESON. Loved great-grandmother of James, Rachel, Isaac, David, Sarah, Julia, Jonas, Jacob, Megan, Mark, William, Elina, Klara and Alexander. Dear sister of Jan IEDEMA, Dirkje IEDEMA and Douwe IEDEMA and friend Riemt LEGGER. Sadly missed by a number of brothers and sisters-in-law, nieces and nephews and family in Holland. Sarah was born in Holland on January 11, 1915, the daughter of the late Sjerp and Saakje IEDEMA. She was a member of the First Christian Reformed Church. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin St. Saint Thomas until Monday morning and then to the First Christian Reformed Church for funeral service at 11: 00 a.m. Interment to follow in Elmdale Cemetery. Visitation Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Donations may be made to the charity of one's choice.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

MCARTER - All Categories in OGSPI

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-06 published
LOUCKS, John Edwin " Jack"
John Edwin " Jack" LOUCKS, born on the East Back Line in Artemesia Township, Ontario on July 7, 1922, a son of the late Edwin and Mildred (WHITE/WHYTE) LOUCKS, passed away peacefully at Markdale Hospital on Thursday, May 31, 2007 at the age of 84.
After leaving the Flesherton area in 1941, Jack went to Work on the Alaska Highway. He met Edna McARTHUR and the couple were married in 1946. Jack owned and operated JL Loucks Tire Service, a tire retail and repair business in Rocky Mountain House, Alberta for many years until his retirement in 1984, where he and his wife Edna lived and raised their family.
Jack was an avid outdoorsman who loved to hunt, fish and camp and who especially enjoyed touring about in his camper visiting family and Friends. He especially liked taking each of his family for a week during the summer months when they would share time together, usually on a fishing adventure. Jack also enjoyed getting away to the "acreage" where he would relax in his woodworking hobby and just enjoying the life which it provided. His family, and particularly his grandchildren, were his "pride and joy".
He was predeceased by his beloved Edna (née McARTHUR) and is lovingly remembered by his children Tom LOUCKS (Andrea) of Coronation, Jean (Bob) WALL of Calgary, Bob LOUCKS (Shar) also of Calgary, Janice (Gary) AUSTIN of Rocky Mountain House and Ronald, also of Rocky Mountain House. Jack was also predeceased by a son, Donald. He will be sadly missed by his 16 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren. Jack will also be remembered as a dear brother by George LOUCKS and his wife Dorothy of Chesley, Doris (late Archie) CUNNINGHAM of New Hamburg, Carmen LOUCKS and his wife Marie of Kitchener, Verna (late Raeburn) ALMOND of Meaford, Milford LOUCKS and his wife Geraldine of Owen Sound, Ronald LOUCKS and his wife Margaret of Markdale and Clifford LOUCKS and his wife Ineke of Flesherton. He was predeceased by brothers Norman LOUCKS of Markdale and Ross LOUCKS of New Brunswick and a sister Jean MERLA of Sudbury and will be remembered also by sisters-in-law Mary LOUCKS of Markdale and Sandra LOUCKS of New Brunswick and is also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Following cremation, a family service and celebration of Jack's life, officiated by Reverend Doctor Brian GOODINGS, was conducted at the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher St. E. in Meaford, Ontario on Saturday, June 2 at 11: 00 a.m.
Jack's cremated remains will be interred at Rocky Mountain House, Alberta. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Centre Grey Health Services Foundation would be appreciated.
Page 6

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-21 published
McARTHUR, John Cameron
Passed away peacefully at home in Southampton after a valiant battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. John, much loved husband of Anne (née LOUGHLIN.) Loving father of Peter (Cathy) of Thornhill, Patti (Louis) of Toronto, Mary Jo (Will) of Oakville, Malcolm (Lisa) of Cambridge and Jane of Toronto. Dear Bumpa to Colin, Ian, Graeme, Aidan, Cameron, Daniel and Nicholas. Also survived by his brother Don of London. Predeceased by his parents Malcolm and Lettie and by his brother Neil. John was a long time employee of Bell Canada retiring in 1990 after 42 years of service. After moving to Southampton John was very active and happily involved with the Chantry Centre, the Propeller Club and Marine Heritage. Visitation will be held Friday June 22, 2007 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. at the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Patrick's Church, Southampton, on Saturday at 11 a.m. Interment of Ashes, Southampton Cemetery. If desired Expressions of Remembrance to Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre Palliative Care Program or Marine Heritage Southampton. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-30 published
SEELEY, Sherman George
In Meaford on Thursday, June 28, 2007 at the age of 70. Sherman SEELEY, son of the late Norman Austin and Marjorie Ethel (nee GREIG) SEELEY. Beloved husband of Doreen BURNETT and much loved father of Sheryl (Dan) TOMPKINS of Carvel, Alberta and Michelle McARTHUR of Owen Sound. Predeceased by an infant daughter, April, in 1976. Sadly missed grandfather of David, Matthew, Christopher and Meghan TOMPKINS and Nicole and Britney McARTHUR. Dear brother of Shirley (late Bill) KEILY of Owen Sound. Remembered by nephew Shawn (Jennifer) KEILY of Meaford and their children Cameron and Nicolas and by nephew Darren (Robin) KEILY of Peterborough. Remembered also by Doreen's mother Amelia BURNETT (late Alex) of Owen Sound and formerly of St. Vincent Township. Dear brother-in-law of Faye (Cal) HESLIP of Meaford, Darlene REID (Tim HARNES) of Bognor, and Carol TAILOR/TAYLOR of Thornbury and uncle to Mike and Marilyn HESLIP of Meaford and their children Jeremy and Dalton, Chad REID (Jen LYON) of Meaford, Krystal (Wil) BULSINK of R.R.#3 Markdale, and Joey and Jessie TAILOR/TAYLOR of Thornbury. Lovingly remembered by an aunt, Rita GREIG, of London. Friends will be received at the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher Street East in Meaford on Sunday from 2 to 4 and from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral services, officiated by Pastor Rosanne JUDGE, will be conducted at Meaford United Church on Monday July 2 at 11 o'clock with committal and interment to follow at Lakeview Cemetery, Meaford. As your expression of sympathy and in lieu of flowers, donations to Temple Hill United Church or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-18 published
BEACOCK, Hazel (née SMITH)
Of Wiarton passed away at Wiarton Hospital surrounded by her family on Friday, August 17, 2007 in her 95th year. Cherished mother of Lorna (Francis) EDMONSTONE of Sauble Beach and Diane (Geoff) EPSTEIN of Waterloo. Special grandmother of Lisa (Steve) ASHTON, Greg (Anita) EDMONSTONE, Scott (Shannon) Edmondstone, Graham EPSTEIN and Jordan EPSTEIN and great-grandmother of Tyler ASHTON and Blaise and Savana EDMONSTONE. She will be sadly missed by her sister-in-law Clara SMITH of Lion's head as well as many nieces, nephews and her many special Friends. Hazel was predeceased by her husband Norman, parents Sarah (McARTHUR) and Patrick SMITH, brothers Alf, Charlie, Angus, Patrick (Tiny) and Bill and sisters Kathleen EBEL, Stella BRANNICK and Ellen HEPBURN. Visitation will be held at the George Funeral Home, Wiarton on Sunday, August 19, 2007 from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. The funeral service to celebrate Hazel's life will be held at the funeral home on Monday, August 20, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Bayview Cemetery. Donations made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society or charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-20 published
LAVERGNE, Mary Susan (née MARVELL)
