SHABSOVE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-03 published
DEGRAW, Anthony Michael
Suddenly, as the result of an accident, on New Year's Day, Anthony Michael DEGRAW " Tony" of Newbury in his 21st year. Beloved son of Don and Karen (CAMPBELL) DEGRAW and dear brother of Lindsey and Laura and sadly missed by Sady and Felix. Loving grand_son of Dona and Arn CAMPBELL of Inwood and Sandra and Ken DEGRAW of Newbury. Fondly remembered by his aunts, uncles and cousins, Sandy Campbell, Sheila and Al SHABSOVE; Mia and Sydney, Maggie and Frank MOSHER; Jeffery (Rosanna) DEGRAW, Judy and Jim McKELLAR Courtney, Kaleigh and Matthew, Ken and Kim DEGRAW; Ashley, Brittany and Taylor as well as by his many Friends. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Van Heck Funeral Home, 172 Symes Street, Glencoe on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at St. Charles Church, Glencoe on Friday, January 5, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. Rev. Deb DOLBEAR- VAN BILSEN officiating. Interment Oakland Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to Ontario Students Against Impaired Driving or the Newbury Fire Dept.

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SHACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-23 published
POTTER, Jack
Peacefully in his 93rd year on Sunday, October 21, 2007 at Humber River Regional Hospital. Jack POTTER, beloved husband of Rose, his loving wife of 67 years. Loving father and father-in-law of Stanley and Sharon POTTER, and Linda and the late Tom MAHER. Dear brother of the late Clara (Chippy) SHACK, and Morris POTTER. Devoted grandfather of Marla BAKER and Brian SILVERSTEIN, Jonathan BAKER, and Jordan POTTER. Adoring uncle of Michael TIETELBAUM, and Carol PASTERNAK. He was a W.W.2 veteran, and an avid fisherman and bowler. After 42 years of service working for Continental Can starting as a printer and retired in 1979 as general plant manager. He and Rose were among the founding members of Club L'Chaim at Adath Israel Synagogue. A respected gentleman who will be missed by all. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Tuesday, October 23, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Adath Israel section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Donations may be made to the Jack Potter Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324, www.benjamins.ca

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SHACKELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-15 published
SCOTT, James Jim Menzies
Peacefully, with his family by his side, at Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital, Burlington on Thursday, December 13, 2007 at the age of 78. Beloved husband of Bettina 'Betsy' SCOTT. Adored father of Lynn SCOTT (Mark STRONG) of Ottawa, Brenda McAULIFFE and her husband Richard of Burlington, Greg SCOTT and his wife Lorie of Mississauga and Nancy REED and her husband Rob of Burlington. Cherished 'Grampa' of Amy-Rose, Jonathan, Jeff and Kailee, Sarah and baby Jenny. James will be dearly missed by his sister, Grace SHACKELL and her husband Stewart of Ottawa, twin-brother, Doctor John 'Spike' SCOTT and his wife Barb of Ottawa and many extended family members. James was an enthusiastic innovator with a 'craving for challenge' that spanned over his 40 years in the packaging industry. James was also past president of the Packaging Association of Canada and Canadian Paper Box Manufacturing Association (North American Packaging Association). Jim was an avid tennis player and sailor who loved life and his family with a 'passion scarcely human'. A special thank you to Pat Deley for her care and support. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 1167 Guelph Line (one stoplight north of Queen Elizabeth Way), Burlington (905-632-3333), on Monday, December 17, 2007 from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Private Family Service will be held. Cremation to follow. If desired, as an expression of sympathy, donations made to the Alzheimer Society of Canada would be greatly appreciated by the family. www.smithsfh.com

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SHADLYN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-14 published
SHADLYN, Joseph
Family man, button master, gambler. Born July 10, 1916, in Toronto. Died March 31 in Toronto of natural causes, aged 90.
It was a 1,000-to-one shot. When Joseph SHADLYN turned over a royal flush, dealt to him at a Miami casino in 1996, and walked away with $10,000 cash, his reaction was typical: inner excitement masked by outer calm and a slight smile. Joe's gambling spirit was always balanced by a rare ability to savour the experiences life dealt him while they lasted.
As one of seven siblings born to immigrant parents in downtown Toronto, Joe spent his early years shooting dice, playing sports and hanging out with his Jewish and Italian Friends. Despite the sometimes nefarious activities of his companions, he managed to avoid serious trouble, and actually became quite proficient at swimming, speed skating and handball. In the years to come, the sports would end but the love of gambling continued. Joe was able to handicap horses, play cards and shoot dice into his 90th year.
During the Depression, he left school at the age of 14 and found a job making deliveries on his bicycle for a button factory in the garment district.
Before he became Spadina Avenue's "Button Man," Joe served as an army medic in the Second World War. He took part in the invasion of Kiska Island, in the Aleutians, carrying cola bottles instead of bullets. Asked why he made this gamble, Joe responded that he wasn't going to shoot anyone.
After he returned from the war, Joe met his wife, Eva, started a family and immersed himself in the button business. Joe was never a proud man, and even after his first business in the garment district failed, he was willing to work for his competitors. Eventually, with the help of a partner and Eva, who would keep the books for more than 60 years, Joe started National Button.
Joe had his chances to build a monstrous company, but he was content with his small operation and enjoyed the other things that enriched his life: family, Friends, and gambling. Perhaps it was this contentedness and humility that, despite a major heart attack at 72, allowed him to endure cardiac rehab and work into his mid-80s - practising a lost art and maintaining a factory in an industry that had mostly moved overseas.
Joseph SHADLYN combined a keen and often quirky sense for the gambles in his life, with a lighthearted and unshakable appreciation for the moments along his journey. A few days before his passing, sitting contentedly by the fireplace in his son's home, a 90-year-old Joe remarked that he had seen it all and loved every minute of it. The smile on his face that evening showed that he truly knew just how lucky he was.
Luke JOHNSTON is Joe's grand_son-in-law.
Page L6

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SHAEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-10 published
NEUMAN, Shirley (formerly SHAEN, née WASSERMAN)
On October 31, 2007 passed away peacefully after complications from a recent illness surrounded by her loving family. In addition to her wide and loving circle of Friends, Shirley will leave a painful void in the life of her husband, Mel NEUMAN, with whom she enjoyed the best 19 years of her life. The indescribable loss will also be felt by her two children, Michael SHAEN (Anita MacKEY) and Debbie SHAEN (David WALKER.) Shirley will also be dearly missed by Mel's children, Debbie BELLAN (Phil BELLAN,) Jody ADELMAN (David ADELMAN) and Ralph NEUMAN (Miriam NEUMAN). Shirley was also a much-loved grandmother. 'Bobbie' Shirley will be missed by her grandchildren, Jeffrey, Andrew, Emma, Rachel, Laura, Marnie, Jamey, Lane (Kate), Cara, Lauren, Ruel and Jenna. Anyone and everyone who knew Shirley were immediately captured by her infectious enthusiasm, energy and joy for life. These qualities will be missed by all. Her capacity for love, Friendship and compassion will endure forever. Donations in Shirley's honour can be made to: Jewish Foundation of Manitoba, The Crohns and Colitis Foundation of Canada, or the Canadian Diabetes Association.

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SHAFMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-08 published
GARFINKEL, Louis, D.C.
On Thursday, September 6, 2007 at his home. Louis GARFINKEL, loving father of Laura, and Evan. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Lynne and Harvey KAGAN, Ava and Jerry SHAFMAN, and Gary and Stella GARFINKEL. Beloved son of William and Dorothy GARFINKEL. He will also be fondly remembered by Susan Shiller. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W., (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, September 8th at 4: 00 p.m. Interment, Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Community section. Shiva 3 Craigmont Drive. Donations may be made to the Louis Garfinkel Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, M6A 2C3, 416-789-0324 or at www.benjamins.ca

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SHAH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-27 published
SHAH, Reza Husami, P.Eng., Ph.D
Dr. SHAH passed away peacefully at his home in Acton on Saturday, November 24th, 2007 following a one-year illness. He was the beloved husband of Assiya. Reza was predeceased by his parents Dr. Ataur and Saleha and his siblings Doctor Qamar HAQUE and Razia ARIF. He will be missed by his siblings Ziaur SHAH, Zakia CHAUDHURY and Ashima CHAUDHURY, as well as many nieces, nephews, grand nieces and grand nephews. The family will receive Friends at the MacKinnon Family Funeral Home "Shoemaker Chapel", 55 Mill Street East, Acton, (1-877-421-9860 - toll free) on Tuesday, November 27th from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. and also at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 1674 Wanless Drive, Brampton on Wednesday, November 28th from 10 a.m. until the Funeral Service which will take place at eleven o'clock. The interment will follow at Fairview Cemetery, Acton. Remembrances to the Cancer Assistance Services of Halton Hills would be appreciated by the family. On line condolences and donations may be made at www.mackinnonfamilyfuneralhome.com

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SHAINHOUSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-10 published
AMAR, Sara Allison Shapiro
By Pam SHAINHOUSE and Melanie ORFUS, Page A20
Daughter, sister, wife, niece, cousin, grandchild, friend. Born September 6, 1979, in Toronto. Died July 12, 2006, in Toronto of Hodgkin's lymphoma, aged 26.
