PETCH o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-27 published
PETCH, Dawson and Donald Sr. and Myrle and Douglas and Ina and Donald Jr.
In loving memory of a dear husband, father, grandfather, great-grandfather and brother-in-law, Dawson PETCH, who passed away June 23, 1975. A father-in-law, grandfather, great-grandfather Donald PETCH Sr. who passed away June 17, 1988. A mother-in-law, grandmother, great-grandmother Myrle PETCH who passed away July 2, 1975. An uncle, great uncle and brother-in-law Douglas PETCH who passed away October 8, 2000. An aunt, great aunt, sister-in-law Ina PETCH who passed away February 16, 2002. An uncle, great uncle and brother-in-law Donald PETCH Jr. who passed away June 21, Loving and kind in all their ways,
Upright and just to the end of their days.
Sincere and kind in heart and mind,
What beautiful memories they left behind
Lovingly remembered and sadly missed along life's way.
- Marion PETCH and family and Clara WILEY.
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PETERMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-06 published
LIBBY, John “Jack&rdquo
Of Lions head passed away peacefully at Golden Dawn Nursing Home on Sunday, June 3, 2007 in his 88th year. Cherished father of Barbara (Randle) BROWN of Lion's head and special friend and grandfather of Matthew BROWN of Toronto. He will be sadly missed by his sister Georgina (Doug) SHURGOLD of St. Catharines and sister-in-law Mary Jane LIBBY of Toronto. John spent many hours playing cards and Jim PETERMAN has lost a true friend and opponent. John was predeceased by his wife Ruth, parents Katie (DUKE) and Clarence LIBBY, his brother Al LIBBY and his sisters Grace LIBBY, Lillian OLDS and Geraldine CONRON. Cremation has taken place. There will be a graveside service at Eastnor Cemetery, Lion's head on Saturday, June 16, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. with Pastor Billy STRACHAN officiating. Arrangements entrusted to the George Funeral Home, Wiarton. Donations made to the Golden Dawn Nursing Home would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

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PETERS o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-08-01 published
ACHESON, Lorne
Suddenly in Honeywood Arena on Saturday, July 28 2007. Lorne ACHESON in his 87th year, dear friend of Doris LANGDON and beloved husband of the late Roma (CHANDLER) ACHESON. Dear father of Ted (Frances) ACHESON of Dundalk, Ken ACHESON (Norah PETERS) of Mississauga, Beth (Jay) GOSTICK of Port Elgin and Joyce (Blain) CLARKE of R.R.#5 Dundalk. Loving grandfather of Olivia, Jesse, Holly, Melissa, Kevin Heather, Janine, Steven, Ted (Jackie), Allan and Robert. Loving great-grandfather of Abigayle. Survived by two sisters June (Elwin) WILSON of Dundalk and Doreen PORTER of Toronto and a brother James (Alice) ACHESON of Toronto. Predeceased by two sisters Lucille DOLMER and Erma JOHNSON, an infant brother Glen ACHESON and three brothers-in-law John DOLMER, Veryal JOHNSON and Doctor Tom PORTER. Resting at the McMillan and Jack Funeral Home, Dundalk. Service In the Dundalk United Church, on Wednesday August 1, 2007 at 11 a.m. Interment in Bethel Cemetery. Donations to Dundalk United Church, the Cancer Society or Honeywood Fire Department would be appreciated. Visitation was held on Tuesday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9.
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PETERS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-31 published
ACHESON, Lorne
Suddenly in Honeywood Arena on Saturday, July 28th, 2007. Lorne ACHESON in his 87th year, dear friend of Doris LANGDON and beloved husband of the late Roma (CHANDLER) ACHESON. Dear father of Ted (Francis) ACHESON of Dundalk, Ken ACHESON (Norah PETERS) of Mississauga, Beth (Jay) GOSTICK of Port Elgin and Joyce (Blain) CLARKE of R.R.#5 Dundalk. Loving grandfather of Olivia, Jesse, Holly, Melissa, Kevin, Heather, Janine, Steven, Ted (Jackie), Allan and Robert. Loving great-grandfather of Abigayle. Survived by two sisters June (Elwin) WILSON of Dundalk and Doreen PORTER of Toronto and a brother James (Alice) ACHESON of Toronto. Predeceased by two sisters Lucille DOLMER and Erma JOHNSON, an infant brother Glen ACHESON and three brothers-in-law John DOLMER, Veryal JOHNSON and Doctor Tom PORTER. Resting at the McMillan and Jack Funeral Home, Dundalk. Service in the Dundalk United Church, on Wednesday, August 1st, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. Internment in Bethel Cemetery. Donations to Dundalk United Church, the Cancer Society or Honeywood Fire Department would be appreciated. Visitation on Tuesday from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

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PETERS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-29 published
RIDDELL, Ester Mary Elizabeth "Betty" (née McGREGOR)
Peacefully, at the Grey Bruce Regional Health Services in Owen Sound, on Tuesday, August 28th, 2007. Ester Mary Elizabeth (Betty) RIDDELL (née McGREGOR,) of Owen Sound, in her 84th year. Beloved wife of the late Arnold RIDDELL. Loving mother of Linda Marie CLARKE, of Dorchester, Donald (Betty Anne) RIDDELL, of Sauble Beach, Gayle Yvonne (Ray) GLEADALL, of Hamilton, Betty-Jean (Eldon) SILVERTHORN, of Owen Sound, Louise (Lui) DELISIO, of St. Catherines, Lorelei (Dan) LAXTON, of Chatsworth. Proud grandmother of Jennifer (Jason), Scott (Jacquie), Kathleen, Tina (Allistair), Jessica, Sarah (Radek), Tonya (Stacey), Tracy (Michael), Keith (Rhoda), Jason, Steven (Charlotte), Elizabeth-Ann, Michael, Amanda, Bill, Missy, and great-grandmother of Hayden, Raina, Dylan, and Wesley. Survived by her brother-in-law George KIDDLE, and sisters-in-law Alice (Wally) PETERS, Bonnie “Betty” RIDDELL, and Jean RIDDELL. Survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her sister Margaret KIDDLE, her infant sister Jessie RIDDELL, and her son-in-law David CLARKE. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (519-376-7492) on Thursday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A funeral service for Betty RIDDELL will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Friday, August 31st, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Ralph SCHMIDT officiating. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Grey Bruce Regional Health Center Foundation, Canadian Cancer Society, or Heart and Stroke Foundation as your expression of sympathy.

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PETERS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-31 published
HILL, Ernest Hugh Knowles, B.Th., M.A., M.Li.S.
The family is saddened to announce that suddenly, as the result of a recent illness, Hugh HILL, Library director at Emmanuel Bible College, passed away on Monday, October 29, 2007 in his 50th year. Hugh was the loving husband and best friend to Gail (née McMILLAN) and adoring Dad to Liam and Miriam. He is survived by his father Stanley HILL, sister Alexis DICKSON/DIXON (Scott) of Orangeville, and brother John of Kitchener, Hugh was loved as a son by in-laws Don and Eileen McMILLAN of Owen Sound, and also leaves brother-in-law Eldon McMILLAN (Linda,) sisters-in-law, Sheila TEDFORD (Richard) and Carol WALKER (Wayne) all of Owen Sound. Also lovingly remembered by many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his mother Elva (1989.) Ernest Hugh Knowles HILL was born in Ballymena, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland on August 14, 1958, Hugh emigrated to Canada as a child with his family, residing first in Toronto and then Brampton, and following his marriage to Gail, the family settled in Kitchener, were both Liam and Miriam were born. Hugh was an ardent student of many forms of literature, but was particularly well-read in his field of Christian theology. He was a passionate collector of books and loved to search out new titles to acquire. As an ardent bird-watcher, he also amassed a collection of prints and water colours depicting many of his favourites. An accomplished musician Hugh expressed his abilities in practical ways through he and Gail's involvement in the music ministry at several Kitchener churches, most recently Bethany Evangelical Missionary Church. Friends are invited to join the family for visitation on Tuesday, October 30 from 7-9 p.m. and again on Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. at the Henry Walser Funeral Home 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener, 519-749-8467. Funeral services will be held at Bethany Evangelical Missionary Church 160 Lancaster St. E. Kitchener on Thursday, November 1, 2007 at 2 p.m. Doctor Rev. Virgil GINGERICH, Dr. Rev. Olu PETERS and Rev. Bill ANDERSON officiating. Cremation to follow. As expressions of sympathy donations may be made to Emmanuel Bible College or to the charity of your choice. Visit www.henrywalser.com for Hugh's memorial. Psalm 91: 1

