MARSHMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-16 published
HAYES, Ruth " Marion"
Ruth "Marion" HAYES, of R.R.#1 Elmwood, passed away at Hanover and District Hospital on Monday, November 12, 2007. She was 83.
Born in Toronto, daughter of the late Albert and Florence (nee HICK) HAYES.
Survived by her cousins Betty WATSON of R.R.#1 Elmwood and Agnes MARSHMAN of Durham, nephews Hugh MacMILLAN of Toronto, John (Mary) HAYES of Toronto and Mark (Jan) HAYES of Newmarket and niece Nancy (LORNE) WHITTAKER of Chesley. Predeceased by her sister Dorothy MacMILLAN and brother Allen HAYES.
A Memorial service to follow at a later date.
Memorial donations to the Elmwood United Church or Charity of one's choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover assisting with funeral arrangements.

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MARSHMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-13 published
HAYES, Ruth “Marion&rdquo
Of R.R.#1 Elmwood, passed away at Hanover and District Hospital on Monday, November 12, 2007. She was 83. Born in Toronto, daughter of the late Albert and Florence (née HICK) HAYES. Survived by her cousins Betty WATSON of R.R.#1 Elmwood and Agnes MARSHMAN of Durham, nephews Hugh MacMILLAN of Toronto, John (Mary) HAYES of Toronto and Mark (Jan) HAYES of Newmarket and niece Nancy (Lorne) WHITTAKER of Chesley. Predeceased by her sister Dorothy MacMILLAN and brother Allen HAYES. A Memorial Service to follow at a later date. Memorial donations to the Elmwood United Church or Charity of one's choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover assisting with funeral arrangements.

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MARSON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-29 published
YEO, Ruby Helena (née MARSON)
Peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services, on Sunday, October 28th, 2007. Ruby Helena YEO (née MARSON,) of Owen Sound, in her 90th year. Dearly beloved wife of the late Milton “Mickey” YEO. Loving mother of Carole (John) LOCKWOOD, Jeannette (Terry) COUTURE, both of Owen Sound and Gail (Lou) DUGGAN, of Caledon. Proud grandmother of eight grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Ruby will be fondly remembered by her daughter-in-law, Janet YEO. Predeceased by her parents, Thomas and Mary MARSON, her son, Bill YEO, three sisters and one brother. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (519-376-7492) on Tuesday evening from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service to celebrate the life of Ruby YEO will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, October 31st, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. with Jeffrey LOCKWOOD officiating. Interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Georgian Bluffs. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Grey Bruce Health Services Foundation as your expression of sympathy.

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MARSTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-10 published
LACH- MARSTON, Barbara Freda (née LACH)
Peacefully on Tuesday, January 09, 2007 at Parkwood Hospital. Barbara Freda LACH- MARSTON of London in her 54th year. Beloved partner of Robert "Bob" GREEN. Loving daughter of Julia LACH and the late Peter LACH of Delhi. Dear mother of Ashley and Morgan MARSTON of London. Dear sister of Joe LACH (Arlene) of Simcoe and Richard LACH of Delhi. Cherished aunt of Nicole (LACH) COMELLA and Daxton LACH. Dear cousin of Tony LACH (Stephanie.) Special friend of Glen and Donna BARTON. Friends will be received by the family on Thursday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. with prayers at 8 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North where the funeral service will be conducted on Friday, January 12th, 2007 at 11 a.m. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Barbara are asked to consider Parkwood Hospital Foundation Palliative Care Unit. On-line condolences may be sent to condolences@westviewfuneralchapel.com

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MARSTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-22 published
Socialite's Brazilian Carnival Ball raised millions for Toronto charities
Using organizational skills and strategy worthy of a Bay Street Chief Executive Officer, she transformed a church-basement affair into the social event of the season, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
Italian and Brazilian in ancestry, Anna Maria DE SOUZA heated up the staid fundraising climate in Toronto with the Brazilian Carnival Ball, probably the most significant philanthropic gala on the Canadian social calendar. A warm-blooded, energetic outsider, she had the entrepreneurial zeal, organizing skills and shrewd ambition of a self-made Chief Executive Officer. But, instead of starting a company or a launching a hedge fund, she camouflaged those skills under the patina of a society hostess. Using old-fashioned influence, rather than naked power, she forged alliances with charitable foundations in campaigns that raised their profiles, her status, and close to $45-million for Toronto hospitals, universities and arts and culture organizations over the past 40 years.
For all her flamboyance, Ms. DE SOUZA was intensely private. Nobody knew her real age - not even her husband Ivan, as she loved to boast. "I've known her for 35 years and it never occurred to me to wonder," said her friend Catherine NUGENT. " She was one of those people who was ageless."
Along with Ms. DE SOUZA's success came complaints about her management style. She seemed unapologetic to criticisms that she was territorial and a micro-manager who autocratically chose the event's annual beneficiary. "This is big business, and the organization requires that we have a good board to sell the ball, a recipient who will pay for our computers, our secretarial staff," she told Maclean's last year. "This work requires a huge infrastructure." And even knowing how much work was involved, if Ms. DE SOUZA asked if you wanted to be the beneficiary of the Brazilian Carnival Ball, "there was absolutely no reason to say no," said Paul ALOFS, president of the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation "because it is such a massive fundraising and awareness-generating opportunity for a not-for-profit."
Although the ball was her biggest activity, it wasn't her only one. She also volunteered on the women's committee of the Canadian Opera Company and was the curator of the Henry Birks Antique Collection of Silver in the late 1970s. A passionate gardener and a keen tennis player, she loved to entertain and to cook for her guests. "She was the most generous, vivacious person I know," said Ms. NUGENT. " She loved to introduce people to each other and to grow her circle of Friends, but she was also shy."
Anna Maria DE SOUZA, the daughter of Amadeu GUIDI and his wife Honorica (née MARCOLLINI,) was born in Sao Sebastiao de Parasio in the mountainous state of Minas Geras in the interior of Brazil. She grew up in a family of four brothers and one sister. Her grandfather on her mother's side had immigrated from Genoa, Italy, as a teenager and found a job as a construction worker building homes for plantation workers, according to Rosemary Sexton in The Glitter Girls, Charity and Vanity: Chronicles of an Age of Excess.
When money was scarce, her grandfather was paid in land. Eventually he accumulated enough acreage to start his own plantation and enough wealth to take his family back to Genoa on a trip. There, he bought a villa. For the rest of his life he spent half the year in Italy and the other in Brazil. When his daughter, Honorica, married, Mr. MARCOLLINI handed over control of his Brazilian plantation to her new husband, Amadeu. That's where his granddaughter, Anna Maria, grew up, in what she later compared to paradise. It was a time in which life "was gracious and slow and everything was looked after." She was educated at the Collegio Paula Frassinette in Brazil where she earned a teaching degree, and then attended the Escola Técnica de Comercio C.A.
At 18, she married William John GRIFFITHS, an English mining engineer for Wimpey Construction, a British firm that had a contract to build a dam in Brazil. Anna Maria went into labour with their first child on Good Friday, a holiday in Brazil. Her doctor was away, the birth was arduous and afterward Anna Maria was unable to bear more children. The baby, a daughter, lived for only 23 days. To compound the tragedy, her husband died in a work-related accident 10 months later.
Widowed, and still in her teens, Anna Maria went to live with her grandmother in Italy where she attended finishing school. Afterward, sailing back to Brazil on a cruise ship, she met a Brazilian plantation owner who urged her to get involved in the coffee exporting business. As chance would have it, at a party in Rio de Janeiro on New Year's Eve in 1964, Anna Maria met a man named John MARSTON, who said he imported bulk foods into Canada. If she had products to sell, he was interested in seeing them.
With an insouciant entrepreneurship, she gathered some samples from the family coffee plantation and set out for Canada, arriving in Toronto in gloomiest February, 1965. She looked up Mr. MARSTON and married him three months later in a Protestant ceremony, which her mother, a Catholic, boycotted. "I fell in love with Toronto and the only thing I could do to stay was to get married," she once confided. By 1974, the MARSTONs had divorced, Anna Maria complaining later that her husband was a workaholic who had little interest in married life.
Anna Maria had long since found ways to make her own life more interesting. Homesickness propelled her "to kill the longing" by organizing her first Brazilian Ball in 1966, the winter after she arrived in Canada, in a church basement at Dundas and Grace Streets, a largely Portuguese area of Toronto. Tickets cost $5, the food for the 50 guests was prepared by Anna Maria and her Friends, and the aim was merely to cover costs and bring a little Mardi Gras colour to the dreary Toronto winter. The ball quickly became a tradition.
By the early 1970s, the ball, which had quickly moved above ground to the Sutton Place Hotel and then the Sheraton Centre, was making a small profit, with the proceeds going to a Brazilian orphanage. That tradition has continued with five per cent of the annual profits benefiting leper colonies, old age homes and other causes in or around her hometown. When Toronto charities began asking if they could reap the ball's annual largesse, Anna Maria astutely decided to bestow the fundraising benefits on a different cause every time, thereby hooking into a fresh network and set of volunteers annually.
Krystyne GRIFFIN attended her first Brazilian Ball in 1977, the year she left Paris, married businessman and Griffin Poetry Prize founder and benefactor Scott GRIFFIN, and moved to Toronto. "Everybody told me this was the party to go to because it showed that Toronto could be fun." They were correct. "A guy in drag dressed like Queen Alexandra walked up and smacked Scott right on the lips. That was my introduction to Anna Maria's parties," said Ms. GRIFFIN. "I liked her without knowing her well."
The ball celebrated its 14th anniversary in 1980 at the Four Seasons Hotel on Avenue Road in Toronto and netted $50,000. That's where it stayed until 1988, when it moved to the yawning depths of the Metro Toronto Convention Hotel, the only venue that could accommodate crowds upward of 1,000.
Disaffected by her globe-trotting, work-obsessed husband, Anna Maria met the late Montagu Black at the Brazilian Carnival Ball in the early 1970s, and he thought she should meet his younger brother, Conrad, who was then plying his way as an aspiring tycoon and researching his biography of Quebec premier Maurice Duplessis. Eventually, lawyer Igor Kaplan introduced them and they dated for about two years after her 1974 divorce. "She was a delightful, refreshing, and enterprising person, and was a very popular and respected person in a community where she started as a stranger and, at first, hardly spoke the language," Conrad Black wrote in an e-mail message yesterday. "I saw her a lot at the time my parents died, 10 days apart, in 1976, and she could not have been more supportive."
Anna Maria's lasting love, however, was businessman Ivan DE SOUZA. Introduced by Marvelle KOFFLER, wife of Murray KOFFLER of Shoppers Drug Mart, they had much in common, both being Portuguese-speaking and Catholic. They were married on December 22, 1982, and were devoted to each other.
More than the venue of the ball changed over the years. As it became more lavish and raised more money (much of it matched by government programs with costs underwritten by corporate sponsors), so, too, did the entertainment. Instead of handmade decorations on a carnival theme, Ms. DE SOUZA began importing carnival dancers from Brazil. That meant switching the date from Mardi Gras (the carnival on the eve of Lent, the 40-day period of penance preceding Easter in the Catholic calendar) to April or May so that the dancers could travel to Toronto in their off-season.
At the 40th anniversary of the ball in 2006, the $2-million in net proceeds went to York University's Accolade Project and the 1,600 guests were entertained by a 30-minute samba parade from the Rio Carnival - including 50 dancers in feathered, beaded and bejewelled costumes processing on foot or on wooden horses - to the beat of the batucada rhythm supplied by the Cocktail Brazil Band.
Last November, Ms. DE SOUZA was diagnosed with rampaging cancer and underwent rigorous treatment that included chemotherapy at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. She looked frail, but valiant, at the 2007 ball, which was held April 21 and raised $2.6-million net for the Arthritis and Autoimmunity Research Centre in Toronto. "She and the ball were a brand, and for a very small organization like us, she had a tremendous impact. She did a great job," said Gerri Grant, executive director of the AARC.
About a month ago, Ms. DE SOUZA went back into hospital for more treatment, but was well enough to decide that oncology nursing, through the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, should be the focus and the beneficiary of the 2008 Brazilian ball - the first one that will occur without her dominant presence.
Anna Maria DE SOUZA was born in Brazil, probably in 1941. She died in Toronto on September 18, 2007. She was in her mid-60s. She is survived by her third husband, Ivan DE SOUZA, her step-son John, and her extended family.

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MARTEL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2007-06-13 published in memoriam
MARTEL
In loving memory of our dear mother (Tessie) who passed away June 4, 2003.
There will always be a heartache
And often a silent tear.
But always the precious memories
Of days when you were here.
We hold you close to our hearts
And there you will remain.
To walk with us through our lives,
Until we meet again.
Lovingly remembered always, Darlene and Bill, Don and Ruth, Alan and Norma.

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MARTELL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2007-01-10 published
Elda Catherine DUNN
In loving memory of Elda Catherine DUNN who died peacefully at Manitoulin Centennial Manor on Saturday, January 6, 2007 at the age of 90.
Predeceased by husband Thomas J. DUNN. Loved mother of Jim and wife Marilyn DUNN of Port Dover. Predeceased by daughter Linda Love.
Remembered by son-in-law Ed LOVE of Spring Bay. Cherished grandmother of Jason and wife Alison of Port Dover, Tyler and wife Natalie of Sudbury, Darcy, Jeff and Chris LOVE, all of Barrie. Great grandmother of Morgan and Paige. Predeceased by sister Beryl and husband Bruce
WYMAN. Dear sister-in-law of Mary and husband Geoff FOURNIER, Margaret and husband Doug ORTON, Irene and husband Frank DROLET, Isabelle and husband Pete MARTELL, John and wife Beatrice, Patrick DUNN, Charles and wife Nellie, Bernard DUNN, all predeceased. Survived by sister-in-law Claire (Mrs. Bernard DUNN.) Elda loved her flowers in summer, curling in the winter, and playing bridge with Friends. Visitation was 2 - 4 and 7 - 9 pm, Sunday at Island Funeral Home. Funeral Mass was at 11 am, Monday, January 8, 2007 at Saint Bernard's Catholic Church, Little Current, Ontario. Burial in Saint Bernard's Cemetery.

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MARTELLOTTI o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-09 published
BURK/BURKE, Barbara (née CHALMERS)
Barbara BURK/BURKE, of Hanover, passed away at Hanover and District Hospital on Saturday, November 3, 2007. She was 69.
Born in Toronto, daughter of the late Walter and Florence (nee MAYNARD) CHALMERS. Barbara was a bookkeeper/ secretary at Hanover Motors until retiring. Barb was a proud member of the Hanover Police Service Board, serving three terms over 13 years. She was also a member of the Hanover Public Library Board from 1985 to Survived by her daughter Michelle (Shawn) HAGGERTY of Fergus, son Wayne BURK/BURKE (Susan MARTELLOTTI) of London, grandchildren Megan (Shawn) SIMPSON, Leslie BURK/BURKE, Dana BURK/BURKE, Theron HAGGERTY and Marissa HAGGERTY, great-grandchild Alex SIMPSON and step-granddaughter Shauni HAGGERTY. Also survived by her sisters Donna (Doug) SCHAUS of Hanover, Carol Anne (Dennis) KUPFERSCHMIDT of Mildmay, brother William (Elaine) CHALMERS of Neustadt, brother-in-law and sister-in-law Joe (Mabel) BURK/BURKE of Point Clark, and sister-in-law Susie Marie DONALDSON of Hanover. Predeceased by her husband Ronald BURK/BURKE and brothers Kenneth, Robert and Ronald.
Visitation was held at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover on Monday 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service was held on Tuesday, November 6, 2007 at 1 p.m. at Hanover Missionary Church. Rev. Peter GIBBINS officiated. Interment in Hanover Cemetery.
Pall bearers were Ben KUPFERSCHMIDT, Kevin CHALMERS, Mark SCHAUS, Alvin GREIN, Bob WHITE/WHYTE and Tracy DAVID.
Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, Children's Health Foundation, Hanover Hospital Foundation or Hanover Library were appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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MARTENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-09 published
BARTHA, Edith (née MITTLER) (January 27, 1916-May 31, 2007)
Our beloved mother Edith BARTHA née MITTLER, passed away at home in Calgary, Alberta on May 31st 2007 at the age of 91 years. She was born in Budapest, Hungary on January 27, 1916. and was predeceased by her devoted husband, Georges Bernard BARTHA. Edith will be deeply missed by those whom she loved and who always will love her dearly; her daughters Evelyn BARTHA Roundy of Miami, Florida and Doctor Liliane BARTHA of Olympia, Washington and Calgary, Alberta; her son-in-laws Paul V. ROUNDY, III of Miami and Doctor Craig SOUTHWELL of Olympia and Yakima, Washington; her grandchildren Dr. Johann Nicholaus (Nicky) MARTENS and Jorge Enrique (Ricky) MARTENS of Miami, Maya Georgine BARTHA- SOUTHWELL of Olympia, Washington and Calgary; her great-grand_son Rick MARTENS Jr. of Miami and many cherished Friends. Edith left Hungary for Canada following her 1938 wedding and spent many happy years in Montreal where she turned her diverse talents to being a devoted mother. With her life partner, Edith enjoyed traveling to the far corners of the world. Widowed in 1977, she moved to Toronto where she lived for almost thirty years. Due to failing health, Edith relocated to Calgary to be with her family in October 2006. Always willing to lend a sympathetic ear, she leaves behind many Friends of all ages who recognized and appreciated her wisdom, intelligence, compassion and lady-like elegance. Our mother frequently said that 'it was not by words that I would wish my life distinguished but rather by deeds done'. In this spirit she volunteered with the Royal Ontario Museum and with the Canadian Blood Services, the latter until the age of 87 years.

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MARTIGNY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-17 published
BREWSTER, John Maitland, M.D.
Peacefully at Summit Place, Owen Sound on Saturday, December 15, 2007. Doctor John BREWSTER of Owen Sound in his 94th year. Beloved husband of the late Hazel (née TAILOR/TAYLOR.) Dear father of Skip and his wife Cristina of Waterloo. Sadly missed by three grandchildren Ryan, Derek and August BOURRÉ. Sadly missed by two sisters Marg BREWSTER of Leith, Frances DE MARTIGNY of Owen Sound and a daughter-in-law Donna BREWSTER of Owen Sound. Predeceased by three sons David, Richard and Arthur, a brother Doctor Maitland BREWSTER and a sister Betty BURNETT. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home, Owen Sound for visiting on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Church, Owen Sound on Wednesday morning at 10 o'clock. Note: Funeral Details Are Not Confirmed As Of Press Time. Please Call 519-376-3710 For Details. Interment, Saint Mary's Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Alzheimer Society, Canadian Cancer society or the G.B.R.H.C. Foundations would be appreciated. Parish prayers will be held at the funeral home on Tuesday evening at 8: 30 p.m.

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MARTIGNY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-18 published
BREWSTER, John Maitland, M.D.
Peacefully at Summit Place, Owen Sound on Saturday, December 15, 2007. Doctor John BREWSTER of Owen Sound in his 94th year. Beloved husband of the late Hazel (née TAILOR/TAYLOR.) Dear father of Skip and his wife Cristina of Waterloo. Sadly missed by three grandchildren Ryan, Derek and August BOURRÉ and a great-granddaughter Grace BREWSTER. Sadly missed by two sisters Marg BREWSTER of Leith, Frances DE MARTIGNY of Owen Sound and a daughter-in-law Donna BREWSTER of Owen Sound. Predeceased by three sons David, Richard and Arthur, a brother Doctor Maitland BREWSTER and a sister Betty BURNETT. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home, Owen Sound 519-376-3710 for visiting on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Church, Owen Sound on Wednesday at 12 Noon. Interment, Saint Mary's Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Alzheimer Society, Canadian Cancer society or the G.B.R.H.C. Foundations would be appreciated. Parish prayers will be held at the funeral home on Tuesday evening at 8: 30 p.m.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-10-03 published
MARTIN, Mary Rietta Mae "Ettie" (ROWE)
At Royal Terrace Palmerston on Sunday September 30, 2007. Mary Rietta Mae " Ettie" (ROWE) MARTIN, formerly of Mount Forest in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late Harry MARTIN. Loved mother of Margaret DAILY and her husband Lorne of R.R.#4 Mount Forest, Anne SYMONDS and her husband Wayne of Markham and George MARTIN and his wife Geraldine of Mount Forest. Loving grandmother of 9 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by a sister Elizabeth MARTIN and by one brother and one sister in infancy. Friends may call at the Hendrick Funeral Home, Mount Forest on Wednesday October 3 from 12 noon til time of the funeral service at 1 p.m. Interment at Mount Forest Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or Morrison United Church, Cedarville would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences may be made at www.hendrickfuneralhome.com.
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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-11-07 published
WADE, " Ted" Albert Edward
(Vet. World War 2)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services Markdale on Saturday November 3, 2007 of Flesherton in his 85th year. Loving husband of Ethel MARTIN. Dear father of Larry (Shirley) of Priceville and Linda TEETER (Allan DOWN) of Annan. He will be loved and remembered by grandchildren Sherry (Jon), Sabrina, Samantha; Michael (Juliet), A.J. (Amy), Adam (Heather); step-grandchildren Jeff, Brent and Chris, great-granddaughter to Kyrsten. Dear brother of Doris MANN of Scarborough and the late Jean BLUETT, Madeline ORMSBY, Doug, Eleanor WILLIS, Edith LONERGAN, Evelyn GILL and predeceased by son-in-law Steve TEETER. The family received Friends at Fawcett Funeral Home Flesherton on Tuesday November 6 where services will be held on Wednesday November 7 at 1 p.m. Interment Lakeview Cemetery, in Meaford. Memorial contributions to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation would be appreciated.
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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-09 published
McMULLEN, Violet "Vi" Elizabeth Rachel (née McCOY)
Violet "Vi" Elizabeth Rachel McMULLEN, of Chesley, passed away at Emerald Heights Retirement Home, Chesley on Friday, November 2, 2007, in her 98th year.
Loving mother of Marie SCHACHT of Kitchener and Arnold and his friend Mary of Tara.
Grandmother of Steven, David, Roger, Kirk, Elana, John and Nathan, 10 great-grandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Dear sister-in-law of Marjorie McCOY of Hanover. Predeceased by her husband Stanley; son Ivan; son-in-law Robert SCHACHT; sisters Mernie MARTIN and Martha McCOY; brothers John, David, Percy, Gordon, Melvin, Harvey and Elmer and parents Robert and Annie (COOK) McCOY.
Visitation at Cameron Funeral Home, Chesley, on Monday from 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service was held on Tuesday, November 6, 2007 at 11 am.
Interment in Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara.
Memorial donations to Saint_John's United Church or the charity of your choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-05-30 published
CHUTER, Harvey Edwin
Peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Tuesday, May 29, 2007. Harvey CHUTER of Owen Sound in his 88th year. Beloved husband of the late Audrey (née BUTLER.) Dear father of Catherine and her husband Dan SHANAHAN of Sarnia, Marlene and her husband Rick BURNS and Debbie and her husband Greg MARTIN all of Owen Sound and Trevor and his wife Shelley of Sarnia. Sadly missed by four grandchildren Sharleen and her husband Paul LEONE, Kimberly and her husband Paul HURST, Chevonne MARTIN and Brendon MARTIN and five great-grandchildren Jestyn, Jayla, Lexie, Rachel and Leighton. Also survived by two sisters Ida McBRIDE of Exeter and Bessie TOWNSHEND of Clinton and two sisters in law Tillie ISAAC and Florence CHUTER. Predeceased by four sisters Doris, Mary, Margaret and Irene and three brothers Bus (Elliott), Tom and Wilfred. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home 519-376-3710 for visiting on Thursday evening from 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted at St. George's Anglican Church on Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Father Ed WAGNER officiating. There will be visiting at the church on Friday afternoon from 1 o'clock until service time. Interment, Greenwood Cemetery. Memorial donations to St. George's Anglican Church, Crescent Athletic Club or the G.B.R.H.C. Foundation would be appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-25 published
MARTIN, Mae (née SMITH)
Of Owen Sound, and formerly of Lion's Head, passed away surrounded by her family on Saturday, June 23, 2007 in her 81st year. Cherished mother of Bill of Lion's head and Joanne of Toronto. She will be sadly missed by grandchildren Rob (Kim), Samantha, Nastassja, Cassaundra and Dylan, sister Bernice (Norman) NIXON of Lion's head and daughter-in-law Leslie MARTIN of Burlington. Mae was predeceased by her husband Bill, son Bob, parents Joice (SHEARER) and Malcolm SMITH, brother Glen SMITH and sister Margaret SHOULDICE. Family and Friends are invited to the visitation on Tuesday, June 26, 2007 from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 at the Davidson Chapel, 71 Main Street, Lion's Head. The service to celebrate Mae's life will be held on Wednesday, June 27, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. at the Davidson Chapel. Interment Eastnor Cemetery. Arrangements entrusted to the George Funeral Home, Wiarton. Donations made to the Lion's head Hospital or charity closest to your heart would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-12 published
MALE, Ronald Allan
Peacefully on July 10, 2007 with his family by his side in his 75th year. Beloved husband to Barbara (GALLANT.) Loving father to Sandra POMEROY (Dave), Roy, Ronnie and Julie STOCKL (Rob). Loving granddad to Michael, Emily, Laura, Rebecca, Joely. Predeceased by his mother Jessie DRAGER (McCRAE) and his father Charles MALE. Nephew to Laurine MARTIN. Ron was a loyal and long time employee of Versa Food Services. At Ron's request cremation has already taken place. Ron's family will receive Friends and relatives at a Celebration of his Life at Upper James Chapel of Cresmount Funeral Home, 1020 Upper James Street, Hamilton on Friday from 2-4 p.m. In lieu of flowers a donation to Doctors Without Borders would be appreciated. Cresmount “Upper James Chapel&rdquo