Alli's yearbook quotation, when she graduated from high-school, came from a song written by one of her favourite bands, Counting Crows: I can't remember all the times I've tried to tell myself /To hold on to these moments as they pass. Although she was afforded fewer moments than she deserved, she used her time to be a strong, bright, loving person, living for her moments with family and Friends.
Alli collected her Friends from every stage of her life. She had an especially powerful bond with her grandmother, a strong woman whose maternal influence, and keen eye for a good bargain, could be seen in her granddaughter. Alli's family and Friends will always talk about her hugs -- her full, strong, straight-from-the-heart hugs. If you gave her a mediocre hug, she would let you know and then squeeze until you understood what a true hug really was.
To complement this instinct, Alli applied tenacity and wisdom in all the right situations. When the best limousine was needed for the prom and when donations were needed for the school play, you went to Alli. When her Friends wanted to give her younger brother beer at a concert, Alli stepped in. She had a real passion to express herself. Although she had two brothers to compete with, Alli's opinions were always heard -- even if you did not want to hear them! She could, and would, confront anyone; however she did so with a balance of reprimand and encouragement.
She matched this audacity in behaviour, too. At one high-school exam, the class was given the essay question in advance. Alli saw no reason to wait. She immediately borrowed some school paper and prepared her essay at home one night. At the exam, she sneaked the fully written essay in under her sweatshirt. The only evidence of her bold move was the loud coughing she produced to hide the crinkling of the paper when she pulled it out and flattened it out on her desk. Alli emerged from the exam very well-rested.
It was not long after high school that Alli was diagnosed with cancer, in her first year of Ryerson University. Instead of letting it slow her down, she graduated with a fine arts degree at the same time as her Friends. She endured chemotherapy, radiation, and a stem-cell transplant while others were drinking beer and worrying only about finals. Instead of hiding out, she maintained Friendships and made new ones; she partied at spring break in the Dominican Republic, took a group of teenagers across the United States, and travelled to Israel with her mother. In her studies, Alli worked late nights producing plays. Her attitude, energy and strength made us all forget that she was sick.
Because Alli's focus was always on somebody else, we were so thrilled when she found someone to dote on her: Philip AMAR, her other half. Philip did not consider her cancer treatment a deterrent; he proposed to her in the presence of her ailing grandmother. Married for just under two years, Phil gave Alli the undying love, exceptional support and normalcy she deserved, supporting her through a bone-marrow transplant and other treatments.
As her Friends' lives progressed, Alli's battle with cancer continued. Realizing that there was so little support available for young adult cancer patients, she began Alli's Journey -- a non-profit organization dedicated to raising funds for education, research and support for young adults, 18 to 35, with cancer. Its opening musical gala took place a little over a month before she died and found Alli on stage encouraging others to be a friend to the young cancer patient. She will continue to give hugs and support to others through Alli's Journey.
Pam is Alli's Mom; Melanie Alli's friend.

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SHALONE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-03 published
JOHNSTON, Kenneth " Speed" Clarence
Peacefully after a courageous battle with cancer Mr. Kenneth (Speed) Clarence JOHNSTON of Blyth in his 73rd year. He is survived by his wife Thelma and by his family Glenda (Dave) NOVAK of Lyons, Illinois, Blaine (Tracy) JOHNSTON of Sherwood Park, Alberta, Dori JOHNSTON and Chris SHALONE, Lee (Albert) KWONG all of Edmonton, Sonya (Jeff) WERNER of Cambridge. Also missed by 10 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. He will be missed by Thelma's family, Wayne (Debbie) McDOUGALL, Bill (Brenda) McDOUGALL all of Blyth, Diane (Ken) ANDERSON of R.R.#1 Londesborough, Shirley (Dan) TAILOR/TAYLOR of R.R.#1 Varna and Kevin (Betty) McDOUGALL of Trenton. Also missed by 10 step-grandchildren and 5 step-great-grandchildren. Dear brother-in-law of Lloyd (Lillian) APPLEBY of R.R.#2 Blyth, Marguerite (John) PECKITT of Nepean, Don (Sharon) APPLEBY of Lucan. Also missed by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Clarence and Marjorie (GRASBY) JOHNSTON, sister Iona McLEAN, brothers-in-law Donald McLEAN and Bill APPLEBY, and by step-grand_son Luke ANDERSON. Friends will be received at the Blyth Visitation Centre of the Falconer Funeral Homes, 407 Queen Street, Blyth on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Friday January 5, 2007 at 2 p.m. Interment Blyth Union Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations to the Blyth Legion Branch #420 Building Fund, Blyth Fire Department Training Centre, or Blyth Minor Sports would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Royal Canadian Legion Branch #420 Blyth service will be held Thursday evening at 6: 45 p.m.

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SHAMY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-24 published
ROSSY, Edmund P. (1928-2007)
Passed away peacefully, at the age of 79 years, after a courageous battle with cancer, on September 22, 2007. Beloved husband of Shirley, loving father of Carol (Peter MALOUF), Alan (Roula ZEENNI) and Joanne. Cherished grandfather of Stephanie, Patrick, Christopher, William and Daniel MALOUF; Michelle, William and Christopher ROSSY; Philip and Eric TABAH. Proud uncle to his many nieces and nephews. son of the late Salim and Katrina, brother to Georgette CHACRA, Michael (Celia SHAMY), Agnes, Edward, Raymond and the late Theo, Walter, Fred and George. He will be remembered as a loving and devoted husband, father, grandfather and friend. His commitment, sense of duty and generosity was much appreciated through his involvement with his church and its beautification program. He was a past president of St. George Antiochian Orthodox Church and a life member of the Order of St. Ignatius. Edmund was a partner of "S. Rossy Inc" and founding partner of "Dollarama" stores. He was highly respected by his employees and associates. Dad will always be remembered for his courage, grace and honour. God bless you Dad. We will cherish you and your legacy forever. The family will receive condolences at St. George Antiochian Orthodox Church, 555 Jean Talon East, Montreal, on Sunday from 7-9 p.m., Monday from 2-5 and 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday, September 25, 2007 from 10 a.m. followed by the funeral at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. George Antiochian Orthodox Church would be greatly appreciated. The family wishes to express their gratitude to Doctor April Shamy, Doctor David Melnychuk, Doctor Barry Stein; oncology nurses Graetha and Kathy and caregiver Mina as well as the lovely palliative care team at the Jewish General Hospital.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-05-30 published
CHUTER, Harvey Edwin
Peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Tuesday, May 29, 2007. Harvey CHUTER of Owen Sound in his 88th year. Beloved husband of the late Audrey (née BUTLER.) Dear father of Catherine and her husband Dan SHANAHAN of Sarnia, Marlene and her husband Rick BURNS and Debbie and her husband Greg MARTIN all of Owen Sound and Trevor and his wife Shelley of Sarnia. Sadly missed by four grandchildren Sharleen and her husband Paul LEONE, Kimberly and her husband Paul HURST, Chevonne MARTIN and Brendon MARTIN and five great-grandchildren Jestyn, Jayla, Lexie, Rachel and Leighton. Also survived by two sisters Ida McBRIDE of Exeter and Bessie TOWNSHEND of Clinton and two sisters in law Tillie ISAAC and Florence CHUTER. Predeceased by four sisters Doris, Mary, Margaret and Irene and three brothers Bus (Elliott), Tom and Wilfred. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home 519-376-3710 for visiting on Thursday evening from 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at St. George's Anglican Church on Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Father Ed WAGNER officiating. There will be visiting at the church on Friday afternoon from 1 o'clock until service time. Interment, Greenwood Cemetery. Memorial donations to St. George's Anglican Church, Crescent Athletic Club or the G.B.R.H.C. Foundation would be appreciated.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-27 published
Judge caused a revolution in Ontario family and youth laws
Wronged by his kindergarten teacher, he never forgot the inequity and, as an adult, developed a keen desire to set things right. 'He was greatly offended at injustice'
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
In 1966, Ross FAIR was the youngest man to become a judge in the Ontario Provincial Court. He was just 39. Appointed to the family and criminal divisions, he made his greatest impact in family and youth law reform by influencing Queen's Park's decision to take a long look at the antiquated Deserted Wives and Children Maintenance Act and the Juvenile Delinquents Act. The result was the Family Law Act and the Young Offenders Act.
Ross Harold FAIR grew up in St. Catharines, Ontario, where he was the youngest of five boys. His father Willard worked in insurance, but it was the work of his mother Helen, a legal secretary, that inspired him to choose law as a career.
His sense of injustice developed early in life. Left-handed by nature, he was sent home from kindergarten with a note saying he had been suspended until he started using his right hand, at which point he'd be "welcomed back." The lesson came hard and forever introduced him to ideas about injustice.