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PETERS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2007-05-23 published
Lucie Jane DOAN (née COLLINS)
In Loving Memory of Lucie Jane DOAN (née COLLINS) who died peacefully at the Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Sunday, May 20, 2007 at the age of 94.
Predeceased by her beloved husband Andrew in 1987. Loved by her children Betty BOWERMAN (husband Clint predeceased) of Espanola, Everett and wife Maralynn of Rexdale, Lillian (predeceased in 1975), George (predeceased in 1996) wife June of Toronto. Cherished grandmother of Sandra and husband Albert BEAVEN, Debora and husband John MERCHANT, Joanne and husband Peter KATZUR, Cathie and husband Cas BURNS, Staccy and husband Michael DUNNE, Kim and husband Jeff TOPPIN, Derwin DOAN and Samantha, Leanne and husband Royce HAMIGUCHI, Leslie and husband Dave GUYON. Special great grandmother of Chris and wife Joelle MERCHANT, Megan MERCHANT and fiance Matt, Kara MERCHANT, Ehren KATZUR, Michael BURNS and fiance Jennifer, Anthony BURNS, Patrick and Thomas DUNNE, Jessie TOPPIN, Britney and Jake DOAN, Cassidy Hamiguchi, Cole GUYON. Proud great great grandmother of two - Jack and Darcy MERCHANT. Will be missed by her siblings Alice KIRK (predeceased by both husbands Ivan KIRK and Russ HORE,) Pearl SMITH (husband Aubrey predeceased,) Dorothy WISSON (friend Orest NADOR) (husband Lorne "Spike" predeceased,) Richard COLLINS (wife Dorothy predeceased,) Clifford COLLINS and wife Moria, Percy (predeceased) wife May COLLINS, Elizabeth and husband Wilbert McCULLIGH (both predeceased,) Walter (predeceased) wife Norine COLLINS, Bella and husband Fred DENNIS (both predeceased,) Mable PETERS (predeceased,) Norman and wife Ruth COLLINS (both predeceased.) Will be forever remembered by many nieces and nephews. Visitation was 7 - 9 pm Monday. Funeral Service was at 11: 00 am Tuesday, May 22, 2007 at Island Funeral Home, Little Current. Reverend Faye STEVENS officiating. Burial in Elmview Cemetery, Sheguiandah. Donations to Sheguiandah United Church, Manor Bed Fund or to cancer.