Peacefully and surrounded by her family at the Kelso Pines Retirement Home in Owen Sound on Sunday August 19th, 2007. In her 72nd year, Mary Susan Lavergne (née MARVELL,) the beloved wife of the late Ronald J. LAVERGNE. Loving and cherished mother of Stephen LAVERGNE and his fiancee Kathy, Sharyn RUSSELL, Brian LAVERGNE and his wife Lorna, Ann Marie and her husband John McARTHUR and Susan LAVERGNE. Loving grandmother of Matthew, Kasey, Paige, Connor, Andrew, Katelynn, Joshua, Graydon and Zabree. Dear sister of Gordon MARVELL and his wife Joyce, Peggy (Mrs. James CORCORAN), Janet and her husband Mac MacDONALD, Marjorie and her husband Wayne STURGEON, and Ken MARVELL and his wife Christine. Fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Mary demonstrated her strength and spirit throughout her lengthy illness and passing. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Tuesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Church on Wednesday morning at 10 a.m. Father Stephen LACROIX officiating. A Vigil service will be held at the funeral home on Tuesday evening at 8: 30 p.m. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimers' Society, the Canadian Cancer Society and the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-27 published
MacARTHUR, John Bradley " Brad"
Suddenly on August 25th, 2007. John Bradley MacARTHUR, loving husband of Marianne (née HILLYER.) Loving father of Nicholas and Sarah. Funeral Arrangements will be announced in a later edition.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-28 published
MacARTHUR, John Bradley " Brad"
Passed away suddenly on Saturday August 25, 2007. In his 53rd year. Loving husband and best friend of Marianne (née HILLYER.) Treasured Dad of Nicholas and Sarah both at home. Loving son of Lawrence and Marjorie (née WILSON,) of Owen Sound. Loved big brother of Lynn SMITH, of Kamloops, British Columbia and Laurie and her husband Jeff SMITH of Owen Sound. He will always be remembered with love and affection by his brothers and sisters-in-law Charlene JOHNSON (Mrs. Terry MacARTHUR) of Spence's Bridge, British Columbia, Paul and his wife Elizabeth HILLYER, Peter and his wife Danielle HILLYER, Tim and his wife Paddy HILLYER, Pat and her husband Allan GORDANIER, Tom and his wife Ann Marie HILLYER; all of Owen Sound, Michael HILLYER, of Meaford, Ruthanne “Puddy” and her husband Mitch HOPKINS, of Georgia, Jane STEVENS, of Montana and Frances and her husband Mark HARDIG, of Indiana. He will be fondly remembered by his aunts, uncles; his many cousins and special nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his brother Terry (August 24, 2006,) sisters-in-law Judy HILLYER, Diane Gow HILLYER and by his parents-in-law Mary and Bill HILLYER. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Catholic Church on Thursday morning at 10 a.m. A Vigil Service will be held at the funeral home on Wednesday evening at 8: 30 p.m. Interment in Saint Mary's Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Diabetes Association, Heart and Stroke Foundation, Saint Mary's Church or to the Arthritis Society would be appreciated by the family.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-06 published
McARTHUR, Dorothy Adelaide
At Lee Manor, Owen Sound, on Wednesday, August 29th, 2007, at the age of 86 years, Dorothy McARTHUR of Owen Sound and formerly of Port Elgin. Wife of the late Don McARTHUR. Grandmother of Marc HEMSTOCK and his wife Michelle, and Lee Ann and her husband Rick CORBETT, all of Owen Sound. Great-grandmother of Noah, MacKenzie, Marlee, and Brian. She is also survived by her son-in-law Phillip HEMSTOCK and his wife Effie of Owen Sound, sisters-in-law Jean PARKER and her husband Horrie of Port Elgin, and Betty REID of Southampton. She is predeceased by her daughter Marilyn HEMSTOCK in 1993. Friends may call at the at the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin, (Town of Saugeen Shores), from 10: 00 to 11:00 a.m. on Saturday, September 29th, 2007. A funeral service to be conducted in the chapel on Saturday at 11: 00 a. m. with the Rev. Gordon WILLIAMS officiating. Interment Sanctuary Park Cemetery, Port Elgin. Memorial contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Memorial and portrait online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-14 published
HINDMAN, Grace (née CUNNINGHAM)
Of Owen Sound, and formerly of Lion's Head, passed away at Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre Owen Sound on Wednesday, September 12, 2007 in her 85th year. Loving mother of John (Charlotte) of Tobermory, Ron of Victoria and Steven (Sharon) of Edmonton. Also sadly missed by grandchildren Kevin (Marlene) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Nathan, Chris (Tania,) Dan, Marina, and Kaitlyn HINDMAN, great-grandchildren Beth and Whitney STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Nicole and Tori BAILEY, great-great-grandchildren Taylor McARTHUR and Braden PALMER, brother Roger (Jane) CUNNINGHAM of Pike Bay, sisters Alma (Murray) ANDERSON of Owen Sound, Eileen WHITTAKER of Lion's Head, brother-in-law Jack JACQUES of Port Elgin and son-in-law Morgan STEWARD/STEWART/STUART of Lion's Head, as well as many nieces and nephews. Grace was predeceased by her husband Lorne, daughter Marilyn STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, two infant daughters, parents Olive (ROGERS) and Imri CUNNINGHAM, a sister Ruby JACQUES and a brother in infancy. Visitation will be held at the Davidson Chapel, Lion's head on Friday, September 14th from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. The funeral service to celebrate Grace's life will be held at the Chapel on Saturday, September 15th at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Eastnor Cemetery. Donations made to Leukemia Research Fund or a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-24 published
BELROSE, Earl
Of Tobermory passed away surrounded by his family on Saturday, September 22, 2007 in his 76th year. Cherished father of Holly ECKENSWILLER and her husband Dave of Tobermory, Nick BELROSE of Wiarton, Shelley McARTHUR and her husband Bryce of Tobermory and Lynn BELROSE and his wife Lorrie of Bobcaygeon. Special grandfather to Matthew and his wife Noelle, Debbie, Michael and his wife Felicia, Lori and her husband Mike, Angie and her husband Ronnie and Troy, great-grandfather to Hunter, Houston, Sydney and Ronnie and special uncle to Sheree. He will be sadly missed by his sister Linda TUPLING and her husband Bruce of Erin, best friend Freida Warder as well as his companion Sailor. Earl was predeceased by his wife Edna, parents Debra (HOPKINS) and Wesley BELROSE, brothers Gordon, King, Albert, Herbie and Gerald and sisters Gwen and Donna. Visitation will be held at the Light and Life Chapel, Highway 6, Tobermory on Monday, September 24, 2007 from 2: 00 to 4: 00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. where the funeral service to celebrate Earl's life will be held on Tuesday, September 25, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. with Pastor Jerry CLUBINE officiating. Interment Dunk's Bay Cemetery. Donations made to the Lion's head Hospital would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Arrangements entrusted to the George Funeral Home, Wiarton. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-26 published
McARTHUR, Dorothy Adelaide
Passed away at Lee Manor, Owen Sound, on Wednesday, August 29th, 2007, at the age of 86 years, Dorothy McARTHUR of Owen Sound and formerly of Port Elgin. Wife of the late Don McARTHUR. Grandmother of Marc HEMSTOCK and his wife Michelle, and Lee Ann and her husband Rick CORBETT, all of Owen Sound. Great-grandmother of Noah, MacKenzie, Marlee, and Brian. She is also survived by her son-in-law Phillip HEMSTOCK and his wife Effie of Owen Sound, sisters-in-law Jean PARKER and her husband Horrie of Port Elgin, and Betty REID of Southampton. She is predeceased by her daughter Marilyn HEMSTOCK in 1993. Friends may call at the at the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin, (Town of Saugeen Shores), from 10 to 11 a.m. on Saturday, September 29th, 2007. A funeral service to be conducted in the chapel at 11: 00 a.m. with the Rev. Gordon WILLIAMS officiating. Interment Sanctuary Park Cemetery, Port Elgin. Memorial contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Memorial and portrait online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-26 published
McANGUS, Donald Alexander “D.A.&ldquo