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-11 published
MARTIN, Carole Ann (née IRELAND)
At Collingwood General and Marine Hospital on Friday August 10, 2007. Carole Ann Martin (née IRELAND) of Thornbury in her 74th year. Predeceased by her beloved husband of 50 years, Charles Chuck MARTIN, in 2003. Loving mother of Cheryl (Gerry) STONE of Collingwood; Christine (Lyndon) JOHNSTON of Walter's Falls Caron (Jim) ELLIS of Wasaga Beach, and Charlene (Paul) FOSTER also of Wasaga Beach. Sadly missed Grandma of Zachary, Calvin, Jordan and Lauren, Eric and Keegan. Dear sister of Joy COLLINSON and family. Carole will also be remembered by her sister-in-law Shirley WATSON and family. A funeral service, officiated by Reverend Dr. Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at Grace United Church in Thornbury on Tuesday August 14 at 1 o'clock. Committal and interment services will be conducted at Lakeview Cemetery in Meaford. As your expression of sympathy and in lieu of flowers, donations to Collingwood General and Marine Hospital would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, 20 Alice St. E., Box 556, Thornbury N0H 2P0 (519-599-2718) to whom arrangements have been entrusted.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-12 published
MARTIN, Buehle
Passed away with his daughter and son-in-law by his side on September 9th, 2007 in his 79th year. Predeceased by his wife Fern JOHNSTON. survived by his daughter Lynn Francine MUELLER, and son-in-law Luke MUELLER. Grandson Hayden and Blyth MUELLER, sister-in-law Lorraine KNUDSEN, Gwen GEEN. Memorial Service on Saturday, October 6th, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. at the Victorius Living Centre (across from the Grey Granite Club), 720 2nd Ave. East. Cremation. Donations would be appreciated to the Victorious Living Centre.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-01 published
TAILOR/TAYLOR, Margaret Elizabeth
In her 74th year, passed peacefully at her home in Kemble, the village that she loved. Beloved daughter of the late Wilbur and Nettie TAILOR/TAYLOR (née McKINLAY.) Loving mother of Kelly BABCOCK and his wife, Geri, Chris BABCOCK and his partner, Deanna MARTIN and Danny BABCOCK and his wife, Lois O'NEILL. Devoted granny of Gennie-Wren and Nicholas. Held in the hearts of her sister, Beverley DAVIS, of Tofield, Alberta and her brother, Donald TAILOR/TAYLOR, of Chatsworth. Predeceased by her in-laws, Delphine TAILOR/TAYLOR and Lloyd DAVIS and her nephew, Jim DAVIS. Good friend of Susan MARSHALL, of Kemble and Chasity STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, of Cambridge. Margaret spent her childhood on the family farms in Kemble. As a young mother she was in the forefront of the drives to build the new arena and to convert the hall into a Senior and Community Centre. She helped to produce Christmas Concerts, was a member of the Kemble Women's Institute, taught gardening for the 4-H Club, took her turn running the snack bar at the old arena and cleaning the church. She drove rural mail and was the Post Mistress for many years. She, along with her mother and others, researched and wrote the Chronicles of Kemble. Her love of the past was evident in her wealth of stories and her respect for old things led her to a second career as a respected antique dealer. Family and Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (519-376-7492) on Tuesday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service to celebrate the life of Margaret TAILOR/TAYLOR will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, October 3rd, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. with Rev. Deborah MURRAY officiating. Interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Georgian Bluffs. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Kemble Arena or the charity of your choice as your expression of sympathy.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-02 published
MARTIN, Mary Rietta Mae “Ettie” (ROWE)
At Royal Terrace, Palmerston on Sunday, September 30, 2007. Mary Rietta Mae “Ettie” (ROWE) MARTIN, formerly of Mount Forest in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late Harry MARTIN. Loved mother of Margaret DALLY and husband Lorne of R.R.#4 Mount Forest, Anne SYMONDS and husband Wayne of Markham and George MARTIN and wife Geraldine of Mount Forest. Loving grandmother of 9 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by sister Elizabeth MARTIN and by one brother and one sister in infancy. Friends may call at the Hendrick Funeral Home, Mount Forest on Wednesday, October 3rd from 12 noon till time of the funeral service at 1: 00 p.m. Interment at Mount Forest Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or Morrison United Church, Cedarville would be appreciated by the family. On line condolences may be made at www.hendrickfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-25 published
LIPSKIE, Douglas Harvey
Passed away peacefully with his family by his side on Wednesday, October 24, 2007 at Freeport Health Centre of Grand River Hospital in his 63rd year. Beloved companion and friend of Frances WILSON. Loving father of Brad LIPSKIE and his wife Lynn of Wellesley, Steven LIPSKIE and his wife Shannon of Kitchener and Joanne MIRANDA and her husband Norm of Paris. Cherished grandfather of Julia, Owen, Mitchell, Carter and Madison. Dear brother of Jim LIPSKIE, Gloria GRAHAM and her husband Russ, Donna CHARTRAND and her husband Rene, Sharon MARTIN and her husband Roger. Predeceased by his parents Harvey and Dorothy and by his brother Dennis. Doug's family will receive relatives and Friends on Friday, October 26th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener, 519-749-8467. A funeral service to celebrate Doug's life will be held at St. Stephen Lutheran Church, 248 Highland Rd. E., Kitchener on Saturday, October 27, 2007 at 11 a.m. Interment at Williamsburg Cemetery followed by a reception at the Romanian Cultural Centre-Banatul (2150 Bleams Rd.). Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Terry Fox Foundation would be appreciated by the family (cards available at the funeral home). Visit www.henrywalser.com for Doug's memorial.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-01 published
MARTIN, Richard Johnson
After a lengthy illness at Molokai General Hospital, Molokai, Hawaii, on Friday, October 26th 2007, Richard Johnson MARTIN, of Kaunakakai, Hawaii, in his 84th year. Left to mourn his passing is his wife of 58 years, Mae MARTIN (Nee McGUIRE,) formerly of Malcolm-Elmwood, Ontario, his seven children and their families, and his sister, Daphne JOHNSON and her husband, John, of Annan, Ontario. Predeceased by his parents, Doctor W.Y. MARTIN and his wife, Mary, formerly of Atherton, England; his brother, Tommy MARTIN; his sister, Kitty PEARSON. Richard was a World War 2 Veteran serving in the British Navy as a Lieutenant. He saw action in France and the Mediterranean and participated in D-Day. Post war, Richard immigrated to Canada where he settled in Nova Scotia and enlisted in the Royal Navy Reserve. It was here that he met his wife, Mae, who at that time was in the Royal Canadian Air Force Seeking warmer climate and new adventures, they moved to California and eventually to Hawaii in 1963, where they remain at present. A Funeral Service for Richard MARTIN will be held at St. Sophia Catholic Church, Molokai, Hawaii, on Saturday, November 3rd, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m.. Interment in Kanala Cemetery, Molokai, Hawaii. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Salvation Army or the charity of your choice as your expression of sympathy and may be made through the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250-14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario. N4K 3X8 (519-376-7492).

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-05 published
McMULLEN, Violet Elizabeth Rachel (née McCOY)
Of Chesley, passed away at Emerald Heights Retirement Home, Chesley on Friday, November 02, 2007 in her 98th year. Loving mother of Marie SCHACHT of Kitchener and Arnold and his friend Mary of Tara. Grandmother of Steven, David, Roger, Kirk, Elana, John and Nathan; ten greatgrandchildren and two great-great-grandchildren. Dear sister-in-law of Marjorie McCOY of Hanover. Pre-deceased by her husband Stanley; son Ivan; son-in-law Robert SCHACHT sisters Mernie MARTIN and Martha McCOY; brothers John, David, Percy, Gordon, Melvin, Harvey and Elmer and parents Robert and Annie (COOK) McCOY. Visitation at Cameron Funeral Home, Chesley, on Monday from 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Tuesday, November 06, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Memorial donations to the Saint_John's United Church or the charity of your choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. www.cameronfuneralhomes.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-05 published
WADE, “Ted“ Albert Edward
(Veteran World War 2)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale on Saturday, November 3, 2007 of Flesherton in his 85th year. Loving husband of Ethel MARTIN. Dear Father of Larry (Shirley) of Priceville and Linda TEETER (Allan DOWN) of Annan. He will be loved and remembered by grandchildren Sherry (Jon), Sabrina, Samantha; Michael (Juliet), A.J. (Amy), Adam (Heather); step-grandchildren Jeff, Brent and Chris, great-granddaughter Kyrsten. Dear brother of Doris MANN of Scarborough and the late Jean BLUETT, Madeline ORMSBY, Doug, Eleanor WILLIS, Edith LONERGAN, Evelyn GILL and predeceased by son-in-law Steve TEETER. The family will receive Friends at Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton on Tuesday, November 6, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held at 1: 00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 7. Interment Lakeview Cemetery, Meaford. Memorial contributions to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-29 published
MARTIN, Norman
In Southampton, on Tuesday November 27, 2007. Norm MARTIN of Southampton in his 84th year. Loving husband of Kathleen (Kay) for 59 years. Dear father of Barb and her husband Roger TRUMBLEY of Southampton, Rick and his wife Linda of Port Elgin, and Debbie and her husband Archie INDOE of Southampton. Norm will be sadly missed by his grandchildren, Tanya (Mark), Tim (Allison), Lisa (Norm), Sarah (Brandon), and Jenna (Jon), and his great-grandchildren, Alyssa, Jarrett, and Brodin. Survived by his siblings, Mildred, Ethel, Fred (Ruth), Marion, his nieces and nephews, and Kay's family. Predeceased by his parents Oliver and Grace MARTIN, and his brother Elgin. Cremation. A Memorial Service to Celebrate the Life of Norman MARTIN will be held at the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, on Saturday December 1, 2007 at 1 p.m. A Time of Fellowship will follow in the family centre of the funeral home. Expressions of remembrance may be made to Saugeen Memorial Hospital Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society, or the Gideons Society. Condolences maybe forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-10 published
MARTIN, George Walter
At Southampton Care Centre on Thursday, December 6, 2007 George Walter MARTIN of Sauble Beach, Ontario, in his 78th year. son of the late George and Violet MARTIN of London, Ontario. Survived by his wife Shirley, sister Lois MARSHALL, brother James, son Gene and his wife Shirley, sister Lois MARSHALL, brother James, son Gene and his wife Jenni (Keelan/Seren), son Dan and his wife Jo-Ann (Jessie/Erin/Logan,) and daughter Carol WELLS (Rachel SYMON, Kristy and John DOBBYN, Richard and Melissa SYMON, (Kristin/Ethan WELLS.) A memorial gathering will be held Thursday, December 13th at Oxford Golf and Country Club, Woodstock, from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. Memorial donations (in lieu of flowers) to Alzheimer Society of Canada or the Salvation Army would be appreciated. Condolences can be sent to www.memorialfuneral.ca

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-19 published
VAICIUNAS, Christa E. (née HINZ)
Peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound on Monday December 17, 2007. In her 83rd year, Christa E. VAICIUNAS (née HINZ,) beloved wife of the late (Ken) Kestutis VAICIUNAS. Loving mother of Irene MUSGROVE, Ruth MARSHALL and Mary MARTIN. Loved grandmother of Daniel and his wife Dora, Kurt and his wife Cindy and Alexis. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Friday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Church, Owen Sound on Saturday morning December 22, 2007 at 9 a.m. Interment in Saint Mary's Cemetery, Owen Sound. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
SPICE, Robert William Barry
Of Saint Thomas, on Saturday, January 6, 2007, at his late residence, in his 58th year. Loved son of Connie MAITLAND and the late Albert William SPICE and dear brother of Marilyn and her husband Roy MARTIN of Windsor and Sandra and her husband Earl BROWN of Fort Nelson, British Columbia. Dear friend of Marilyn KELLY of Saint Thomas. Sadly missed by a number of nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his step-father Lloyd MAITLAND. Robert was born in Sarnia on March 8, 1949. He served in the Armed Forces and for the past number of years was a bartender at Branch 41 of the Royal Canadian Legion and also had worked at the Hi-Ro Shrine Club. Bob was a long time member of Branch 41 and was in the Colour Guard. He also bowled a number of years. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Thursday at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Visitation Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Flowers gratefully declined. Remembrances may be made to the Poppy Fund of the Legion or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
VENTON, K. Patricia " Pat" (MARTIN)
Peacefully, at Exeter Villa Nursing Home, Saturday, January 6, 2007, K. Patricia "Pat" (MARTIN) VENTON, age 89. Beloved wife of the late John Edwin VENTON (1999.) Loved mother of Penelope "Penny" VENTON of Exeter, J. Peter and Anne VENTON of Toronto, Robert "Bob" VENTON and companion Heather SMITH of Collingwood. Loving grandmother of Scott, Margot, Michelle, Tory and great-grandmother of Meredith. Remembered by favourite cousins, Susanne BAWDEN of California and Mary Lou DICKSON/DIXON of Exeter. Predeceased by her sister Margaret ZWICKER. Resting at the T. Harry Hoffman and Sons Funeral Home, Dashwood, with visitation Thursday 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m.; where the funeral service will be held Friday, January 12, 2007 at 11 a.m. The Rev. Harry DISHER officiating. Interment Exeter Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations would be appreciated to the William Gartshore Chapter, Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire London, Grand Bend United Church, or Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority, Exeter. Condolences at www.hoffmanfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-10 published
WARDELL, Mary Elizabeth (née SHARPE)
With her girls at her side, peacefully, at Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, on Tuesday, January 9, 2007. Mary Elizabeth WARDELL (née SHARPE) in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late Thomas David WARDELL (1990.) Lovingly remembered by daughter Lisa BIRD, granddaughter Angela KUZMA, great-granddaughter Emily, grand_son Sean BIRD (Chantal MARTIN,) daughter Jane (Chris) SMITH, granddaughter Christine (Denis) JARRY, great-grand_son Daulton, granddaughter Paula SMITH, daughter Heather (Robert) EDWARDS and granddaughter Jennifer EDWARDS. Predeceased by her parents Hugh and Violet SHARPE. Dear sister of Don (Joan) SHARPE, Hilda PHILLIMORE, Donna CLARK, Kay MacEACHERN and the late Imogene ARMSTRONG. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends will be received at the Evans Funeral Home, 648 Hamilton Rd. (1 block east of Egerton), on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be conducted in the Evans Chapel on Thursday, January 11, 2007, at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Janet FRADETTE, of Richards Memorial United Church, officiating. Interment in Straffordville Cemetery. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mrs. WARDELL.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-13 published
GATES, Mariette Maria
With her husband by her side on Tuesday, January 9, 2007, Mariette Maria GATES, of London, in her 87th year. Loving wife of Louis for over 60 years and mother of Kenneth (Adeline), Ronald (Judy) and Marleen (Henry) ILLEMANN. Cherished grandmother of Charmaine, Juliane, Ashley, Dwayne, Michelle, Carrie and Nicole, and great-grandmother of Taryn, Amber, Ethan and Jagory. Predeceased by 4 sisters and 1 brother in Belgium. Also survived by many nieces and nephews in Belgium. A Celebration of Mariette's life will be held at the Kingdom Hall, Jehovah's Witnesses, 459 Second Street, London, on Saturday, January 20, 2007, at 2: 00 p.m. with Mr. Robert MARTIN officiating. Evans Funeral Home, (519-451-9350) entrusted with arrangements. Online condolences can be expressed at www.evansfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mrs. GATES.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-07-06 published
Bull kills man, 46, in attack in Peel
By Sun Media, Fri., July 6, 2007
A Peel man is dead after he was attacked by a bull on a Side road 18 farm in Wellington County, yesterday.
Police were called about 8: 40 a.m. to a report of a man being injured by a bull in Peel Township.
According to the victim's son, the man was in the bull pen with the animal when the bull began to run at him.
The man's son came to his rescue and tried to get the bull way from his father. The man was able to climb out of the pen but later collapsed after a second attack by the animal.
The man, identified at Edward MARTIN, 46, was taken to Grand River Hospital were he later died of his injuries. Police are still investigating the death and have contacted the Farm Safety association to help in the investigation.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-11-03 published
Convicted wife-killer BUXBAUM dies in jail
By Joe BELANGER, Sun Media, Sat., November 3, 2007
Helmuth BUXBAUM, a church-going, millionaire nursing home operator whose double life of sex and drugs imploded with the contract killing of his wife, has died.
Focus of one of Canada's most sensational murder trials in the mid-1980s, he died in prison at age 67.
An official at Warkworth Institution near Peterborough said BUXBAUM died Thursday after being transferred to Kingston Penitentiary Regional hospital because of unspecified health concerns.
Free Press reporter Chip MARTIN, who covered BUXBAUM's trial that ended with a life sentence for the murder of his wife, Hanna, said he was struck by BUXBAUM's double life. "On the one hand, he was a very good family man, a very good businessman and, on the surface, a very religious man and a leader in his faith community," said MARTIN.
"That he had a dark side to his personality -- that he could hang around a bunch of low-lifes and let them exploit him for money in exchange for drugs and sex -- was a real revelation," said MARTIN, author of Buxbaum: A Murderous Affair.
During the trial, BUXBAUM, who had built a Komoka-based nursing home empire from scratch, was described as a cocaine addict who preferred the company of young prostitutes and was desperate to do away with his wife, whom he found dull and unattractive.
MARTIN offered another description of Hanna.
"His wife was a wonderful woman and mother who stood up to him and paid the price with her life."
BUXBAUM reportedly sold the business before his conviction for $23 million.
The Crown's case centred on money, saying nearly $2 million had disappeared from BUXBAUM's bank account and that he had recently taken out a $1-million life insurance policy on his wife.
Hanna BUXBAUM, 48, was shot in the head by a gunman at the side of a highway in July 1984 while a nephew, Roy BUXBAUM, sat in the car.
They had stopped, supposedly to help people having car troubles.
It was later learned BUXBAUM planned the killing earlier in the day, but it was foiled when a police cruiser pulled up after the cars had stopped on Highway 402.
They left and drove to Pearson International Airport to pick up a nephew. The shooting was staged when they returned later that day.
BUXBAUM denied he hired a drug dealer as the hit man.
But at trial, drug dealer Rob BARRETT testified BUXBAUM offered $25,000 plus expenses and a house for someone to kill his wife.
BARRETT said he offered the contract to Pat ALLEN, another London-area drug dealer. ALLEN, sentenced to eight years, testified he agreed to perform the killing, but backed out and let Gary FOSHAY take over.
FOSHAY was convicted of second-degree murder and sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for 25 years.
In a later appeal, rejected by the Ontario Court of Appeal, the defence argued BUXBAUM was insane at the time of the killing because of a stroke suffered two years earlier.
The nephew, Roy, who later sued BUXBAUM, could not be reached for comment.
Despite being behind prison walls, BUXBAUM never quite faded from the limelight, his name regularly resurfacing in the media as recently as January 2005 in a documentary about his lawyer, Eddie GREENSPAN, and in June 2000, when a reporter wrote about BUXBAUM advocating for the rights of seniors in prison.
In that story, BUXBAUM said he still dreamt about reconciliation with his six children and his grandchildren, but knew it wouldn't be easy.
"After so many years, it's like I don't exist," he said. "I'm an inconvenience. They've built their own lives and their own careers. They don't need me."
In the article, BUXBAUM complained about life in prison, especially for seniors.
"There is no mercy in Canada," BUXBAUM said.
"We've lost our mercy, and these old people must die a lonely death in prison."