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PETERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-03 published
HARRIS, Freida (née RICE)
Of Saint Thomas, on Tuesday, January 2, 2007, at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, in her 82nd year. Beloved wife of the late Robert HARRIS (1987) and loved mother of the late R. Wayne HARRIS (1984). Dearly loved grandmother of Brent and his wife Erica, Darren, Brandy, Katie and great-grandmother of Christian. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Dear mother-in-law of Janet and her husband Greg PETERS. Dear sister of Audrey MONTEITH of Saint Thomas and the late Marjorie JONES and the late Elsie LAMPMAN. Dear step-sister of Harold RICE of Saint Thomas and the late Mervin, Hazel, Helen, Sheldon and Harry. Freida was born in Langton on April 8, 1925, the daughter of the late Peter and Gertie (CONNORS) RICE. She worked at Metcalfe Shoe, Clevite, Erie Iron and volunteered at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Friday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Elmdale Cemetery. Visitation Thursday from 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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PETERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-13 published
ALLEN, Lillian Gladys (née GROVES)
Of Saint Thomas, on Thursday, January 11, 2007, at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, surrounded by her loving family, in her 77th year. Beloved wife of the late Frank ALLEN (1980) and dearly loved mother of Kathy POWERS (Gary,) Thomas ALLEN (Carol,) David ALLEN (Barb) and Karen PETERS, all of Saint Thomas. Dear sister of Helen HARRIS (Don) of Toledo, Ohio and the late Harold GROVES. Sadly missed by 9 grandchildren, 9 great-grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews. Lillian was born in Saint Thomas on October 19, 1930, the daughter of the late Thomas and Florence (SHELTON) GROVES. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Monday at 1: 00 p.m. Interment to follow in Elmdale Cemetery. Visitation Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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PETERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-12-28 published
Priest was a driving force behind many area projects
Rev. Patrick COSTELLO also built relationships with developing churches across Africa.
By April ROBINSON, Sun Media, Fri., December 28, 2007
A priest known as the spark behind enduring Saint Thomas community events and projects has died.
Rev. Patrick COSTELLO died of cancer on Christmas Day in Chatham. He was 78.
"Everybody knew Father Pat in Saint Thomas, whether you were Catholic or not," said Steve PETERS, member of provincial parliament for Elgin-Middlesex-London and a former Saint Thomas mayor.
"He had this ability to pull people together for any goal or any project," he said.
One project was the annual Sports Spectacular celebrity dinner in Saint Thomas.
COSTELLO was the driving force getting the event, now in its 30th year, started.
The dinner raises money for the Association for Community Living and the Special Olympics, groups COSTELLO believed in supporting.
"He's always been sports-minded," said Gary CLARKE, an organizer of the dinner and a superintendent of the London District Catholic school board.
CLARKE, who worked with COSTELLO on the dinner for 15 years, said he wants to commemorate him at the next dinner on January 24.
COSTELLO's cousin, Les COSTELLO, founded the Flying Fathers -- a hockey team made up of priests who raise money for charities after quitting the Toronto Maple Leafs to become a priest.
Pat COSTELLO played a bit of hockey himself, said CLARKE.
His true gift was his ability to get the church to extend its reach into the community and beyond, he said.
"He always had a project on the go."
COSTELLO began the annual Saint Anne's festival, a four-day event in June.
He was a strong supporter of minor hockey and soccer.
He also initiated the building of the Saint Anne's Centre in Saint Thomas, now a community hub for weddings, dances and the Sports Spectacular.
COSTELLO also saw a need for a seniors centre so elderly parishioners could just "walk across the street" to church, said CLARKE. So, COSTELLO oversaw construction of the non-profit seniors residence.
"He was able to create a sense of community from the bricks and mortar," said CLARKE.
That sense extended to Africa, where COSTELLO built relationships with developing churches in Zambia, Tanzania and Zimbabwe.
"Father Pat always wanted to know how the Catholic church was faring in my part of the world," Telesphore Mpundu, archbishop of Lusaka, Zambia, said in an e-mail.
COSTELLO helped to establish a parish in a remote region of Zambia in 1980 named Saint Anne's after the Saint Thomas church.
"I know there will be a lot of sadness at his death," said John SHERLOCK, former bishop of the London diocese.
"He was brimming with self-confidence and he was gregarious," he said.
After 25 years at Saint Anne's, COSTELLO capped off his career at Sacred Heart parish in Port Lambton and celebrated 50 years of work as a priest in 2004.
Visitation is today at the Blessed Sacrament Church in Chatham from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and tomorrow from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m.
The funeral, also at Blessed Sacrament, is tomorrow at 11 a.m.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-23 published
YUSKEWICH, John
Passed away after a courageous and well fought battle with Emphysema at Laurentian Hospital in Sudbury on June 20, 2007.
John was born in Ukraine on April 4, 1904, in the Village of Werchrata, Rawaruska District Halychyna, son of the late Petro YUSKEWICH and Anne (HUK.)
He was predeceased by his sister Maria SMUT, cousins Doris GUAY and Polly CZEREWKO.
John came to Canada in 1948 to Wishart, Saskatchewan, sponsored by Fred G. Bzdel. He went to Winnipeg in 1949 to his aunt Julie TYPA, where he worked for the C.N.R. In 1950 he moved to Sudbury where he worked for Inco in the mines and smelter until his retirement in 1984. At the mine he was known by his fellow workers as "Fur Coat Johnny".
John is survived by his nephew Michael DUDA, his wife Louise and their son Sebastien in Montreal. Nieces Katyryna KUZMIAK and Maria SZCZERBIK both in Ukraine. Cousins Harry TYPA, Joanne HEALEY and Helen HUEN in Winnipeg, Michael CZEREWKO in Havelock. Joan PETERS, Janet PETERS, Steve PETERS, Joseph PETERS, his wife Irene in Saint Thomas.
The family would like to give special thanks to the Staff at Westmount Retirement Home and the Doctors and Nurses at Saint_Joseph's and Laurentian Hospitals.
Resting at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, Sudbury. Funeral Mass in Saint Mary's Ukrainian Catholic Church, 40 Notre Dame Ave., Tuesday, June 26th, 2007 at 10 a.m. Interment in the Civic Cemetery, Second Ave. Donations to Saint Mary's Church or charity of your choice would be appreciated. Friends may call 6-8 p.m. Monday.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-27 published
OLMSTED, Marjorie Kingsland (née SALTER)
(February 25, 1917-June 23, 2007)
Marjorie OLMSTED lived 90 years of what she would have termed an 'ordinary life', but to those of us who knew and loved her, she was extraordinary. She brought joy to others in the simplest way possible - yet few achieve it - she made us laugh. Constantly! Her keen eye combined with quick wit left any situation open to her humorous quips. Marj will always be remembered as kind, gentle, artistic and creative, and most of all, funny. She loved the sound of laughter and even as Alzheimers slowly diminished her memory in later years, with a twinkle in her eye she managed to bring delight to others daily. This beautiful Scottish/Irish lassie with the gorgeous auburn hair and freckles was born in Quebec City on February 25th, 1917 to parents Lillian and Norman SALTER who later moved to Ottawa. At 14, Marj met her childhood sweetheart, Earl OLMSTED, whom she married at 23 and they remained together for 76 years. Not an easy feat when you consider they endured the 2nd World War being apart. (Lt. Col. OLMSTED [Ret.] was overseas for 5 years and is one of the few living survivors of the Normandy Beach landing.) For 2 of the war years Marj attended Kemptville Agricultural College, one of the highlights of her life. This was followed by a life being an 'army wife' with moves from Ottawa to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, Fort Churchill, Manitoba, and Madison, Wisconsin accompanied by their four children - Eric, Valerie, Eleanor, and Bruce. She was able to put her home economic studies to good use in her chosen career as a devoted and outstanding Mom. Marjorie lived for many years on Broadview Avenue, Ottawa and in Amberwood Village, Stittsville surrounded by wonderful neighbors. On one of their postings 45 years ago, Marjorie discovered she had breast cancer. Her humour helped her through those dark times and upon waking from major surgery asked her doctor 'Does this mean I can no longer wear double breasted suits?' He encouraged her to find a new hobby so she signed up for art lessons as a form of therapy and found a hidden artistic gift that blossomed into years of painting (often with her beloved dog Lara at her feet). Using mixed media, she would amaze relatives and Friends with her original artwork and poems to suit special occasions. Always a journalist and poet, at the age of 80 Marj wrote an article entitled 'Diary of Breast Cancer.' Not only was it published in the Ottawa Citizen, but it has been widely distributed to thousands of women across Canada to offer them hope and inspiration. Her illness never returned and she lived cancer-free 45 more years! Marjorie's #1 passion was her family and grandchildren - Jana and Pat CLENDON of Calgary, Lani EL- GUEBALY of Vancouver, and Tally, Lindsay, and Geoffrey OSBORNE of Toronto - and many happy reunions took place at Marj and Earl's beloved Red Pine Camp on Golden Lake, Ontario where lifelong Friendships were formed and strengthened each summer for over 65 years. Beauty was an ongoing theme in her poems; Sugarbush Pointe and Red Pine Camp captured for Marjorie the best that camaraderie and nature had to offer. Perfect and personal pieces of Canada. Already sadly missed by her husband, children, and grandchildren, some very special people who will mourn her loss are relatives Noreen LANGDON, Rita SALTER, Ted and Muriel LANGDON, Alan and Waveney SALTER, Doctor Nady EL- GUEBALY, Doctor Ray OSBORNE, Judy KETCHESON, Marilyn EL- GUEBALY, Bill SALTER Jr., Mary and King CHAPMAN, Andrea and Albert PETERS, Doug and Jean SALTER, Red Piners and lifelong Friends in the Ottawa Valley. She was recently predeceased in August 2006 by her first-born son Eric, also by her parents, her brothers Bill and Jack, her niece's son Scotty, many aunts and uncles, fellow grandparents Ahmed and Andree EL- GUEBALY, and nephew Geoffrey LANGDON. In the summer of 2002 Marjorie said, 'soon I will be flying with wings.' We are forever grateful that we had a few more years to enjoy her company before she flew away. Marjorie loved words and here are a few of her own which foreshadowed this occasion.
End of Summer
Touch the rustic railings one more time And gaze at the quiet lake. The leaves are brittle now And rattle in the breeze. Feel the sun, half warm, half chill, And say goodbye to summer. A quiver is in the poplars; A shiver is in the pines, On the lake the waves wear A lacey fringe of winter white And one bird flies Into a fading sky.
Special thanks to Evelyn ALBAN, who is like a member of the family, and to the loving staff at the Claremont Retirement Residence in Toronto, especially Barbara. You are truly an amazingly loyal and caring group of people. A Graveside Internment Service will be held at Capital Memorial Gardens Cemetery, 3700 Price of Wales Drive, Nepean on Thursday, June 28, 2007 at 3: 15 p.m. For further information please call Tubman Funeral Homes at 613-722-6559. In lieu of flowers, donations in Marjorie's name to the Ottawa Mission, 35 Waller Street, Ottawa, K1N 7G4, would be sincerely appreciated. Anyone wishing to read 'Diary of Breast Cancer' can find it on Val Warner's website www.walkandtalkforwomen.com.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-14 published
COXON, Howard Woodrow
Howard died peacefully in his sleep at the family farm, in his 92nd year, on Sunday, July 8th, 2007. Pre-deceased by his wife Paula, loving father to Marcus, Brian, Graeme and Carol. Father-in-law to Jonna and Bruce and grandfather to Sara-Katherine, Hanna, Sam, William and Nicholas. Loving brother to Jean Richmond WATSON and brother-in-law to Margot and Roberto GUALTIERI and uncle to Eric, Inger and Domenic. Loving partner to Helga GODDARD. Howard was very connected to his roots in Mexico, where he was born, in Tampico, in 1915. Returning with his parents to England, Howard went on to receive an M.A. in History from Cambridge. Howard left the United Kingdom after World War 2, having served in the Royal Air Force as Squadron Leader, and with a spirit of adventure, arrived in Ottawa, where he married Paula PETERS in 1950. Finding Canada exciting and full of promise, Howard began his career with Imperial Oil Ltd. in Toronto, and subsequently moved to British Columbia, where he encountered some of the greatest challenges of his career. Howard moved back to Toronto, and then to New York City in 1967, where he worked as Deputy Vice President of Marketing, Exxon Corporation, until his retirement in 1975. In 1979, Howard and Paula settled in Northumberland County, Ontario, on the farm chosen by Paula to be the family gathering point and base for their many travels in retirement. A man of great integrity, his wisdom, constancy, patience, and commitment will be greatly missed by all of us who knew and loved him. A remembrance gathering for Howard was held at the farm on July 12th. Condolences received at www.MacCoubrey.com.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-09 published
PETERS, Audrey C. (Dec. 2, 1928 - August 2, 2007)
Our dearest Audrey died peacefully in her sleep during the evening of August Second at the Palliative Care Unit of the Toronto Grace Medical Centre. She will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved her; her husband of 53 years, The Honourable Douglas PETERS her two children, Doctor David W. PETERS (Alina) and Doctor Catherine GILCHRIST (Ian;) and by her two wonderful grandchildren, Keir and Evan GILCHRIST. She will also be missed by her many Friends and relatives across Canada and around the world. Audrey lived a joyful life as she studied and loved art and anthropology and travelled widely. She made Friends wherever she went as she was truly interested in people. Indeed, making Friends was an art form she mastered. But her greatest interest and achievement was being a caring and thoughtful wife, mother and grandmother. A memorial service will be held in St. Andrew's United Church, 117 Bloor Street East, Toronto on Tuesday, August 14th at 2: 00 p.m. If desired, in lieu of flowers please make a donation to Cancer Research or to the charity of your choice. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-06 published
NEUFELD, Jacob Albert " Jake"
Peacefully at St Joseph's Villa, Dundas, Ontario on Friday September 14, 2007, age 97. Jake has joined his beloved wife of 71 years, Lottie (2004.) Brother of Elvin (Joanne) NEUFELD, predeceased by six sisters and two brothers. Remembered with deep love and affection by his children: Lorraine (John) PETERS, Victor (Barbara) NEUFELD, Rudy (Frances) NEUFELD, Caroline NEUFELD, Myrna Emilja NEUFELD. Cherished Opa of eleven grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren. Jake was a proud and passionate teacher for 47 years, and Founding Principal of the High School at Caronport, Saskatchewan. Throughout his life he was a choral conductor committed to music that was worthy of the Creator to whom it was dedicated. In later years he directed the Melody Ensemble, a gathering of seniors who made music with everything from kazoos to bass fiddles. Memorial service at First Baptist Church, Brantford Ontario, 7: 30 p.m. Sunday, October 21, 2007. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Choir, First Baptist Church, Brantford, Ontario or the Canadian Music Educators Association www.cmea.ca would be appreciated.