At the South Bruce-Grey Health Centre, Chesley, on Thursday, October 25th, 2007 at the age of 85 years, D.A. McANGUS of Chesley and formerly of Paisley. Husband of the late Edith YUILL. Dear father of James HOPPER and his wife Nancy of Wallaceburg, and Donald and his wife Debbie of Paisley. Grandpa of Sarah and her husband Ryan VANDERPUTTEN of Calgary, Graham HOPPER of Toronto and Bree-Ann McANGUS, and Kevin McANGUS both of Paisley. Proud great-grandpa of Michael VANDERPUTTEN. Brother of Wilda and her husband Alex LAMONT of Saugeen Township. He is also survived by his sister-in-law Mary McARTHUR of Port Elgin. He is predeceased by his parents William and Kathleen McANGUS, and by his brothers Glen and Jack. Friends may call at the W. Kent Milroy Paisley Chapel, 216 Queen St. S., Paisley, from 1: 00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 27th, 2007. Funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Douglas Hill Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Municipality of Arran-Elderslie for the Paisley Medical Centre would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Portrait and memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-29 published
McARTHUR, Julie Elizabeth
Suddenly at home on Thursday October 25, 2007. Beloved daughter of Leo and Helen, loving sister of Blair (Brenda) and Shawneen (Alvin) and dear friend of Cam WALTERS and his family. Dear Aunt of Rachael, Dylan and Connor, niece of Joe MAROON, Louise Roe, Theresa May, John McARTHUR and the late Betsy MAROON. Granddaughter of the late Betty and Joe MAROON (Windsor) and Mary and Archie McARTHUR (Owen Sound.) Also survived by her family, Friends, cousins and all relatives and will be remembered dearly by her co-workers at Miller Paving Limited and Miller Waste Systems. Friends may call at Marshall Funeral Home, 10366 Yonge Street, Richmond Hill (4th traffic light north of Major Mackenzie Drive) on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Tuesday October 30, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. at Good Shepherd Catholic Church, 21 Simonston Blvd., Thornhill. Cremation. In Julie's memory donations to the York Region United Way, Yellow Brick House or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. Please visit the Miller Group website www.millergroup.ca, to leave a personal message and tribute and enjoy some remembrances of Julie (Jubes).
Footprints
One night a man had a dream. He dreamed he was walking along the beach with the Lord. Across the sky flashed scenes from his life. For each scene, he noticed two sets of footprints in the sand; one belonged to him, and the other the Lord. When the last scene of his life flashed before him, he looked back at the footprints in the sand. He noticed that many times along the path of his life there was only one set of footprints. He also noticed that it happened at the very lowest and saddest times is his life. This really bothered him and he questioned the Lord about it. Lord, you said that once I decided to follow you, you'd walk with me all the way. But I have noticed that during the most troublesome times in my life, there is only one set of footprints. I don't understand why when I needed you the most you would leave me. The Lord replied, My precious, precious child, I love you and I would never leave you. During those times of trial and suffering, when you see only one set of footprints, it was that I carried you.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-31 published
WYONCH, Eva Delena (formerly WILSON, née GRANVILLE)
Of Tobermory peacefully with her family at her side at Grey Bruce Health Services Lion's head on Monday, October 29th, 2007. The former Eva Delena GRANVILLE in her 92nd year. Loving wife of the late Dan WYONCH (2001) and Pat WILSON (1944.) Devoted mother of Goldie and her husband Clayton MIELHAUSEN, of R.R.#2 Lion's Head; Patsy and her husband Dale McARTHUR, of Port Elgin; Romayne WILSON and his wife Marie, of Tobermory; and Gail and her husband Barry THORN, of Hope Bay. Eva will be forever remembered by her 14 grandchildren and several great-grandchildren. Sadly missed by her daughter-in-law Laverne WILSON, of Port Dover; and her many nieces, nephews and Friends. Predeceased by son John (1955) 4 brothers; 2 sisters; and her parents Joseph and Lydia. Family will gather for a private family service at the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel, Sauble Beach (519) 422-0041 on Thursday, November 1, 2007. Family invite Friends to join with them at Dunk's Bay Cemetery, Tobermory for a graveside service on Thursday afternoon at 1: 30 p.m. Following interment, there will be a reception at the Royal Canadian Legion Hall (7437 Hwy. 6 Tobermory). As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Tobermory Health Clinic Auxiliary, or the charity of your choice would be appreciated and may be made through the funeral home. In living memory of Eva a Maple tree will be planted in the funeral home meadow by the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel. Condolences may be expressed on-line at www.whitcroftfuneralhome.com.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-10 published
LIEVAART, Ingelbert
Age 86, 1920 Schoonrewoerd, Netherlands -- 2007 Whitby, Ontario
"Verily, verily, I say unto you, 'He that heareth My Word, and believeth on Him that sent Me, hath everlasting life, and shall not come into condemnation; but is passed from death unto life.' " John 5: 24
On Sunday, January 7th, the Lord in His mercy took home our dear Papa, Opa, and great Opa peacefully, in his sleep. Papa was predeceased by his treasured wife, Betsy, in 1993, also by brothers Leen and Dirk. Papa will be keenly missed by his children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren: Ellie (Eleanor) and Dennis FOX -- Thunder Bay, Tracey and Grant McARTHUR -- Spencer and Lochlan -- Montreal, Luke and Anna FOX -- Levi -- Burlington, Gregory and Annie FOX Mary-Anne, David and Joel -- Vars, Jerry and Shelly FOX -- Casselman, Joey (Johanna) and Andy BUWALDA -- Whitby, Timothy BUWALDA -- Bowmanville, David BUWALDA -- Toronto, Joshua-Dan BUWALDA -- White River, Ingelbert LIEVAART II -- London, Friend Lena CARNEY- ANDREW, Renie, Geraldine. Papa will also be missed by the Moraal families, other relatives and Friends Visitation will be at the Mount Lawn Reception Centre and Chapel, 21 Garrard Road, Whitby, Ontario, (905) 665-0600 Thursday, January 11th, 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. The funeral takes place at 10: 30 a.m. Friday morning, January 12th, with interment to follow at 2 p.m. in Rosemount Memorial Gardens, Peterborough. Donations to Durham Christian High School (Technology) are gratefully accepted. We wish to thank all for their kind thoughts, visits, letters and cards, wonderful gifts of food, flowers, encouragement and prayers. Also for the excellent care provided by Durham East Community Care Access Centre, and special caregivers. Thank you, Pastor Bernie BAKKER, for your spiritual support.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-08 published
Officer, two teens die in crash
By Greg McARTHUR, Page A9
Toronto -- A 28-year-old off-duty police officer was among three people killed in a fiery car crash Saturday morning in the Toronto suburb of Vaughn.
Constable Davis AHLOWALIA, who had been with York Regional Police for 2½ years, was killed when a westbound minivan occupied by three people swerved into oncoming traffic at 3: 30 a.m., colliding with his eastbound Honda Civic.
Two occupants of the minivan, both teenagers, were killed in the accident on Major Mackenzie Drive. The third occupant, who was severely burned, is in critical condition at the hospital, York Regional Police said late last night.
During his short time with the force, Constable AHLOWALIA launched a fundraising drive for a Jamaican orphanage. He spent many of his vacations in India and Jamaica, working with the poor and Human Immunodeficiency Virus patients. He was stationed out of the force's headquarters in Newmarket.
"This is truly a tragedy that someone so young, with so much to give is gone. Policing is a family and Davis's loss will be felt by every member of York Regional Police," Chief Armand LA BARGE said.
"We extend our deepest sympathy to Davis's many Friends and family and we will be supporting them in their time of grief."