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-11-30 published
A lifetime of writing from a difficult existence
By Ian GILLESPIE, Free Press Columnist, Fri., November 30, 2007
For years he shuffled along London's streets, clutching tightly to his notebooks, propelled by an urgent need to blacken the pages with the words streaming through his head.
Maybe you saw him. And if you did, maybe you steered a wide path. Because it was clear that something was amiss with Terence (Terry) QUINLAN.
"I called him the Van Gogh of the neighbourhood," says Steve GOODINE, a London police officer who lived near QUINLAN. " You knew he knew about life. You knew he had a lot to offer. But he struggled, because society didn't see him in that light."
QUINLAN's struggles are over now -- he died of kidney failure on December 4, 2006, at the age of 66 in hospital in Exeter.
But the man who will be familiar to many Londoners -- particularly those who frequent the downtown library and coffee shops -- has found some permanence, as his Goderich-based sister Pat MARTIN has now self-published a hardbound copy of his writings.
Although MARTIN had only 52 copies printed and the book isn't available to the public, she sent copies to the London Public Library, several local churches and to the national archives in Ottawa -- acts that ensure her brother's lifelong work will not soon vanish.
"He was always hungry and broke," says MARTIN. "It was hard for all of us to understand Terry. But the people of London and that neighbourhood kept him alive."
Born in Hamilton and raised in Brantford, QUINLAN was the second eldest in a family of 10 children. MARTIN recalls him as a generous boy known as the family's "scholar" for his bookish ways.
But after enrolling in a Guelph seminary at age 20 to become a priest, something happened.
Although MARTIN is unsure if he was ever formally diagnosed, she assumes it was the onset of schizophrenia that dislodged her brother from the "normal" world for the rest of his life.
There were brief stints, she recalls, when QUINLAN held regular employment. But the jobs didn't last.
"He could sometimes be a bit belligerent," MARTIN recalls. "He wanted people to understand him. He needed a lot of attention."
After drifting through Port Bruce, Aylmer and Saint Thomas, QUINLAN eventually landed in London, where he rented a single, windowless room in a house on Colborne Street for nearly 20 years.
"As long as you let him be and let him write, he was a generally happy fellow," says MARTIN. "He spent all his time writing. Besides eating and sleeping, he didn't do anything else."
Although most of his nearly illegible writings ended up in boxes, some of his poems were published in newspapers, including the Toronto Sun, and others were reprinted in church newsletters.
He wrote about a variety of topics.
He wrote about everything from coping with cold and hunger, to tributes to farmers, Terry Fox and Rose Kennedy. For the most part, the poems are laced with gentle humanity. In Kindness, for example, he wrote: "The greatest poem/ Is kindness/ The hand that turns/ A day into a smile/ A fellow into a friend/ A door into a welcome/ And a quarrel into peace."
But what emerges most from talking to MARTIN and GOODINE is not only a portrait of a poet struggling with mental illness, but a picture of a community that cared for him.
MARTIN says QUINLAN's landlords, the Skinners, showed a "gentle tough love" to her brother, while others supplied him with the gloves and shoes that he invariably seemed to lose.
"Terry would drop off his letters and poetry to people," recalls GOODINE, who typed some of QUINLAN's work. "And everyone did what they could to look out for him."
Of course, even simple gestures could go awry. GOODINE recalls giving QUINLAN a handful of winning roll-up-the-rim stubs from Tim Hortons. Later, he learned QUINLAN had redeemed the coupons all at once, consuming six coffees and five doughnuts in a single sitting.
But in the end, GOODINE says QUINLAN's difficult life reminds him to look beyond a person's outward appearance and behaviour.
"I think that's the lesson," he says. "Everyone adds something. Everyone has a gift, or something to share… And we need to be there for them. That's what works."