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PETERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-10 published
SZOT, Mary Bernadette (née PETERS)
82 years. Thursday, November 8th, 2007 at her daughter's residence in Toronto. Beloved wife of Jan SZOT predeceased in 1992. Loving mother and very cherished grandmother to Janina 'Jan' (Brahm) Julian (Lori) and their children Julian, Jake, Melinda, Emily and Daniel SZOT; Margaret (Mark) and their children Zachary and Henry MAH. Dear daughter of Joseph and Gertrude (HANNAH) PETERS predeceased. Dear sister of Kathleen JONES and Ron PETERS; predeceased by Gertrude TURNER, Jim, Stan, and Fred PETERS all predeceased. Funeral Mass Christ the King Church, 30 Beech Street, Sudbury, Tuesday, November 13th, 2007 at 10 a.m. Interment in the Civic Cemetery, Sudbury. In lieu of flowers, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated. At Mary's request, there will be no visitation at the funeral home. Friends are invited to gather at the church after 9: 30 a.m. Tuesday. Arrangements entrusted to Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, Sudbury.

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PETERSEN o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-02 published
PETERSEN, Guenther
On October 23, Guenther PETERSEN passed away peacefully after a brief illness.
Guenther is survived by his wife Marianne, son Tom and sister-in-law Henny DEHN.
Guenther was born in Hamburg, Germany on August 31, 1922. In 1950, he married his beloved Marianne and immigrated to Canada.
The next 57 years were spent farming, selling real-estate, and engaging in various entrepreneurial ventures. Guenther was a man who loved nothing more than to golf, fish, and spend time with his wife, whom he adored. He was a big man with a true frontier spirit. He had a big heart and lived his life just as big. While we all miss him, we are consoled in the fact that he has merely gone fishing a river in the hopes that a fish will rise.
In respect of his wishes, there will be no funeral service and cremation has taken place. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.
Arrangements entrusted to the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham.

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PETERSEN - All Categories in OGSPI

PETERSON o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-10-26 published
SEDDON, Joseph
Joseph SEDDON, of Hanover, passed away on Wednesday, October 17, 2007. He was 17.
Survived by his father John Paul (Suzanne) SEDDON of Hanover, his mother Denise HAYES of Scarborough, sister Jessica, brothers Damian, Clayton, Andrew, Mathew and Jonathon. Also survived by his Grandma Glenna SEDDON of R.R.#2 Walkerton, Yvonne PARKS of Scarborough, step-grandma Brenda PETERSON of Kitchener, great-grandpa Wilfred SEDDON (Dorothy) of R.R.#1 Varna, aunts Tammy (Howard) MORRISON of R.R.#5 Mount Forest, Tracey (Barney) HURLBUT of R.R.#1 Mildmay, Tanya (James) SNELL of Hanover, aunt Minnie, uncle Dennis, aunt Rachel, uncle Wilfred, aunt Amanda COOK, aunt Corey PETERSON and many cousins. Predeceased by his grandpa John SEDDON.
Visitation was held at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover, on Sunday 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service was held Monday, October 22, 2007 at 11 a.m. at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover. Rev. Alice WILSON officiating. Interment in Hanover Cemetery.
Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, Hanover would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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PETERSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-02 published
PETERSON, Marjorie (née GOODMAN)
It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden passing of Marjorie PETERSON, of Riverside Retirement Residence, on December 31, 2006 at University Hospital. Marjorie, at the age of 89 years, passed away peacefully with her family at her side. She was predeceased by her loving husband George PETERSON and is survived by her loving children, Barbara HURT and her husband David, and Bonnie McCABE and her husband Kenneth, her grandchildren Steven (Josée,) Jeffrey, Ryan (Christine), Aaron and Meagan, her great-grandchildren Shannon, Cassidy, Rochelle, Gavyn, Alexandre, and her loving sister, Helen ALLEN. The family would like to extend thanks to the doctors and staff of the University Hospital Intensive Care Unit for the tender care given to Marjorie during her brief stay with them. Visitation has been arranged for Wednesday, January 3, 2007 from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at Needham Funeral Chapel, 520 Dundas Street, London (519-434-9141) and a funeral service will take place at 1: 00 p.m. on Thursday, January 4, 2007 at Needham Funeral Home. Memorial donations made to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. Tributes may be left at www.mem.com