Questions of fairness returned less than 10 years later, after the outbreak of the Second World War. Just 14, he watched, perplexed, as Friends and their older brothers headed off to fight. In the end, two-thirds of his classmates joined the military, and a startling percentage of them died in battle. One high-school friend went Absent Without Leave and hid out in the FAIRs' basement, causing much grief for Ross's mother, who was torn between handing him over and keeping him hidden. Another friend joined up reluctantly, certain he'd never make it home. He was right. He was shot dead in Holland.
For his part, Ross was troubled less by the prospect of war. As a teenager, he had spent his summers at a military camp in Petawawa, Ontario - a fairly typical experience for a boy during the early 1940s. He eventually lied about his age and joined the navy at 17 to be stationed at St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, as a wireless operator.
After the war, he completed high school in Hamilton in a program designed for veterans (he graduated alongside Lincoln Alexander, who later became Ontario's 24th lieutenant-governor), then studied political science and economics at Victoria College, University of Toronto. In 1948, he entered Osgoode Hall law school, which at the time entailed going to classes in the morning and then articling for a law firm in the afternoon. His first job was working for lawyer Fred Gardiner, who went on to become chairman of Metropolitan Toronto and the namesake of Toronto's Gardiner Expressway. Between the mundane work of serving documents and searching land titles, the student had the chance to sit in on some of Mr. Gardiner's criminal cases.
"You would hear the clacking in the cells down below and these people, some of them in handcuffs and some of them with ankle chains, stumbled up… And they could be a sorry sight; some of them would have been arrested just a few hours before," he once recalled. "They would come up and get in the prisoner's dock, and Fred would say: 'Well, that is a sorry lot we have got to work with today. It is getting so bad you can't tell the prisoners from the lawyers.' "
In 1952, he was called to the bar. He married his childhood sweetheart, Jean WESTELL, the same year and moved to St. Catharines to join a law firm. But while he enjoyed the feeling of belonging that came with being back in his hometown, there were, as he later put it, "too many in-laws and too many outlaws." Six years later, the family moved to Kitchener, Ontario, and a new law firm where, after the death of his father, he persuaded his mother to return to work as a legal secretary.
In Kitchener, he became more involved in family law and with juvenile offenders, but did not like what he found. What's more, he let his disapproval be known. "We were the poor country cousins of the judicial system," he recalled years later. "Back in the early sixties, the family court was being treated as if they were ashamed of it, and the kids didn't have a chance… we were meeting in basement halls and legion halls and they had no facilities."
While the shift away from criminal law came as a surprise to his colleagues, Judge FAIR found the drama behind family law cases to be irresistible. "In those days, most lawyers wouldn't be caught dead in family court -- myself included -- until I began to see what a disaster was going on, and what a hardship it was for people who were there," he told the Provincial Judges Oral History Project in 1995.
At Easter in 1966, he learned he was to be the new magistrate and juvenile and family court judge for the County of Waterloo. The news came as a complete surprise. He and his wife were spending the holiday weekend in New York when he heard the news in a call from his law partner. In retrospect, he came to believe that his appointment had occurred as a result of his criticism of the system.
In 1977, he was named senior judge for Central-Western Ontario, the same year he was chosen as Kitchener's citizen of the year, primarily because of his work as an advocate for families. His greatest influence was in pretrial mediation services and in reducing confrontational settlements so that families suffered less dislocation. He also hatched community solutions for young people who found themselves in trouble with the law, all the while refusing to be silent about the injustices he discovered. In fact, he fairly shrieked.
"I was screaming about inadequate resources, screaming about the terrible way the damned spousal assault cases were being dealt with, and support locally," he told the history project. "Screaming about the crown attorneys and everybody else not doing anything but paying lip service, screaming about the government putting us in basements and in terrible digs all over the place, and screaming about the training schools situation."
Meanwhile, he sometimes sidestepped policy in favour of his own more expedient solutions. For instance, a man who found himself tangled up in bureaucratic technicalities over a custody payment arrived in court, along with his ex-wife. The couple agreed that nothing was owed but that the man's employer continued to garnishee wages. Judge FAIR immediately picked up his telephone and called the company's accounting office.
"He sorted it out in 20 minutes," said his colleague, Justice Ken PEDLAR of Ontario Superior Court. "He told them: 'The man is paid up and his wife confirms it. I don't want any more pay to come off his cheque.' He was greatly offended at injustice, which is fundamentally about the abuse of power. He tried to correct it whenever he could, with great insight and understanding of the human condition."
Over the years, Judge FAIR went public with his beliefs about the system and spread the word as president of the Ontario Family Law Judges Association and with Big Brothers. He also spoke at high schools, and met with students in social-work programs to alert them to flaws in the judicial system.
"He went from the dark ages to enlightenment in an environment where it's always difficult. From youth being delinquent to youth needing a chance, and he was a leader in that group," said Michael O'SHAUGHNESSY, a Brockville lawyer who appeared before Judge FAIR many times.
In 1985, Judge FAIR and his family moved to Kingston to work as one of two family court judges in the Kingston and Brockville areas. To the end, he championed mediation as an effective courtroom tool for families. He retired in 1993 but continued to work per diem. In 2003, he had the satisfaction of seeing the Ontario laws that he had worked so hard to put in place become further improved and overhauled as the Youth Criminal Justice Act.
Ross Harold FAIR was born October 25, 1925 in Peterborough, Ontario He died June 22, 2007, in Kingston. He was 81. He is survived by his wife Jean and by daughters Janet and Judy. He also leaves grandchildren Bayley and Zack.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-14 published
Canadian turned two epiphanies into a career of 'staggering impact'
Much lauded writer formed a bond with readers and used Christianity as a powerful element in her work
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- It was a June night in 2003 when Margaret AVISON accepted the Griffin Poetry Award for the book Concrete and Wild Carrot. Her humility filled the room.
"This is ridiculous," she told those in attendance, after the applause died down. "I do appreciate the occasion and the honour, but I don't see how anybody could pick only one winner." After reflecting, she added: "What makes you write a poem is so remote from this kind of honour."
However, Ms. AVISON was no stranger to applause. She won the Governor-General's Award for poetry twice - the first time in 1960 for her debut collection Winter Sun and again 30 years later for No Time. She also won a Guggenheim Fellowship (1956), a Jack Chalmers Award (2003) and three honorary doctorates, and was made an officer of the Order of Canada. She was 85 years old when she won the Griffin. Judges commended her for "the many decades she has forged a way to write, against the grain, some of the most human, sweet and profound poetry of our time."
Ms. AVISON's reputation is as a rigorously intellectual poet - to understand the depth of her words, one must return to them again and again.
"You work your way into it," said writer Dennis Lee, "and then, after six months, you wonder why you ever found the poem forbidding.
Her work was admired greatly by a wide range of writers, readers and academics, from George Bowering and Gary Geddes to Margaret Atwood.
Ms. AVISON experienced two epiphanies in her life: one specifically having to do with writing poetry, and one related to her life as a devout Christian and writing poetry from inside this frame. The first arrived in a Grade 9 poetry club at Toronto's Humberside Collegiate. Teacher Gladys STORY offered a suggestion: For the next 10 years, don't use the first person in any of your poetry. Ms. AVISON took the advice, allowing her to form a generous and committed bond with her readers, whom she believed to be part of the creative process.
"A poem needs to be received to be complete," she said. "So yes, I write for listeners out there somewhere… not to give to, teach or encourage them, but to acknowledge together that something has touched off a poem."
Her second epiphany came in her early 40s, shortly after publication of her first collection of poems. Her awakening to Christianity dramatically shaped her writing and the rest of her life; she came to be compared to 17th-century metaphysical poets John Donne and George Herbert, as well as Gerard Manley Hopkins and T.S. Eliot.
"Her poetry had a staggering impact," said Toronto writer Ken Babstock. "She is easily one of the best poets Canada has produced. [She is] theologically sophisticated… reading her work, I had not come across syntax like that in any Canadian poetry up to that point. Syntax is where real complex thought happens."
Margaret AVISON was born in Galt, Ontario, in 1918, the year the First World War ended. Her mother played the church organ and her father was a Methodist minister. Shortly after her birth, her parents, brother and sister moved west - Margaret was just 7 when she had her first poem published in the Calgary Herald.
In 1930, the family moved to Toronto. She graduated in 1940 from Victoria College, University of Toronto, having studied English literature under E.J. Pratt and Northrop Frye.
After graduation, she worked in office jobs for a number of years, freeing herself to write in the evenings. In 1956, she was awarded her Guggenheim Fellowship to study in Chicago. This was a transformative experience, not only because she was finally able to devote her time entirely to a manuscript but because this resulted in the 1960 publication of Winter Sun. She was awarded her first Governor-General's Award later that same year.
It was also the year that Christianity became a powerful element in her work. Critic Carmine Starnino warns readers not to assume that her writing is conservative, however: Beneath her words, "untapped revolutionary properties wait like the insides of a shaken bottle of bubbly."