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-12-04 published
'Gentleman' of politics shaped county's future
By Chip MARTIN, Sun Media, Tues., December 4, 2007
Alan JOHNSON, a gentleman in London-area politics who made history and also helped preserve it, has died.
JOHNSON, warden of Middlesex County in 1990 as the county grappled with land annexation by London, was remembered by those in the political arena as a principled, calm and objective leader.
He was 79.
"He was always a gentleman… very analytical of issues that came up," said Charlie CORBETT, the former reeve of McGillivray Township who preceded JOHNSON as warden.
CORBETT remembered the long-festering standoff between the city and its municipal neighbours that resulted in a massive annexation in 1993 as "a rather difficult time."
But JOHNSON, a man of firm convictions, held fast to his belief the county could chart a course after annexation without throwing in the towel and joining London as a whole.
"It was very successful," CORBETT said of Middlesex, which prospered after coming to grips with losing Westminster and vast chunks of London Township to the city. And JOHNSON, a former insurance and car salesperson, deserves credit for that.
It was in London Township that JOHNSON made his mark, first with the planning board beginning in 1970, then on council, winning election as councillor in 1973, deputy reeve in 1986 and reeve in 1989.
Former Westminster mayor David MURRAY was a political brother-in-arms of JOHNSON as they dealt with the challenge of London annexation, and remembered him fondly.
"Alan had principles and he applied them," MURRAY said. "That to me meant a lot. I didn't find a lot of that in the politics of the day. I had a lot of respect for him. He will be missed."
Among JOHNSON's interests were preserving built history. He was a longstanding member of the board of Fanshawe Pioneer Village, a re-created 19th-century farm village in London, and helped raise funds when a former schoolhouse was threatened with destruction. He oversaw its relocation to the village.
The schoolhouse, Fanshawe S.S. No. 19, built in 1871, contained marks left by JOHNSON when he was a schoolboy there.
His wife, Kathy, said while in Parkwood Hospital in his final days JOHNSON was pleased to learn of a $40,000 donation from London Life to help help restore the schoolhouse.
"He knew about that and he was very pleased," she said.
A funeral will be held today at 2 p.m. at Dundas Street Centre United Church, 482 Dundas St. in London.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-02 published
Margaret ATWOOD, Dietitian (1909-2006)
Headstrong woman loved the outdoors and helped inspire her daughter and namesake, Canada's celebrated author and poet
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
A dietitian by training, strong-willed and independent by upbringing, the original Margaret ATWOOD raised her children on a diet of thrift, reading aloud and the freedom to explore their natural and intellectual surroundings. By the time she was a grandmother, economy was ingrained as a habit rather than a necessity, but the years had not blunted her sense of adventure.
"Quite some time after the event, I told both my parents that I had tried LSD," her younger daughter, Ruth SIFERD, said recently. "Daddy pursed up his mouth and looked disapproving. Mum leaned forward and said, 'What was it like?' "
Staying with her grandmother when her parents (writers Margaret ATWOOD and Graeme GIBSON) were away was "fantastic," recalled Jess Atwood GIBSON, 30, now a graduate student in art history at Yale University. "My grandmother would allow me to feed her Venus flytrap endless small pieces of ground meat on toothpicks, and she would show me how to tickle its fronds, pretending to be a fly, and give me an account of its digestion."
Every morning before school, Mrs. ATWOOD would sit young Jess on a stool and wind her hair into long, fat curls around her finger with a white comb dipped in a glass of water. "For a seven-year-old, the best grandmother possible was one who could both explain plant digestion and curl hair into ringlets."
Although Margaret ATWOOD has always resisted interpreting her own fiction for readers, she told literary biographer Rosemary Sullivan (The Red Shoes) that her muse was the mother figure. Mothers run the gamut in Ms. ATWOOD's work from holy terrors to benevolent nurturers, but the story that is probably most autobiographical is "Significant Moments in the Life of My Mother" from Bluebeard's Egg.
"I used to think that my mother, in her earlier days, led a life of sustained hilarity and hair-raising adventure," Ms. ATWOOD wrote. "Horses ran away with her, men offered to, she was continually falling out of trees…" It is only later that Ms. ATWOOD realizes that "the stories were just the punctuation" in a life that had "long stretches of uneventful time."
Margaret Dorothy Killam ATWOOD was born in the Annapolis Valley of Nova Scotia. The eldest of five children of Harold KILLAM, a country doctor, and his wife Ora Louise WEBSTER, she was socially shy but physically daring. A tomboy, she delighted in walking the barn ridgepole and riding her two cherished horses, Dick and Nell.
She was 17 and sliding down a banister at Normal School in Truro when Carl ATWOOD, a hard-working self-made man who had grown up in the backwoods of South Shore, Nova Scotia, spotted her and immediately fell in love -- or so he said.
As wily as she was headstrong, she got the better of her father after he refused to let her bob her hair in the 1920s. She waited until he had a dentist appointment and made her plea while the drill was whirling. He retorted that she could do anything she wanted as long as she left him alone, and so she went straight to the barber and had her waist-length tresses chopped.
Perhaps that's why her father declined to send her to university on the grounds that she was "frivolous." Instead she taught school, saved money and won a scholarship to Mount Allison University. She graduated in domestic science and became a dietitian and nutritionist.
After a long courtship with Carl ATWOOD -- money was scarce and she was having "too much fun," as she later told her children she finally married her beau in 1935. Besides having a PhD, he was an expert woodsman and the only one of her suitors that her father didn't dismiss as a "jackass." They spent their honeymoon canoeing down the Saint_John River in New Brunswick.
Then they headed for northern Quebec, where Prof. ATWOOD, an entomologist, had a small forest insect research station. Living first in a tent then a cabin, Mrs. ATWOOD raised her first two children, Harold and Margaret (Peggy), without the benefit of running water or electricity -- during prime insect season -- from spring until fall. Prof. ATWOOD pawned his fountain pen to pay the hospital bill when Peggy was born in November, 1939.
The family spent winters in Ottawa, but Mrs. ATWOOD much preferred the bush, where she could swim in the cold northern lakes -- "refreshing, refreshing," she invariably trilled as she strode purposefully into the frigid water. She also loved to grow vegetables, pick blueberries, fish, shoot grouse, sweep the dirt out the door in the morning and be done with housekeeping for the day. "My mother baked her way through the war years," Ms. ATWOOD remembered, "with no-butter, low-sugar recipes, and when we ran out of protein she'd open a can of Spam, mix up some Klim milk powder, or go down to the end of the dock and throw in a line for pickerel."
In 1945 the ATWOODs moved to Sault Ste. Marie, where Prof. ATWOOD set up another insect lab. With this change of venue, the family spent the warmer months of the year at a cabin on the shore of Lake Superior.
Mrs. ATWOOD put her children to work picking berries at a cent a cup, which she preserved for eating in the colder months. Her daughter Peggy still remembers seeing her mother waving a broom and yelling "Scat" to chase away a bear that had trashed the food cache.
The family moved to Toronto in 1946, so that Prof. ATWOOD could begin teaching zoology at the University of Toronto. Their second daughter and third child, Ruth, was born five years later, in 1951. Mrs. ATWOOD was 42, but age wasn't the only factor that differentiated her from most of the other neighbourhood moms. She hated housework and was oblivious to the consumer boom of the 1950s and 1960s.
"She had absolutely zero interest in colours of furniture, curtains, or other 'girl' stuff -- Dad did all that," remembered her younger daughter, Ruth. "As long as things were cleanish and had no holes she was happy." She was attached to "things" for their sentimental value, but otherwise material goods were of little interest. "The Depression mentality of reduce-reuse-recycle came naturally to her and was very useful in the bush and on canoe trips."
Besides raising three children, to whom she read aloud voraciously, Mrs. ATWOOD was committed to Scottish country dancing and ice dancing, an activity she enjoyed until she was 75.
Her last years were mired in ill health, but even when she was blind and bedridden in a nursing home, she never complained. She didn't believe in whining.
Margaret Dorothy Killam ATWOOD was born June 8, 1909, in Kinsman's Corners, Nova Scotia She died at home in Toronto this past Saturday. She was 97. Predeceased by her husband, the zoologist Carl ATWOOD, she leaves her three children, their families and her younger sister, Joyce BARKHOUSE. There will be a memorial service later in the month.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
FLYNN, M. Patricia (née MIELKE)
It is with great sadness that we announce the death of Pat FLYNN, who passed away at home on January 4, 2007, following a lengthy illness. She is survived by her loving husband of 53 years, Art FLYNN; children, Michael (Patti STUEWE,) Dartmouth; Christine (Doug) POWER, Dartmouth; Mary-Lou (Ed) DONNELLY, Halifax; Mark (Alison), South Rawdon; Janie (John) McCALL, Calgary, Alberta Peggy (Abder SAHOULI), Montague, Prince Edward Island; Carol (Peter) STORMS, Aurora, Ontario; Derek (Anne CHARLTON), Saint Margaret's Bay; Kevin, Toronto, Ontario; Paula (Robert BOUDREAU), Halifax grandchildren, Matthew and Laura FLYNN, Erin (Gerry) CLARKE and Jonathan POWER, Laura, Stephanie, Shannon and Teddy DONNELLY, Douglas and Jennifer FLYNN, Kate, Lisa and Rachel McCALL, Myriem, Malek and Anissa SAHOULI, Andrew and Sarah STORMS, Adam, Merrill and Maggie FLYNN, David and Bradley DEAN; great-grandchild, Dylan CLARKE; sister, Peggy (Graham) EDWARDS, Toronto, Ontario; numerous nieces and nephews. Born in Halifax on November 22, 1931, she was a daughter of the late Florence (MARTIN) MIELKE and Gerald MIELKE. She was predeceased by brother, Peter MIELKE, and sister, Jackie (Sr. Margaret Patricia, South Carolina). A lifelong resident of Halifax, Pat attended Saint Thomas Aquinas School and St. Pat's High School. She graduated from the Nova Scotia Normal College in 1949 and, at the age of 17, started her teaching career at Ardmore and Alexander McKay Schools in Halifax. After taking a break to raise her children, she returned briefly to teaching at Ida Mae Marriott School in Spryfield in the mid 70s. Pat was a devout Catholic, dedicating much of her time to the church and those in need. Her church work included: the Archdiocesan Liturgical Committee, the Archdiocesan Family Life Committee, Chair - St. Agnes Church Parish Council, member - Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish Council, Marriage Encounter Leader and 30 years with the Catholic Women's League. She served, as well, as a church lecturer, lay distributor and religious education instructor. She gave selflessly of herself, always finding time for the less fortunate, opening her home and her heart to many people of the years. She was passionately involved in several choirs over her lifetime including the Chebucto Community Singers, St. Agnes and Our Lady of Perpetual Help Church Choirs, 18 years with the Nova Scotia Tattoo Choir, 22 years with the Dal Chorale and countless Scratch Messiahs. Her children and grandchildren are the proud recipients of her love of song and music, as well as her great sense of humour. Much of Pat's life was spent at swimming pools, hockey rinks and baseball fields supporting her children's activities. Her years of dedication to the Waegwoltic Swim Team earned her the Mother of the Year Award. Above all, Pat was a devoted wife, mother and friend. She will be sadly missed by her family and all those whose lives she touched. Special thanks to Monica Flinn (Palliative Care nurses), Doctor Stewart Cameron, the Victorian Order of Nurses, and countless family and Friends, who supported Pat throughout her illness with care, compassion, visits, well-wishes and eucharistic ministry. Visitation will be held in J.A. Snow Funeral Home, 2666 Windsor Street, Halifax, on Saturday, January 6, from 2-4 p.m. and Sunday, January 7, from 2-4 p.m. A celebration of Pat's life will take place in Our Lady of Perpetual Help Parish, 2 Melody Dr., Rockingham, on Monday, January 8, at 10 a.m. Reception to follow. Family interment in Mount Olivet Cemetery, Halifax. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Palliative Care Unit, QEII Health Sciences Centre or Victorian Order of Nurses, Halifax. Condolences may be emailed to: snowfh@alderwoods.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-10 published
Charmion KING, Actress: (1925-2007)
The grande dame of Canadian theatre was known for her dynamic stage presence, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
In a career that spanned 60 years on stage, radio, television and film, Charmion KING was known for her dynamic stage presence, her throaty laugh, her beauty, her dedication to the theatre, and her professionalism. Of all playwrights she loved Chekhov the best and no wonder, for she delivered many of her best performances in his work.
"She was the grande dame of Canadian Theatre," Albert SCHULTZ, artistic director of The Soulpepper Theatre in Toronto, said yesterday. Ms. KING joined the company in its third season (2000) to play a character in Noël Coward's Present Laughter. "We needed one of those great dames who could come on stage and convince you that she could function under a couple of martinis and be as witty as the next person in the room and bring with her a great aristocratic bearing and great wit and elegance -- and that was Charm," he said.
The only child of Charles KING, a businessman who worked for Neilsen's (and was called The Candy Man, according to his granddaughter Leah) and his wife Amabel (née REEVES,) Charmion KING spent her earliest years in The Beach area of Toronto in a house fronting the boardwalk. Even as a five-year-old, she dreamed of becoming an actress. After the family moved to Forest Hill, she attended Bishop Strachan, the private girls' school, where she often played male roles in plays. In the summers she went to Tanamakoon, the girls' camp where the late Dora Mavor Moore had begun teaching musical theatre in the 1930s.
She enrolled in University College at the University of Toronto in the early 1940s, where she acted in college productions. In 1944, The Globe and Mail reported that she had been offered a screen test by Warner Brothers after talent scouts for the film studio had seen her perform in Thunder Rock. The 19-year-old star of the University College Players' Guild had declined, saying "this is just a school play."
Her best work was probably done at the Hart House Theatre under the direction of Robert GILL, an American actor who had worked at the Cleveland Playhouse. At the time, only men were allowed to use Hart House, the recreational and athletic facility that had been given to the university by the Massey family, but the theatre was run by a different administration, one that welcomed women on its stage after the war.
Mr. GILL, who headed Hart House Productions, was an "enormous influence," Ms. KING told Susan LAWRENCE in 2002 for an article in the University of Toronto magazine. "He taught me professional behaviour as an actress." In her most memorable role at university, she played the title role in Saint Joan at Hart House Theatre in 1947, the year she graduated. "Her performance of Joan," The Globe and Mail critic wrote the following morning, according to Hart House records, "is a luminous portrayal, instinct with an inner fire of truth and spiritual beauty, and exquisite in its shadings of emotion and execution."
From Hart House and a year of graduate work in English literature, she did summer stock in New York, and then helped found the Straw Hat Players in 1948 with Murray and Donald DAVIS, two brothers who had been part of the Hart House theatre gang. The company, which included Eric HOUSE, Ted FOLLOWS and Barbara HAMILTON, toured Muskoka and Port Carling and the border region of the U.S. for several summers. "In a way it was the best time I ever had on the stage," Ms. KING told The Globe in 1961. "We were 10 ambitious, idealistic youngsters who thought we were building Canadian theatre and, perhaps, we were."
The DAVIS brothers and their sister Barbara CHILCOTT went on to open The Crest Theatre in a renovated cinema on Mount Pleasant Road in Toronto in 1954. At The Crest she played Masha (with Kate Reid) in Chekhov's The Three Sisters, Madame Ranevskaya in The Cherry Orchard and Lady Utterword in Heartbreak House, among other roles in that theatre's ambitious and groundbreaking history.
She worked in England in the very early 1950s but returned to Canada to work in television on the fledgling Canadian Broadcasting Corporation network and at the equally neophyte Stratford Festival, appearing as Hermione in The Winter's Tale and Lady Percy in Henry IV, Part 1 in 1958. (She returned to the Festival in 1982 as a senior member of the Shakespeare 3 company and acted in All's Well That Ends Well and A Midsummer Night's Dream.)
The following year she performed on Broadway in Robertson Davies's Love and Libel, directed by Tyrone Guthrie, and toured in a principal role in Love and Libel in Detroit, Boston and New York.
In 1962, she went back to The Crest to play opposite a Newfoundland actor named Gordon PINSENT in The Madwoman of Chaillot. They married on November 2 of that year, a creative and romantic partnership that lasted more than 44 years. After her wedding, Ms. KING told The Toronto Star that she "was doing Orpheus Descending at the Crest and when it ended I said I didn't want to work for a long, long time. I was tired." Their daughter, actress Leah PINSENT, was born on September 20, 1968. The family moved to Los Angeles in the 1970s where Mr. PINSENT (after the end of the television show Quentin Durgens, M.P., in which he had starred) was writing and finding backers for his film The Rowdyman.
"She was my best friend," Leah PINSENT said yesterday about her mother. "Other than when I had to go away, we talked every day. She was giving and kind and warm and funny and smart and a great cook."
After having retired for most of a decade to spend more time as a wife and mother, Ms. KING ended her self-imposed retreat by appearing in the Ethel Barrymore role in The Royal Family, a comedy by George S. Kaufman and Edna Ferber, at the Shaw Festival in 1972.
She performed steadily after that on television and radio (playing Aunt Josephine on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television's Anne of Green Gables and appearing on The Newsroom, Twitch City and Wind at My Back, and playing the voice of Mrs. Gruenwald in the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio series Rumours and Boarders). She appeared in film (Who Has Seen the Wind? and Nobody Waved Goodbye) and on stage, notably as Jessica Logan, a temperamental actress trying to make a comeback, in the premiere production of David French's showbusiness comedy Jitters in Toronto and at the Long Wharf Theatre in New Haven in 1979, a role that she revived in Toronto in 1986.
In 1990, she again performed opposite Kate Reid in a Hart House revival of Arsenic and Old Lace. In 1998 she starred in the Tarragon Theatre production of Janet Munsil's Emphysema (A Love Story) in which she shared the stage with her daughter Leah, as they both played actress Louise Brooks at different ages. Although Ms. KING had been a heavy smoker, she had successfully stopped for a decade until the director asked them to smoke "real" cigarettes on stage, according to her daughter. Alas, she was hooked again.
Ms. PINSENT said it was "fabulous" working with her mother because she was "always a very generous woman. There was no ego; she always wanted to serve the writer and the theatre in the best way she possibly could."
In the last several years Ms. KING performed regularly at The Soulpepper Theatre in Toronto, appearing in Present Laughter in 2001, as Maria in Chekhov's Uncle Vanya and in Jean Genet's The Maids in 2002. "We called her at home and we got her," Mr. SCHULTZ said about casting her for the first time. "She always brought such humanity and elegance and wit to everything she did. She was a pleasure to have around."
Asked a few years ago by an interviewer whether she could imagine retiring, Ms. KING said absolutely not. "Being an actor is something like being at university. It opens your mind and your soul and makes you tap into yourself." Her last role was as Mrs. Soames in Thornton Wilder's Our Town at Soulpepper in 2006 and she was planning to reprise the role this spring.
"To the very end, Charm stood up for the creative arts in Canada," her family said in a statement this week. She was a steadfast believer in the creative spirit of this country, its culture&hellip her cry was always… get on with it and be proud."
Charmion KING was born in Toronto on July 25, 1925. She died in Toronto of complications from emphysema on Saturday. She was 81. She is survived by her husband Gordon PINSENT, her daughter Leah PINSENT and her son-in-law Peter KELEGHAN. There will be a private family cremation, followed by a memorial service at a later date.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-11 published
MILNE, Ian George, C.A.
Peacefully at Sunnybrook Hospital on January 9, 2007 surrounded by his family. Born in 1915, Ian was a lifelong Torontonian and a lifetime member of the Lambton Golf and Country Club. He had a keen interest in Canadian history and geography, and international travel. Ian received his Bachelor of Commerce in 1939 from University College, University of Toronto and was employed for 32 years at Eaton's head office. He was a Veteran of the Royal Canadian Navy. Beloved husband of the late Marjorie MILNE. Devoted father to Scott, Mike and Rob. Gup-Gup to Sarah (Rod) and Jamie. Loving father-in-law to Anne, Jill and Hilary and future daughter-in-law Meski. Cherished by his sister Isabelle MARTIN of Sarnia. A Celebration of Ian's Life will be held in the chapel of the Trull "North Toronto" Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) on Saturday, January 13, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Inurnment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Society.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-01 published
Canada's first environment minister had orders to clean up Ontario
Appointed in 1969 by premier John Robarts, he was described by a Toronto Telegram reporter as being like 'a sheriff from out of the Old West.' He also twice served as solicitor-general, resigning each time after separate scandals, writes Sandra MARTIN. He survived handily
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
A natural politician who loved the meet-and-greet of politics, George KERR was a cabinet minister in the Ontario governments of John Robarts and William Davis. The first politician to hold the environment portfolio in any jurisdiction in Canada, he was as far-sighted in his struggles to combat pollution as he was controversial in his attempts to ban phosphates and reduce automobile emissions.
The only son and elder child of lumber trader George and Florence (HINTON) KERR, he was born in Montreal but grew up in Esquiminac on Quebec's Gaspé Peninsula. As a child, he and his younger sister Patricia (Patsy) went to the village school in a cart pulled by their pony Julie. He was apparently heartbroken when his parents decided to send him at the age of 9 to Rothesay Collegiate, a boarding school located near Saint John. The school yearbook, The Blue and White, calls him Buzz and says he came to the school as a "wee mite" who "from the hour of his arrival" was into everything "official and not quite so official." He was very athletic, playing on all of the school teams, winning a middleweight boxing championship and serving as captain of the football and hockey teams in his senior year.
He graduated in 1942 and entered the undergraduate program at the University of New Brunswick in Fredericton that fall. Barely a year later, he tried to enlist in the armed forces, but was diagnosed with tuberculosis when he underwent his mandatory medical. Instead of serving overseas, he was sent to a sanatorium where he was subjected to the clean-air cure that was standard treatment in those days. After recovering, he worked for some time in the lumber trade with his father before returning to university in 1949, managing to complete his degree in a year by attending summer school. During this second stretch at University of New Brunswick, he met a student from Spencer Island, Nova Scotia, named Joan Merrydith (Mim) SPICER. They both enrolled in the law school at Dalhousie University in Halifax in September, 1950. Afterward, he liked to claim that he got through because she tutored him. They were married September 1, 1951, and eventually had three children, Larry, Margot and James.
After earning their law degrees from Dalhousie in 1953, the KERRs moved to Ontario, settling in Burlington in 1954, where they both worked in the law firm Kerr and Hawken. As he had done at boarding school two decades earlier, Mr. KERR got into everything "official and not quite so official" from the hour of his arrival in Burlington, from the town council to the chamber of commerce to the Halton County Progressive Conservative Association. He was first elected to the Ontario Legislature in 1963 for Halton and held his seat (which was renamed Halton West and then Burlington South) for more than two decades, finally retiring before the 1985 election.
As a backbencher in premier John Robarts's government, he served on a number of standing committees, including municipal affairs and education, health and welfare, and won his riding in the 1967 provincial election with a plurality of nearly 6,000 votes. Two years later, in June of 1969, Mr. Robarts appointed him to cabinet in the new portfolio of energy and resources management, with the express mandate of cleaning up Ontario's soil, air and water. He was 45.
A reporter from the now defunct Toronto Telegram interviewed the newly minted minister in his Queen's Park office in January of 1970, describing him as tall, with a strong, firm jaw and looking variously like "a sheriff from out of the Old West" and "a trifle stiff and stern in the manner of a not-so-bad high-school principal." Sitting behind a huge desk and smoking his ever-present pipe, Mr. KERR said: "Pollution is the thing everybody seems to be concerned about right now. It's just amazing how the interest in it has boomed in the past 12 months."
He lived beside Hamilton Harbour, infamous for the belching smoke from the Stelco and Dofasco steel smelters on its shores, and admitted that it was "not the most beautiful body of water in the world." He made a promise to change all that, vowing that the bay would be clean enough to swim in within five years.
Five years later, he climbed into an old-fashioned horizontal-striped bathing suit adorned with shoulder straps and plunged into the water for a short but bracing swim, and emerged without any seeming ill effects.
When William Davis succeeded Mr. Robarts as leader of the party and as premier in 1971, he appointed Mr. KERR as environment minister. "He was a very able minister," Mr. Davis said yesterday, suggesting that heading up the first environment ministry in Canada was his major political legacy because "it was a major departure in terms of government responsibility and George did it and did it well." A year later, Mr. Davis shifted him to the ministry of colleges and universities, with postsecondary schools expanding rapidly as the baby boom shouldered its swaggering way into secondary education.
A strong supporter of his own community, Mr. KERR "strenuously and successfully" resisted the inclusion of Burlington in the formation of the Hamilton-Wentworth regional government in the early 1970s, according to Mr. Davis. "He was very persuasive in that regard," said Mr. Davis, who can still remember the arguments around the cabinet table before the legislation was passed in June of 1973. "Most people in Burlington would say that his success in keeping Burlington as a separate community was his main accomplishment."
Mr. KERR's political life was not without controversy. He was solicitor-general twice, resigning each time after a public clamour, although his exile to the wilderness of the back benches was short lived because he had never done anything illegal.
The first occasion, in July, 1975, involved the mention of his name in the trial of former Hamilton Harbour commissioner Kenneth ELLIOT/ELLIOTT in connection with dredging contracts. Mr. Davis reappointed Mr. KERR to cabinet three months later for his second stint as environment minister, where he remained until January, 1978, when the premier shifted him back again to solicitor-general.
The second stumble was more serious. On August 14, 1978, while Mr. KERR was solicitor-general and provincial secretary for justice, he made a telephone call to an assistant crown attorney on behalf of Francis HARRISON, a constituent who was facing trial for driving while his licence was suspended. According to Mr. KERR's explanation, he made the call not to attempt to influence the outcome of the pending trial but to learn whether Mr. HARRISON, a pipe fitter (who had telephoned the minister at home after looking up his number in the telephone book), would face a mandatory jail term if convicted. The intervention quickly became public and Mr. KERR resigned from cabinet on September 9, 1978, in an atmosphere that was already contaminated by John MUNRO, another Hamilton-area politician, who had been forced to step down the day before as the federal labour minister after calling a judge to offer a character reference for an accused constituent.
"I think it was something he felt personally he should do," Mr. Davis said. "George was one of those individuals who was very anxious to do what he felt was appropriate and that is why he resigned. He was not pushed."
Mr. HARRISON was acquitted at a trial that November. A subsequent report of a government inquiry into the matter questioned Mr. KERR's wisdom but stated that: "It does not seem that Mr. KERR's telephone call constituted an attempt to obstruct, pervert or defeat the course of justice within the meaning of Section 127 of the Criminal Code."
Although he never returned to the cabinet table, Mr. KERR served on a number of standing committees and was asked by Mr. Davis to become speaker of the house in 1981, an invitation he declined. "I think he was tired of refereeing," the former premier said.
Four years later, Mr. KERR resigned his seat and returned to practising law with his wife. "He was very dedicated to his family and of course he was supported by Mim," Mr. Davis said. "I would argue that she may have gotten more votes for him than he got for himself. They were a great pair."
About five years ago, Mr. KERR was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease. Although frail, he enjoyed what his daughter Margot called "his last hurrah" in February when he made an appearance at a fundraiser for Joyce Savoline, the successful Progressive Conservative candidate in a provincial by-election in Burlington.
Although Mr. KERR wasn't on the list of speakers, he responded to the call when he was asked to say a few words, said party chief John Tory, who was there to "motivate the troops" for the upcoming vote.
"He was absolutely magnificent," Mr. Tory said of Mr. KERR's 10-minute speech on how much he enjoyed his early days in politics. "I think it was a very moving experience for most of the people there, probably two-thirds of whom were far too young to have known him as an active politician. He summoned up everything he had."
In the middle of April, Mr. KERR suffered a fall and had to go into hospital.
George Albert KERR was born in Montreal on January 27, 1924. He died of pneumonia in a Burlington hospital on May 21, 2007. He was 83. He is survived by his wife Mim, three children, four grandchildren, his younger sister Patricia Lawson and his extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-07 published
MARTIN, Lynn
Died on June 4, 2007. She is sadly missed by cousins Norman, David, Ellen, Mitchell, Jane, Alexander, Ruby and Abraham, by her Uncle Lionel, Aunt Nan, Shelley BUTLER, Sara LEVINE, Ron HALL and family, Carolyn ROBINS and family, Kerry PEACOCK and family, Saul MARTIN and family, Harvey KOFSKY and family, Leon RAVVIN and family, and Ethel ABRAMSON and family. She was predeceased by her father, Eddy MARTIN and mother Annette (RAVVIN) MARTIN. Lynn was a lifelong Calgarian who took pleasure in her independent ways and love of kinship. She was resilient, funny and happiest when she found good company. Her memories of people she loved and knew well, like her Grandfather Israel RAVVIN, Granny Shifra RAVVIN, and her Uncle Albert RAVVIN, kept these people present for the rest of us. Donations can be made to the Cerebral Palsy Association in Alberta (403) 543-1161. Funeral was held on June 6 at the Jewish Cemetery, Erlton Street and 30 Avenue S.W.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-07 published
Charmer, rascal, film producer, ad pioneer
He had hit movies and renegade ideas, but was best at making the deals, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
An advertising and film pioneer, Peter SIMPSON loved making deals and bringing projects together, but he hated the red tape that is so much a part of the Canadian film industry.
He was a charmer and a rascal who loved talking, drinking and eating, but he also expanded the business of filmmaking in Canada and probably hired more actors, directors and technical people than any other producer. His credits range from establishing the first international media buying agency to producing horror films such as the Prom Night franchise to Regeneration (based on novelist Pat Barker's trilogy) to the CTV television series The Eleventh Hour.
Vancouver-born actor Jason Priestly met Mr. SIMPSON in Los Angeles in 1997 about a role in The Highwayman, the first of four films the two made together. "He had an incredible ability to walk into a room and sell people on a project," Mr. Priestly said.
Although they met through work, they became Friends. "He was an incredibly avuncular and jovial man. He loved to laugh, to eat sushi and to drink Heineken. He was a spectacular man."
Peter SIMPSON was born in Port Glasgow, Scotland, the youngest of three sons of a grocer. His father immigrated to Toronto in 1952 and found a job at Eaton's and a place to live in Downsview, in the northern part of Toronto. His mother arrived at the end of the school year with 10-year-old Peter and his brothers. A sister, Marjorie, who died in a car accident in 1969, was born in Canada.
After graduating from high school, Peter attended the University of Toronto, but left to work as a junior buyer for the Young and Rubicam advertising agency.
That's where he met David HARRISON, another "renegade" who shared his love of the zeitgeist, Heineken and the ad business. Mr. SIMPSON quickly moved on to Ogilvy and Mather, then became media director at Stanfield, Johnson and Hill.
During this period, Mr. SIMPSON met and married his first wife, Gordene BYERS. Together, they had four sons: Kerry, Brock, Colin and Bradley. After 14 years, the marriage broke up. In the mid-1980s, Mr. SIMPSON married television producer Ilana FRANK. They had two children: daughter Quinn and son Hayden.
In the 1960s, ad agencies created ads, planned campaigns and placed ads, but the business was getting too complex for this concentration to be efficient. Mr. SIMPSON had the idea to separate these functions and, in 1969, he founded Media Buying Services to purchase advertising space and time for clients. "He was the pioneer," Mr. HARRISON said. "He was a very important guy in the entertainment business."
Media Buying Services quickly acquired clients such as Playtex, Dominion Stores and K-tel, a Winnipeg company headed by Philip Kives that was opening an office in Britain.
"The expertise Peter put in place was not a small factor in the success of K-tel, first in the United Kingdom and then all over Europe," said Ian Howard, the first managing director of K-tel International (UK) Ltd., in an e-mail message. "I could never have concentrated on the rapid growth of the company if the television buying was also a part of the infrastructure." Within five years of its founding, Media Buying Services had seven offices in Canada, Britain and the United States.
By the early 1970s, Mr. SIMPSON had moved into the film promotion business and was spending a lot of time in Los Angeles. After forming Norstar Filmed Entertainment, he started making movies. He became a pioneer again, in making made-for-television movies such as The Sea Gypsies, which he sold to Warner Brothers and which earned a 30-per-cent share when it was broadcast on NBC.
His second film was an even bigger success. Prom Night, which borrowed on the success of Brian de Palma's 1976 film Carrie, starred Jamie Lee Curtis and Leslie Nielson. Released in 1980, it was unabashedly commercial, spawned three sequels and set Canadian film box-office records.
From promotion to production to distribution, Mr. SIMPSON was involved in every part of the nascent Canadian film business, including the Toronto Film Festival, where he served on the board from 1981 to 1990. That's one of the ways he came to know another Scottish immigrant, filmmaker Bill MARSHALL.
"When I started the film festival," Mr. MARSHALL recalled in a telephone conversation, "we used to have a daily session that was on Rogers [cable television] and Peter and I would drink Heineken and excoriate the industry," including the television networks, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and the federal Telefilm funding agency. "Nobody was safe from our rude and grumpy comments."
They wanted to make films, and railed at public officials who weren't eager to finance their projects, no questions asked. "He wouldn't do anything unless it was his way," Mr. MARSHALL said.
"His first big hit was Prom Night, so he always thought he was a great movie picker," Mr. MARSHALL said. But what he was really good at was putting the financing together - although he "was never very good at getting money out of Telefilm." For one of his films, he put in the credits that it was made "in spite of the Canadian Film Development Corporation," Telefilm's earlier name.
Despite that conflict, "I always enjoyed my encounters with Peter SIMPSON. He was as frisky as they come," said filmmaker Peter Pearson, Telefilm's executive director from 1985 to 1987.
Politically, Mr. SIMPSON supported the Progressive Conservative Party. In the 1980s, when Brian Mulroney was prime minister, Mr. SIMPSON and partner Roger Nantel of Montreal set up Media Canada, which won a contract to place all federal government advertising in newspapers and magazines and on radio and television.
In all, Mr. SIMPSON made close to 40 movies and television films, including The Rage, Men with Guns, Pale Saints, Grizzly Falls and Cold Comfort. He was nominated for the Alexander Korda Award for best British film for Regeneration in 1998, won a Gemini for The Eleventh Hour in 2005 and received a Lifetime Achievement Award for his "unwavering commitment" from the Academy of Canadian Cinema in 2004.
Although he gave up smoking two decades ago, he was diagnosed with lung cancer last September. Treatment failed to defeat the disease, and it was evident by February that the cancer was spreading. Even so, Mr. SIMPSON was keenly involved in putting together a television movie about comedian John Candy before he was admitted to hospital about two weeks ago.
Peter SIMPSON was born in Port Glasgow, Scotland, on May 29, 1943. He died at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto on June 5, 2007. He was 64. He leaves his second wife, Ilana Frank, six children and three brothers. A private funeral is planned, to be followed by a memorial service in September.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-09 published
MARTIN, Lynn
Died on June 4, 2007. She is sadly missed by cousins Norman, David, Ellen, Mitchell, Jane, Alexander, Ruby and Abraham, by her Uncle Lionel, Aunt Nan, Shelley BUTLER, Sara LEVINE, Ron HALL and family, Carolyn ROBINS and family, Kerry PEACOCK and family, Saul MARTIN and family, Harvey KOFSKY and family, Leon RAVVIN and family, and Ethel ABRAMSON and family. She was predeceased by her father, Eddy MARTIN and mother Annette (Ravvin) MARTIN. Lynn was a lifelong Calgarian who took pleasure in her independent ways and love of kinship. She was resilient, funny and happiest when she found good company. Her memories of people she loved and knew well, like her Grandfather Israel RAVVIN, Granny Shifra RAVVIN, and her Uncle Albert RAVVIN, kept these people present for the rest of us. Donations can be made to the Cerebral Palsy Association in Alberta (403) 543-1161. Funeral was held on June 6 at the Jewish Cemetery, Erlton Street and 30 Avenue S.W.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-20 published
Czech wartime refugee became one of Canada's greatest composers
Originally a pianist, he forced himself to write a fugue a week until he had mastered composition. He rejected avant-garde electronic and 12-tone techniques in favour of laments and tributes that probably drew inspiration from his memories of Europe, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
A Czech refugee from Nazism, Oskar MORAWETZ was 23 when he arrived in Toronto, but he remained a European in his sensibilities and his musicianship throughout his long and prolific career as one of Canada's best known and most frequently performed composers. Known for his deep emotion, lyricism and melodic line, Prof. MORAWETZ wrote more than 100 orchestral and chamber works, including Carnival Overture, Piano Concerto No. 1, Memorial to Martin Luther King and From the Diary of Anne Frank. His music, both vocal and instrumental, was performed by such musicians as Glenn GOULD, Maureen Forrester, Ben Heppner, Anton Kuerti, Yo-Yo Ma, Lois Marshall and Zubin Mehta.
His knowledge of the great European composers was encyclopedic, which made him a valuable teacher and mentor. In his own work, he eschewed his colleagues' embrace of avant-garde electronic and 12-tone techniques in favour of deeply felt emotional laments and tributes that probably drew their inspiration from his memories of Czechoslovakia, as it was before Hitler occupied the country, and the trauma both of his own escape and the horrific fate of many of his Friends and extended family members.
Pianist Mr. Kuerti remembered Prof. MORAWETZ as a composer "whose eclectic style was reminiscent of music written 50 to 75 years earlier, as were, among others, Bach and Brahms in their time.
"He was in no way experimental or avant-garde, during a time when radical innovation and destruction of tradition were highly prized by the critics and other would-be oracles, if not by the general public. For this he earned considerable disdain. But his music is absolutely sincere, just as his personality was, and it was extremely well crafted and has a distinct aroma of its own.
"He had an uncanny memory for a great deal of music from the past, and from his acquaintance with it he knew thoroughly all about balance, form, orchestration and sound colours. Had he been a visual artist, one would admire how wonderfully he could draw, rather than just splash paint on a canvas. I think some of his best works should continue to keep a foothold in the repertoire."
As well as two Juno awards, three senior fellowships from the Canada Council and a Golden Jubilee Medal, Prof. MORAWETZ was awarded the Orders of Ontario and Canada. Although he could speak several languages, he never lost his heavy Czech accent.
Oskar MORAWETZ was born January 17, 1917, in Svetla nad Sazavou, Czechoslovakia, the second son of four children of a secular Jewish couple, Richard and Frida (GLASER) MORAWETZ. His father made his living running jute factories that had been founded by his grandfather. When Oskar was 3, the family moved to Upice, a mill town in the foothills of the Sudeten mountains in western Czechoslovakia, where Mr. MORAWETZ and his older brother owned a jute factory, although they continued to spend their summers at the ancestral family estate in Svetla. As a child, Oskar loved building blocks, playing the piano and listening to music. When he was 10, his father moved the family to Prague so that the children could attend high school. They lived in a large apartment in the centre of Prague close to theatres and coffee houses and enjoyed an affluent, cultured lifestyle, complete with skiing vacations at Christmas and Easter.
By 1932, Mr. MORAWETZ was president of the International Cotton Congress, and Oskar was studying piano and theory at the Prague conservatoire under Karel Hoffmeister and Jaroslav Kricka, in addition to his academic classes. Fascinated by music, Oskar was barely interested in other subjects and did poorly in school despite extra tutoring. He graduated in 1935 and then suffered such a severe nervous breakdown (exacerbated by a fear that his fingers would lose the ability to play the piano) that his parents took him to Vienna to see a psychiatrist, who treated him for several weeks before the overwhelming sadness lifted.
Oskar had such an acutely developed ability to sight-read orchestral scores that George Szell recommended him for a position as assistant conductor of the Prague Opera. Despite his longing to become a musician, he never questioned his father's wish that he take forestry at university. In 1937, two years after he began studying forestry, he finally won his father's permission to move to Vienna to study piano. A year later, after he watched Adolf Hitler parade through the streets of Vienna, the anti-Semitism he had already endured increased dramatically and, following a run-in with the Gestapo, he headed home to Prague.
That September, England and France signed the Munich Agreement, giving Germany the Sudetenland, the sections of Czechoslovakia that were heavily populated with Germans and contained most of the country's fortifications. Mr. MORAWETZ sent Oskar to Paris, ostensibly to study music, but really to get him out of the country, and sent his son John and daughter Sonja to England. On March 15, 1939, Hitler marched his troops into Prague, slept in the Royal Castle and boasted that Czechoslovakia had ceased to exist. Mr. MORAWETZ was doubly marked because of his Friendship with political leaders Jan Masaryk and Edward Benes. Nevertheless, he managed to acquire exit permits for himself and his wife and fled to England, then sailed for Canada, arriving in September of 1939.
Oskar, thinking he was safe in Paris, where he was enjoying his musical life immensely, had declined to accompany his parents. But he was treated like an enemy alien and his bank account was frozen. After a series of harrowing near-arrests, he acquired an exit visit that took him from France to Italy by way of Switzerland, where he was helped by a former business associate of his father. In March of 1940, three months before the fall of France, he flew from Rome to the Canary Islands and boarded a ship sailing to the Dominican Republic. From there, he set off for Canada, landing on June 17, 1940. His brother Herbert and sister Sonja had come here in December of 1939; his brother John and his bride Maureen arrived after the war in November of 1946. The family was finally safely reunited in Toronto, although many of their relatives had been murdered in concentration camps. By then, Oskar, who had been rejected for military service because a chest X-ray had revealed dormant tuberculosis cells, had become a naturalized Canadian citizen.
From afar, Oskar had seen Canada as a cultural backwater, but it actually provided him with a nurturing artistic environment. He lived with his parents and dedicated himself to studying music. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in music (1944) and a doctorate in composition (1953) from the University of Toronto, studying under Leo SMITH and Albert GUERRERO -- two of his fellow piano students were Mr. GOULD and John Beckwith. Initially, he wanted to be a pianist, but because he had to write an original composition to complete the prerequisites for his bachelor's degree, he forced himself to write a fugue a week.
"He was very frustrated at first," said his daughter Claudia, "but after writing 40 or 50 of them, he found them easier to do." His graduate composition was his first string quartet, Opus 1, and it won a Composers, Authors, and Publishers Association of Canada award. In 1946, he began teaching at the Royal Conservatory of Music, was appointed to the faculty of the University of Toronto as an assistant professor six years later, where he continued to teach composition and harmony for the next three decades.
On June 7, 1958, at the age of 40, he married Ruth SHIPMAN, a pianist and piano teacher from London, Ontario, in a ceremony at Bloor Street United Church in Toronto. (Mr. GOULD played the organ.) The MORAWETZes settled in a house in Forest Hill, with him occupying an upstairs room furnished with a Heintzman piano and a large oak desk, where he composed music. There was a second piano in the living room, a Steinway grand, that Prof. MORAWETZ played occasionally, but it was used much more frequently by his wife, who gave music lessons there. Her office, aside from the kitchen, was in the basement.
Two years after his wedding, Prof. MORAWETZ won the first of three Senior Arts Fellowships from the Canada Council, which gave the young couple the opportunity to travel in Europe, attending concerts and making connections with musicians and, coincidentally, conceiving Claudia, their first child (now a computer scientist) who was born in 1962. Their son Richard (an economist) followed in 1966.
About this time, Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich asked Prof. MORAWETZ to compose a work for cello and orchestra. He said later that he was having trouble finding the inspiration to write a note until he watched the "slow, sad and very moving" funeral procession for Martin Luther King in Atlanta, three days after the civil-rights leader's assassination on April 4, 1968. When he saw the inscription on Rev. King's gravestone, taken from his favourite spiritual - "Free at last, thank God Almighty I am free at last!" - he resolved to write a work dedicated to Rev. King's memory: "I saw clearly in front of me the form, content and orchestration of my composition." Memorial to Martin Luther King was first performed by the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in Another death, long after the fact, inspired another of his memorable musical eulogies. In a radio interview in 1990, Prof. MORAWETZ spoke about the inspiration for From the Diary of Anne Frank (1970), explaining that he hadn't read the diary when it was published in the early 1950s because it reminded him too painfully of the fate of so many of his Friends and family members. When he read it in 1968, he was haunted by the entry in which Anne writes about her friend Hanneli Goslar ("Lies Goosens" in the published diary), who was arrested and sent to a concentration camp while the Frank family was in hiding in Amsterdam. The two girls met up again briefly in Bergen-Belsen in the last months of the war. "I still think it's the most moving passage of the whole book… [it] is nothing else but a prayer for the survival of her friend Lies," Prof. MORAWETZ once said. Soprano Lois Marshall premiered the work with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra in May of 1970.
Prof. MORAWETZ's marriage was not a harmonious one. The couple separated in 1982 and divorced two years later. At 67, Prof. MORAWETZ found himself not only divorced, but retired from his teaching job at the U of T. After some initial dilemmas about housekeeping, he settled happily into a busy lifestyle of composing, giving guest lectures and travelling for most of the next decade. He gave his last performance as a pianist in March, 1992. Two years later, the Elmer Iseler Singers sang one of his last major commissions, Prayer for Freedom, at the inaugural concert in the North York Performing Arts Centre. The work, which was commissioned by the Canada Council, draws on two anti-slavery poems written by 19th-century African-American writer Frances E.W. Harper, reflects Prof. MORAWETZ's thematic commitment to human rights and social justice.
The following year, in May of 1995, he went back to Prague, the city he had fled nearly 60 years earlier. He fell into a depression that was compounded by his failing eyesight and the arthritis that stiffened his fingers and made it difficult for him to play the piano. The breakdown may have been a reverberation of the severe depression he suffered as a teenager, with both episodes linked by a fear of being cut off from his music. He was never able to compose music again.
Six years later, he fell and hit his head, suffering brain damage that severely affected his memory and his ability to express himself. In 2002, after being diagnosed with Parkinson's syndrome, he moved into a retirement home in Toronto. Several symphony orchestras in Canadian cities, including Toronto, Edmonton and Ottawa played concerts of his works in January to celebrate his 90th birthday, and the University of Toronto music faculty organized a tribute to the man and the musician.
Oskar MORAWETZ was born on January 17, 1917, in Svetla nad Sazavou, Czechoslovakia. He died in his sleep at Leaside Retirement Residence in Toronto on June 13, 2007, of complications from Parkinson's syndrome. He was 90. He is survived by two children, two grandchildren and extended family. There will be a memorial service on June 28 at 7 p.m. in Walter Hall at the U of T's Edward Johnson building.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-23 published
MARTIN, Winifred " Wyn" (née MOSSOP) (1926-2007)
Gently to God in peace as spring faded on Thursday, June 21st. Always smiling, gentle in nature, humble, gracious and kind. Loved and missed by Aubrey, her husband of 55 years. Beloved mother of Wendy MacKENZIE (Norman) and grandmother of Kayella and Katherine; Cynthia and grandmother of Aubrey BETTEKE; and Nancy (Mark JACKSON.) Dear friend of many, especially Lorraine PATTERSON. With special thanks to the caring staff at Albright Manor, Beamsville. Aubrey, Cynthia and Nancy reiterate their inestimable appreciation to Wendy and Norman. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Sunday, June 24th. A funeral will be held in the chapel at 11 a.m. on Monday, June 25th with a reception immediately following in the Leaside Room. Private family interment. If desired, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society or the Albright Manor Foundation for Cherrywood Residents (905-563-8252). In honour of Wyn, Aubrey says, "Take a mother out to a fine dinner".