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PETERSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-12-26 published
Flying fingers stilled
International tributes flood as fans recognize 'one of the bright lights of jazz has gone out.'
By Canadian Press, Wed., December 26, 2007
The death of Oscar PETERSON on Monday set off a torrent of memories yesterday. (Canadian Press file photo)
Toronto -- Jazz pianist Oscar PETERSON, whose flying fingers mesmerized audiences around the world -- from dance halls in 1940s Montreal to the lights of Carnegie Hall and beyond -- has died at age 82.
He played alongside the giants of jazz: Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, Charlie Parker, Roy Eldridge, Nat King Cole, Stan Getz, DIzzy Gillespie, Ella Fitzgerald and Duke Ellington, who once called PETERSON the "Maharajah of the keyboard."
"Until the end, Oscar PETERSON could tour the world and fill concert halls everywhere," said Andre Menard, artistic director and co-founder of the Montreal International Jazz Festival.
"This is something that never diminished. His drawing power, his mystique as a musician, was so big that he remained at the top of his game until the end… Oscar PETERSON has been the musician every musician in the world can look up to and aspire to."
Word of PETERSON's death at his home in Mississauga, set off a torrent of international tributes, including a statement from French president Nicolas Sarkozy, who said "one of the bright lights of jazz has gone out."
"He was a regular on the French stage, where the public adored his luminous style," Sarkozy added. "It is a great loss for us."
Heritage Minister Josee Verner called PETERSON a great Canadian and a beloved citizen of the world.
"His musical legacy will live on, as will his generous spirit in the hearts of those who knew and loved him," she said in a statement.
Former prime minister Jean Chretien reminisced Monday about the display of mutual admiration that unfolded when he invited PETERSON to a 2001 ceremony honouring South African leader Nelson Mandela.
Chretien had been a fan and friend of PETERSON's for decades, and says he had already offered to make him Ontario's lieutenant-governor after he took office in 1993.
He said PETERSON declined for health reasons.
Years later Chretien brought PETERSON to an Ottawa event where Mandela was named an honourary Canadian citizen.
During a private meeting, Chretien recalled, the revolutionary political figure glowed upon meeting the great pianist.
"It was very emotional," Chretien said.
"They were both moved to meet each other. These were two men with humble beginnings who rose to very illustrious levels."
Known for the propulsive swing of his music as well as his astounding technical virtuosity, the Montreal-born PETERSON visited almost every major concert hall around the globe, recording some of the country's most distinctive music including "Canadiana Suite" and "Hymn to Freedom."
"He just drove the whole bus," Senator Tommy Banks, also a pianist, said Monday in Edmonton.
For the master himself, playing piano was an "extreme joy" that he couldn't articulate.
"I can only transmit it through the playing; I can't put it into words," PETERSON said.
When describing how PETERSON's music made her feel, the late Fitzgerald once said: "It makes you want to sing."

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-25 published
ORR, David H. (December 4, 1927-August 20, 2007)
At Vancouver, British Columbia after a brief illness, it is with deepest sorrow that the family announces the loss of David H. ORR on August 20th, 2007 at the age of 79. Beloved husband to Connie (née WYMAN) for over 54 years and loving father to Kevin (Pierrette) of Ottawa, Tracey (John DEAN) of Vancouver and Randy (Colleen) of Tsawwassen. He was an adoring grandfather to Joshua, Kaitlyn, Brooke, Paige, Kennedy and Parker. He also leaves his sister Theresa (Forest PETERSON) of Richmond, Viginia and nieces and nephews. David was born and raised in St. Stephen, New Brunswick. He thrived in a career of broadcasting, public relations and telecommunications beginning in Saint John, New Brunswick where he met his wife. Together they moved many times across Canada to cities including Fredericton, Halifax, Ottawa, Quebec City, Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver. An accomplished public relations practitioner, his career spanned Canadian Pacific Railways, Radio Press, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Bell Canada and Bell Canada Enterprises where he was head of corporate communications from its formation in 1983 until 1991 when he retired to Vancouver. He was president of the Maritime Public Relations Society, the Ottawa Public Relations Society and the Canadian Public Relations Society. He enjoyed travelling all over the globe for business and pleasure. Remembered as a great communicator, he could always come up with another question when you thought you had exhausted all your answers. A brilliant strategist, he had the uncanny ability to read a situation in advance and be prepared with the right response and a plan for action when called upon. Loving, kind and considerate with a quick, warm smile, he was always the beacon of honour, trust and respect. The family thanks the Cardiac Care and Intensive Care Unit wards at Vancouver General Hospital for their dedicated care and professionalism. Private family service by request. In lieu of flowers please consider making a donation gift in his honour to the Vancouver General Hospital Foundation, 855 West 12th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia V5Z 1M9 for the 'Vancouver General Hospital Cardiac Rehab Fund'. Gifts can be made by phone at 604-875-4676 or via secure website: www.worldclasshealthcare.ca

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-24 published
RAYNER, George Joseph Cameron
Peacefully in Brantford, Ontario, on Friday, December 21, 2007, George RAYNER, a cherished husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle, friend and proud Canadian, died in his 88th year. Beloved husband of Phyllis (née GALLAGHER) for 56 years; wonderful father of Shelagh (Bruce PETERSON), Mississauga; Moira (Les WHITE/WHYTE), Ottawa; Barbara, Strathroy; and George (Lori LUFF), Mississauga. Devoted Papa of Susan, Kathryn, and Brian PETERSON; Emily, Elizabeth, Fraser, Anna, and Mary WHITE/WHYTE; and Abigail, Joshua, Zachary, and Jessica RAYNER. Dear brother of Mary HADDON; predeceased by Father Frank RAYNER, OMI, Angus RAYNER, and Patricia POCOCK. Survived by Michael HADDON, Joseph POCOCK, Richard and Mary GALLAGHER, Louis and Vivian GALLAGHER, cousin Frederick FLAHIFF and many cousins, nieces and nephews. Born June 3, 1920, in Victoria, British Columbia, to George Jabez RAYNER and Margaret Irene GILLESPIE, George was a wireless operator for the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1939 to 1947, serving overseas for five years in World War 2. He later met Phyllis in Toronto where they settled before moving to Brantford in 1968. George represented eight counties for the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, helped set up the Egg Board, and worked at the Brantford Y. He was a life member of the Knights of Columbus and a volunteer on the Library Board, at St. Vincent de Paul Society, and with the Canadian Mental Health Association. In retirement he learned to cook, play the trumpet, and curl. He loved his family, Friends, curling, a good joke, bridge, and travel. He was a wonderful, gentle man of faith who will be greatly missed. Visitation at McCleister Funeral Home, 495 Park Road North, Brantford, Wednesday, December 26, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass at St. Basil's Church, Brantford, Thursday, December 27 at 11 a.m. Interment Saint_Joseph's Cemetery, Brantford. If desired, the family would appreciate memorial donations to the Saint_Joseph's Lifecare Foundation or the Canadian Mental Health Association. McCleister (519) 758-1553 mccleisterfuneralhome@rogers.com