Generations of writers received Ms. AVISON's poetry as a gift. She was a pleasure, a challenge and, in many ways, a model.
"I listen to [Ms. AVISON's] infinite sympathy for the natural world, her sensitivity to the physical weather of the soul, her razor-sharp eyes, which move like a hawk's and a sighted mole's, her wry debates with herself, her ornery, unfashionable courage, her poetic genius for placing words in such a way that I feel as if I'm meeting them for the first time," said writer Elizabeth Hay.
Ms. AVISON returned to Victoria College and received her master's degree in 1964. As part of her studies, she attended an inspiring writing workshop at the University of British Columbia, where she worked with Black Mountain poets Robert Creeley, Charles Olson and Denise Levertov. Her second collection, The Dumbfounding, was published in 1966. With two published books and a spreading reputation, Ms. AVISON began teaching literature at Scarborough College, University of Toronto.
In 1968, she put poetry aside and dedicated herself more completely to religion. She began working for Evangelical Hall, a Presbyterian mission in Toronto. One of her tasks was to hold poetry workshops at the Queen Street Mental Health Centre.
In 1973, she briefly returned to academia as the first writer-in-residence at the University of Western Ontario in London, Ontario, and published her third poetry collection, Sunblue, in 1978. Shortly afterward, her mother fell seriously ill. As primary caregiver, Ms. AVISON curtailed her literary work again in favour of a steady secretarial job at the Mustard Seed Mission in Toronto. Mr. Lee remembered Ms. AVISON's generosity toward her mother during this time.
"They were living in the same apartment, a lot of her time was devoted to taking care of a 90-year-old blind lady, and if that meant she wasn't going to get a lot of writing done, then so be it. A lot of writers go the other way - the writing comes first and life commitments come second." Her mother died in 1985.
No Time was published in 1989 and won Ms. AVISON her second Governor-General's Award. Thirteen years later, she published Concrete and Wild Carrot.
In 2005, she was awarded the Leslie K. Tarr Award for outstanding career contributions to Christian writing in Canada. She published her final collection, Momentary Dark, in 2006, at the age of Margaret AVISON was born April 23, 1918, in Galt, Ontario She died July 31, 2007, in Toronto after a brief illness. She was 89. She is survived by several nieces and nephews and many devoted Friends.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-23 published
Dreams of Toronto city planner turned into a nightmare of red tape
Visionary and prophetic British-trained surveyor and urban developer battled bureaucracy to make an important contribution to the development of the city in the Sixties
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
As Toronto's first Commissioner of Development, Walter MANTHORPE had a hand in a stunning new city hall complex, envisioned a metropolitan skyline dominated by soaring towers, understood the value of downtown residential neighbourhoods and was among the first to have notions of a domed stadium.
Yet, as a guiding light, he was also an engineer whose vision was infused with controversy. He rode fluctuating waves of public opinion, fashioned creative solutions but still managed to gain the respect of his political opponents. "He and I tangled greatly in the late sixties and early 1970s," said former Toronto mayor, John Sewell. "He believed very strongly, as many people did, in the idea that modernist approaches to the city were a really good idea - high-rise apartments, towers in parks, getting rid of streets. Those kinds of things.
"We were on the cusp of the big change that was happening in Toronto, that gave Toronto the central area plan," Mr. Sewell added.
Walter MANTHORPE cut his teeth on controversy. He was one of two sons born into a family with strong Quaker connections in Norwich, England, during the First World War. His grocer father was a conscientious objector who was sentenced to several years' hard labour in Dartmoor Prison. Meanwhile, his mother ran the family business, which was an early health-food store, and raised her sons as vegetarians during a time when such a path was strongly criticized.
After articling with a firm in Norwich, Mr. MANTHORPE qualified as a surveyor in 1936. But instead of immediately picking up a pencil, he joined Maddermarket Theatre, a local venue that in 1921 had become the first permanent recreation of an Elizabethan Theatre. Under the founder and director, Nugent Monck, Mr. MANTHORPE also acted in early productions of plays by George Bernard Shaw.
Shortly afterward, he found a job in London at the Office of Works, which looked after government property and, in particular, public parks. He then took another surprising turn and moved into a place called the Youth House, a residence established by a group of theosophists who valued the principles of internationalism. While living here, Mr. MANTHORPE helped provide accommodation and find jobs for German and Austrian students who were fleeing the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler. He met his future wife, Anne PARKER, at Youth House.
When the Second World War started Mr. MANTHORPE, like his father, chose to be a conscientious objector, and the ramifications of this decision were significant. Questions were asked in the House of Commons as to the validity of his case, since he was one of the first people in Britain to argue conscientious objector status on philosophical rather than religious grounds. He had to appear before a tribunal as well as resign from his government job. Instead, he did first aid work and become an air raid warden. Meanwhile, his brother Jack enlisted in the Royal Air Force and was later killed.
In 1951, Mr. MANTHORPE joined the Central Office of Information in London and became involved in designing the Festival of Britain. This festival, popularly referred to as "a tonic for the nation," was an attempt to boost the morale of bombed-out Londoners. An elaborate exhibition was developed on the south bank of the River Thames. Controversy plagued the festival. Irate tenants who were being evicted from their homes to make way for the highly publicized development took their fight to the streets, and many believed the millions budgeted for the event would have been better spent on new housing. In the process, Mr. MANTHORPE had caught sight of his future; he attended London University at night and qualified as a town planner. One of his early jobs was to design the dry dock at Greenwich for the Cutty Sark, the last of the three-masted tea clippers. Perhaps it was on the deck of this ship that he first considered crossing oceans and taking his city-planning skills to Canada.
In 1955, he landed a job as Toronto's deputy planning commissioner. He and Anne, along with their daughter Vicky and son Jonathan, who later became a reporter at the Globe and Mail, emigrated to Toronto just as the city was staging an international competition for the design of the new city hall. His career took off and in 1962 he was appointed Toronto's first Commissioner of Development.
"He was at the centre of a community of planners and architects who paved the way for Toronto's progress toward becoming one of the most cosmopolitan and attractive cities in North America," said Vicky. "It was a period of ferment, creativity and excitement."
Mr. MANTHORPE developed a passion for functional architecture in the style of modernist architect Walter GROPIUS, with whom he worked on a Toronto waterfront development later in his career. He viewed the development of high-rise apartments as a necessary component. "His outlook was very cosmopolitan. He was keen on people being able to flow around the world," said Vicky. "In Toronto, he foresaw that there would be great immigration… and that lots of apartments would be required."
He also was one of the first to come up with the idea of a domed sports stadium in downtown Toronto, and believed that derelict railway yards that lay between Front Street and the lake shore was just the place to put it. The idea, however, was years ahead of its time and decades elapsed before the SkyDome took shape.
Fed up with bureaucratic limitations and what he considered to be backward thinking, Mr. MANTHORPE resigned his post as commissioner in 1967. Mr. MANTHORPE was fond of an editorial cartoon that appeared in The Globe and Mail. It shows him slipping out of a meeting of the board of control whose members are all asleep. "Great things are going to happen in this city and I want to be part of them," he whispers.
An editorial published in The Globe and Mail at that time said Mr. MANTHORPE had been hired to attract developers to Toronto and "clear the track ahead of them," but instead of being free to get on with his job, he found himself mired in red tape. So he tiptoed out of city hall and into the offices of Meridian Property Management Ltd. to become a consultant.
Controversy continued to dog him. For instance, a high-rise building development planned for Toronto's South Saint_James Town neighbourhood quickly developed into a highly publicized fracas. In 1970, more than 100 tenants living in low-rise buildings in this downtown neighbourhood were given eviction notices by their landlord, the Meridian Group, to make way for the construction project. They formed a tenants' union and John Sewell - who at that time was a Toronto city alderman - spearheaded their fight against the developer. Mr. Sewell and Mr. MANTHORPE devised an experimental program whereupon Mr. Sewell became the middleman between the company and the tenants. Rents were paid to Mr. Sewell and then passed on to the Meridian Group. While zoning decisions were being made at city hall concerning low-rise or high-rise developments, tenants were protected from immediate eviction. Meanwhile, planning went ahead.
Where Mr. Sewell and Mr. MANTHORPE differed was not that new zoning laws had to be established, but rather what kind of development would fill the space and whether residents would have a say in the planning. "[Meridian] want high density. We say fine. There's no problem with high density at all as long as that doesn't mean high rise," Mr. Sewell said at that time.
Mr. MANTHORPE's position at Meridian gave him a platform upon which to try and shame the city into looking to the future and accepting that higher was better. "It's understandable that people in downtown residential areas are frightened," he said. "Practically every other city has a downtown core that is rotting away, a battlefield that no one dares cross. But Toronto is on the right track and if you're winning, it's the wrong time to turn tail and run away."
His approach did not always win Friends but it did gain him respect. "He was actually a nice man; I liked him," said Mr. Sewell earlier this month. "I got along with him in a personal way, but we believed in fundamentally different directions."