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-28 published
'He became effortless in his greatness'
It was his experience under fire as an army medic serving in Italy during the Second World War that imbued him with a spiritual appreciation of humanity, writes Sandra MARTIN. He would later draw on it as one of Canada's finest classical actors
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
A man who could command a stage in any country and who chose to make his career in Canada, William HUTT was a formidable presence at the Stratford Festival since its founding in 1953, appearing in myriad roles from Prospero, Lear and Falstaff to Lady Bracknell in The Importance of Being Earnest. For fans, he made Shakespeare accessible, speaking in his homegrown voice rather than adopting plummy tones from across the Atlantic. For actors, he was a mentor, a friend and an avuncular presence, showing them how to inhabit a stage without hogging the limelight. And he did it all with generosity and panache. The stage was his home, and no stages were more familiar to him than those at Stratford, where he performed in 130 productions over 39 seasons.
"This is a historic moment in Canadian arts," Richard MONETTE, artistic director of the festival, said in an interview. "It is a cause of mourning for this loss and also a cause of great celebration because of his legacy. He was a great classical actor and he essayed all the great roles. He was equally at home with crowds as well as kings. He had a great range, everybody in the audience could relate to him - whether they were society people or farmers, he could appeal to them. He became effortless in his greatness."
William Ian deWitt HUTT was the middle of three children of Edward deWitt HUTT, a magazine editor, and Caroline Frances Havergal (née WOOD.) His mother suffered from septicemia after his birth, and was soon pregnant with her third child. Consequently, he spent long periods of time with an aunt and uncle in Hamilton. "My aunt belonged to Christ Church and they were doing a Christmas pageant. I was only 4 or 5 years old, but I wanted to be in it," he said later. He had only one line - "Beads for sale" - that he delivered looking directly at the audience. At that moment, he fell in love with performing.
During the Depression, his father's magazines failed and he was forced to sell insurance, a job he "loathed," and to move his wife and children into a home belonging to her family. Young Bill attended Vaughan Road Collegiate and then North Toronto Collegiate, performing occasionally in school productions, including a role as a policeman in The Pirates of Penzance. A gangly loner, he was socially awkward as a teenager; that's when he realized he was bisexual. Homosexuality was morally taboo and illegal in the 1930s, and that increased his sense of isolation from his family and his peers.
He did very poorly in high school and left without graduating in 1941 to enlist in the army and the 7th Light Field Ambulance Unit. He was 21 and, unlike many young men who dash off to war deluded by visions of glory, he "had no intention of shooting anybody," as he explained in an interview in his Stratford living room last Friday afternoon.
After going overseas, he saw a production of Arsenic and Old Lace in London with Sybil Thorndike and Lillian Braithwaite that enthralled him, but it was his experience as a medic that imbued him with a spiritual appreciation of humanity that he would draw on later as an actor. "You see a lot of death and dying and the one thing you realize is that the cheapest commodity on the market is one human life." He won the Military Medal for bravery and was promoted from corporal to sergeant after he volunteered to set up a first aid centre under heavy mortar fire just north of Cassino in Italy. He never liked talking about his heroism, explaining that "you just do what needs to be done, you don't think about it."
When he returned to Toronto in 1946, he marched into Exhibition Stadium and was told that his parents were sitting in the section of the stands marked H. When he saw his mother for the first time in five years, she looked at him blankly across a morbid divide of devastating experience, and said nothing, not even his name. "It haunted me for a while," he admitted on Friday.
He realized he "had to get on with my life," so he enrolled at the University of Toronto's Trinity College, which gave him a high-school equivalency based on his war service. He performed at the Hart House theatre, and graduated with a bachelor of arts degree in 1949.
By then, he had already gained experience in summer repertory and a season with Canadian Repertory Theatre in Ottawa. He also directed Little Theatre groups throughout Ontario and adjudicated for the Western Ontario Drama League from 1948 to 1952. When he heard that Tom PATTERSON was launching the Stratford Festival in 1953, he said he had to look up the place on a map. Although he thought Mr. PATTERSON was "out of his cotton-picking mind," he signed on and spent most of the next decade serving an apprenticeship in supporting roles such as Sir Robert Brackenbury and Captain Blunt in Richard III and Minister of State in All's Well That Ends Well in the festival's inaugural season, and Froth in Measure for Measure, Hortensio in The Taming of the Shrew and Leader of the Chorus in Oedipus Rex the following year, when he became the first recipient of the Tyrone Guthrie Award.
He was not an overnight sensation, waiting until after he was 40 to land his first major role at Stratford - Prospero in The Tempest - in the festival's 10th season in 1962. The following year, he dazzled critics and audiences with his sexually ambivalent portrayal of Pandarus in Troilus and Cressida.
Although the stage was his mainstay, Mr. HUTT also appeared in film and on television, notably as a port-soaked Sir John A. Macdonald in the 1974 Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television production of Pierre Berton's The National Dream, a performance that earned him both a Genie and an Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists award. He also played the father in Robin Phillips's The Wars, based on the novel written by his friend, Timothy Findley. Mr. HUTT generally disliked the disjointed "bits and pieces" approach of filmmaking, complaining that it was antithetical to the process of developing a character and fleshing it out with other actors in the immediacy of a continuous theatrical performance. Nevertheless, he recently starred in six episodes of the television series Slings and Arrows, playing an aging actor performing Lear.
People were surprised when he was cast in the female role of Lady Bracknell in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest in 1975, but he made the character his own. He said he learned "stillness" from a comment by director Robin Phillips: "Lady Bracknell moves through a room without disturbing one speck of dust." Her towering feathered hat perched atop his 6-foot-2 frame made it awkward for him to move, and he resolved "never to move on stage, unless it improved on stillness." What he wanted to share with the audience was the fact that "thought conveys itself" through the stillness that precedes movement.
In 1979, he played the fool to Peter Ustinov's Lear, making way for the British actor's celebrity turn on the Stratford stage in a role that Mr. HUTT had already played twice. But it was Mr. HUTT's tragic death-haunted fool that drew the raves; according to backstage lore, Mr. Ustinov was "shaken" by his supporting actor's greatness, never thinking that "such an actor was here on this continent."
He had a dry spell at Stratford under John Hirsch, who was artistic director from 1981 to 1985, and only cast him in one role. He fared better under John Neville, but truly enjoyed a renaissance when Richard MONETTE became artistic director in 1994. By then, Mr. HUTT had become heavily involved in the Grand Theatre in nearby London, where Martha Henry was artistic director from 1988 to 1994, and had appeared at the rival Shaw Festival in Niagara-on-the-Lake in Man and Superman in 1989.
When Mr. HUTT received a Governor-General's Award for lifetime achievement in the performing arts in 1992, he couldn't accept in person because he was performing in A.R. Gurney's The Dining Room at the Grand. The following season, he had three major roles at Stratford: Falstaff in Shakespeare's The Merry Wives of Windsor, diplomat Harry Raymond in Timothy Findley's The Stillborn Lover (a play that Mr. Findley had written for Mr. HUTT and actress Martha Henry; Stratford reprised it in 1995 as a 75th birthday present for him), and James Tyrone in Eugene O'Neill's A Long Day's Journey Into Night.
About this time, people began asking when he would retire from the stage. He blamed himself for starting the rumour after he performed in The Tempest at Stratford in 1999 and said he wanted to take a year off. That same year, Canada Post issued a stamp celebrating the Stratford Festival with an image of its famous thrust stage superimposed with an ethereal depiction of Mr. HUTT as Prospero with his arms outstretched and a wistful expression on his face. The following year, the City of Stratford renamed the Waterloo Street bridge in his honour.
Instead of taking a final bow at Stratford, he added a new venue to his repertoire by agreeing to play the poet Spooner in Soulpepper's remounting of Harold Pinter's No Man Land in 2003, the first time he had been on a Toronto stage in nearly two decades. " HUTT's Spooner is a miracle of economy, delivering every ounce of the text with an efficiency that makes his performance almost terse in the play's first act," said Kate TAILOR/TAYLOR, then theatre critic for The Globe and Mail, before he "masterfully delivers Spooner's final proposal with an expansiveness that leaves one speculating about the desperation beneath and so closes the play."
The man who lured Mr. HUTT to Toronto was Soulpepper impresario Albert SCHULTZ. A member of the Young Company when Robin Phillips was artistic director at Stratford, Mr. SCHULTZ had played Edgar to Mr. HUTT's desolate monarch in the festival's 1989 production of King Lear. Mr. HUTT returned to Toronto and to Soulpepper in 2004 to play Vladimir in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot. During rehearsals, he told The Globe's Ian Brown that "most of my dark moments now centre around just how many more years I am going to be granted. When I turned 80, the heart specialist - because I have a bit of a heart problem - said, 'Well, after 80, it's a bit of a crapshoot, you know.' " By then, he had a bad back from an injury he incurred in the 1950s when, as a minor player in The Merry Wives of Windsor, he jumped into a laundry hamper and jolted his spine.
Although Mr. HUTT had officially retired from Stratford at the end of 2005 with his poignant and masterful performance as Prospero in The Tempest, leaving the audience with the final words, "Let your indulgence set me free," he agreed to come back for one role this year as a farewell gesture to artistic director Richard MONETTE, in Diana LeBlanc's production of Edward Albee's A Delicate Balance. In March, he underwent a series of tests and was diagnosed with anemia, which turned into acute leukemia. He withdrew from the play, offering "my most profound apologies for the problems and inconvenience I'm sure it will cause."
And then he prepared for what he said on Friday was his final project - death - of which he was determined to be the "project manager." With landscape gardener Matthew MacKAY, the man who shared his home since 1973, he chose a cemetery plot and decided on his epitaph: Soldier and Actor. After a stay in hospital, he returned to his home on the banks of the Avon in Stratford and visited with family and Friends, including Albert SCHULTZ. "Bill was extremely brave and generous in preparing those near to him for his final exit. And yet today it seems unthinkable that he is no longer among us," he said in a statement.
On Tuesday, Mr. HUTT decided it was time to go back to hospital. That same afternoon, Michael Therriault, who once played Ariel to Mr. HUTT's Prospero and is currently getting raves as Gollum in the English production of The Lord of the Rings, cancelled a performance to fly home to see him. Sadly, he arrived a few hours too late.
The three stages of William HUTT
His voice was commanding and polite when I requested an interview two weeks ago. "I will be happy to talk with you, but my days are short," he said. "I am looking on my demise as a project, and I am the project manager." We set a date for last Friday afternoon.
On a clear, sunny day I walked across the bridge named in his honour to his house on Waterloo Street in Stratford, where the white Cadillac, with WMHUTT on the licence plate, was parked in the driveway. I rang the doorbell and was ushered into the living room by his housemate, Matthew MacKAY. Wearing a loose, brown-patterned shirt over casual trousers and, with terribly swollen ankles showing above a pair of moccasins, Mr. HUTT sat in a wing chair beside a window. He was attached to a portable oxygen tank and did not rise to greet me -- yet another indication, from an unfailingly courteous man, that his strength was failing. His face had a waxy pallor and, as a reformed smoker after more than 60 years of cigarettes, he was often racked with coughing spells, but his conversation was thoughtful and engaging. Over the next 90 minutes, he talked frankly about his parents, the war and his introduction to death before he had had a chance to know much about life. He said there are three major changes: The first is adolescence, when things happen to your body and your mind. The second stage is when you are in your 20s and your parents become your Friends rather than authority figures (the war had interrupted that process for him and left him divided from his parents). The third stage, the one he was entering, is death and wondering what that will be like.
Mr. HUTT was well aware of his own capacities as an actor. "I will leave the word 'great' to history," he said, "but I do know that in some kind of way, my career as an actor has paralleled the growth of theatre in this country." He said he had always been very practical as an actor, and that his decision to stay home rather than to chase fame in London and New York came from an "arrogant pride" in Canada. "I had no intention of leaving this country until I was invited. I wasn't going to beg." And by doing so, he showed that it was possible to have both a stellar career here and illustrious offers to work elsewhere. Of artistic director Richard MONETTE, who built so much of the last 15 years at the festival around him, Mr. HUTT said: "He has prolonged my life and my career."
The only question he deflected was about his romantic life. He referred to his housemate Mr. MacKAY as "the backbone of my life," but insisted on keeping the nature of their relationship private. "He has his own life, he always has had. I know people would like to pigeonhole it, but it isn't a pigeonhole thing."
Sensing his fatigue, I said my goodbyes. After struggling to get up, he pulled my face down and kissed me on both cheeks, a farewell that only now I realize was permanent. Sandra MARTIN
William deWitt HUTT was born in Toronto on May 2, 1920. He died in hospital in Stratford, Ontario, on June 27, 2007, of acute leukemia. He was 87. A funeral is being planned for Saint_James Anglican Church in Stratford.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-07 published
Pioneer filmmaker turned hard-hitting social issues into popular television
He returned from naval duty in the Second World War to pioneer such shows as Wojeck, writes Sandra MARTIN, and to set standards for 'what an archetypal Canadian drama series ought to be'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
Forty years ago, when John Vernon as Wojeck and Gordon Pinsent as Quentin Jurgens, M.P., were upholding Canadian attributes of social justice on the country's black-and-white television sets, Ron WEYMAN was in his golden age at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television drama. A visual artist and a navy veteran who had seen H.M.S. Hood go down and landed at Omaha Beach in the D-Day invasion of Normandy, Mr. WEYMAN learned to make documentaries at the National Film Board and to shoot film on location by watching Italian directors Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini in action. That's the cultural baggage Mr. WEYMAN brought to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television in the mid-1950s. Within a decade, he had persuaded the corporation to shift from videotape to film and to send directors out of the studios and into the streets so that they could use real locations in home-grown stories that reflected contemporary social issues. And he had put Wojeck, a short-lived but stellar dramatic series, into the imaginations of viewers.
One early fan was Ivan Fecan, president and Chief Executive Officer of CTVglobemedia. Back in 1966, when Wojeck premiered, he was a 12-year-old boy. "In Wojeck, I saw performances and stories and images of Toronto in a way that I had never seen before and, frankly, rarely afterward. It made a huge impression on me," he said in a telephone interview this week. Of Mr. WEYMAN, he said, "I didn't know him well personally, but I was a huge fan of his work. He was the real deal, the real ground-breaker in Canadian drama, and I don't think he ever got enough credit for what he proved could be done."
A little more than 20 years later, when Mr. Fecan was program chief at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, he hauled six Wojeck episodes out of the vaults and put them back on the air. Mr. Fecan still thinks that Mr. WEYMAN's work sets the standard for "what an archetypal Canadian drama series ought to be today."
Ronald Charles Tosh WEYMAN was the third son of four children of Margaret (POTTS) and Joshua WEYMAN, a machinist. He was born in England in the middle of the First World War. The family immigrated to St. Catharines, Ontario, in 1923 because Mr. WEYMAN's older brother Charles had settled there. Within a few years, the WEYMANs had moved to the Danforth area of Toronto, where Ron attended Danforth and East York Collegiates. When the Depression hit and Ron had to leave school to help out financially, he took on a variety of jobs, including working as a tea taster.
As soon as he had some money in his pockets, he bought a small boat and taught himself to sail. He was also very interested in painting and acting and, with his younger sister (broadcaster and sculptor Rita Greer ALLEN,) became part of a local theatrical group that swirled around Dora Mavor Moore. Through these connections, Ron met University of Toronto undergraduates Alison (Ashy) Alford and her older sister Giovanna (Vanna), the daughters of John Alford, who was the founding chair of the university's fine arts department.
After the Second World War broke out in 1939, Mr. WEYMAN enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve. Despite his lack of formal education, he was in the first group of Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve recruits who were seconded to the Royal Navy for officer training. About the time that France was falling and Dunkirk was being evacuated, Sub-Lieutenant WEYMAN was qualifying as a specialist with anti-submarine detection equipment.
Among other ships, he was the only Canadian to serve on H.M.S. Achates as part of the escort-destroyer group attending on the battlecruiser Hood when she was sunk in 10 minutes by the German capital ship Bismarck with the loss of all but three hands during the Battle of the Denmark Strait on May 24, 1941.
After Achates hit a mine on the Murmansk run, with the loss of half its company, SLt. WEYMAN joined H.M.C.S. St. Croix on convoy escort duty in the North Atlantic during some of the most treacherous U-boat engagements of the war. He and Ashy were married in October, 1941, while he was home on leave. About 16 months later, when he was overseas again, she died in her sleep -- probably of an epileptic seizure.
As the balance finally shifted in the war, he was promoted to first lieutenant on a landing ship, tank (LST) and responsible for getting what he called a "floating radar palace" on Omaha Beach in June, 1944. Subsequently, he received a promotion to lieutenant commander and a new assignment: command of an LST bound for Southeast Asia, where he was to lead Indian troops onto the beaches of Malaya and Burma. Before he could see action, the Americans dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrendered. In describing his war service, he said he "was mined once, torpedoed once and got sunk a third time."
Life was not all battle stations. He had continued to paint on his various vessels and while on leave in London contributed some canvasses to an exhibition of Canadian War Art at The National Gallery in London. One of his paintings, U-Boat Attack, was purchased by The National Gallery in Ottawa. Another dozen works (five paintings and seven drawings) now belong to the Canadian War Museum.
After he was demobilized in Halifax, Mr. WEYMAN wanted to become a serious painter and headed to Ottawa to consult with a curator at The National Gallery. That same weekend, he encountered Sydney Newman of the fledgling National Film Board, who suggested he try film instead. By chance, Nick Reed had just come back from Greece with the film footage that would later be used in the film Out of the Ruins. He took Mr. WEYMAN on as an assistant, and when Mr. Reed returned to his home in South Carolina, he inherited the film. "I was hooked," he wrote later.
He was also becoming hooked on his sister-in-law, Vanna. Her husband, John TERRACE, a bomber pilot in the U.S. Army Air Force, had been shot down over Magdeburg, Germany, in 1944 and was missing in action for two years until his death was finally confirmed. She and Mr. WEYMAN became close because of their bereavements and their mutual interest in the visual arts. They married on June 28, 1947, and eventually had five children: Cindy, Jenny, John (Tiki), Peter (Bay) and James.
Mr. WEYMAN worked for the National Film Board from 1946 to 1953. He made more than 20 films, including After Prison, What?, which won the prize for best theatrical film at the Canadian Film Festival in 1951, and The Safety Supervisor, which earned a first award at the Venice Film Festival in 1952. After seven years, he quit to freelance in Italy, the ancestral home of many in his wife's family. While they were abroad, he wrote and filmed eight documentaries in Italy and the Middle East for the National Film Board and the United Nations, learning how to shoot film on location rather than in studio, a skill that he brought back to Canada and to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, where he began working in 1954 under Robert ALLEN, who was the head of television drama and the scriptwriter/accountant who had married Mr. WEYMAN's younger sister Rita.
His lasting contribution began in the 1962-63 season with his invention of The Serial, a program that presented Canadian novels on film and tape and employed Canadian actors, directors, writers and producers. It was on The Serial that Mr. WEYMAN produced dramatizations of Thomas Raddall's The Wings of the Night, Morley Callaghan's More Joy in Heaven and the pilots that would become Wojeck, Quentin Durgens, M.P. and Hatch's Mill, working with such directors as Paul Almond, David Gardner and later Daryl Duke.
Tell Them The Streets Are Dancing, based on the files of Doctor Morton Shulman, was written by Philip Hersch and starred John Vernon (obituary February 4, 2005), Bruno Gerussi and Patricia Collins. The plot pitted a crusading big-city coroner investigating the deaths of five Italian construction workers against their greedy bosses and corrupt government inspectors. Audiences loved it and Mr. WEYMAN quickly commissioned enough scripts from Mr. Hersch to run 10 episodes the next season, staring Mr. Vernon as Wojeck. As a model, Wojeck (which ran from 1966 to 1968) was the forerunner of NBC's Quincy, M.E., and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Da Vinci's Inquest.
The series, which used the WEYMANs' own home as the set for Wojeck's house, attracted 2,900,000 viewers with an overall audience enjoyment of 80 and climbed into the top 10 of most popular shows when sold to Britain. Another pilot, Mr. Member of Parliament, starring Gordon Pinsent as a naive and conscientious politician, and directed by Mr. Gardner, became the hit series Quentin Durgens, M.P.
Both programs brought hard-hitting contemporary social issues (abortion, suicide, abuse of power) into dramatic stories played out in locations that Canadians recognized as part of their own worlds. But none of it lasted, for the same reasons that have beleaguered so many other "golden ages" in Canada's cultural history: a lack of money, vision and commitment. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation couldn't commit to a third season of Wojeck or promise steady employment to the actors, directors and producers, so they all followed the jobs and the money to Los Angeles. Even Mr. WEYMAN toyed with moving to California.
In a brief to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation management in April, 1970, a frustrated Mr. WEYMAN complained that a vacuum existed between the policy planners and the drama producers that "threatens the future of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation drama" and "the survival of our community of talent." He insisted that "a given volume of production is essential on a continuing basis, if we hope to maintain a healthy climate in which talent can survive" and he outlined the various measures he thought should be taken, including training and letting people make mistakes in regional and local productions rather than on the network, where the new writer or new director "falls on his face in front of millions of people" while the public and the critics "quite properly" wonder "if we know what it is we are doing."
He continued to make drama at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in the 1970s with shows such as Corwin, The Manipulators, Welcome Stranger, The Albertans and a dramatization of Margaret Laurence's novel The Fire Dwellers, but nothing exceeded the audience rapport he had achieved a decade earlier with Wojeck. "The tragedy is that he got sidetracked," Mr. Fecan said. "He could have gone on to do so much more, but he never got the chance and consequently he didn't get the credit he deserved for what he did."
After he retired from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1980, Mr. WEYMAN turned back to painting and to writing screenplays and a new form: novels. He borrowed Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous fictional character Sherlock Holmes and created new adventures for him after his presumed death at the Reichenbach Falls in the Swiss Alps in The Adventure of the Final Problem. Instead of mouldering in his grave, the famous sleuth was flitting about Canada from 1891 to 1894 at the behest of Queen Victoria's son, the Prince of Wales and later Edward VII. At least that was the story Mr. WEYMAN spun in his trilogy, Sherlock Holmes and the Ultimate Disguise, Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Mark of the Beast and Sherlock Holmes Travels in the Canadian West. He also wrote In Love and War: A Memoir, a vivid account of his romantic and naval experiences in the Second World War. As well, he directed the occasional film, learned to play classical guitar and travelled.
About four years ago, Mr. WEYMAN suffered a stroke that left him paralyzed on one side and unable to speak or to feed himself. Late last month, sensing the end was near, his family took him to a farmhouse northwest of Toronto that he and Vanna had bought in 1964, the fount of so many happy family occasions. "Every time we left the farm, he would say, 'Goodbye, this place,' " she said in an interview this week. That's where he died, two days before they would have celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary.
Ronald Charles Tosh WEYMAN was born in Erdith, Kent, on December 13, 1915. He died near Flesherton, Ontario, on June 26, 2007. He was 91. He is survived by his wife Vanna, five children, 11 grandchildren, his sister Rita and extended family. A celebration of his life will be held tomorrow at the Arts and Letters Club, 14 Elm Street, Toronto.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-09 published
DUNCAN, Jessie McCRANEY (née MARTIN) B.H.Sc.
(September 24, 1908-July 6, 2007)
(Born in Milton, Ontario) Peacefully, at Champlain Manor, Orillia, on Friday, July 6, 2007, in her 99th year. Jessie DUNCAN of Orillia, formerly of Peterborough, beloved wife of the late John DUNCAN. Loving mother of John (Janet) of Bracebridge, Bruce (Kathleen) of Coldwater, Elizabeth (Eugene predeceased) COLLINGE of Rio Vista, California and Susan (Don) MURCHISON of Calgary. Also loved by her 6 grandchildren and 1 great-granddaughter. Jessie was predeceased by her son James, 4 brothers and 4 sisters. Cremation has taken place. A Memorial Service will be held at the Mundell Funeral Home 79 West Street, N., Orillia on Friday, July 27th at 11 o'clock. If desired, memorial donations to the Saint_Johns Anglican Church, Peterborough or Charity of one's choice wouldbe appreciated. Messages of condolence are welcomed at www.mundellfuneralhome.ca