Investigators are still trying to determine what caused the minivan to swerve. The force's traffic bureau asks anyone with any information to call 1-866-876-5423 ext. 7703, or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-16 published
He steered Canada's answer to the Peace Corps through rough waters
As executive director of the Company of Young Canadians in the idealistic Sixties, he fended off critics who said it was infiltrated by Communists
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
Toronto -- As a toddler during the Depression, Alan Martin CLARKE helped his mother hand out food to men riding the rails in search of work. As a university student he spent summer months with the adult-literacy organization Frontier College, toiling on a railway gang during the day and teaching his co-workers to read in the evening.
Those early acts kicked off a lifelong commitment to adult education, social action and human rights, in which he played key roles with Frontier College, the Young Men's Christian Association, Algonquin College, the International Joint Commission and the United Nations Association in Canada.
But no job brought him more publicity, good and bad, than his stint from 1966 to 1968 as executive director of the fledgling Company of Young Canadians. He headed the government-financed agency at a time when the press and many politicians were charging it was controlled by Communists, radicals and Québécois separatists.
"Alan's life touched a lot of people," says David MacDonald, a former Conservative cabinet minister who hired Mr. CLARKE for projects several times. "He was a community educator par excellence. He had an intense interest in citizen empowerment."
Over the years, Mr. CLARKE fought for many causes, both as an employee and as a citizen volunteer. Early in his career, he played a key role in the establishment of Toronto's York University. He worked in Ottawa to help settle Vietnamese "boat people" fleeing Communism in 1979, to raise funds for African famine relief in 1985 and 1986, to help Canadians increase their reading skills through the Movement for Canadian Literacy and to turn an old Ottawa courthouse into a centre for the arts.
He first came to national prominence in the 1960s as head of the beleaguered Company of Young Canadians. The group, modelled roughly on the U.S. Peace Corps, was created by prime minister Lester Pearson's Liberals during a turbulent era when baby boomers were coming of age and questioning traditional values. The Company of Young Canadians's mandate was to deploy young Canadians in impoverished communities across the country where they would help people better their lives.
In 1967, opposition members demanded the government put the Company of Young Canadians on a short leash after two volunteers, David DePoe and Lynn Curtis, took part in a rally against the U.S. war in Vietnam.
Mr. CLARKE insisted the volunteers had acted strictly as individuals, and threatened to resign if the prime minister didn't defend the agency's independence in Parliament. Eventually, Mr. Pearson did just that, thanks to the intercession of Marc Lalonde, then a member of the Company of Young Canadians council and an adviser to the Prime Minister's Office. Mr. Lalonde would later become a cabinet minister under Pierre Trudeau.
Mr. CLARKE's victory was short-lived, however, as new charges of radicalism and overspending continued to dog the organization. In 1968, Mr. CLARKE was ordered by the office of Gérard Pelletier, then secretary of state, to fire Martin Beliveau, a Quebec employee accused of separatist leanings. Despite his misgivings, Mr. CLARKE asked Mr. Beliveau to resign, then he handed in his own resignation.
Mr. CLARKE quit on a matter of principle, says Stewart Goodings, who replaced him as executive director, and was to quit himself within a matter of months.
"No one man could have solved the dilemmas that CLARKE faced daily," wrote Ian Hamilton in his 1970 book, The Children's Crusade: The Story of the Company of Young Canadians. He praises Mr. CLARKE for fighting for the group's independence and involving the volunteers in decision making, but faults him for not hiring people capable of keeping the Company of Young Canadians on an even keel. The group was brought under government control in 1969 and finally disbanded in 1976.
Co-workers remember Mr. CLARKE as a serious man who worked long hours. But his family saw his fun-loving nature.
"Every so often he would come into our bedrooms, stark naked and carrying just a briefcase," recalls his oldest son, Andrew. "He'd say, 'Okay, I'm off to work.' The children, fearing he was so distracted he had forgotten to dress, would rush downstairs to head him off. They would find him hiding in the closet.
The son of Emily (EDGAR) and Lorne CLARKE, both teachers, he grew up in a strict Baptist home in Sudbury. The family later moved to Ottawa where he was graduated from Glebe Collegiate Institute.
While earning a degree in philosophy and ethics at the University of Toronto, he spent his summers as a labourer-teacher and later as a supervisor with Frontier College. He went on to become first a member, then chairman of the college board. He was employed during his university years, and immediately after, by the Young Men's Christian Association. In 1958, while serving as founder and first director of the Centre for Adult Education at the Young Men's Christian Association's North Toronto branch, he was a member of the group that set up York University. York recognized his contribution in 1992 by awarding him an honorary degree.
In 1958, he married Margo BRODDY, a teacher, and lived with her for more than 40 years. They separated in 1998 and were divorced in 2003. They had three children together: Andrew, Beth and Jeffrey. He had another son, Matthew DEVLIN, through a separate relationship.
Alan CLARKE never paid attention to the speed limit when driving, says his son Andrew. "The only times my dad stepped on the brakes were for stop signs, red lights and to check out pretty girls."
At the family dinner table, Mr. CLARKE challenged his children by leading discussions about current events. "He wanted us kids to learn to think things out for ourselves," says his daughter Beth.
Prior to Mr. CLARKE's appointment with the Company of Young Canadians, he served six years as executive director of the Canadian Citizenship Council and concurrently, for three years, as director of the Canadian Centenary Council. For 15 years, starting in 1970, he worked at Ottawa's Algonquin College as director of a community development project and later as director of continuing education.
In 1985, he was hired as an adviser to David MacDonald, who had been named Canadian emergency co-ordinator for the African famine. Mr. MacDonald says he was initially reluctant to hire Mr. CLARKE because he had employed him in the past, and because they were close Friends. He feared the appointment would look like nepotism.
But he went ahead when Joe Clark, then prime minister, insisted Mr. CLARKE was the only person capable of motivating Canadians to contribute. A Decima poll later showed that two out of every three Canadians made a donation.
For the next 10 years, Mr. CLARKE served as communications officer with the International Joint Commission, a Canadian-U.S. body that deals with issues concerning shared boundary waters. Mr. CLARKE joined the board of the United Nations Association in Canada in 1989, and worked there on a contract basis after his retirement from the International Joint Commission in 1996. He continued to come into the office after he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease but realized that his memory was starting to fail.
"He was remarkably calm as he faced that challenge, recalls Joan Broughton, the group's public information officer. "It was tough to watch and wonderful to watch at the same time."
In 2000, he moved in with Estelle REED, a civil servant and long-time friend. They lived together first in Ottawa and later in Toronto. She continued to care for him after he was admitted to North York Seniors Health Centre in Toronto, where he was to live for 2½ years.
Alan Martin CLARKE was born on August 1, 1929, in Stratford, Ontario He died in Toronto on June 12, 2007, of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 77. He leaves his wife of 40 years, Margo (née BRODDY;) children Andrew, Beth and Jeffrey CLARKE and Matthew DEVLIN; two granddaughters, Ella and Grace CLARKE a brother Edgar; three sisters, Mary, Harriet and Margaret; and his common-law partner, Estelle REED, . A memorial service will be held tomorrow at the First Unitarian Congregation, 30 Cleary Avenue, Ottawa at 3: 30 p.m.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-22 published
McARTHUR, John Cameron
Passed away peacefully at home in Southampton after a valiant battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. John, much loved husband of Anne (née LOUGHLIN.) Loving father of Peter (Cathy) of Thornhill, Patti (Louis) of Toronto, Mary Jo (Will) of Oakville, Malcolm (Lisa) of Cambridge and Jane of Toronto. Dear Bumpa to Colin, Ian, Graeme, Aidan, Cameron, Daniel and Nicholas. Also survived by his brother Don of London. Predeceased by his parents Malcolm and Lettie and by his brother Neil. John was a long time employee of Bell Canada retiring in 1990 after 42 years of service. After moving to Southampton John was very active and happily involved with the Chantry Centre, the Propeller Club and Marine Heritage. Visitation will be held Friday June 22, 2007 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. at the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Patrick's Church, Southampton, on Saturday at 11 a.m. Interment of Ashes, Southampton Cemetery. If desired Expressions of Remembrance to Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre Palliative Care Program or Marine Heritage Southampton. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-26 published
Ford Canada president recognized the value of a free-trade auto pact
Described as a youthful financial whiz when he took over at 42, he also persuaded head office to build a engine plant in Canada after twisting the arms of Pierre Trudeau and Bill Davis
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Roy BENNETT helped his buddies set up the "Friday Night Poker Club" while attending North Toronto Collegiate Institute in 1945. He would continue to attend its monthly sessions for more than 60 years.