While critics point to Saint_James Town as a failure, the low-cost housing development may also be seen as another example of Mr. MANTHORPE's prescience. Many years later, residential downtown towers are now flourishing in the form of expensive condominiums.
After the debate surrounding Saint_James Town died down, Mr. MANTHORPE continued working as a town planning consultant on various projects, both in Toronto and in Great Britain. He was an authority on planning law and was much in demand as an expert witness at hearings and tribunals. In the mid-1980s, he managed the redevelopment of the Hudson's Bay headquarters in London and in the early 1990s, he returned to Southern Ontario to work on development planning with the Anglican Church.
At 80, he finally retired and spent his final years back home in Norwich.
Walter MANTHORPE was born in Norwich, England, on November 15, 1916. He died in Norwich on June 13, 2007. He was 90. He is survived by his wife, Anne, his son, Jonathan, and daughter Vicky.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-05 published
Chronicler of the Ottawa Valley sought 'not from books but from life'
Weaned on the stories of her father, hockey-hero Frank FINNIGAN, she became 'an archival gumshoe' determined to pass on the oral histories of lumbermen, farmers and settlers
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Joan FINNIGAN was the unofficial historian, champion and poet laureate of Ontario's Ottawa Valley.
Over the years, she followed the Opeongo Line, an area of the valley settled in the 1850s by Irish, Scottish and German immigrants, to collect the stories of saints and sinners, heroes and giants, settlers and lumbermen. The result was enough material for 31 books, 14 collections of poetry, plus screenplays, radio scripts, newspaper and magazine articles, most of which are an informed sprinkling of anecdotes, tall tales, folklore, humour, legend and historical fact.
Among her titles are Some of the Stories I Told You Were True Laughing All the Way Home; Legacies, Legends and Lies; Tallying the Tales of the Old-Timers; and Life Along the Opeongo Line.
Joan Helen FINNIGAN was the daughter of national hockey legend Frank FINNIGAN, captain of the Ottawa Senators when the club won the Stanley Cup in 1924 and again in 1927. Her mother Maye (HORNER) was a teacher who also came from long-time Valley stock. While Ms. FINNIGAN's early fascination with heroes began during summers spent on her grandfather's farm in Pontiac Country, Quebec, it only grew from knowing her father.
"And in the house on McLeod Street, my father came home from Toronto, Montreal, Detroit, New York, and talked of giants he had encountered, giants he had beaten, giants he had lost out to," she once wrote. "This thing 'not from books but from life' continues to pervade my whole life, my life decisions and my writing."
Ms. FINNIGAN attended Lisgar Collegiate in Ottawa and, in 1945, edited the 100th anniversary edition of the school's magazine, Vox Lycei. (Fifty years later, she returned to edit the 150th anniversary edition.) After graduation, she entered Carlton University's fledgling journalism program, but lasted just 18 months before deciding that the way to acquire skills and knowledge was not by sitting in the classroom, but to go out into the field. Interestingly, her decision to withdraw came soon after she had been elected to the student council. Although she polled the most votes, the five young men who were elected with her decided that a young woman could not be president. The sexist slight likely reinforced her resolve to quit Carlton and added to her fighting spirit, so evident later when she took on politicians and publishers in her crusade to tell the story of the Ottawa Valley.
Decades later, Ms. FINNIGAN told a reporter that one stirring and influential experience at Carleton was studying political science under Pauline Jewett, a teacher who later became an member of Parliament committed to social justice causes and a strong advocate for women's rights.
After working as a reporter at the Ottawa Journal for a few years, she studied English and history at Queen's University in Kingston, where her mentor was Canadian historian A.R.M. Lower. While at Queen's, she met her future husband, Grant MacKENZIE. They married in 1949 and, in order to support his medical studies, she dropped out of school and worked as a freelance journalist, publishing her stories in The Globe and Mail, the Toronto Star, The Farmer's Advocate, the Journal, and Chatelaine magazine, while it was under the editorship of Doris Anderson.
In 1965, her husband suddenly died and Ms. FINNIGAN faced the future as a single mother with three youngsters under 15. By all accounts, this was when her fighting spirit truly kicked in. In the late 1960s, she would pack her children in the car, pick up her notepad and, with a reel-to-reel tape recorder stashed in the trunk, go out into the Ottawa Valley to collect stories. In the early years, her interest lay in architecture. First, she described the state of historic structures, and next she lobbied for their preservation. A couple of decades later, her son, Jonathan, joined her as the photographer -- until one day he convinced her to take her own photographs. Still later, she made the same drive, counting different structures (or, more often, noting their absences) and interviewing different clusters of "old-timers," this time with granddaughter Caitlin.
"Not unexpectedly, the majority of the people interviewed are related to the lumbering saga in the valley," Ms. FINNIGAN wrote in an autobiographical sketch. "From a social history perspective [these tapes were] binding together two diametrically opposed social classes: the wives of the timber barons who made so much money they never could count it… and the seamstresses in the sweatshops in Ottawa who sewed beads on the timber barons' wives ball gowns until their fingers bled."
One of the people she interviewed in 1978 was the 102-year-old grandfather of Sean Conway, former Liberal member of provincial parliament and now a teacher at Queen's. Ms. FINNIGAN and Mr. Conway later became Friends and he recalls her crusade to unearth lost relics of an earlier time.
"She was an archival gumshoe," he said. "Her car would be encrusted with mud and sand and rock chips, and then she'd tell me about some gem that she had found. 'Now, Conway,' she'd say, 'you and your Friends in government have to do something about these log barns. They are disappearing far too rapidly.' "
For 40 years, Ms. FINNIGAN charmed her way into many Ottawa Valley kitchens and demonstrated skills as a keen listener, she was also sometimes known to be a prickly, opinionated contrarian.
"She was a genuine Ottawa Valley character," Mr. Conway said. "She liked powerful people, understood the world was made up of both saints and sinners, and that all saints have a past, all sinners have a future.
"We had pretty heated arguments… [she believed that] great people often had not-so-great things in their past."
Mr. Conway said she identified with many of the people she had interviewed. Like her, they had spent a lifetime on stony grounds and she found much to admire in their tenacity and persistence.
Ms. FINNIGAN was determined to pass on their stories. The roads in the Ottawa Valley were surveyed in the 1850s and settled by immigrants who were enticed to the area by government land agents, who described it as the last remaining corner of the garden of Eden. In reality, the soil was so thin that it could scarcely hold a surveyor's stake upright and the settlers' sacrifices were stupendous. The result was character in spades, she said. "The men who went into the bush to create Ottawa Valley lumbering mythology were largely illiterate, wonderfully oral, full of the language of poetry and wit."
Little by little, her stories found a public and the National Film Board decided to produced her screenplay The Best Damn Fiddler From Calbogie to Kaladar. The film, featuring a young Margot Kidder, won a Genie award in 1969.
Over the years, Ms. FINNIGAN acquired a loyal following of readers, who appreciated the stories and the regional history woven into them. In 1984, Laughing All the Way Home was short listed for the Stephen Leacock Award for Humour, and in 1989, Tell Me Another Story was on the short list by the Ottawa Citizen for its Literacy Award. That same year, The Watershed Collection was short-listed for the Pat Lowther Memorial Award for poetry, and in 1992, she was short-listed for Ontario's Trillium Award for her poetry collection Wintering Over. Ms. FINNIGAN accepted her perennial status as a runner up with good humour. "I'm glad to be short and honoured to be listed," she once told an audience.
In 1987, her play Songs from Both Sides of the River was performed at the National Arts Centre in Ottawa, and in 1992 she published Old Scores, New Goals: The Story of the Ottawa Senators.
Perhaps most significantly, Queen's University has acquired the bulk of her research. Over the years, the school has purchased and catalogued her literary papers so that much of the work has been preserved for future oral historians and scholars. The National Archives has also purchased 400 hours of interviews, considered a benchmark in Ottawa Valley history.
During her final years, Ms. FINNIGAN took her life's work on the road to story-telling festivals and schools and into the offices of politicians. In 2004, her final oral history, Life Along the Opeongo Line, was published, and on April 16, 2005, the mayor of Ottawa declared that day to be "Joan Finnigan Day.
Earlier this year, Looking for a Turnout, her 14th book of poetry, was published. Among the works she left in progress are a 600-page memoir and a collection of love poetry.