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-11 published
LYONS, Renee - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Renee LYONS, late of the City of Toronto, who died October 27, 2006, must be in our hands by Friday, August 24, 2007, after which date the estate will be distributed.
Dated at Toronto, this 4th day of July, 2007
Ian ROTHMAN and William D. MARTIN
Estate Trustees
For the Estate of Renee LYONS
c/o William D. MARTIN
Barrister and Solicitor
1152 Yonge Street
Toronto, Ontario M4W 2L9
Page B11

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-14 published
MOORE, William Vining (May 14, 1925-July 11, 2007)
William Vining MOORE (Bill) passed away peacefully at the age of 82 on Wednesday July 11, 2007 at the Hill House Hospice in Richmond Hill. Bill will be dearly missed by his wife Maria his children Linda ARMSTRONG, Diane WHITE/WHYTE, Kevin BARRETT and Caroline GEENEN; his sons-in-law: Michael PURMORT (and his wife Pat,) Peter ARMSTRONG, Michael WHITE/WHYTE, Mark GEENEN; his daughter-in-law Kimberly BARRETT, as well as his 10 grandchildren: Jessica, Carly and Michelle PURMORT; Thomas, Amanda and Ryan ARMSTRONG; Stephen and Christopher WHITE/WHYTE; Lauren and Madeline GEENEN. He will also be missed by Jackie and Bill HOOD and their children Kaitlyn and Riley; as well as Barb MARTIN and Fred SCHWERING and their sons Carl, Robert and Fredrick. Bill is lovingly remembered by his sister Nancy MARINELLI (Luigi) and his nieces Lucia and Madeline. He was predeceased by his brother Peter (Phyllis) and his daughter Sharon PURMORT. Bill was born in Oshawa, the son of Albert Lauder and Jean (MacEWEN) MOORE. He served his country in the Royal Canadian Air Force from 1943 to 1946. Upon leaving the service he enrolled in Queen's University and graduated with a Bachelor's degree in Commerce in 1951. Bill soon took a sales position with International Business Machines Corporation Canada and was appointed President in 1969. After leaving International Business Machines Corporation in 1972, he pursued other business ventures in information technology. Larger than life, Bill was a charming, outgoing, funny, optimistic and encouraging man. Every cloud he saw had a silver lining and he was quick to support his Friends and family. Extremely intelligent and a brilliant card player, he attained the status of Life Master in contract bridge. He was an avid golfer and downhill skier and continued pursuing both sports long after most people hang up their gear. Bill kept his sense of humour, charm and gratitude throughout his illnesses. There will be a visitation on Saturday July 21st from 4: 00 p.m. until 7: 00 p.m. at Fawcett Funeral Home, 82 Pine Street, Collingwood, Ontario. A church service will be held at Emmanuel Presbyterian Church in Clearview Township on Sunday July 22nd at 2: 00 p.m. and a reception will follow immediately at the Blue Mountain Golf and Country Club in Collingwood. In his final days, Bill received compassionate and loving care at the Hill House Hospice in Richmond Hill. The family requests that contributions be made in Bill's memory to Hill House Hospice, 36 Wright Street, Richmond Hill, Ontario, L4C 4A1. For more information contact the Fawcett Funeral Homes at (705) 445-2651. The family invite Friends and relatives to sign the online guest by visiting www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-16 published
McKEE, Joy
Peacefully at her home in Guelph on July 14, 2007, in her 89th year, surrounded by her clan. Predeceased by her husband Bill and Sister Melody MARTIN, Joy is survived by her sister Daphne KIRKWOOD, son Jon and his wife Barbara, and her granddaughter Maeve. Joy will be greatly missed by Eric and Betty BOYDEN, Mance and Frongia families, and by the many others whose hearts she touched. We wish to thank all the patient, loving caregivers who helped to ease her passing. According to her wishes cremation has taken place. A celebration of Joy's life will be held in Guelph in September. Donations in her memory to the charity of your choice would be much appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-17 published
She was a 'marvellous example of commitment to the public good'
Even as a teenager growing up in Montreal, she possessed a hatred of intolerance, writes Sandra MARTIN. It was a theme that later wove through the many disparate parts of a hugely complicated life to embrace politics, the arts, health care, social justice and human rights
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
Blunt, buoyant and bountiful, she was always known as Bluma. A dogged fundraiser and networker, she had a flinty sensor for injustice and intolerance, a lifelong love of the arts and a passion for fixing things, people and the world.
Irreverent and possessed of a wicked sense of humour, she loved to say that her husband, Bram APPEL, made the money and she spent it. A friend once said the Appels were involved with everything but racehorses; Ms. APPEL shot back: "Bram says you can lose more on plays." On their 25th wedding anniversary, Mr. APPEL gave his wife a spectacular ring, but she, with his permission, took it back to the jeweller and spent the money on a play, instead. "He's lucky I didn't ask for extra money," she joked.
"She wanted to help society, but I can tell you this," Ms. APPEL's elder son, David, said yesterday. "If she had gone into business, anybody who backed her would have made a fortune. She knew everybody and she could get into any door, but she used all of that for philanthropy or to support interesting cultural causes."
A non-conformist, Ms. APPEL "created spaces and places for herself where she didn't have to compete with others," said long-time friend and colleague Patrice Marin Best. "But I also believe she was gifted with a kind of foresight or intuition. Because she was curious and she read very widely, she was always picking up snippets of things and thinking about how they fit together."
"She was very effective," former federal politician Marc Lalonde said yesterday, commenting on the breadth of the causes and issues she supported. "She could not see a problem and remain indifferent to it. She was a marvellous example of commitment to the public good."
Her father, Jack LEVITT, came from Vilna, Lithuania, and her mother, Dora, from Kovna, Russia, probably around 1905 as Jewish emigration from czarist Russia surged because of wide-scale repression and fear of pogroms. Her father, who made a living initially selling photographs on Montreal street corners, went into the textile business and eventually formed a prosperous company called Town Hall Clothes. The youngest of four children, Bluma (which means flower in Yiddish) grew up in a hard-working, socially conscious environment in Outremont.
She learned French at a young age (and later mastered Spanish and Italian), and was Friends with a young Pierre Trudeau. She was also involved in the same little theatre group as Herbert Whittaker, the late theatre critic of The Globe and Mail.
She went to high school in Montreal but never attended university. In a speech to the Canadian Club in April, she said she had refused to take the entrance examinations for McGill University in 1936 because, "being Jewish, I needed straight A-plus to qualify." Since B-minus was good enough for anyone else, this struck her as unfair. So, even as a teenager, she possessed a hatred of intolerance, a theme that wove through the many disparate parts of a hugely complicated life that embraced politics, the arts, health care, social justice and international human rights.
In 1937, she was introduced to a young chartered accountant named Bram APPEL at a hotel in the Laurentians, north of Montreal. He had a canny head for numbers and a good eye for investment opportunities. Because he had trouble finding a job, he started his own company, then helped to found a high-tech firm based on the clean filtration systems invented by scientist David Pall, a friend from his student days at McGill.
The APPELs married on July 11, 1940, and had two sons, David (1941) and Mark (1944.) As a young wife and mother, Ms. APPEL made a career out of volunteering. "I learned early on you enter every door open to you," she said in her Canadian Club speech. "A locked door particularly intrigued me and I never gave up looking for the key."
Growing up, said David, "our home was filled with laughter and intense discussion." He described his mother as a dynamo. "The passport into our home had nothing to do with your station, but whether you were interesting and what you brought of yourself. It was an incredibly febrile and exciting environment. You take it for granted, but, in retrospect, you see the extent to which our mother and father enriched our lives."
Although she was drawn to the creative process, her prodigious energies and talents did not reside in the making of art. She said that, after six months of piano lessons when she was 6, her teacher begged her not to come back; at 13, she joined an after-school painting class but all her attempts at figurative work turned into abstracts. As for acting, "I couldn't even get a part in a mob scene." For a time, she tried identifying and supporting the creation of various art forms by becoming part-owner of Waddington's art gallery in Montreal in 1957 and producing plays in the 1960s in New York City, including a short-lived off-Broadway production of Jean Genet's The Maids and Olympia Dukakis's first play, The Opening of a Window.
Her real talent lay in fundraising. There are four crucial steps, she liked to explain. "First, you decide on your victims." And then you stalk, encircle and entrap them. In a typical campaign, she would begin by appealing to her "victim's" better nature and, if that didn't work, would quickly switch to "fear, greed and guilt."
When she was on the prowl, she never limited herself to one project at a time. In 1955, she was in Geneva to help her husband run the booth for Pall Corp. Filtration, which was exhibiting at a commercial venue, and dropped in at the first Atoms for Peace Conference in an adjoining building. There, she just happened to meet physicists and Nobel Prize winners Isadore Rabi and Sir John Cockroft, who, among other eminent scientists, had gathered to try to chain nuclear power for peaceful purposes.
In the mid-1960s, the APPELs moved from Montreal to Ottawa (although they always kept a home in their native city) so Mr. APPEL could take a position as executive assistant to Jean-Luc Pépin when he was the minister of energy, mines and resources in Lester Pearson's last Liberal government. During their Ottawa years - the APPELs moved to Toronto in 1979 - she worked for secretary of state Gérard Pelletier at $1 a year.
That connection led her, in 1970, to Marc Lalonde, then principal secretary to Mr. Trudeau. After granting her a 15-minute interview, she showed up in her mink coat and hat and pleaded her case to have the prime minister attend a dinner to launch the American Friends of Canada, an organization that persuaded wealthy Americans to give works of art to Canadian museums in return for a tax credit. She had inveigled David Rockefeller, Henry Ford and Armand Hammer to sit on her board. Ms. APPEL ran overtime and Mr. Lalonde showed her the door. "I was probably the first one to ever kick her out of an office," he said yesterday. Seeing how flummoxed she was, Mr. Lalonde organized another meeting and they became fast Friends.
In 1972, Mr. Lalonde ran for office and became secretary of state for the status of women and quickly appointed her as his personal representative at the usual fee of $1 a year. Her big push was to have women on the boards of directors of the major banks. She would walk in with her mink coat and hat and would argue with bank presidents, Mr. Lalonde said yesterday. "She could give better than she could receive… Lo and behold, slowly, the banks started appointing women and, a few years later, it became a point of honour for them to appoint women."
In 1979, Ms. APPEL ran unsuccessfully for the Liberals in the federal election. She then moved to Toronto with her husband and took on the rest of the country. Always one to sense an issue that was about to develop into a crisis, Ms. APPEL became deeply involved in the community of activists that banded together in the 1980s to found the Canadian Foundation for AIDS Research.
Her lifelong love of music and the theatre prompted her to invest heavily in terms of time, energy and money in the Toronto theatre scene. She was a big supporter of the St. Lawrence Centre for the Arts, which named one of its theatres in her honour in March of 1983 after she made a donation to help renovate the 876-seat theatre. She was also a significant force behind Opera Atelier. In June of 2005, the Toronto Alliance for the Performing Arts gave Ms. APPEL an honorary Dora Mavor Moore Award "for her exceptional and lifelong dedication" to the performing arts in Canada.
About two years ago, she began to feel unwell. But, with her characteristic verve, she carried on as though nothing were bothering her. In June of 2006, Ms. APPEL, the woman who had never attended university, was given an honorary degree by the University of Toronto. The severe acute respiratory syndrome epidemic in Toronto in 2003 had focused Ms. APPEL's attention on nurses and their vulnerability in caring for infectious patients, so she donated $350,000 to help the Faculty of Nursing establish a Clinical Simulation Learning centre within the new Health Sciences Building at the U of T's St. George campus.
When she was named Canadian of the Year at a luncheon at the Canadian Club on April 30, she appeared with a neck brace and spoke with a raspy voice. Although she was never a smoker, she was diagnosed with lung cancer in May. Ms. APPEL took the opportunity of the Canadian Club award to speak out against Islamist extremism and to plead for open dialogue among Arab, Jewish and Muslim communities. "Let us return to a time when tolerance was not shrouded in silence born of great fear, but of loud and raucous debate, born of great hope."
Last month, she was given an honorary degree by Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario Here's the advice she gave the graduates in her convocation address: "Stay curious. Don't make the same mistake twice, life is rough - it is a battle for turf - so learn by observation - take notes - write memos. Listen to opinions but not to the opinionated. Do not tolerate intolerance. Cherish the environment. Keep an open mind and stick to your principles. And dream big dreams!" In closing, she told the students that "the two most important issues we face are the deterioration of the environment, and the increase in the number of extreme fundamentalist groups."
Clearly, she was gearing up for another campaign, but, this time, her seemingly impervious energy was felled by illness. About 10 days ago, she was admitted to hospital. That's where she celebrated her 67th wedding anniversary, on July 11. Her husband swept into the room with a bouquet of yellow roses, then sat by her bedside holding her hand.
Bluma APPEL's birth certificate says she was born in Montreal on September 4, 1919, but she always claimed 1920 as her date of birth. She died of lung cancer in Princess Margaret Hospital on July 14, 2007. She was either 86 or 87. She is survived by her husband, Bram, two sons, five grandchildren, her sister Goldie EPSTEIN of Montreal and her extended family. The funeral is today at 1 p.m. at Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel in Toronto.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-18 published
LYONS, Renee - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Renee LYONS, late of the City of Toronto, who died October 27, 2006, must be in our hands by Friday, August 24, 2007, after which date the estate will be distributed.
Dated at Toronto, this 4th day of July, 2007
Ian ROTHMAN and William D. MARTIN
Estate Trustees
For the Estate of Renee LYONS
c/o William D. MARTIN
Barrister and Solicitor
1152 Yonge Street
Toronto, Ontario M4W 2L9
Page B11

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-21 published
GUALTIERI, Mark Nixon (1963-2007)
We are devastated by the loss of our cherished son Mark, dearly loved only son of (Prof. Antonio) Nino and Peggy GUALTIERI and beloved brother of Julia (Maher), Joanna (Serge) and Sarah (Maria Elena). Mark died peacefully on the deck of his cabin, under the stars and pine boughs at our Aylen Lake cottage, Mark's spiritual home, on Thursday, July 19. We remember him as a fearless and curious little boy and as a man tender toward others, especially in his love for his nephews, Nicola, Zacharie, and Sebastien. We will hold in our hearts forever the memories of a happy and helpful nine year old in our drive across Africa to India in 1972-73, and of a young man proud and protective of his sisters. We are thankful for his gifts of caring kindness, winsome humour, his marvellous Thai meals, and for the happiness he found in adventuring from Newfoundland to the Rockies and in Southeast Asia. He flourished in his occupation as a renovator/landlord. Mark will be remembered by his companion, Lisa MARTIN and her daughter Riza. He supported a child through World Vision which we will continue. Gathering of remembrance will follow: contact Karen Ann Reid 613 791-3834. Instead of flowers, donations in Mark's memory to the Connaught Public School Y After School program would be greatly appreciated (Connaught Public School, 1149 Gladstone Ave, Ottawa, K1Y 3H7 - indicate 'in Mark GUALTIERI's memory'.)