During that time, he became a chartered accountant, rose through the ranks of the Ford Motor Co. of Canada to become its president at age 42 without having gone to university, and held executive and board positions with many of the country's leading businesses and institutions. But he never abandoned the regular poker-and-beer nights with his old Friends, many of whom also became business leaders.
"Whatever he did, he was committed," said Jim Hunter, who worked with him on a number of financial projects and is now president of NexGen Financial. "Whether it was business, tennis or poker, those commitments were life-long," he said. He was also very bright, affable and "a counter-thinker, who would look at a problem and come up with a different conclusion than everyone else."
Ken Harrigan, who followed Mr. BENNETT as president of Ford Canada, said his predecessor's main contribution was convincing government officials in Ottawa to negotiate a free-trade auto pact with Washington. The Canada-United States Automotive Agreement, signed in 1965, allowed free movement across the border of vehicles from Big Three auto plants in both countries. For Canada, this meant lower car prices and an increase in Canadian production, which created new jobs.
While heading Ford's Canadian subsidiary from 1970 to 1981, Mr. BENNETT worked to build a profitable operation independent of the U.S. head office. He also made relations with employees a priority and reached out to find common ground with both government and organized labour. After stepping down as president in 1981, he founded and ran Bennecon, a firm that provides cash-flow advice to large companies. At the same time, he served terms as chairman or director with BP Canada, Midland Walwyn, Jannock, Metropolitan Life Holdings Co., York University, the Mississauga Hospital, Scouts Canada and a host of other companies and organizations.
Ron Osborne, chairman of Sun Life Financial, called Mr. BENNETT a role model for accountants who want to make other contributions - "to go straight," as he put it. "He was the model director big picture, strategic, not prone to sweat the details, rigorous in his questioning, but, after the decisions were made, very supportive."
Mr. BENNETT and his wife, Gail COOK- BENNETT, were one of corporate Canada's power couples. When they were married in 1978, he was president of Ford Canada and she was executive vice-president of the C.D. Howe Institute of Research in Montreal. They met at a Canadian-American Committee meeting in Washington. At the end of one session, Dick Schmeelk, an American who served as co-chair of the group, invited them for a ride in a Cadillac to go and get a nightcap. The irony, Mr. Schmeelk said, was that the president of Ford Canada had that "first date" in a General Motors vehicle.
Over the years, they twice served on the boards of competing corporations - once in the petroleum field, once in insurance. No discussion of their respective companies was allowed at home, said Ms. COOK- BENNETT, who is now chair of the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board.
While president of Ford Canada, Mr. BENNETT persuaded the U.S. head office to build a $535-million engine plant in Windsor, Ontario, instead of Ohio, which was offering state subsidies. He alerted Queen's Park and Ottawa to the urgent need for their involvement, and arranged a meeting between prime minister Pierre Trudeau and Ontario premier William Davis while both were attending the Calgary Stampede. On the spot, the two agreed to a $68-million cash incentive plan that helped seal the deal.
The youngest of two sons of English-born parents, William Charles BENNETT and Gladys Mabel (MATTHEWS), Roy Frederick BENNETT spent his early years in Winnipeg. Roy was 10 when his father, a manufacturing agent in the woollens industry, moved the family to Toronto. In 1941, while attending Maurice Cody Public School, Roy played on the team that won the Toronto school soccer championship.
Athletics were to play an important role in his life. He enjoyed hockey, golf and squash. As a young man, he once won a tennis match against Don Fontana, who later became one of Canada's top-seeded players.
After high school, Mr. BENNETT chose a fast-track route to become a chartered accountant. He apprenticed directly with the accounting firm Lever and Hoskin, rather than attending university. He worked with the firm until 1954, when he joined Kelvinator.
Two years later, he moved to Ford Canada as supervisor of financial planning. He was made marketing manager in 1964 and vice-president of finance in 1965. In the early years at Ford, Mr. BENNETT was offered a posting in South Africa and was told it could help his chances of becoming president. He declined, preferring not to uproot his family, according to daughter Brenda BENNETT- LEARMONTH. He had married Laurie McDERMOTT in 1955 and they had three children, Bruce, Brenda and Lynne. The couple later separated and were divorced. Laurie McDermott BENNETT later died.
But opportunities knocked again at Ford Canada. Mr. BENNETT had won the admiration and backing of Ford Motor Co. chairman Henry Ford II by making himself the company expert on free trade, and on November 16, 1970, he was given the job of president.
Heading one of Canada's largest companies at 42 won Mr. BENNETT the reputation of being a wunderkind. In a profile, The Globe and Mail described him as a "youthful financial whiz who never graduated from university." Two years later, he was given the additional title of Chief Executive Officer.
When he was made president, Mr. BENNETT said he would take the job for no less than five years and no more than 10, says his son Bruce, now president of Bennecon. "He felt if you couldn't do what you wanted in 10 years, it was time for someone else to take charge."
So in 1981, he stepped down as president, although he served a brief period after that as chairman. He turned down an executive job offer at the U.S. head office because he didn't want to leave Canada. He continued to serve on the Ford Canada board until the subsidiary was privatized in 1995.
Claude Lamoureux was an executive at Metropolitan Life Holdings when Mr. BENNETT was named chair of the company's board. He went to their first meeting together prepared to answer questions about sales and finances. Instead, Mr. BENNETT wanted to know about the human resources department. "He put real emphasis on people, on having the right human resources department… on having the right team," said Mr. Lamoureux, now president and Chief Executive Officer of the Ontario Teachers' Pension Fund.
In 1986, Mr. BENNETT served on the Royal Commission on Unemployment Insurance and issued a minority report saying that plans to remove seasonal benefits would be too Draconian a measure for chronically depressed regions. He argued that an income-supplement program should be put in place before any move was made to base unemployment benefits on a full year's income. That strong sense of fair play was demonstrated again in February, 1995, when he wrote a critical letter to Ford's U.S. head office. It charged that the parent company's transfer pricing policy was suppressing profits at the Canadian subsidiary.
He called the low earnings "an embarrassment for management, employees and dealers as well as Canadian directors." The letter suggested that Ford Motor Co. buy out the minority shareholders if it was not prepared to let the Canadian operations become more profitable. A buyout plan was announced two months later.
A focal point for the BENNETT family's time together was a cottage on an island in Lake of Bays, in the Muskoka area, north of Toronto. Mr. BENNETT installed "the smallest car ferry in the world" to transport his Ford Explorer to the island, said Keith HILLYER, who had a cottage nearby. A motorized cable system pulled the ferry across. "To get on the ferry, the car had to go down a precipitous incline," Mr. HILLYER said. "He had to be careful it didn't slide off the other side."
Mr. BENNETT pursued his busy lifestyle of business, charitable, athletic and social endeavours into his late 70s - it was just last year when a diagnosis of bladder cancer forced him to slow down.