Joan Finnigan MacKENZIE was born November 23, 1925, in Ottawa. She died of ovarian cancer in the Ottawa Valley on August 12, 2007. She was 81. She is survived by her three children, Jonathon, Roderick and Martha. She also leaves seven grandchildren.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-14 published
KITCHEN, Marguerite Mary (née MILLER) (1915-2007)
Finally reunited with her cherished Cliff (Clifford Earl KITCHEN, Q.C., 1900-1966). It is with profound sorrow that we announce the passing of Marguerite in the early morning hours of September 10th, 2007 at North York General Hospital following a valiant struggle with chronic heart disease. It is sadness for us, but peace and release for her. Predeceased by her parents William Cousins MILLER and Margaret Medora Gill MILLER, her brother William Cousins MILLER (the late Mary,) and her daughter-in-law Patricia Van Fleet KITCHEN. She is already sorely missed by her best Friends her children, daughter Kathleen KILGOUR (Gordon HANSON) of Collingwood and Honey Harbour and son Bruce KITCHEN (Marlene SHANAHAN) of Burlington and Honey Harbour. Mourning their Gran are Ian KITCHEN (Gretchen, and Ursan) of Fort Saint_James, British Columbia, Jennifer KITCHEN (Chuck CAMPBELL) of Vancouver, British Columbia, Christopher CLEMENTS (Tracy, and Adam) of Dunnville and Fraser CLEMENTS (Julie, and Kenzie) of Reno, Nevada. Beloved aunt of June BARTON (Paul, Joanne, Steven, Andrew and families) of Barrie, Doctor William C. MILLER (Uta, and Bill) of Windsor and Dr. Robert MILLER (Rikki, Graham and Grant) of Toronto. Also fondly remembered by the Hanson and Shanahan offspring. A devout Christian, Marguerite supported Eglinton St. George's United Church and innumerable charities at home and abroad. Her thoughts were always of others. She loved the cottage and Honey Harbour, Georgian Bay, music, dancing, bridge, cryptic crossword puzzles, books, plants, wildlife and sharing her great sense of humour with her close Friends, the Saturday Night Gang. Special thanks to the caring staff of Amica at Bayview, the nurses on Coronary Care Unit and 6 West at North York General Hospital, Doctors James, Nunes Vaz, and Rose. Cremation has taken place. We plan a private family funeral and then a Celebration of Mum's Life sometime in October, when all family and Friends can join together in remembrance. Mum would appreciate donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or a charity of your choice. Please, for Mum, do something for someone.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-28 published
He represented 'Toronto the clean' - at least abroad
He talked trash with the Soviets and lunched with the Queen while dealing with garbage strikes and layoffs
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- The man who made green garbage bags fashionable for curbside pickup back in the 1960s was Toronto streets commissioner Harold ATYEO. His mandate also included snow removal and the earliest attempts at recycling - for instance, "bundle up for Wednesday" newspaper pickup. According to former mayor David CROMBIE, who worked with Mr. ATYEO, his colleague's efforts were the likely inspiration behind Peter Ustinov's oft-quoted description of the city as "New York run by the Swiss."
Mr. ATYEO "was an excellent public servant with a strong interest in the city," Mr. CROMBIE said. "In those days, Toronto had a great reputation as a city that works, as 'Toronto the clean,' and Harold made an enormous contribution toward that."
One of his more popular legacies was a service that allowed senior citizens to have their sidewalks shovelled for them, free of charge. He was also involved in restoring the historic St. Lawrence Market and Town Hall to their 19th-century splendour.
It wasn't all laurels, however. As streets commissioner, Mr. ATYEO faced garbage strikes, inclement weather and bad tempers as one of the most picked-on bureaucrats at city hall, frequently blamed for snowdrifts, stinky streets and litter.
Opinions differ as to whether Mr. ATYEO was a visionary or a pragmatist, but his efforts took him as far afield as the Kremlin, New York and Buckingham Palace.
"He was a strong proponent of things that simply made sense," said his son Mark. "In Moscow, he was struck by the non-unionized babushkas picking up street litter with corn brooms."
Harold ATYEO was the second of three children born in Camden, Ontario, to Jesse May (MANLEY) and Frank Wesley ATYEO. In 1920, when he was 2, his family purchased a farm in Lethbridge, Alberta. He told stories about heading into town for supplies with his older brother William and passing a community of Blood Indians, who were living in tepees along the Oldman River Valley.
In 1923, the family moved back to St. Catharines, Ontario, where his father worked first as a blacksmith, then as a hydro linesman until an injury ended his career. As a teenager during the Depression, Harold delivered newspapers and stocked grocery shelves to help support the family. In 1938, he attended teachers college at the Toronto Normal School (now part of Ryerson University) and began his first assignment a year later, on the day Germany invaded Poland and the Second World War began.
He soon became principal of a two-room schoolhouse in Amherstburg, Ontario In 1943, conflicted about not being part of the war, he left teaching and joined Ferry Command in Montreal, where he worked as an air navigation instructor. In 1944, at the age of 26, he realized that because of a punctured eardrum, he'd never get his wings. Hoping to at least get closer to the action, he joined the merchant marine.
The war ended shortly after his first trip across the Atlantic, however, and he returned to the family home, which by then was in Windsor, Ontario He took a job as an inventory clerk at a department store. The war widow who hired him was Margaret Loretta CASSON - they married in 1948 and moved to Fredericton, where he obtained an engineering degree. After moving back to Ontario two years later, he began his career in municipal engineering.
In 1953, he took a position as an engineer with the Township of North York, which was amalgamated into the City of Toronto the following year. In 1964, he took a job as commissioner of the streets department in the city of Toronto and moved into an office in the new City Hall. One of his early tasks included posting newspaper notices urging citizens to "clean up, paint up, don't be a litter bug."
From there, he moved on to being a kind of ambassador for the city, culminating in a trip to Moscow in 1968, in the thick of the Cold War, to meet with Soviet premier Alexey Kosygin and make suggestions about such issues as street cleaning, snow removal and synchronized traffic lights.
Ben GRYS, who was chairman of Toronto's public works department at the time, joined Mr. ATYEO in Moscow. He remembers his colleague as approachable and open-minded, but noted: "He wouldn't mind getting into a real knock-'em-out discussion to prove his point, and in most cases, he was right."
On the way back from the Soviet Union, Mr. and Mrs. ATYEO stopped off for a luncheon hosted by the Queen at Buckingham Palace. Although this luncheon made for a good family story, his son said nobody knew exactly why his parents were invited in the first place.
In 1972, Mr. ATYEO instituted another significant change by reducing Toronto's curbside garbage pickup to once a week, from twice. "It would be a nice, clean operation," he told The Globe and Mail at the time.
The schedule shift was an important step along the road toward the kind of recycling and composting initiatives the city has in place today, with garbage now picked up only once every two weeks. Nevertheless, when it was implemented, critics saw it as anything but clean. A union spokesman representing garbage collectors told the Toronto Star that once-a-week pickups would result in the trash "being carted off by maggots… hopefully they'll walk in the direction of the garbage trucks." There were also layoffs.
The streets and works departments merged in 1972 and fell under the jurisdiction of commissioner Ray BREMNER. Mr. ATYEO lost his title and reluctantly moved into a new position in the property department.
One of his last major projects for the city was in 1974, restructuring St. Lawrence Market and Town Hall. "They re-established the St. Lawrence Hall and did a lot of renovation in the South Market," Mr. CROMBIE said. "And here we are, 33 years later, [planning to] change the St. Lawrence Hall into the Toronto museum… Harold would have understood the vision."
Mr. ATYEO left Toronto in 1976 to take a job as superintendent of works in Gravenhurst, Ontario, where he worked until retiring a decade later. The end of his career, however, harked back to his schoolhouse roots: He temporarily went back to work as a supply teacher, teaching shop.
Harold ATYEO was born June 24, 1918, in Camden, Ontario, and died of cancer August 26, 2007. He was 89. He is predeceased by wife Margaret and leaves children Frank, Candace, Susan, Debra, Mark and Jo.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-19 published
KITCHEN, Marguerite Mary (April 18, 1915-September 10, 2007)
Beloved wife of the late Clifford Earl KITCHEN, B.A., L.L.B., Q.C., 1900-1966. Marguerite's daughter Kathleen KILGOUR (Gordon HANSON,) and son Bruce KITCHEN (Marlene SHANAHAN) invite family and Friends to Celebrate Marguerite's Life on Friday, October 26th from 2-4 p.m. at the Toronto Cricket Skating and Curling Club, 141 Wilson Avenue (1 block south of Hwy 401, on the south side of Wilson Ave., just east of Avenue Rd.)

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-09 published
She served in wartime Britain and attended the Khaki University
Raised in the dustbowl of Depression Saskatchewan, she tended to the wounded in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps hospitals and then took up the study of economics
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Esther POKRUPA found her way out of the swirl of Saskatchewan dust during the bleakest days of the Depression by paying careful attention to a future that led her to nursing, enlistment in the Canadian army and a degree in commerce and economics whose beginnings took shape in a unique institution called the Khaki University.
She had begun her life as a farmer's daughter in North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Her parents were homesteaders from Norfolk, England, who had crossed the Prairies by train after arriving in Halifax in 1905. Her father, Jack MANTS, kept a travel diary and, upon arriving in Saskatchewan, he wrote a succinct description of the landscape: "There are a lot of train wrecks here."