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-26 published
King of the keys made jazz a pleasure
His critics said he lacked imagination and relied too heavily on technical skill. But Oscar PETERSON always knew how to have fun
By J.D. CONSIDINE, Page R1
He made it all seem so easy.
When Oscar PETERSON soloed, the notes flowed like water from a fountain. It hardly mattered whether PETERSON, who died Sunday at the age of 82 at his home in Mississauga, was playing solo piano, with a small combo, or a big band; he was perennially, preternaturally capable, playing as if he could barely keep the ideas inside him.
Yet no matter how ferociously the notes flowed forth, his solos bore such a strong sense of swing that audiences bobbed happily in their wake, heads swaying gently with the rhythm. Nor did his body betray any sense of exertion, except to the extent that he was very obviously enjoying himself.
Watching PETERSON at the keyboard was a bit like watching a duck on a pond - his fingers may have been skittering furiously across the keys, but the rest of him seemed to float effortlessly. It was the sort of display that made jazz piano appear not only fun but almost as easy as singing, something PETERSON also did, shadowing his solos with gruff, breathless scat singing.
In truth, playing piano like PETERSON wasn't easy. In fact, it was damned near impossible. Like the great Art Tatum before him, PETERSON was prodigiously gifted, possessed of virtuosity beyond anything normally found in jazz. As guitarist (and frequent collaborator) Herb Ellis put it, "most piano players end where [ PETERSON] starts," an observation that goes a long way toward explaining why there has been a notable lack of PETERSON clones in the jazz world.
He had acolytes, most notably Oliver Jones, who grew up in the same Montreal neighbourhood and studied piano with PETERSON's sister Daisy. But for the most part, pianists found it easier to admire PETERSON than to imitate him.
Count Basie, who recorded a string of duet albums in the 1970s with PETERSON, said he "plays the best ivory box I've ever heard," while Duke Ellington, no slouch himself, referred to his Canadian comrade as a "Maharajah of the keyboard." Herbie Hancock moved from classical piano to jazz after being inspired by the "precision" of PETERSON's playing, while Diana Krall credits PETERSON as the reason she does what she does. "In my high school yearbook it says that my goal is to become a jazz pianist like Oscar PETERSON," she told the Los Angeles Times.
Somehow, though, PETERSON's reputation as a giant among jazz pianists didn't quite translate to an equally towering reputation among jazz critics. Typical was English critic Max Harrison, who in 1960 sniffed that PETERSON "appears to be concerned mainly with playing the piano and only incidentally with making music."
Variations on that theme - critics casting PETERSON as soulless technician, a piano automaton - would recur throughout his career. To some extent, he was a victim of fashion, as the most celebrated pianists of the mid-1950s and '60s were players whose ideas were considerably stronger than their technique: Dave Brubeck, Thelonious Monk, Bill Evans, McCoy Tyner, Chick Corea. Even those whose playing flirted with virtuosity, such as Keith Jarrett or Cecil Taylor, seldom dazzled as PETERSON did.
In short, PETERSON had the misfortune of being a musical moderate at a time when all the big noise was being made by radicals and rebels.
He came by his chops and his adoration of melody honestly. As a child, PETERSON studied piano with Paul de Marky, a student of Franz Liszt; as a young jazz musician, he was hailed as "the Brown Bomber of Boogie-Woogie," likening his two-fisted technique to that of boxer Joe Louis. But with both Liszt and boogie-woogie, PETERSON built his sound and style on music that had plenty of room for dazzle and melody, but relatively little interest in the sort of harmonic innovation Monk and Evans championed.
In the 1930s and 1940s, such an approach made sense, and when PETERSON was discovered by producer/entrepreneur Norman Granz (who convinced the young pianist to move away from boogie and toward bebop), he clearly had the makings of a star. Granz introduced the young Canadian to American audiences in 1949, with a cameo appearance at a Carnegie Hall Jazz at the Philharmonic show. Listening to the recording today, you can almost hear the jaws drop as PETERSON, on the tune Fine and Dandy, balances a fluid, boppish line in the right hand with surging, Basie-like accents in the left. It was definitely the sound of a star being born.
Granz, who quickly signed PETERSON to his Verve imprint, was a good shepherd to the young Canadian, pointing him toward sympathetic sidemen - most notably bassist Ray Brown, guitarist Herb Ellis, and drummer Ed Thigpen - and letting his creativity flower. Being as versatile as he was gifted, PETERSON was a natural for Granz's JATP shows, where he shone both on his own and while accompanying everyone from Ella Fitzgerald to Stan Getz.
But Granz also helped PETERSON play to less obvious strengths, from big band dates like 1959's Swinging Brass with the Oscar Peterson Trio that stressed his big sound and nearly vocal approach to melody, to groove-oriented albums such as the 1962 release Night Train, which found the pianist taking a pared-down approach to the same blues James Brown had on the charts that year.
PETERSON's relentless creativity and near-encyclopedic knowledge of standards (both pop and classical) made it easy for him to take on new recording projects, and it's likely that his prolific output - he released nine albums in 1959 alone - contributed to the notion that his playing tended to repetition. From there, it was easy enough to leap to the sneering conclusion that, as critic Martin Williams put it, " PETERSON's melodic vocabulary is a stockpile of clichés, that he seems to know every stock riff and lick in the history of jazz."
That's not quite fair, though. True enough, PETERSON liked to pepper his solos with musical quotes, but he was hardly alone in that; indeed, well-placed quotes were considered among the hallmarks of saxophonist Dexter Gordon's mid-1970s comeback. What Williams and the others missed amidst the impossibly fast runs and thuddingly obvious melodic allusions was that PETERSON was, above all, a master of subtlety, someone whose greatest moments were harmonic ploys or melodic twists that only those who knew the tunes inside and out would notice.
Not surprisingly, this aspect of his playing came increasingly to the fore as he got older. His albums with Basie are a case in point. At first glance, the two seem little more than a Mutt and Jeff act, with tall, musically garrulous PETERSON appearing utterly at odds with the short, taciturn Basie. But the music they made together was playful, witty and wonderfully simpatico, as notable for what wasn't played as for what was.
Above all, the albums with Basie were an absolute gas, and that was perhaps the most striking characteristic of PETERSON's approach to piano. He didn't play like he wanted to change the world, or make the audience see things through the prism of his personal vision; he played like he wanted everyone else to have as much fun as he was having.
It may not have been the most profound reason to play jazz, but it was a damn good reason to listen.