A year ago, he attended his last session of the Friday Night Poker Club and lost $120. David FLEMING/FLEMMING, one of four founding members still living, says the group plans to carry on its six-decades-old tradition.
Roy Frederick BENNETT was born in Winnipeg on March 18, 1928. He died at his Toronto home of bladder cancer on June 4, 2007. He was 79. He leaves his wife, Gail Cook- BENNETT; children Bruce, Brenda, Lynne and Christopher; and seven grandchildren. He was predeceased by his brother, Ken.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-27 published
Hospital physiotherapy pioneer was a 'tough but sympathetic' taskmaster
For more than 25 years, she was a force to be reckoned with at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, where she helped polio victims and treated Canada's first separated conjoined twins
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Isabel BRODIE was a pioneer physiotherapist who played a key role in rehabilitating children crippled by a polio epidemic that swept across North America, and treated the first set of Canadian conjoined twins to be successfully separated. For more than 25 years, she headed the physiotherapy division at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, where she was a force to be reckoned with.
She was variously described by Friends as outspoken, feisty, loud, compassionate and caring. Doctor Barry SHANDLING, the former pediatric surgeon at Sick Kids, called her "tough but sympathetic" - exactly the qualities needed for treating infants whose heads were bent to one side because of wry neck.
The condition, which is caused by a shortened muscle, can be corrected in small babies provided someone has the skill and tenacity to twist the head to its proper position. Most parents and physiotherapists do a "wishy-washy" job of this because they are too concerned about being gentle, he says. Not so Ms. BRODIE.
In 1972, she performed physiotherapy on Heather and Kristen, the first set of Canadian conjoined twins to be successfully separated. Doctor SHANDLING performed the surgery and she helped to keep them active and to mobilize their joints.
Early in her career, she had treated scores of children who had been crippled by polio. Successive epidemics had affected thousands of children across the continent until Doctor Jonas Salk of the University of Pittsburgh developed a vaccine in 1955.
"Ms. BRODIE was a very dedicated, compassionate physiotherapist who was very effective in treating of children with paralysis, particularly those who suffered from poliomyelitis in the years before the vaccine was developed," said Doctor Robert SALTER, a professor emeritus of surgery at Sick Kids.
But her contributions at the children's hospital went beyond simply treating young people. She also became involved in their lives. She invited numerous children and their families to live at her home while the youngsters were undergoing treatment.
As director of physiotherapy, however, she was a strict taskmaster who asked her staff to address her as Ms. BRODIE, recalled Anne-Marie HAMILTON, a former co-worker. Later, after stepping down for health reasons and rejoining the front-line therapy team, she asked them to call her by her nickname, Skip. "Then we got to see her soft side," Ms. HAMILTON said. "We saw she had a sense of humour."
Isabel BRODIE grew up in Oakville, Ontario Her Scottish-born father, Robert BRODIE, had travelled around the world as a ship's carpenter before building the family home. Her mother, also from Scotland, was a homemaker who often returned to the old country to visit relatives.
Ruth MacDONALD, who also grew up in Oakville, remembers bicycling along the shore of Lake Ontario with Ms. BRODIE to visit Friends in the nearby village of Clarkson when both were girls. After the outbreak of the Second World War, Ms. BRODIE joined the Royal Canadian Air Force and convinced Ms. MacDONALD to do the same.
They were among 17,000 Canadians who enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force to serve in the Women's Division, which trained those who joined in more than 40 trades. Ms. BRODIE, who enlisted in 1942, worked as an equipment assistant and achieved the rank of leading air woman. She was posted to a number of places in Canada, as well as Torbay, Newfoundland., which at the time was considered to be "overseas."
She used to talk about the snow in Newfoundland being so high that she had to go in and out through an upstairs window to get to the mess hall, said Marion LEAVITT, a close friend and frequent travel companion over the years years. She also told about talking an air force chef into cooking up some steaks so she could organize a party. After the war, but while still in uniform, she was sent to England and posted to an Royal Canadian Air Force airbase in Topcliffe, Yorkhire.
After returning to civilian life, Ms. BRODIE used her military allowance to take a three-year physical therapy course at the University of Toronto. She graduated in 1950 and practised for about four years at Toronto's Saint Michael's Hospital before moving to Sick Kids, where she worked for more than a quarter of a century.
Mary SAURIOL, who worked with her at Saint Michael's, said: "She was wonderful with children. If they wanted to run around, she ran around with them." She often took outpatients on excursions to the Canadian National Exhibition or on day camping trips.
Next to her work, Ms. BRODIE's greatest love was travelling, both within North America by camper van, and abroad, including Russia, China and several times to India. She sponsored a number of children through the Christian Children's Fund and visited some of them overseas.
Her most constant companion for travel, sports and pastimes was Mable STUBBS, a Revenue Canada employee who had also served in the air force. After the war, the two women shared an apartment and later bought a house in Clarkson. In 1988, when Ms. STUBBS was quite ill with cancer, they took their final trip together, a Mediterranean cruise. Ms. STUBBS died shortly after their return. Friends said Ms. BRODIE took a long time to recover her bounce after the loss.
Their relationship was one of Friendship and convenience, but nothing more, said her niece, Heather HEAPS. Ms. BRODIE was engaged to a man who was killed during the Second World War, and later to a second man, but she broke that relationship off when she realized she still loved the first.
A woman of eclectic interests and athletic prowess, she filled her leisure time with camping, canoeing, cross-country skiing, bird-watching, photography, wood-carving, dressmaking, gardening, playing the organ, folk dancing, and playing bridge. She took up golf in her early 70s, and went on to win three hole-in-one trophies.
Isabel BRODIE loved entertaining, said Marilyn BRODIE, a niece by marriage. "The first time I met her was at a corn roast in her backyard. She had a giant pot like a witch's cauldron."
In her early 80s, she began to develop Alzheimer's disease and could no longer drive. But that didn't ground her. She would jump on her bicycle and ride to a favourite restaurant for ribs and a rum and Coke, Ms. HEAPS said.
As her health deteriorated, she began using a cane. "Unfortunately, the cane became a lethal weapon," Ms. HEAPS added. "When dining in a restaurant, she thought nothing of smacking the waitress with the cane to get her attention."
Isabel BRODIE was born in Oakville, Ontario, on May 31, 1920. She died of complications of Alzheimer's disease at the King Nursing Home in Bolton, Ontario, on June 1, 2007, one day after her 87th birthday. She is survived by a nephew and five nieces. She was predeceased by her older brothers John, a former Mountie, and Robert, who died in Walkerton, Ontario, in 2000 when the municipal water supply there became contaminated with E. coli bacteria.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-25 published
Prince Edward Island plant pathologist led the world in potato research and breeding
Although unable to stomach spuds himself, he believed that with some laboratory tinkering the humble tuber could be the answer to beating famine in developing countries
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
As a boy, Orville PAGE had a bad experience with a potato. He either choked on one or had an allergic reaction. In any case, he never knowingly ate one again.
Yet he was to become one of the world's leading potato researchers and a strong believer in the introduction and expansion of potato production in developing countries as a means of alleviating hunger. The Ontario-born scientist worked in Peru from 1973 to 1985 as the first director of research and deputy director at the International Potato Center. The centre is a multinational institution devoted to reducing poverty through sustainable development of the potato, sweet potato and other root and tuber crops.
Dr. PAGE, known to Friends and co-workers as Ory, had earlier spent 12 years researching potatoes in Fredericton with Agriculture Canada and the University of New Brunswick. And he continued his potato work after his retirement through assignments with a number of development agencies.
As a young man, he was based in Prince Edward Island, Canada's potato capital, where he served as a pilot with the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. He went on to obtain a doctorate in plant pathology, to teach at the Ontario Agriculture College in Guelph and to spend a number of years researching banana diseases for the United Fruit Co. in both Honduras and the United States.