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-25 published
LYONS, Renee - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Renee LYONS, late of the City of Toronto, who died October 27, 2006, must be in our hands by Friday, August 24, 2007, after which date the estate will be distributed.
Dated at Toronto, this 4th day of July, 2007
Ian ROTHMAN and William D. MARTIN
Estate Trustees
For the Estate of Renee LYONS
c/o William D. MARTIN
Barrister and Solicitor
1152 Yonge Street
Toronto, Ontario M4W 2L9
Page B9

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-27 published
Numerous tips lead to arrest in Ontario killing
Man considered a missing person until two fishermen found his body
By Unnati GANDHI, Page A7
The mysterious disappearance of a man named Jeffrey MASON last year had nearly everyone in a Northern Ontario town talking. The 37-year-old welder's home and car had been found burned and gutted - his loyal dog's remains inside - and, for months, there hadn't been a trace of Mr. MASON anywhere.
But the mystery is no more: The body of Mr. MASON, from Dowling, Ontario, near Sudbury, was discovered in a nearby river last month, and this week an arrest was made in his death.
Two couples fishing on the Vermillion River on June 7, just kilometres from Mr. MASON's home, caught sight of something that had floated up from the 120-foot-deep river.
"Two of the people went out and retrieved what was floating and it was actually Jeffrey," said Sudbury police Staff Sergeant Sheilah WEBER, adding that Mr. MASON was found fully clothed, with a light-coloured cloth wrapped around him. He had died of blunt-force trauma.
Then on Wednesday, Sudbury resident Nicholas Aaron MARTIN, 18, was charged with first-degree murder in Mr. MASON's death. Mr. MARTIN appeared in court yesterday and has been remanded into custody until Tuesday.
Local police initially treated the investigation, which The Globe and Mail reported on in February, as a missing-person case. But with each passing day they were further convinced it was much more than that. His family always maintained that he was murdered, and that the killer burned away the slightest bit of evidence.
Staff Sgt. WEBER said Ontario Provincial Police divers had twice searched the river, once in the days immediately after Mr. MASON's disappearance, and once in the early spring after the temperature had risen, but could never make it deeper than 90 feet.
After the discovery of his body, the case became a homicide investigation.
Four investigators worked on the file full-time. Witnesses: began to come forward, forensic evidence - including a blanket that belonged to Mr. MASON that was found near the river - was analyzed, and tips were followed up, she said.
"Basically, everybody had a piece of the puzzle and now we've been able to put that puzzle together," Staff Sgt. WEBER said.
Police confirmed that at the time of his arrest, Mr. MARTIN was already in jail awaiting a trial for attempted murder in an unrelated incident from last November, when he had allegedly slashed another person's neck with a knife during a house party in the Sudbury area.
Mr. MASON's eldest brother, John, confirmed yesterday that Jeffrey and the accused weren't strangers. "He was known to him, but he wasn't an acquaintance," he said. "I certainly don't believe [his death] was random."
The discovery of Jeffrey's body and the news of an arrest, he said, brings an uncomfortable sense of relief to his tight-knit family - three siblings and a widowed mother.
Mr. MASON had moved back to the family farm in 2003 from Calgary to take care of his mother after his father died of a stroke. He never went a day without getting in touch with her or his siblings.
"It was just so unbelievably surreal. We always felt that something disastrous had happened to him. He could not, because we believed he would not, stay away from us for so long."
Despite the arrest, the elder Mr. MASON says there will never be closure with the family, not even with a conviction, because he never got to say goodbye to his baby brother.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-28 published
MARTIN, Brenda (RAINEY)
At home, quietly, with her family at her side on Thursday July 26, 2007; Brenda Dianne RAINEY of Paris and formerly of Toronto, in her 54th year; beloved mother of Andrew (Casey) of Paris and Carolyn (Paul) of Windsor; cherished grandmother of Lily; special aunt of Kate; best friend and sister of Bonni McCHESNEY of Paris also missed by brother Brian, Diane and Courtney RAINEY of London and her travelling partner Ruth PENGELLY. Brenda was a graduate of Trinity College, University of Toronto and spent 30 years in the Etobicoke and Toronto School Boards teaching elementary school French and Computers. She was an inspiration to all she taught. Brenda was a world traveller, lifelong environmentalist and a lover of the arts. Friends may call at the Wm. Kipp Funeral Home, 184 Grand River St. N. Paris, on Monday 2: 30-4:30 p.m. for memorial visitation. A memorial service will be held in the funeral home chapel on Tuesday at 1: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations in Brenda's memory may be made to Grand River Conservation Authority. Online condolences or donations may be arranged through www.wmkippfuneralhome.com or by contacting Wm. Kipp 519-442-3061.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-08 published
STEINHOFF, Patricia (née EADIE)
Dearly beloved daughter of Ken and Shura EADIE. Dear wife of Bob. Loved sister of Sandra, Christie, Bob and Tom. Adored mother of Robert, Thomas and Brian and dear niece of Diana and Ian MARTIN of Montreal and Frank and Marion EADIE of Ottawa. In a diving accident in Bermuda, August 6, 2007.
The sweetest ray of sunshine that ever came our way.
And remembering our Pattie still can chase the clouds away.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-18 published
'Brilliant alchemist' inspired Toronto and its artists
Conductor's determination transformed the Canadian Opera Company - and made its new home a reality, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
Everything about Richard BRADSHAW was big: his personality, his intellect, his appetite for ideas and experience, his ambition, his optimism, his heart and his faith in God. He lived in Toronto for fewer than 20 years, but his impact was huge. His vision and determination built the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, one of the world's very best theatres for ballet and opera, both acoustically and architecturally. He transformed a regional opera company into an internationally recognized one; he gave us our first full production of Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle he pushed the artistic boundaries of who should direct and perform opera. He made opera the hottest ticket in town.
Tall, grey-haired and bold, with florid cheeks and eyes encased in black Buddy Holly glasses, Mr. BRADSHAW was both an artist who could inspire his musicians and an entrepreneur who could sell his vision. Asked in an interview which came first during what he liked to call "the 30 years war," making music or building an opera house, he replied: "In the middle of the night, I worry about money. When I get up in the morning, I look forward to conducting."
Writer Margaret Atwood captured that dual capacity in an e-mail message from Scandinavia. "Richard BRADSHAW was one of a kind. He was passionate about the work itself - whatever it might be - and set the highest standards for it. But he was playful and innovative as well, and a joy to work with. We saw the premiere of The Handmaid's Tale in Denmark together - and I could just hear him thinking about how he would do it if he could get it to Toronto - which he did, triumphantly. His specialty was making silk purses out of the sow's ears handed to him time and time again by our mingy politicians. Nobody could make two cents stretch as far as he could.... The best tribute to him will be to try to match his commitment to excellence, and his grand vision of what we can be - as opposed to what we sometimes all too drearily are."
Richard James BRADSHAW was born in Rugby in the British Midlands, the only child of Alfred James BRADSHAW, an accountant, and his wife, Florence Mary (DUNKLEY.) When Richard was quite small, the family moved to Higham Ferrers in Northamptonshire. From his father, an amateur musician and a dedicated rereader of Charles Dickens, he inherited a love of literature. His mother passed on her acutely sensitive ear - he once scored 100 per cent in an aural exam.
When Richard was 8, his parents took him to a piano performance of Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro, and it stuck as his earliest musical memory. As a boy, he was also learning to play the piano and the organ. By the time he was 12, he had a paying job playing the organ at the local church. Two years later, he took at least symbolic steps toward his career goal when he conducted a rehearsal of Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony with the Kettering Orchestral Society. But music was not his entire life. He loved sports, especially cricket and rugby, and collected stamps and indulged in the peculiarly British pastime of trainspotting.
To please his accountant father, who wanted him to have a broad educational background, he studied English literature at the University of London, graduating with an honours degree in 1968. At the same time, he was continuing his musical education, playing the harpsichord, organ and even the flute and studying conducting privately with Sir Adrian Boult.
After university, he returned home and founded Music at Higham, serving as its musical director for four years. Then, with his entrepreneurial juices flowing, he moved back to the capital and founded the New London Ensemble and conducted the Saltarello Choir from 1972 to 1975. He said later (in a Toronto Life profile) that these years were "among the most wonderful" in his life because there was government money for the arts, and he felt, with the confidence of youth, that he "could do anything."
What he needed, though, was a boost so that he could work with a major orchestra. That came in the usual way: a combination of luck, talent and chutzpah. A musician friend's father heard him and introduced him to conductor Sir Colin Davis, who was intrigued enough to attend one of Mr. BRADSHAW's rare London concerts. Sir Colin then called the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, which had already declined to hear Mr. BRADSHAW conduct, and secured him an audition. Mr. BRADSHAW won a fellowship to work with the prestigious orchestra and went on to Glyndebourne in 1975 as the chorus director of its opera festival. That was where he made another fortuitous connection, with administrator Diana HEPBURNE- SCOTT. They were married on June 30, 1977. In many ways, she was Mr. BRADSHAW's antithesis - shy, intensely private - but also his steadying counterbalance - ironic, stalwart, commonsensical. It was an extremely rare rehearsal or performance that didn't find her quietly sitting in the audience, listening and watching intently.
That same year, he was invited to join the San Francisco Opera as resident conductor, a position he held for the next dozen years, mostly under Kurt Herbert Adler as general director. Mr. Adler, a Teutonic maestro who controlled every aspect of the company, from costumes and sets to maintenance budgets, was a grandiose influence on Mr. BRADSHAW. While working at San Francisco Opera, Mr. BRADSHAW often accepted appointments as a guest conductor, which is how he first came to the Canadian Opera Company in Toronto in 1988, to conduct Tosca.
In 1989, he was hired as the Canadian Opera Company's chief conductor and head of music, arriving just in time to see the elaborate plans to build a ballet and opera house in midtown Toronto jettisoned by the provincial government because of cost overruns and fundraising shortfalls. He was promoted to artistic director in 1994 after the abrupt and choleric departure of Brian DICKIE, the man who had hired him four years earlier, and was named general director in January, 1998, making him the first musician to lead the Canadian Opera Company since Ettore Mazzoleni in the late 1950s.
He conducted more than 60 operas during his tenure with the Canadian Opera Company and kept up a steady off-season life travelling around the world as a guest conductor. While he was criticized for not putting more Canadian operas on the stage - he refused to compromise his musical standards to nationalist fervour - he did commission at least two homegrown operas, The Golden Ass and The Scarlet Princess. Meanwhile, he continued the composer-in-residence program established by predecessor Lotfi Mansouri and spiced up the lineup of crowd-pleasing operas such as Carmen, The Barber of Seville and Rigoletto with edgier modern offerings, including Bluebeard's Castle, Salome and Jenufa. He also persuaded talented and innovative directors from film and theatre to work in opera.
Mr. BRADSHAW was "so passionate" about such provocative and novel approaches to presenting both new and classical work, according to film director Atom Egoyan. After seeing Mr. Egoyan's Exotica, Mr. BRADSHAW approached him about directing Salome.
"He was a brilliant alchemist who was able to put together designers and directors and singers. That was his craft," Mr. Egoyan said yesterday between preproduction meetings for his next film, Adoration. "And then he was able to respond to the production and colour the orchestra to accommodate the vision he is seeing on the stage. He was the glue that put it all together."
Salome and François Girard's production of Oedipus Rex with Symphony of Psalms (which won eight Dora Mavor Moore awards in 1997) attracted younger audiences, and Mr. BRADSHAW's decision to take productions such as Robert Lepage's double bill of Bela Bartok's Bluebeard's Castle and Arnold Schoenberg's Erwartung to the prestigious Edinburgh Festival won the company international acclaim that resounded in the box office back home. He would return to these directors when he undertook his audacious scheme to present a full Ring Cycle -- all 17 hours of it -- in 2006 to coincide with the opening of the opera house.
Journalist Barbara Amiel, a devotee of Wagner, has seen the Ring Cycle in Bayreuth, Munich, London and Berlin, among other places. "Musically, BRADSHAW's Toronto Ring matched any of them and in places, exceeded some," she said in an e-mail message this week.
"To do this with any orchestra would be magnificent. To do this with a Canadian orchestra that essentially had to learn a new language is a miracle," she said. "He sweated musicality and that orchestra he loved mopped it up. All the young musicians he laboured over and encouraged (they look like none of them have seen the other side of 30) are as much his monument as the bricks and glass of his opera house."
And it very definitely was his opera house. Architect Jack DIAMOND has been widely praised for designing an auditorium that has glorious acoustics and ambience and a building that embraces audiences and the city, but it was Mr. BRADSHAW's vision and grit that made it happen.
"What was extraordinary about Richard was his relentless optimism," said Kevin Garland, former executive director of the Canadian Opera House Corp. and now executive director of the National Ballet of Canada. "He never gave up and never stopped being determined that it would happen and never stopped badgering governments to make sure that they knew it was important to support the arts."
Richard James BRADSHAW was born in Rugby, England, on April 16, 1944. He died in Toronto of a heart attack on August 15, 2007. He was 63. He is survived by his wife, Diana, two children and extended family.
A day in the life
There must have been times when Richard BRADSHAW was in resting mode, but they aren't on record. In 2003, I shadowed him for a day that began before 9 a.m. with a planning meeting for the Ring Cycle, followed by a press conference to announce the new season, a lunchtime lecture at which he twisted a few fundraising arms, a Bay Street meeting with architect Jack Diamond before the Canadian Opera Company board's building committee, a quick trip home for dinner, during which he snatched time to play Bach's Goldberg Variations on the piano before heading to the Hummingbird Centre to oversea a rehearsal of A Masked Ball that lasted until almost midnight, when he headed home for a stack of paperwork and a large Scotch before climbing into bed. The next day, he was at it again, except he also conducted the orchestra at the dress rehearsal of Jenufa.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-20 published
MARTIN, Ella May
Peacefully at home on Sunday, August 19, 2007. Beloved wife of the late Armien John. Lovingly remembered by her children, their spouses and families, Ashton A. MARTIN, Malcolm H. MARTIN, Debby MORTON and Daphne P. RICHARDSON, nine grandchildren and three great-grandchildren Samantha, Nathan and Cierra. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Yorke Chapel", 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway from 2-4, 7-9 p.m. Tuesday. A private service for family and immediate Friends to follow. In lieu of flowers, remembrances made to Canadian Cancer Charity.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-30 published
Gifted keyboard artist, arranger and composer 'could play everything'
Known as Doctor Music, he was music director of shows for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and CTV, and backed up Ray Charles and scores of other performers, writes Sandra MARTIN. He also fronted his own 16-piece band
By Sandra MARTIN with a report from Canadian Press, Page S9
Composer, pianist and record producer Doug RILEY was a classically trained musician and a prolific jingle composer who had a major influence on the sound of popular Canadian music beginning in the 1970s. Best known by his nickname, Doctor Music, he worked with many jazz and pop artists and was the leader of a 16-piece vocal and instrumental ensemble. He produced and performed with Ray Charles, David Clayton-Thomas, Bob Seger, Ringo Starr, Gordon Lightfoot, Anne Murray, Moe Koffman and many others.
Mr. Clayton-Thomas, former lead singer of Blood, Sweat and Tears, described Mr. RILEY as a close friend and a brilliant technician who "could play everything from Tchaikovsky to Thelonious Monk and then could get down and rock 'n' roll and play the blues, too. He's irreplaceable. There's only one Doc RILEY."
Canadian keyboardist Paul Shaffer, musical director of the Late Show with David Letterman, said Mr. RILEY was a big influence on his playing after they met in Toronto in 1968 during auditions for the musical Hair. They were both accompanying would-be performers on piano. "He really was an inspiration for those of us thinking about going into music ourselves."
Doug RILEY grew up in Toronto as the middle of three children of businessman Norman RILEY and his wife Lillian (MARSHALL) RILEY. When he was 2, he contracted polio, which meant he couldn't walk until he underwent a revolutionary operation at the Hospital for Sick Children when he was 9. (He walked with a limp for the rest of his life.) Born with perfect pitch, he seemed to have emerged from the womb playing the piano, an instrument he began studying when he was 3. By 5, he was taking lessons at the Royal Conservatory of Music, eventually studying pipe organ with Harry Duckworth at Saint Anne de Belleville Church near Montreal, and piano with Paul DeMarky, Oscar Peterson's piano teacher. At 6, he discovered jazz by listening to records - mostly his father's collection of stride and piano boogie 78s that featured such players as Meade Lux Lewis, Albert Ammons, James P. Johnson and Fats Waller.
As a teenager, he played rhythm and blues with a group called The Silhouettes at the Toronto nightclub the Blue Note. He attended the University of Toronto, graduating with a bachelor of music degree in 1965, after having studied composition with John Weinzweig and ethnomusicology with Mieczyslaw Kolinski. Later, he did postgraduate work with Prof. Kolinski on the music of the Iroquois.
Even while at university, he was a prolific composer of jingles, working with Mort Ross, Tommy Ambrose and Larry Trudel (through Trudel Productions). By the early 1990s, he had composed more than 2,000 catchy commercial tunes.
Drummer Bob MacLaren played in a jazz group led by Mr. RILEY and worked steadily with him recording jingles in the 1970s and 1980s, including a campaign for Labatt Blue and Carlsberg. "He would go to the production meeting one day and write the music that night, and the next morning we would record it and the singers would come in and the voice over would be done by the afternoon." The next day, they would repeat the process. "He was a workhorse," said Mr. MacLaren.
"He had an ear for the commercial, but he was also a writer and a player and a bandleader. He had all these things going at the same time and he had respect from the commercial community that was hiring him and respect from the musicians," he said. "Once he was on the bandstand and the music started, he was 100-per-cent player. He loved playing and that's why he never retired."
In one of Mr. RILEY's earliest recordings, he was the arranger and second keyboard player for Ray Charles's album, Doing His Thing. "Ray Charles was my first influence outside of boogie-woogie and stride pianists like Albert Ammons and Fats Waller," he told the Toronto Star last year. "I was enthralled by his jazz, blues and gospel music, and really his roots and my roots were the same. It was the biggest break of my life when I played organ and piano and arranged his 1969 album Doing His Thing."
Mr. Charles asked Mr. RILEY, who was 22 at the time, to join his band, but after a lot of soul-searching, he decided to stay in Toronto and write music.
He found steady work as a studio musician in television working as an arranger and pianist for The Ray Stevens Show from 1969 to 1970 and Rolling on the River from 1970 to 1972, both of which aired on CTV. He also served as music director for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Music Machine from 1973 to 1974 and Tommy Ambrose's Celebration from 1975 to 1976 and The Wolfman Jack Show the following year. He went back to CTV in 1981 to work for a season on Ronnie Hawkins's Honky Tonk and also did specials with Anne Murray, Lou Rawls and others.
As a player, he performed as a sideman for jazz and pop artists, including Tommy Ambrose, Dianne Brooks, Mr. Clayton-Thomas, Dan Hill, Klaatu, Mr. Koffman, Mr. Lightfoot, Bob McBride, Kathryn Moses, Ms. Murray, Walter Rossi, Sweet Blindness, Sylvia Tyson, the Brecker Brothers and Mr. Seger.
He also formed his own group, Doctor Music, a 16-piece vocal and instrumental ensemble. The band made three albums between 1972 and 1974: Doctor Music, Doctor Music II, and Bedtime Story. The last consisted largely of jazz compositions by Mr. RILEY and band members Claude Ranger and Don Thompson. His most popular singles were One More Mountain to Climb (1971), Sun Goes By (1972), and Long Time Comin' Home (1972), all of which were included on the compilation Retrospective (GRT). The group disbanded in 1997, soon after recording a fourth album.
In the 1990s, he began focusing on live performances and formed a quartet with saxophonist Phil Dwyer in 1993. Late in 1998, he and his second wife, Jan, bought a restored farmhouse near souris, Prince Edward Island, and settled there permanently in 2005. Walking on the beach near his farmhouse, he began to hear and feel the beginnings of what would become the Prince Edward Island Suite for Symphony and Jazz. The piece had its premiere at the Isabel Bader Theatre in Toronto and has since been known to evoke such emotion in Island audiences that tears begin to flow.
"His concerts had been a highlight of the season for the last several years," said University of Toronto historian Michael BLISS, who spends summers on Prince Edward Island and is a patron of the Indian River Festival. "He was just a wonderful pianist&hellip there have been concerts where Doug was simply the accompanist and done a much better job than the featured performer."
Prof. BLISS said the Island was very proud of Mr. RILEY. "He had an immediate and big impact on the musical scene here."
Mr. Clayton-Thomas considered Mr. RILEY his closest musical collaborator and friend. "Canada just lost a musical giant," he told Canadian Press in a telephone interview from Montreal on Tuesday, his voice shaking with emotion. "I can't imagine my life without him," he said. "I loved him beyond what I could tell you."
Mr. RILEY was supposed to have shifted into semi-retirement, playing golf and performing frequently with the Indian River Festival. But he loved playing so much that he couldn't resist invitations, and so Mr. RILEY, a smoker who enjoyed a drink and suffered from diabetes, spent a great deal of his time on airplanes travelling from one festival to another, one performance to another. That is what took him to Calgary late last week to play in a jazz and blues Festival.
He was jazz organist of the year from 1993 to 2000 at the annual Jazz Report Awards and was named a member of the Order of Canada in 2004.
Douglas Brian RILEY was born in Toronto on April 24, 1945. He died of a massive heart attack in an airplane on the tarmac in Calgary on Monday, August 26, 2007. He was 62. He is survived by wife Jan RILEY, sons Ben and Jesse from his first marriage, two siblings and his extended family. Musical celebrations of his life are being planned for October in Toronto and Charlottetown.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-12 published
Fatal stabbing shakes Toronto schools
Scarborough student slain at lunchtime
By TIMOTHY APPLEBY with reports from Unnati GANDHI, Jennifer LEWINGTON, Karen HOWLETT and Shawn McCARTHY, Page A1
Toronto -- In a lunch-hour confrontation that dispatched fresh shock waves across Toronto's school system, a 16-year-old Scarborough student was stabbed to death yesterday on a walkway leading from his high school.
Homicide detectives were hunting at least one suspect, seen fleeing the crime scene at Winston Churchill Collegiate Institute in a speeding car, and offered little insight into why the youth - identified by CTV News last night as Denesh MURUGIAH - had been killed.
Suspicion, however, immediately fell on a long-simmering rivalry between Tamil factions, whose animosity is believed responsible for a firebombing and a stabbing in the same neighbourhood in April.
What was certain was that the teen's death came just four months after the shooting death of teenager Jordan MANNERS in a high school on the other side of the city. And, moreover, it had the hallmarks of being planned.
"My Friends told me they saw the victim standing there when two guys came up behind him and said, 'Do you want to do this now?' recounted Ajay MANGARA, 18, who lives a few doors from the school, near Lawrence Avenue and Kennedy Road.
"Then they saw the guy screaming on the ground, 'Help me, help me.' "
The teen was stabbed several times in the stomach and showed no vital signs when paramedics responded to the 12: 05 p.m. call. He died soon after in Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.
Word on the street is that the killing stemmed from "Tamil reprisals," Mr. MANGARA said, echoing the opinion of a Lawrence Avenue pizza parlour operator that caters to many Winston Churchill pupils.
If so, it is not the first time police attention has been drawn to a Tamil-based gang conflict, loosely spread across half a dozen Scarborough schools.
Students milling around the collegiate in the bright sunshine yesterday seemed to know little about the victim, a new arrival in his second week of school, and some appeared strikingly unaffected.
As television cameras hovered, several urged their Friends, "Don't snitch, don't talk."
Yesterday's killing was Toronto's 57th of 2007 - 11 more than had occurred at the same time last year.
The principal suspect is thought to be a male with brown skin, 17 or 18 years old, about 5 foot 5, wearing black jeans, a black zip-up hoodie and a bandana covering his face.
Also sought is a light blue Honda, probably a mid-1990s Civic, in which the killer or killers are believed to have fled.
Whether any of them also attended Winston Churchill was unknown.
But 41-year-old floor installer Jim NIKOLAKAKOS, an alumnus who has lived close to the walkway for most of his life, said the school has become markedly rougher in recent years and that tensions were often evident.
"There's a lot of rivalry going on in the school - kids from this school, kids from other schools - they get together in little gangs and it's all, 'You said this, you said that,' " he said.
"The whole school has changed; inside there's graffiti all over the place, it's not kept up. There's no respect any more for anything… Things have changed."
Others familiar with the sprawling 1,200-student school disagreed.
Jessica COPELAND, 19, was a student for five years and wept yesterday as she arrived home to learn what had taken place almost on the doorstep of her Flora Drive home.
"I just can't believe something like this would happen at Churchill it was a really good school for me, the teachers were nice," she said.
"There were incidents, yeah, but they were really contained and personally I never saw anybody with any weapons, not in five years. Nothing ever got out of hand like this."
Toronto Police Service Inspector Kathryn MARTIN said much the same.
"I'm very familiar with the neighbourhood, I've spent 13 years working in 41 Division and this is a very good school… so I'm thinking this is an incident unrelated to the school itself."
Winston Churchill, however, is adjacent to a community centre that last year installed closed-circuit cameras because of fights. And in the past, local councillor Michael THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON has asked nearby retailers not to sell knives.
Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said of yesterday's homicide that he was "not shocked but saddened."
Gerry CONNELLY, director of education at the Toronto District School Board, denied rumours that the victim had been transferred to Winston Churchill because of behavioural problems.
In fact, she said, the teen was a new student because he and his family had moved into the Lawrence and Kennedy area from Don Mills.
"I can't speak to behavioural issues, but he was not a transfer student," she said.
The fatal stabbing nonetheless reignited the issue of safe schools, which erupted in May after 15-year-old Jordan MANNERS was shot to death at his school in the Keele and Finch area.
As police quizzed witnesses: at nearby 41 Division yesterday, Detective Sergeant Gary GRINTON of the homicide squad alluded to Jordan's death, in which two 17-year-olds have been charged with first-degree murder, and appealed for public help.
"Do the right thing, come forward, man up," he urged the suspect.
Liberal Leader Dalton McGuinty commented on the stabbing during a campaign stop in Markham, Ontario, last night. "As Premier, and maybe more importantly just as a dad, I wanted to express my deepest sympathies to the family and Friends of this young man who lost his life today in a senseless tragedy," he said.
Progressive Conservative Leader John Tory described the homicide as symptomatic of a larger problem - the Liberal government's alleged failure to crack down on violent crime.
"We simply let this kind of thing go on," Mr. Tory said. "We simply have to deal with this kind of crime and the causes of this kind of crime."