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-26 published
'Man with four hands' was one of the greatest piano players of all time
Canadian whose flying fingers mesmerized audiences around the world - from small clubs in 1950s Montreal to the lights of Carnegie Hall - was a lyrical stylist and a mentor to many
By Nicholas JENNINGS, Special to The Globe and Mail with reports from Canadian Press and staff, Page S9
Toronto -- Few pianists swung as hard or played as fast and with as many grace notes as Oscar PETERSON. The classically trained musician could play it all, from Chopin and Liszt to blues, stride, boogie, bebop and beyond. He led his own jazz trios, performed with such legendary figures as Ella Fitzgerald, Count Basie, DIzzy Gillespie and Louis Armstrong - the latter called him "the man with four hands" - recorded more than 200 albums and wrote such memorable works as Hymn to Freedom and the Canadiana Suite. "A virtuoso without peer," concluded his biographer, Gene Lees, in The Will to Swing.
"The piano is like an extension of his own physical being," composer and clarinetist Phil NIMMONS, who helped create Canadiana Suite, said in 1975 of his long-time friend. "I'm amazed at the speed of his creativity. I am not talking about mere technical capabilities, although his are awesome. I'm speaking of the times when you find him under optimum conditions of creativity. His mind can move as quickly as his fingers and that is what is so astounding."
The story of Oscar PETERSON's rise from immigrant poverty to world fame is one of popular music's great inspirational tales. Born in Montreal's Saint-Henri district, he was the fourth of five children of a Canadian Pacific Railway porter and his wife who came to Canada from the Virgin Islands. His father, Daniel, a self-taught amateur musician and a strict disciplinarian, insisted that his children develop musical skills. Oscar began on piano and trumpet, but dropped the latter after a bout with tuberculosis when he was 7.
By 14, he was studying with Paul de Marky, a renowned Hungarian-born classical pianist who piqued his interest in jazz, particularly works by pianist Art Tatum. Mr. PETERSON always credited his sister Daisy, a noted piano teacher in Montreal who also taught such Canadian musicians as Oliver Jones and Joe Sealy, with being an important teacher and influence on his career. Soon, he was winning competitions. But his father never let it go to his head. He played his son Tatum's renowned recording of Tiger Rag that caused the young musician to quit piano for two months.
Mr. PETERSON always said it was his father who instilled in him an unwavering will to succeed. When he dropped out of high school to play in the Johnny Holmes Orchestra, becoming its only black member, a displeased Daniel PETERSON gave him some stern advice. "He told me, 'If you're going to go out there and be a piano player, don't just be another one. Be the best.' "
The 17-year-old took the words to heart. Within a few years, he was leading his own trio at Montreal's Alberta Lounge, where he developed his distinctive style and attracted some illustrious onlookers, including Count Basie and Ella Fitzgerald. Then, on one fateful night, American jazz impresario Norman Granz heard Mr. PETERSON at the club and was so impressed that he invited him to play at New York's Carnegie Hall.
Mr. PETERSON's appearance on Mr. Granz's Jazz at the Philharmonic program in 1949 was a watershed event. Mr. PETERSON didn't have a work visa, so Mr. Granz decided to introduce him as a surprise guest on a bill that included Charlie Parker, Lester Young and Coleman Hawkins. Although the young pianist was terrified, Mr. Granz assured him it would be worth it. "He told me, 'You'll know if you have what it takes, and if you do what you do and they love it, then you know you've made it,' Mr. PETERSON later recalled.
Performing with bassist Ray BROWN, who would become a long-time sideman, Mr. PETERSON brought the house down with such songs as Fine and Dandy and Tenderly. The 24-year-old "stopped the concert dead cold in its tracks," according to Down Beat magazine, which added that the pianist displayed "a flashy right hand, a load of bop and a good sense of harmonic development." Mr. PETERSON's course - with Mr. Granz as his manager - was set.
Over the next 50 years, Mr. PETERSON played in a variety of trios, including those with Mr. BROWN and guitarist Herb Ellis (1953-1958,) Mr. BROWN and drummer Ed THIGPEN (1959-1964,) bassist Sam Jones and drummer Bobby Durham (mid-60s) and guitarist Joe Pass and bassist Niels Pedersen (late 1960s). During this time, he recorded such memorable albums as 1956's Stratford Festival recording, 1958's On the Town, recorded at Toronto's Town Tavern, and 1962's Night Train, which included a number of Duke Ellington pieces as well as Mr. PETERSON's own Hymn to Freedom. Then, in 1964, he produced his best-known work, Canadiana Suite, with each of the album's tracks inspired by a different region of the country. Mr. PETERSON called the project "my musical portrait of the Canada I love," and it was nominated for a Grammy Award in 1965.
By 1979, his career had arrived at a point where he was in steady demand and his life had developed a certain stability. He built a recording studio in his house and set aside enough time most mornings to "ring out some different pieces of equipment and get myself together," he told The Globe and Mail. "I'll maybe come up with something I would want to get started writing."
The studio was irresistible, he said. Later in the day, usually after attending a business meetings elsewhere in the house, he liked to return to the keyboard "to work on some writing, or maybe rehearse a little music."
By all accounts, Mr. PETERSON led two lives - one on the road and one at home. "I work probably six solid weeks then take off a month or two. My work is like that. If I tour, it is usually three or four weeks and when it's over it's done."
When he wasn't away, Mr. PETERSON seldom liked to leave the house. But the constant touring remained a trial before he brought order to his life. "It can be very harried during touring, but we try to control that now. I have to know where I'm going one way or another. I feel that if I have to go on the road I'm not going to stay the Young Women's Christian Association, and I'm not going to eat at the Big Burger. If I go to France, for instance, I eat at the best possible restaurants and stay in the best hotel. I like the finer things in life and I think I deserve what I can afford. I don't thing there's anything wrong with shooting for the best. It's unfortunate that a few more of us don't think that way."
The travelling took its toll on many of Mr. PETERSON's sidemen, who gave up work with the master because personal or health reasons. Some fell victim to the bottle or drugs. Mr. PETERSON, who always avoided such things, kept going, and performed solo frequently in the 1970s. But he paid his own price for touring, which kept him from his wives and children. "How destructive was [the road] for me?" he once asked a CBS reporter. "Almost four divorces - that's how destructive it can be."
Mr. PETERSON recounted in his 2002 autobiography, A Jazz Odyssey, how his breakup with third wife, Charlotte, separated him from their son, Joel, for whom he wrote the tune He Has Gone. "They now live somewhere in Eastern Canada," he wrote. "This had been a dreadful loss." He seemed to find happiness in his fourth marriage to Kelly GREEN, with whom he had a daughter, Céline, in 1991, when he was 66. He credited them with helping him to find a balance between family and music.
"When you first start out, you're impatient, uptight," he once said. "Everything has to be done right now, it doesn't matter what you might like it to be." Later, he said he became a little more sensible about all of life's elements. "You realize that some of the things that you want to do require a depth that you won't have until you're more mature. Even then, there are things that you still can't get together."
Mr. PETERSON possessed a boyish sense of humour and was renowned for his love of laughter. He was also a notorious practical joker. His mischievous side was something that came through in two documentaries: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's The Life and Times of Oscar PETERSON and the National Film Board's In the Key of Oscar, which was produced by his niece, former basketball star and Canadian Olympian Sylvia SWEENEY. The latter film recounted some of the early incidents of racism that Mr. PETERSON encountered in his career and featured his emotional journey back to Montreal for the first reunion of the extended PETERSON family, including grandchildren who had previously only ever seen him on television.
Beyond his career and family, Mr. PETERSON pursued his twin hobbies of photography and fly fishing, which he undertook at a summer home in Ontario's Haliburton Highlands. It was also at the cottage that he followed an interest in the heavens. "I'm an amateur astronomer, when I have time, which is usually in the summer at our cottage," he once told The Globe.
He also involved himself in the academic side of music. In 1960, he opened the Advanced School of Contemporary Music in Toronto with Mr. BROWN, Mr. THIGPEN and Mr. NIMMONS. Mr. PETERSON's students included Skip Beckwith, Brian BROWNe, Wray Downes and Bill King. Although his touring commitments forced the school to close in 1964, Mr. PETERSON returned to teaching at Toronto's York University in 1986, when he was appointed as adjunct professor of music in jazz studies. He remained involved with the university afterward, serving as its chancellor from 1991 to 1994.
A two-date reunion in 1990 with his most famous trio, featuring Ray BROWN and Herb Ellis (also featuring drummer Bobby Durham) at New York's Blue Note: club resulted in four separate album releases. Critics hailed Mr. PETERSON's playing from this legendary engagement, citing his emotional depth and softer playing style. Three years later, while performing again at the Blue Note, Mr. PETERSON suffered a stroke, something he only realized after returning to Toronto to receive the Glenn Gould Prize. The stroke weakened his left hand and sidelined him for two years, during which time he fell into a depression. But he credited Friends such as bassist Dave Young for encouraging him to return to performance, which he did with the help of intensive physiotherapy. In 1999, he returned to Carnegie Hall with guitarist Ulf Wakenius, bassist Niels-Henning Orsted Pedersen and drummer Martin Drew. His left hand could no longer "conjure the rumbling musical earthquakes of old," wrote The New York Times, but his right hand's inventive, fluid work alone prompted several standing ovations.
Two years earlier at the Grammys, he had been given a Lifetime Achievement Award. In all, he won eight Grammys and, in 2005, Canada Post marked his contributions to music with a 50-cent stamp.
A lyrical stylist who has been described as one of the greatest piano layers of all time, Mr. PETERSON inspired countless musicians. Duke Ellington called him "a man who's blessed with great talent, has acquired tremendous skill and executes it with unlimited authority." Ella Fitzgerald said of him, "to me, he's like a brother and a friend, and one of the greatest you'll ever meet."
Diana Krall, who celebrated Mr. PETERSON's 80th birthday with him in 2005 at his home in Mississauga, Ontario, recalled how he invited her down to his basement studio. "He said, 'Hey, Dee, come down and check out the box,' which meant his 10-foot Boesendorfer [piano]," Ms. Krall recalled. "The only problem was then you have to play for him. So I played some Nat Cole tunes and we sang some duets. The fact that I got a chance to sit and talk with him, and laugh with him and his family, is pretty great. It stays with you." Added Ms. Krall: "If I ever feel like I'm needing a boost, I listen to Oscar."
His personal studio represented a dream that was a long time coming, Mr. PETERSON said in 1979. "Years ago, I always wanted this studio, but there was no way I could because I was out playing all the time. But now, with the new studio and the chance to do some composing, it's much easier. I can pursue the love of my life, and yet it's my profession."
Oscar Emmanuel PETERSON was born in Montreal on August 15, 1925. He died of kidney failure at his home in Mississauga, Ontario, on December 23, 2007. He was 82. He leaves his wife, Kelly, and six children from different marriages: Lynn, Gay, Oscar Jr., Norman, Joel and Celine.