Colleagues at International Potato Center say Doctor PAGE set the centre's overall research policy while letting his staff get on with their individual projects without interference. They remember him as a charming but tough boss, and as a dedicated scientist with a commitment to feeding the world's burgeoning population and a reputation for looking immaculate -- even when inspecting agriculture projects in remote areas of the Third World. In his spare time, he had a passion for sailing and dabbled in studying sparrows, saying he was intrigued by the small birds' ability to adapt to local conditions anywhere in the world.
"Ory laid the groundwork for a highly recognized international potato research program," says Hubert Zandstra, a fellow Canadian who was International Potato Center's director general from 1991 to 2005. One of Doctor PAGE's major contributions, he says, was the development of sanitary measures that allow genetic material from potatoes to be exchanged among researchers around the world and to be made available for breeding in developing countries. Without those procedures, most countries would refuse entry to specimens taken from live potato plants.
Peter VanderZaag, a Canadian potato breeder, says Doctor PAGE's initial priority at the centre was to collect and classify wild and cultivated species of potato and study their properties. His team then had to find ways to transfer disease-resistant genes from plants that grow wild in the Andes to domesticated varieties, a complicated process because of the genetic makeup of potatoes.
Dr. PAGE also helped further the growing of potatoes from the plants' seeds, rather than from pieces of the tuber as had been the normal practice. This is important in Third World countries because it means all the tubers could be used for food, says Dr. VanderZaag, who was once Southeast Asian regional director with the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, of which International Potato Center is a member.
Dr. PAGE had a special interest in late blight, the fungal disease that led to one million deaths during the great Irish famine in the mid-1800s, says George Tai, a retired New Brunswick potato researcher. Late blight continues to ravage crops today, and Dr. PAGE worked to find a way to prevent it by building up resistance. Under his guidance, researchers and breeders developed many new potato varieties and introduced them to suitable locations around the world. "To a large extent," says William George BARKER, a retired potato researcher and long-time friend, "the potato presence in the world is largely his doing."
In a 1994 paper published in the Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, Dr. PAGE explained that potatoes yield more food energy per hectare than cereals and are especially valuable in developing countries that can grow more than one crop a year. The most critical problem in developing countries is the population explosion, he wrote. But potato production in the Third World is limited by the lack of disease and pest controls and the limited availability of chemical fertilizers.
Orville Thomas PAGE grew up in Burlington, Ontario, and learned carpentry skills from his father, English-born Thomas William PAGE, and used them later in life to design and finish a 12-metre wooden sailboat he called Caesar's Ghost. He passed his woodworking skills on to his son, William, a professional carver who lives in New Brunswick.
Orville's mother, Eunice Grace (née BUSCOMBE,) died when the boy was 3. He and a younger sister Grace (now BRIDLE) were raised by their father's second wife, Scottish-born Isobel REID.
The future scientist was not a stellar student at high school and was happy to sign up with the Royal Canadian Air Force when war broke out, says his daughter, Karen MARANTZ. He joined as a mechanic, but soon quit and re-enlisted to be trained as a pilot. He should have been turned down because he was colour-blind, she says. But he avoided detection by memorizing the correct responses to eye tests. Based at No. 1 General Reconnaissance School in Summerside, he flew low flights over coastal waters looking for enemy submarines. He was also the base's chief test pilot. Wartime flying in Prince Edward Island was so dangerous that 98 young airmen died there, mostly as the result of air crashes. While in the service he courted Norma Isobel ELLIS of Summerside and married her in 1944.
After the war he went to Guelph to earn a bachelor of science at the Ontario Agricultural College (then affiliated with the University of Toronto), followed by a masters and PhD from Iowa State College. From 1954 to 1957, he was an associate professor at Ontario Agricultural College. It was there he met Doctor BARKER, then a fellow member of the botany faculty. The pair went on to work together in both Honduras and Fredericton.
While in Guelph, Doctor BARKER, who had also served in the Canadian military, extolled the virtues of "army underwear" and convinced his friend to buy some with him at a surplus store. The pairs they purchased were too constrictive to wear, but became the basis of a long-running joke.
Once while Doctor PAGE was giving a scientific lecture in the United States, his friend dangled a set of army underwear from the balcony on a string. Doctor PAGE retaliated by having a pilot friend drop a package containing army underwear to Doctor BARKER using a parachute. The underwear passed back and forth on special occasions for half a century. At Doctor PAGE's 50th anniversary party, Doctor BARKER had a pair piped in on a silver tray.
From 1957 to 1959, Doctor PAGE worked in La Lima, Honduras, where he conducted research into banana diseases for the United Fruit Co. He brought along his wife and two young children. Mrs. MARANTZ says her parents flipped a coin to decide whether to go or not. At that time, United Fruit, which operated banana plantations, had near-total control of most Central American economies. He continued as a research officer with the United Fruit Co. in Norwood, Massachusetts., from 1959 until 1961.
The family then moved to Fredericton where Doctor PAGE was a research officer with Agriculture Canada's national potato program until 1964 and then a professor and associate dean of science at the University of New Brunswick until 1973. His work at the potato centre in Lima started as a one-year sabbatical from the university, but he ended up staying until his retirement in 1985. He hired staff and directed the work of some 50 PhD-level scientists and their research students. During his career he published 33 scientific papers and served as president of the Canadian Phytopathological Society.
On his retirement, he moved with his wife to a Summerside house that had been built for her parents. But he continued to work as a consultant with International Potato Center and such agencies as Canadian International Development Agency and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Over the years his work took him to more than 25 countries including China, India, Tanzania and Papua New Guinea.
In Summerside he put his knowledge of sustainable development to use as a volunteer board member with the Bedeque Bay Environmental Management Association, a non-profit group that focuses on local ecosystem issues. He helped with the establishment of the Prince Edward Island Potato Museum at O'Leary and worked on setting up a local library in a former train station. He also laid out a heritage tree walking tour that highlighted species imported from Europe by pioneers or from points abroad by early seafarers. That project won him the nickname Tree Man of Summerside.
In recent years, he began writing poetry, with environmental issues as one of his most common themes. He continued to keep up with developments in science until he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.
Orville Thomas PAGE was born in Burlington, Ontario, on February 13, 1921. He died of pulmonary arrest on August 4, 2007, in Summerside. He was 86. His wife, Norma Isobel (née Ellis), died in 2006. He leaves his daughter, Karen Marantz, his son, William PAGE, and his sister, Grace Bridle.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-03 published
Man acquitted in notorious shooting found slain
Former Toronto resident tried in Just Desserts case was deported to Jamaica in 2002
By Unnati GANDHI, Page A18
The man who was acquitted in the notorious Just Desserts shooting, but later deported, has been shot dead in Jamaica.
O'Neil GRANT was found with several gunshot wounds to his body late Monday night at a busy downtown bus terminal in west Kingston. Police say the 35-year-old was hunted down in the crowd.
"He was approached by a lone gunman on foot, who opened fire, hitting him," Leslie Green, Jamaica's assistant commissioner of police for serious and organized crime, told The Globe and Mail. "… From the investigation to date, the officers believe this may have been a reprisal, that he may have shot somebody locally some time ago."
Mr. GRANT was taken to Kingston Public Hospital shortly before midnight, where he was pronounced dead.
His death marks the final chapter of a life that, in the eyes of his family and Friends, has been hounded by tragedy and misfortune.
In April of 1994, Mr. GRANT was charged with manslaughter and robbery in the shooting death of Georgina (ViVi) LEIMONIS, who was having coffee with a friend at the Just Desserts café on Davenport Road.
After 5½ years in the Don Jail, he was acquitted of all charges by a jury in 1999.