Farming in southern Saskatchewan was never easy. Land that had previously been disturbed only by grazing animals went under the plows of thousands of farmers. The top soil, made dry by drought, became airborne in immense black clouds of dirt so that dust lay thick on the kitchen counters during Esther's childhood. Later, in the bleakest days of the Depression, she was sent to work as a 14-year-old au pair in Edmonton. It was fortunate that her employer was also her high-school principal; she was able to stay in school as well as hold down a job.
Esther weighed her prospects. As she saw it, she had two choices: nursing or teaching. She chose nursing because it paid better. She attended Edmonton nursing college and, after graduating in 1941, started work as a public-health nurse in a town called Bonanza, near Peace River, Alberta. She lived alone in the bush and travelled from community to community but decided, after a while, that her nursing skills would be more useful elsewhere. By then it was the middle of the Second World War, so she enlisted in the military alongside her younger brother, Jim, who became a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force.
In 1944, Ms. POKRUPA joined Canada's Nursing Sisters and went overseas to serve in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps hospitals. First, however, she was sent to work for a short time at a prisoner of war camp at the exhibition grounds in Medicine Hat, Alberta. The camp housed more than 12,000 Germans, many of whom were ardent Nazis who that same year famously court-martialed and executed fellow PoWs for expressing defeatist views.
Once overseas, she ended up working in two well-established British army hospitals, one near Basingstoke, in northeast Hampshire, and the other near Horsham, in West Sussex. Basingstoke was the site of the No. 1 Canadian Neurological and Plastic Surgical Hospital.
"In Basingstoke, she worked with burn victims from airplanes used in [the air war mainly over Europe]," said her husband, Peter POKRUPA, a retired economist with Shell Canada. "After the D-Day invasion, she was in another hospital near Horsham, where the casualties were brought in."
As well as keeping up with the frantic pace of an army hospital in wartime, she also had to contend with peculiar restrictions placed on officers - some of them with a particularly repressive twist reserved for women. As a lieutenant, she was not permitted to marry; nor could she socialize with enlisted men.
After the war, she stayed in Britain and attended the Khaki University at Watford, just north of London. Established and managed by the Canadian Army in Britain at the end of the First World War, the school was revived in 1945 to help prepare servicemen for their return to civilian life.
While there were few women among the student body, and most of them women studied home economics, that was not for Esther POKRUPA. With a shrewd eye towards a career and financial independence, she took up economics. Her husband described a school photograph of her from that time: "There were hundreds of men and three women. [The women sat] with crossed legs in the front row. It was an incredible picture, very unusual to have women in university at all in the 1940s - especially in England - so it was quite unique."
Unfortunately, her studies were interrupted by a serious bout of tuberculosis, contracted while nursing at Basingstoke. She was sent home on a troopship and at Halifax she was carried down to the dock on a stretcher. There, someone in the crowd reached out and placed an apple on her blanket, a gesture she found deeply touching. She spent long months in a sanatorium before she could return to her books.
In 1948, she was finally well enough to resume her studies. She transferred her credits from the Khaki University to the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon and pursued her interest in economics. "Her reason for going into nursing… was not a hard-felt passion," said her son, Ronald POKRUPA, a neurosurgeon in Kingston. "She wanted to do something more than be a registered nurse."
While at University of Saskatchewan, she met Peter POKRUPA. By all accounts, he was first smitten with her because of her independence - and by the fact that she owned her own car. He was a war refugee from Czechoslovakia, also working towards at degree in economics, and they shared some classes.
They were married in 1950, the same year she graduated with an economics degree. The couple moved to Toronto and their two sons were born a short while after. A few years later, she suffered a serious relapse of tuberculosis. In 1956, she spent nine months in a Toronto sanatorium. "That was during the early years of chemotherapy for tuberculosis," Doctor POKRUPA said. "Before that it was a death sentence. She was in one of the lucky groups that got the drugs, and so she recovered."
Dr. POKRUPA remembers being six years old and visiting her at the sanatorium. Years later he realized the illness cost her dearly. "I always suspected that her having had tuberculosis damaged her ambitions… [it was a] sobering, frightening experience to go through, and had an impact on her attitude toward her children as well. She had been a doting mother, but for months she couldn't have contact [with us] for fear that we'd catch tuberculosis."
Later, she applied her nursing skills to her younger son, Paul. In 1970, while living in Tucson, Arizona., he was shot in a robbery and spent several weeks recuperating in hospital - with his mother nearby.
In 1971, Ms. POKRUPA moved to England with her husband for two years and spent some time travelling. One of their trips was to areas where she had nursed during the war to try and locate the actual hospitals. Sadly, she was disappointed. Some of the hospitals were large stately homes that had been pressed into service. At Horsham, the hospital was said to have been the home of the Duke of Wellington, victor of the Battle of Waterloo and later a prime minister of Britain, and that his horse was buried in the yard.
"We tried at Horsham," Mr. POKRUPA said. "We asked people and they said, 'Oh yes, there was a military hospital here, long ago… not exactly sure where it was.' "
After returning home, Ms. POKRUPA continued to work as a public health nurse in Toronto until she retired in 1984 but her joie de vivre continued long after. "Esther was interested in everything," her husband said. "Women's clubs, the Canadian Club in London&hellip she even went to tea at Buckingham Palace. She was interested in history, music; whenever we could, we would attend extension classes at the University of Toronto, York, Elderhostel." In a last gesture toward the living, Ms. POKRUPA and her husband planted 20,000 pine trees on the rocky stretch of the Canadian Shield north of Kingston.
Esther POKRUPA was born Esther MANTS in North Battleford, Saskatchewan., on August 3, 1918. She died peacefully in Kingston on October 22, 2007. She was 90. She is survived by her husband, Peter POKRUPA, and by her sons Peter and Ronald. She also leaves her brother, Jim MANTS, and her sister, Norah MULLAN, and by numerous grandchildren.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-06 published
Engineer was among the first textile makers to go green and recycle
Founder of Spintex was on his way to becoming a naval engineer when he took the advice of a stranger on a train and took up the manufacture of fabrics. Today, he is regarded as a genius
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Toronto -- Panayotis PANTZIRIS was a "green" textiles manufacturer long before most of his contemporaries had even thought of the concept. The founder of Spintex Yarns in Toronto, he was the first in the industry to salvage scraps from the floors of cutting rooms and recycle them into quality yarn. Considered something of a genius, he was recognized as one of the world's experts in yarn spinning and fabric development.
"What we're hearing today, from people like Al Gore, my father recognized in 1990," said his son, Spiros, Chief Executive Officer of Spintex. "He always believed that, even though people were buying the yarn from us for many reasons, he knew that one day they would buy it because of its environmental value."
It all started in 1950 because of a chance meeting with a stranger. Just like the Dustin Hoffman character in the movie The Graduate who was told that "the future is in plastics," he was told his future was in fabrics.
Panayotis (Takis) PANTZIRIS was born in Alexandria, Egypt, a few years after the country gained its independence from Britain. His father, Spiros, worked as a headwaiter at the British Officers Club and often took home extra rations for his wife and two children in the heart of the Greek expatriate community. By all accounts, young Takis was more interested in hefty portions of food, or in playing sports, than he was in anything having to do with fabrics. A child with a large capacity for curiosity, he also attached himself to all kinds of hobbies or buried himself behind a book.
He graduated from a Greek high school in Alexandria at a time when the Second World War was raging not far away. He remembered watching the streets fill up with soldiers from Britain, New Zealand, Australia and India who were assembling to defend the city. At this time, the Germans stood poised at the Egyptian border with Libya, with Alexandria, Cairo and the Suez Canal as their next targets. As it turned out, Erwin Rommel never set foot in Alexandria; the Germans were turned back at the Second Battle of El Alamein in late 1942.
It was a challenging time to be a teenager, but Mr. PANTZIRIS graduated with high grades and fluency in Arabic, Greek, French, English, Italian and Spanish. His father told him to get an education abroad. At 21, he left Alexandria for France to study naval engineering in Marseilles. It was on a train crossing France that he met a fellow passenger who urged him to go into textiles. Until that moment, it is likely the thought had never crossed his mind. But, perhaps because Egypt was a giant in the cotton industry, he fully understood the wisdom of the man's advice. Instead of leaving the train in Marseilles, he continued north to Mulhouse, close to the Swiss and German borders, and entered an apprenticeship in a machine shop that held contracts with textile factories. For a year, he learned mechanical skills on the shop floor, then decided it would be a good idea to attend the École nationale supérieure des industries textiles de Mulhouse and get an education as a textile mechanical engineer.
After graduating, he returned to Egypt and, 18 months later, became general manager of a large textile mill that employed more than 3,000 workers. Later, he set up a second mill for the same owner. In the end, he built and operated four plants in Egypt: two yarn-spinning ones, a fabric and yarn dye house and a knitting one.
By the mid-1950s, Egypt was in crisis. In 1952, a group of army officers that included Gamal Abdel Nasser had seized power and begun nationalizing industries. In 1956, Nasser became president and took over the Suez Canal. Britain, France and Israel allied themselves to regain control and attacked Egypt, but Soviet and U.S. pressure forced the withdrawal of forces - all of which caused Mr. PANTZIRIS to think seriously about going abroad again.