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-26 published
The humble legend
'He was one of the last of the giants, but his music and contributions will be eternal.' Jazz impresario Quincy Jones 'He was a regular on the French stage, where the public adored his luminous style.' French President Nicolas Sarkozy 'He was the kindest, gentlest, most forgiving person on the face of the earth.' Senator and jazz pianist Tommy Banks
By Peter CHENEY, Page A1
Mississauga -- The street is pleasant but ordinary, and so is the house, a two-storey monument to the forgettable architecture of the late 1960s. There's a two-car garage, a neatly kept lawn and a driveway flanked by a pair of coach lamps. But look closer, and you realize that this is a very special house indeed.
There is a windowless brick addition that looks like a military command centre, and on the front door, carved into the wood so subtly that you might miss it, is the face of one of the world's most famous and respected musicians - jazz legend Oscar PETERSON, once described as "the maharaja of the piano."
Mr. PETERSON, who died this weekend at 82, put Canada on the world musical map and helped forge a new era in race relations. Yet he spent much of his life in a world drawn straight from The Brady Bunch, a universe of suburban tract homes, strip malls and winding avenues with names like King Forrest Drive and Friar Tuck Boulevard.
Although his choice of neighbourhoods surprised many, Mr. PETERSON loved Mississauga. "He felt at home there," said his niece, Sylvia SWEENEY. "It was his world."
Mr. PETERSON's house was tweaked to his special needs. There was a soundproof brick studio that held his Bosendorfer grand piano and multitrack recording suite. The bay windows that faced the street were replaced with opaque glass blocks, to prevent the curious from spying. But this was not the home of a star.
"All he wanted was an ordinary life," Gene LEES, who authored a biography of Mr. PETERSON, said. "He wasn't a celebrity show-off."
To those who knew him best, Mr. PETERSON's address was the result of his love-hate relationship with Canada and its approach to visible minorities. The musician chose Mississauga in the early 1970s after being snubbed by a landlord in Toronto's wealthy Forest Hill neighbourhood who refused to rent to him because he was black.
In the suburbs, Mr. PETERSON found a new, more open society. Although it was largely white, Mississauga seemed more amenable to change, if only because it lacked the crushing social history of downtown Toronto, still a White, Anglo-Saxon, Protestant bastion at the time.
"I think it was a case of not being rejected," Ms. SWEENEY said. "In Mississauga, he got a chance to know his neighbours and build a history together."
Mr. PETERSON, the son of a railroad porter, was a musical icon by the time he reached his mid-20s. He learned to play the piano from his sister Daisy (who went on to become a world-renowned music instructor) and dazzled fans around the world with his impeccable technique and musical imagination. But in Canada, where blacks were still a tiny minority, Mr. PETERSON felt himself largely shut out by a white-dominated musical and cultural establishment that controlled access to key venues - particularly the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, which Mr. PETERSON loathed until the end of his life.
Mr. PETERSON played a critical role in the battle for equal rights, using his professional stature and personal dignity to help erode long-standing barriers. Mr. LEES, a former Hamilton Spectator reporter who went on to become the editor of a music magazine and Mr. PETERSON's biographer, met him in 1951, when Mr. PETERSON was caught up in a racial dispute. Mr. LEES was assigned to cover the story when a Hamilton barber refused to cut Mr. PETERSON's hair because he was black.
Mr. LEES came away impressed by Mr. PETERSON's strength of character, and by his humanity. Although he pursued the complaint against the barber because he was offended by the man's prejudiced attitude, Mr. PETERSON later spoke on the barber's behalf when Hamilton city officials moved to revoke his business licence.
"He was never a nasty guy," Mr. LEES said. "And he believed that the point had been made. He was angry about what had happened, but he didn't want to destroy the man. He said: 'This is Canada. Here, the law is on my side.' "
His long Friendship with Mr. PETERSON and other black jazz greats gave Mr. LEES an inside view of the rejection they faced - even though they were wealthy and famous, many experienced racism in its cruellest, rawest form. He remembered how Mr. PETERSON was threatened by redneck Southern sheriffs, and how the manager of a Ritz-Carlton hotel in the 1960s tried to stop him from performing, saying, "That nigger isn't coming into this hotel."
Mr. PETERSON fought racism on several fronts. In the early 1970s, he lobbied to have more minorities on television shows and advertisements, in the belief that white-dominated media marginalized other cultures.
"He thought that kids got their view of the world from what they saw on television," Ms. SWEENEY said. "He was way ahead of his time."
Mr. PETERSON married four times. His first wife was black. The others were white. This surprised Mr. LEES, who believed that Mr. PETERSON had rejected mixed marriage - he had told his biographer that unions between blacks and whites demanded "incredible intellectual unselfishness."
When Mr. LEES asked Mr. PETERSON about his apparent about-face, the musician listened patiently, then explained that Mr. LEES had failed to understand him: "I didn't say I was against it," he said. "I just said it was hard."
To his neighbours in Mississauga, Mr. PETERSON was a compelling figure, an unpretentious, decent man who happened to be a world-renowned musical genius.
"He was very gracious," said Renneth BEGBIE, a retired school teacher who lived next to Mr. PETERSON for 22 years. "So is his family."
Mr. PETERSON wore his fame lightly, Ms. BEGBIE said. He and his wife sent her a Christmas card each year, and apologized for the mess when they landscaped their yard. In return, she treated Mr. PETERSON as he wished - like anybody else.
"That's just common sense," she said. "He was my neighbour. People need to be respected and appreciated for who they are. If Julia Roberts lived next door, I'd do the same thing."
Award highlights
Oscar PETERSON accumulated about 100 awards, prizes and honorary degrees, eight Grammys and two Junos.
1972: Officer, Order of Canada.
1978: Inducted, Juno Hall of Fame.
1984: Companion, Order of Canada.
1992: Governor-General's Performing Arts Award for Lifetime Achievement.
1997: Grammy for Lifetime Achievement and an International Jazz Hall of Fame Award.
1999: Praemium Imperiale Award, the Nobel equivalent for the arts.
2000: United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization International Music Prize.

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PETERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-29 published
PETERSON, Oscar E., C.C., O.Ont., LLD., D.Mus.
Peacefully at home on Sunday December 23rd, 2007 with his loving wife Kelly and his daughter Celine by his side. Oscar is also survived by his children Norman, Joel, Gay PARR, Lynn SPINNEY and the late Sharon BLACKBURN and Oscar PETERSON Jr. Dear brother of Daisy SWEENEY, May PETERSON, Phil PETERSON; and the late Fred and Chuck PETERSON. He will always be remembered by his grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. A private funeral service was held. A public Celebration of Oscar's Life and Legacy will take place in the future. Information regarding the details of this Service can be found at www.oscarpeterson.com or www.neweduk.com. In memory of Oscar, donations to World Vision Canada or the Christian Children's Fund of Canada would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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