Lawrence BROWN was found guilty of first-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison in Ms. LEIMONIS's death, and Gary FRANCIS received a 15-year sentence for manslaughter and robbery convictions.
But the publicity surrounding the shooting and Mr. GRANT's treatment in jail resounded for years afterward, and highlighted racial divisions in Toronto and concerns about immigration policy.
In a separate ruling handed down in November, 1998, Mr. Justice Brian TRAFFORD of Ontario Superior Court wrote that Mr. GRANT was unfairly treated during his time at the Don Jail, including the use of waist restraints connected to his handcuffs.
"The use of restraints… was the result, in part, of cultural insensitivity towards black people," he wrote.
And while Mr. GRANT had not been convicted of a crime since 1992, or been charged with any offences since his release from jail, the father of three was ultimately deported to his native Jamaica in 2002, from where he had come to Canada at the age of 11.
An immigration board said he had violated the terms of a stay of an earlier deportation order, one of which was failing to notify authorities of his change in address when he was being held at the Don Jail.
Heather McARTHUR, one of Mr. GRANT's lawyers, said she has kept in touch with Mr. GRANT's common-law wife, his mother and his siblings, all of whom still live in Canada. His two daughters, 7 and 18, and son, 14, learned of his death two days ago.
"They're devastated," Ms. McArthur said.
She said there is no way Mr. GRANT, who had been having a hard time adjusting to life in Jamaica where deportees are treated roughly, was involved in any criminal activity in the Caribbean country. She added he never should have been deported from Canada in the first place.
"He was an innocent man. He didn't do it. But still, he stayed in jail for over 5½ years… and despite that, they sent him down to a country where he knew nobody, he had no money, they just put him on a plane," she said. "And now, he's dead."

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-24 published
VICHERT, Gordon Stewart (1934-2007)
Gordon VICHERT was born to missionary parents, Clarence VICHERT and Constance WELCH, in Ibin, West China, and was raised in Ya-an speaking Mandarin and English. In the nineteen thirties, this remote part of China was frontier country: before the age of one, Gordon had survived a riverboat sinking and a bandit attack that killed his nurse as he lay in her arms. His schooling was handled by his parents until he returned from China to attend King Edward High School in Vancouver and Lewis and Clark High School in Spokane, Washington, where he received both the Bausch and Lomb Science Award and the Good Citizenship Award for his thorough knowledge of the U.S. constitution. As editor of the school newspaper, Gordon interviewed Senator Joe McCarthy who, he felt, was embarrassed by questions much more challenging than expected. The subsequent article in the school paper led to calls to have Gordon expelled.
After high school, Gordon worked in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Despite the offer of a scholarship to Reed University, he chose to attend McMaster in Hamilton, the university of many of his forebears, and where his great uncle, Harold Stanley STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, was Dean of Theology. At McMaster, he proceeded to a degree in Honours English, winning a number of prizes and medals, including the Alexander Scholarship. During several summers, Gordon taught English and worked as a labourer for Frontier College at Niagara, Wawa, and Kitimat, British Columbia. Winning an Honour "M" for editing the student newspaper, debating and other activities, he graduated with high honours from McMaster in 1957.
He completed his M.A. at Saint Michaels College at the University of Toronto before he and his wife, Nancy NABLO, traveled to Enugu, Nigeria, where he taught English Literature for 2 years at the Nigerian College of Arts, Science, and Technology and where their daughter Nicola Constance was born.
A second daughter, Rebecca Suzanne, was born during a short period teaching at McMaster, before Gordon completed his Ph.D. at Birkbeck College, University of London, England on a Commonwealth Scholarship. Research for his Ph.D at the British Museum included certain ancient volumes which could be viewed only under the supervision of the Archbishop of Canterbury.
Returning to Ontario, he became a member of the McMaster Faculty of English for several years and loved hiking on the Bruce Trail with Nicola, Rebecca, and young son Marcus Gregory.
Gordon left academic life to become both a candidate and an administrator for the Ontario New Democratic Party, first in Hamilton and later in Toronto, holding the positions of General Secretary and Ontario President. As a candidate for the New Democratic Party in the riding of Hamilton-Wentworth, Gordon was among the first in the long fight to clean up pollution in Hamilton and preserve Coot's Paradise and other wilderness areas. Gordon enjoyed telling the story of giving an impassioned anti-pollution speech at an all-candidates meeting; after what he thought was an especially well-reasoned plea for new environmental policies, he turned the microphone over to one of his opponents, the front runner in the election, who cleared his throat and intoned gravely, "I too, am for pollution."
Gordon and his second wife, Janice McARTHUR, moved to Saskatchewan where he worked with Premier Allan Blakeney as a special assistant and speech writer, and where he organized the Cultural Policy Secretariat. A son, Keir John, was born in Regina.
Seconded to Roy Romanow in November of 1981, Gordon was among the advisors assisting in the "Kitchen Accord" which many believe helped enshrine the Charter of Rights and Freedoms in the Constitution.
Those who encountered Gordon in the political world knew his principles, historical expertise, and passion for debate made him a great ally and formidable opponent.
In Saskatchewan, as he was enjoying a new career and new family, Gordon was diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. Relocating to West China, he taught English for two years in Xining, near his boyhood home, and where virtually no Westerners had been seen since before the Cultural Revolution. When he passed through his childhood town, local people could be heard calling his father's name. During this period, Gordon and Janice's daughter Hilary Jane (Ning Ning) was born, within view of the Tibetan Himalayas.
Gordon and his family settled in Vancouver, British Columbia where he lectured in English Literature for the University of British Columbia and the Open Learning University as much as his health would allow. For a two-year term, he was appointed by the British Columbia Lieutenant Governor to the Medical and Health Care Services Appeal Board.
It was Gordon's belief that higher education should be available to anyone who wanted it, not just those who could afford it. He particularly enjoyed his work at Frontier College and at the Open Learning University. Doctor VICHERT will be remembered by his students as a vibrant and accomplished lecturer whose particular interest was Eighteenth Century Satire.
Eldest of three boys, Gordon was brother to Bruce and to Alan, both of British Columbia.
Gordon's Friends and family are grateful that he so easily shared his love of conversation, travel, political observation, literature, hiking and film. Everyone who knew him continues to benefit from this generosity.
Donations in Gordon's memory to the Pacific Parkinson's Research Centre or the Bruce Trail Society are gratefully requested in lieu of flowers.
Please write to gordonvichertmemorial@gmail.com for information about a memorial service to be held in early 2008.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

McARTHUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-03 published
McARTHUR, June (née SKELLY.)
Died peacefully at home, as was her wish, on December 1, 2007. June lived in The Beach for over 50 years and had many family, neighbours, Friends, and colleagues there. Predeceased by her husband Harry. Proud mother of Ruth GERMANN and her husband John, Peter, and Paul. Loving Nana to Jennifer, Ella, Jamie, Jesse, Duncan and Colin. Sadly missed by Peni PATRICK and Louise. Sister to Bill (Gail) and Jim (Pat). Our deepest thanks to the Temmy Latner Palliative Team: Doctor Kevin BEZANSON, Nurses Ann DUFFY and Anne COLLINS. Your compassion knows no bounds. Our mother was larger than life, please remember her today if only for a moment. Friends will be received at the Sherrin Funeral Home, 873 Kingston Rd (West of Victoria Park) on Tuesday from 6-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held in the chapel on Wednesday, December 5, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment Resthaven Memorial Gardens. Memorial donations to the Temmy Latner Palliative Team or the Toronto East General Hospital.

  M... Names     Mc... Names     McA... Names     McAR... Names     Welcome Home

MCARTHUR - All Categories in OGSPI

McAR surnames continued to 07xar002.htm