Not long after, he met an attractive young woman named Aglaia and fell in love. They married in 1957. Together, they believed opportunities would be greater elsewhere. Mr. PANTZIRIS spent a few years working on contracts in Sudan, Germany and Greece. In 1963, he was hired to build and operate a yarn-spinning plant in Saint-Placide, Quebec By then, he had children, so he took his family with him. They liked what they saw and, a few years later, moved to Toronto, where he took over the running of Canadian Worsted, the largest long-staple yarn-spinning plant in the country. Along the way, he attended industry fairs in Milan, Paris and Hanover to pick up the latest techniques and developments in the business.
All things considered, Mr. PANTZIRIS was probably the smartest textile producer in North America, said clothing manufacturer Len ZWEIG, who likes to tell a story about once sharing an airplane ride with him. "One day I was in Montreal, rushing to get my plane. The stewardess took me to my seat and he was in it. He told me, 'I've got some new type of yarn and I'm opening up my own factory.' So I kicked the guy out of the next seat because I knew that, with this guy, I could make money." They became close Friends, said Mr. ZWEIG, who produced London Fog sweaters in Toronto.
In 1972, Mr. PANTZIRIS left Canadian Worsted and built Spintex Yarns. At last, he had his own plant and could fully develop his ideas. At the forefront was a new technique to recycle yarn. At first, many people in the industry laughed at the idea of making new clothing and textiles from old, said Spiros PANTZIRIS. "It has turned 180 degrees from a negative to a positive selling point," he told the National Post. "He said there was a great business in these scraps of cotton left on cutting-room floors. We talked about the impact on not just the process of spinning but on the environment, as well."
As for his recycled yarn, Mr. ZWEIG said it's not the best yarn in the world but it sure saves a lot of waste. "It goes into a machine in rags and gets ripped apart. It gets put into another machine and, lo and behold, it comes out in a big bale that looks like cotton batting, almost. They put the bale into another machine and it comes out spun as yarn, wind it right on the cones and it's USAble for knitting machines or looms, ready to be shipped out to customers."
Among the customers are Wal-Mart, Nike, Patagonia, Columbia, the Gap and Eddy Bauer.
"I'm dealing with companies now that I never would have dreamed of dealing with," Spiros PANTZIRIS told The Textile Journal in April. "They're coming to [Spintex] because they are selling to the 18-to-24 age group - a group that is, by nature, more interested in the environment."
And the recycling doesn't end there. Fibres too short to be respun are sold to felt makers to be turned into mattress pads; cotton dust created by the spinning process is collected, pressed into a puck-like shapes and given away to local farmers for use as a feed additive or as fertilizer. And there is more to come. In the United States alone, many thousands of metric tons of cotton "table waste" produced by cut-and-sew facilities currently end up in landfills that could be recycled.
For Panayotis PANTZIRIS, it was proof that the textile industry could be environmentally friendly. "He always understood the value of the environment, [and] the value of protecting the environment," said his son. "The fact that he could translate it into a business was something he cherished."
Panayotis PANTZIRIS was born in Alexandria, Egypt, on January 4, 1929. He died of leukemia in Toronto on October 10, 2007. He was 78. He is survived by his wife, Aglaia, his son Spiros and daughter Ellen BOWLIN. He also leaves his sister Stella BOUCHEROT and grandchildren Taki, Jack, Alexander, Nicholas and Aglaia.

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SHANAHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-18 published
Robert STACEY, 58: Curator
He was 'the most authoritative student of Canadian art history'
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
As an independent Canadian art history scholar with a mind that never shut off, Robert STACEY was an archivist's nightmare. He'd badger them with obscure questions, demand accuracy and behave like some kind of academic detective who ferreted out truths.
"Bob STACEY saved our ass," said writer Christopher Moore, referring to his collaboration on The Illustrated History of Canada in the mid-1980s. "Here was someone who knew every image of the Canadian past, knew what it signified and how to use it, and knew where to secure prints and rights at blinding speed."
Mr. STACEY worked on art history projects, books, documentaries, gallery shows and academic study projects from one end of Canada to the other. "But it barely jelled into a career," said Mr. Moore. "He was always simultaneously a freelance art curator and the most authoritative student of Canadian art history anyone knew."
Bob STACEY was born with an arts legacy. The son of Harold STACEY, a renowned Toronto silversmith, and Margaret STACEY, the third daughter of artist C.W. JEFFERYS, he grew up in a home where art was an everyday topic. After all, his father's work had been acquired by the National Gallery, while his grandfather's art was found in the Art Gallery of Ontario, the War Museum, the Library and Archives of Canada and many private collections. According to Mr. STACEY's partner, Maggie KEITH, he enjoyed a childhood in which an appreciation for the arts was considered to be a perfectly normal part of life. "That's what normal people did. Who you would question, instead, would be people who weren't involved in the arts; what did they do with themselves all day?"
In 1966, while a Grade 11 student at Northview Heights Collegiate in North York, Bob wrote, directed and acted in an absurdist play called A Dream of Unreason that was performed at Hart House Theatre in Toronto. Two years later, he graduated from high school and enrolled at the University of Toronto. While an undergraduate, he ran into some unusual academic challenges. Instead of providing essays on assigned topics, he often annoyed his professors by pursuing independent lines of scholarly research. One of his early obsessions was moving the Canadian art world away from the notion that the Group of Seven was born as a reaction to something staid and European. For instance, he positioned C.W. Jefferys as an artist at the centre of an important group who painted the Canadian landscape a good 15 years before members of the Group of Seven had ever taken a walk in the woods.
In 1976, Mr. STACEY curated "C.W. Jefferys, 1869-1951" at the Agnes Etherington Gallery in Kingston. Two years later, he curated a poster-art exhibition at the Art Gallery of Ontario, followed by the publication of The Canadian Poster Book: 100 Years of the Poster in Canada. According to Ms. KEITH, he was once again compelled to debunk a popular notion of art history by proving that some of the Group of Seven had earned their living as commercial artists, and that tattered broadsheet advertising could be works of art.
"Bob was one of the most thorough, questioning researchers-writers I've ever met," said Jim Burrant, who answered many of his calls at the Library and Archives Canada. "He was always looking for answers, so you tended to feel bombarded with phone calls and wonderfully handwritten messages about various points. I learned so much working with Bob and trying to answer his questions."
An example of the depth of his research was evident in 1997, when he was working on the book Massanoga: The Art of Bon Echo and discovered that nobody had ever photographed the pictographs on Mazinaw Rock. He hired a photographer and crossed the ice one frigid March day, cameras in tow. "It probably cost him as much as he earned on the book," said Mr. Burrant.
Mr. STACEY published a variety of other books and curated a number of successful exhibitions on Canadian art history during the 1970s and 1980s. At the same time, his reputation as a researcher grew. He consistently juggled a fistful of scholarly projects: citizens fighting to save historical murals; publishers seeking historical images for their book covers; art auction houses looking to authenticate paintings.
"When someone in Canada has a problem, a challenge, or an opportunity involving images of Canada's history, as often as not a call will reach Robert STACEY at the Archives of Canadian Art and Design in an old industrial building on the edge of downtown Toronto," Mr. Moore wrote in The Beaver.
Mr. STACEY was frustrated by what he called laziness by historians, art directors and writers who used illustration in a very cavalier manner. "They act as if everything were in the public domain and don't credit the artist or the source - partly because things get swiped so often, so one sees the same images, and the same misinformation about them, perpetuated again and again," he said in The Beaver.
From 1991 to 1992, Mr. STACEY became the first Fellow at the National Gallery of Canada with work focusing on 20th century Canadian art, including preparing a monograph on the graphic art and design work of J.E.H. MacDonald of the Group of Seven.
An impressive series of publications and exhibitions followed, including "Varley: A Celebration" (1997); North by South: The Art of Peleg Franklin Brownell (1998); "Qu'Appelle: Tale of Two Valleys" (1998) and a group exhibition and publication called The Group of Seven in Western Canada (2002).
Mr. STACEY was adjunct curator at the McMichael Gallery in Kleinburg, Ontario, in 2002 but, according to Ms. KEITH, it was a heartbreaking experience. She described the gallery's rigid and conservative approach to exhibitions, and the fact that then-Ontario premier Mike Harris had passed legislation limiting what could be collected. The McMichael board, she said, didn't like contemporary works in travelling exhibitions.
"For a long time, Bob had badly wanted an adjunct curatorship at a public gallery so that he could advocate for his projects more effectively than he could as an outsider… unfortunately, the appointment came too late for him."
Mr. STACEY was an alcoholic and within a few months of accepting this position he suffered a seizure. He continued working, but was forced to slow down during his last few years.
Robert STACEY was born July 2, 1949, in North York, Ontario He died of liver failure on November 4, 2007, in Toronto. He was 58. He is survived by his partner, Maggie KEITH, and his mother, Margaret STACEY. He also leaves his sister Clara.

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