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-14 published
Surgeon scored 1962 breakthrough with world's first coronary care unit
Doctor who had served on HMCS Prince Robert in wartime later maintained a thriving practice and taught generations of medical students at the University of Toronto, writes Sandra Martin
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
Back in the early 1960s, when prescribing blood thinners was the standard treatment for acute heart attacks, Robert (Bob) MacMILLAN and his colleague Kenneth (Ken) BROWN were disturbed by the 40 per cent mortality rate in their recovering patients at the Toronto General Hospital. Some of these patients, who seemed very well when the night nurse checked on them, were found dead the following morning. The cause seemed obvious: a disturbance in the rhythm of the heart's electrical system, or ventricular fibrillation. But what triggered the fatal imbalance remained a mystery.
In 1962, the two doctors established the world's first coronary care unit at Toronto General Hospital. Within a year they had reduced the mortality rate by 10 per cent. The significance of the coronary unit was "huge," said cardiologist Douglas WIGLE, a former colleague and now professor emeritus at the department of medicine at the University of Toronto.
"Bob was a superb teacher with a very dry wit who made a point of being charming and friendly to students when it was more typical in those days for doctors to be austere and professorial," said hematologist Michael BAKER, an intern under Doctor MacMILLAN in the mid-1960s and now physician-in-chief at university health network.
"I learned the technical aspects of cardiology from him but, far more important, looking back, I learned the human side of being a prominent physician," said Doctor BAKER. "He was pleasant, he had a sense of humour, he had a life outside the hospital and he was interested in us as people."
Robert Laidlaw MacMILLAN was born into a medical family in Toronto during the First World War. His father, Robert Johnson MacMILLAN, was an anesthetist at the Wellesley Hospital and his mother, Merle (née LAIDLAW,) was a nurse. The family, which included Bob's younger brother Hugh (who also became a distinguished doctor) and his sister Mary, lived first on Admiral Road and then on Dunvegan in Forest Hill.
When Bob was about 13, his father decided to spend a year in Europe to complete his medical training, which had been truncated by the war. The three children were sent to the Lycée Jacquard in Switzerland, where they learned to ski and to speak French. When the MacMILLANs returned to Toronto, the boys enrolled at University of Toronto Schools, then a boys-only elite private academic institution. They were both burly and very athletic and were known as Big Beef and Little Beef. Bob graduated in 1934 and went that fall to Trinity College in the University of Toronto, where he played college rugby and hockey, and earned an honours degree in biological and medical sciences in 1938 and a medical degree three years later.
Meanwhile, an 18-year-old Welsh woman named Eluned (Lyn) CAREY- EVANS, had graduated from Roedean School near Brighton in Sussex, and set off on a tour of Canada in August of 1939, having been assured by her grandfather, the former British prime minister David Lloyd GEORGE, that fears of war breaking out were grossly exaggerated. She was in Sault Ste. Marie on September 3, 1939, when British prime minister Neville Chamberlain declared war on Germany.
Stranded without money, connections, or winter clothes, Lyn was rescued by Friends of her family who arranged for her to stay at St. Hilda's, the women's residence at Trinity College. The university allowed her to attend medical classes (based on her English qualifications) and that is how, coming out of the library with her arms loaded with borrowed books, she literally ran into Bob MacMILLAN, the older brother of her classmate Hugh. After he got down on his hands and knees to retrieve her books, he invited her for a milkshake, and that was that. "He was so funny always; he was such an interesting person," she said in a telephone interview late last week.
They were married three years later on Valentine's Day, 1942, at Trinity College, with no member of her family able to cross the Atlantic to attend the ceremony. By then, he had enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve. They made their first home in Victoria, British Columbia, which they both loved, but she returned to Toronto when he was posted overseas as a surgeon lieutenant commander on HMCS Prince Robert. The ship, which had been designed as a coastal ferry for Canadian National's Vancouver-to-Alaska run, was the vessel that had carried King George VI and Queen Elizabeth on the round trip from Vancouver to Victoria as part of a Royal tour in May, 1939. It was then converted to an armed merchant cruiser for convoy duty and escorted Canadian troops to Hong Kong in October of 1941 for the ill-fated defence of the British crown colony against the Japanese.
By the time Lt.-Cmdr. MacMILLAN climbed aboard, Prince Robert was an anti-aircraft cruiser. It sailed for Plymouth via the Panama Canal, picking up a huge bunch of green bananas on route which Bob decided to present to his in-laws as a getting-acquainted gift. Their first sight of him, as he emerged on the station platform in North Wales in 1943, was of a tall, husky man with a red beard bent under the weight of his bounty of ripe bananas a fruit they hadn't seen in years. They were charmed, according to Lyn MacMILLAN who recollected that her family "ate bananas until they were blue in the face."
Lt.-Cmdr. MacMILLAN remained on Prince Robert for the duration of the war, during which the ship had more conversions and sailed more operational miles than any other in the Royal Canadian Navy. For much of the conflict she was the navy's largest and most heavily armed ship, and later had a final life as a luxury ocean liner.
While her husband was overseas, Mrs. MacMILLAN gave birth to their first child, the historian Margaret MacMILLAN, now warden of St. Antony's College, Oxford. Four more children followed, Ann, a London-based Canadian Broadcasting Corporation broadcaster Tom, a financier; Robert, a urologist; and David, an energy consultant.
After he was demobilized at the end of the Pacific War, Doctor MacMILLAN was joined by his growing family where he did post-graduate studies in London and Oxford and qualified as a Member of the Royal College of Physicians in 1947. The next year, the MacMILLANs moved back across the Atlantic so he could take up a position at Toronto General Hospital as senior intern in hematology. He became a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (Canada) in 1948 and began his long career as a cardiologist on staff at the Toronto General Hospital, initially doing work on blood clotting and platelets.
In the early 1960s, Doctor MacMILLAN and his colleague Doctor K.W. BROWN decided to isolate and observe cardiac patients closely to see if they could determine the factors contributing to high mortality rates in supposedly recovering patients. Federal and provincial governments provided research grants; a private donor, Percy Gardiner, contributed the start-up funds to hire extra nurses to monitor the patients on a 24-hour basis especially in the critical 48-hour period after admission, and the Toronto General Hospital supplied a small room containing four beds separated by curtains.
When the unit opened on March 12, 1962, four patients were attached to improvised electro-cardiogram machines to record every beat of their hearts. Nurses became expert at recognizing complications and instituting life-saving procedures while waiting for doctors to arrive. After a year, this team approach and quick interventions to adjust or restart heart-beat rhythms had reduced the death rate by 10 per cent. The two doctors described their study in an article in the medical journal The Lancet on August 17, 1963, which enabled them to claim credit for establishing the first coronary intensive-care unit in the world.
Despite this medical breakthrough and the fact that Doctor MacMILLAN remained co-director of the coronary unit (which quickly expanded to eight beds) for the next decade, his calling was not primarily as a researcher. Above all, he was a practitioner and a professor, establishing an extensive private practice and teaching generations of medical students at the Toronto General Hospital and the University of Toronto. From his first position as a clinical teacher and an assistant physician in 1952, he rose steadily through the medical and academic ranks, becoming an assistant professor in 1965, an associate professor and senior staff physician in 1968 and professor of medicine and head of the division of general internal medicine at Toronto General Hospital in 1976. He had to retire from teaching when he turned 65 in 1982, but maintained his medical practice for another decade and served as a consultant to the province's Workman's Compensation Board when he was even older.
Dr. MacMILLAN was also a fearless and accomplished traveller and athlete who loved the outdoors. He delighted in canoeing, scuba diving, hiking, camping and playing tennis and skiing in remote locations only accessible by helicopter well into his late 70s. In addition, he and his wife had an active country life on a farm in Vaughan, Ontario, north of Toronto (which his father had bought in 1934) where, among other activities, he kept bees.
The MacMILLANs were at the farm in 2001 when he recognized that he was having a heart attack and told his wife to drive him to the local hospital - fast - where he read his own cardiogram and diagnosed a clot in his heart. The next morning he had a massive coronary. After several weeks in hospital he was transferred to the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, where after six weeks in residence and six months as an outpatient he gradually learned to walk and talk again. "We had six happy years," said Mrs. MacMILLAN. At the beginning of this year, his health declined seriously and he had to go into a special care unit.
Robert Laidlaw MacMILLAN was born May 23, 1917, in Toronto. He died of complications from heart disease on September 5, 2007 at East York General Hospital in Toronto. He was 90. He is survived by his wife Lyn, five children, 12 grandchildren and his extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-15 published
He was first North American reporter to go behind the Bamboo Curtain
Dispatched to China in the 1950s, he covered the Orient and the Middle East for two decades with Associated Press, writes Sandra MARTIN. He ended his career at The Globe and Mail
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
A triple hitter as a reporter, editor and photographer, David LANCASHIRE was the Zelig of foreign correspondents. Wherever trouble brewed, he was there reporting back by telephone, telegraph or whatever other communications tool he could commandeer, in prose that was succinct, accurate and sparkling with precise and evocative detail.
The first North American correspondent to report from mainland China in the 1950s, he covered the Orient and the Middle East for Associated Press for two decades.
"David had a certain almost insouciance, which gave his personality the racy, devil-may-care air of a young boulevardier. At its best, his writing could be spectacular with the ability to take the reader along with him on a specific assignment," said Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and Mail.
"One of his many endearing qualities was his modesty," said Marcus Eliason, an Associated Press assistant international editor, "so it took a long time to know that he had scored a huge coup by getting a visa to go into Red China in the 1950s and produced a series of stories that was the first look into this closed society."
The two men worked together in Israel in the small Associated Press bureau in Tel Aviv from 1972 to 1976. "What I saw in him was a wonderful reporter, a man of enormous curiosity, a guy who always found something good to say about whatever culture he was covering," Mr. Eliason said. "He would go to the most exotic, strange and even dangerous places, but he always came back with a little story that brought the people and their lives alive to you." Speaking of Mr. Lancaster as an editor, he said: "In his quiet and unimposing way, he made you feel how a story should work, how to get it right, how to be fair, all the things that we desperately need [to know.]"
David Miles LANCASHIRE was born the year after the Wall Street Crash of 1929, the middle of three sons of Robert Harold LANCASHIRE and his wife Victoria (CAMPBELL.) His father held an eclectic series of jobs from musician to house detective at the Royal York Hotel and his mother was the daughter of Colin CAMPBELL, the city editor of the Toronto Star. By his late teens, he was bored with school and in love with playing the trombone. There's a story he liked to tell about spending the afternoon at what was probably the Victory Burlesque on Spadina Avenue. At the show's end, the lights came on, Mr. LANCASHIRE got up from his seat to leave and spotted his father, also playing hooky, sitting in the seat behind him. Neither one of them ever told Mrs. LANCASHIRE about their clandestine encounter.
Jazz brought him together with artist and musician Michael SNOW on a snowy night in 1948, when Mr. Lancaster paid 75 cents to hear three bands, including Ken Dean's Hot Seven, play at Lansdowne Hall in Toronto's West End. The two men began playing together as part of a group - Mr. Snow on the piano and Mr. LANCASHIRE on the trombone - at venues such as Balmy Beach, fraternity houses and the Snow family living room. In 1953, they went separately to Europe, but kept meeting by chance at clubs in Italy, France and Belgium. Mr. SNOW dropped into a club called La Rose Noire in Brussels and there was Mr. LANCASHIRE, the only Canadian in a Belgian combo. Soon, Mr. SNOW was playing there too. One night, Quincy Jones, Clifford Brown and a few other players from the touring Lionel Hampton Orchestra wandered in and jammed with them. A few days later, in Paris, Mr. Jones wrote and recorded a song he called La Rose Noire. And so it went for a couple of carefree years. "There was something very special about him," Mr. Snow said. "He was one of my very best Friends."
Wandering around Europe convinced Mr. LANCASHIRE, a high-school drop out, that he wanted to become a foreign correspondent, although he lacked any training - including the ability to type. He came back to Canada and talked his way into a job on the Quebec Chronicle Telegraph in 1954. After four months, he transferred to The Montreal Herald, where he worked as a crime reporter for a year. In 1955, he returned to Toronto and landed a job as a general reporter at The Globe and Mail. The late Richard (Dic) DOYLE remembers him in his book Hurly Burly as "a quiet gangling fellow" who was "a jazz nut." He once came across a sale of military drums in a loft on Yonge Street, and persuaded several of his senior editors to fit themselves out with drum kits. Mr. Davey still uses the regimental bass drum he acquired as a coffee table.
Restless from chasing fires and covering press conferences, Mr. LANCASHIRE longed to go to China, which had been largely out of bounds to foreign journalists since the Communist Revolution of 1949 had brought Mao Zedong to power. In September, 1956, Mr. LANCASHIRE wrote a letter to Premier Zhou Enlai asking for a visa. Some time later, he cornered managing editor Tommy MUNNS and offered himself as The Globe's first China correspondent. Mr. MUNNS declined.
Coincidentally, China announced that it would make visas available to American correspondents, an overture that triggered an embargo from the U.S. State Department, denying U.S. citizens the right to apply for a visa. The next day, Mr. LANCASHIRE received a wire from Mr. Zhou saying his application had been accepted. He quit The Globe, shopped his services to news agencies and was quickly hired on a freelance contract by the Associated Press in New York. Mr. LANCASHIRE flew to Hong Kong and walked across the bridge into China, the first reporter for any U.S. news organization on the Chinese mainland since 1949.
Before his two-month visa expired, he travelled more than 8,000 kilometres and produced a lengthy series of stories on life behind what was called the Bamboo Curtain. "Red China today is an immense machine with 600 million moving parts, running at top speed," Mr. LANCASHIRE wrote in an eerily prescient Associated Press story from Hong Kong on December 15, 1956. "Its 600 million individuals are sacrificing individually at Communist behest in an all-consuming drive to change a backward, poverty ridden nation into a modern state.
"China has the largest labour force in the world. And with the straining sinews of the 600 millions, she is struggling to reach a fantastic goal - to leave the middle ages behind and equal the United States in industrial power by the year 2000."
Based on his reportage, he was hired as an Associated Press staff foreign correspondent, a job he kept for the next two decades, filing many wire-service stories that ended up in the columns of his old newspaper. He spent three years in East Asia, reporting from Japan, Jakarta, Singapore, Bangkok and Saigon and almost every other country in the region. In 1960, he moved to Beirut and a new assignment as a roving Middle East correspondent. It was in Beirut that he met Adrienne (Dédée) TELDERS, a young woman from The Hague, Netherlands, who was working as a secretary at the Dutch embassy. They married in July, 1961. Their son Michael was born in 1963, followed by Adriaan in 1964.
"Writing for Associated Press meant covering everything from economics in Tokyo to opium dens in Laos, rigged elections in Tehran and Investiture of Prince Charles in Wales," Mr. LANCASHIRE wrote later. He covered nine wars, including the 1958 civil strife in Indonesia, the Sino-Indian war of 1962, ongoing Mideast conflict, the Turkish assault on Cyprus in 1974 and the overthrow of the Imam of Yemen in 1962. He also reported on Pope Paul VI's visit to Jerusalem in 1964, and Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi in Iran.
In 1968, he transferred to London, but he and his wife missed the tumult of the of Middle East and he snapped up an opportunity to move to Israel as news editor for Associated Press in Tel Aviv in 1972, where he covered the 1973 Yom Kippur War and the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Selling their London house before heading back to the Middle East was his only regret, he explained earlier this year in a conversation about escalating British house prices.
In the mid-1970s, the LANCASHIREs decided it was time to "Canadianize" their teenaged sons. At about the same time, Mrs. LANCASHIRE was diagnosed with the early stages of multiple sclerosis, a chronic, inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. He quit Associated Press in 1976 and returned to Canada and The Globe, where he worked as chief feature writer.
"I loved the man," Ed O'DACRE, the paper's former features editor, said yesterday. "He could do whatever you asked him to do. Clarity was his forte. His style was simple, perfect, clear English." His writing was not hit-of-the-week stuff that called attention to itself, said Mr. O'DACRE, but it lasted. "That was his virtuosity - you didn't notice his skill."
After suffering a heart attack in the newsroom in 1981, Mr. LANCASHIRE took time off to recuperate and returned to the newspaper as an editor. He was 63 when he retired in June, 1994, after The Globe announced an editorial buyout package. He devoted himself to caring for his wife and kept up a lively correspondence in The Globe's letters page, pointing out slips and inconsistencies in polite but pithy notes. He also reviewed jazz books and wrote travel articles that were rich in anecdotes and experience.
After the first Persian Gulf war, he wrote a piece about Jordan reopening its deserts to tourism with a reprise of the lead he had written 25 years earlier when the country, having lost most of its tourist attractions during the Six-Day War in 1967, launched a camel safari as a lure for foreign visitors.
"The tents are folded and the caravan winds into the desert. The sun pours down like molten brass on a line of lurching camels and hooded riders. Rifles glint from the saddles."
While much was the same, much had changed between his two trips. "On our final night in the desert, we had a fireside feast of mutton and rice eaten with bare hands. Sitting across from the fire, a gnarled old Bedouin suddenly interrupted the conversation. One of the Palestinian policemen translated: 'He says, praise God that tomorrow the rain will fall from the skies again.' "
A wise nomad in tune with the elements, Mr. LANCASHIRE thought to himself. Reverting to journalist mode, he asked the Bedouin how he knew rain was coming. The old man reached into his robe, pulled something out and silently handed it to Mr. LANCASHIRE. "It was a gorgeous little radio - olive-green colour, shaped like an avocado, and into its side was set a little silver plaque that read, Pierre Cardin, Paris."
This past summer, he began cleaning out his files and uncovered a pile of negatives covering his Middle East years. He had the best of them printed, framed them himself, and had a one man photography show in Kilgour's, a pub in Toronto's Annex neighbourhood. He also found the letter that jogged his memory about his 1962 trip to Yemen. It formed the basis for his final Globe article, about a time there when "there were no hotels, no tourists, not even a road to the capital, only a rocky track for trucks and camels."
At the time, Mr. LANCASHIRE was based in Aden, sharing a room in the Rock Hotel with the correspondent for The Observer, a man named Kim Philby - the very same Soviet spy who disappeared from the Mideast four months later and was uncovered as Britain's infamous "Third Manitoba" Ever the professional, Mr. LANCASHIRE captured the traitor's image on film.
David Miles LANCASHIRE was born in Toronto on December 30, 1930. He died of a heart attack at his home on September 10, 2007. He was 76. He is survived by his wife Dédée, his sons Michael and Adriaan, his daughter-in-law Mayte, two grandchildren and extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-17 published
MITCHELL, Sheilha Grace (née TRIBE)
At the Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital, Burlington on Saturday September 15, 2007, Sheilha (née TRIBE) MITCHELL of Burlington in her 78th year. Beloved wife of Graham MITCHELL. Much loved mother of Stephen and his wife Jane of Comox, British Columbia, Cynthia MARTIN and her husband Robert of Tampa, Florida and Robert of Oakville. Cherished grandmother of Elyse and Travis MITCHELL and Gregory and Catherine MARTIN. Predeceased by her brother Stephen TRIBE. Sheilha was a longtime member of The Ron Edwards Family Young Men's Christian Association. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street, (one block north of City Hall) Burlington (905-632-3333) on Tuesday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. where Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday September 19, 2007 at 1 p.m. Cremation. If desired, expressions of sympathy to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Charity of your choice would be sincerely appreciated by the family. www.smithsfh.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-19 published
MARTIN, Pol (HALNA DU FRETAY)
Peacefully on September 16, 2007 with his loving wife Suzanne (Josée) steadfast by his side, after a valiant battle with cancer. Beloved father to Melissa, Brett and Abigail. Father-in-law to Douglas, Jennifer and Jason. Proud grandfather to Zachary and Alexander. Brother to Roland of Noailhac, France, his wife Gabrielle and special uncle to Marc of Le Loroux Bottereau, France, his wife Geneviève and their children Hugo and Pol. Throughout his life, Pol had a depth of passion for adventure, laughter, sailing, automobiles, entertaining and always great food. Those who were lucky to know him experienced his wonderful hospitality, graciousness and revelled at his great story telling. Life-long Friendships gave him much joy developing strong relationships that he held dearly. Pol MARTIN was a celebrated chef, restaurateur and author. He has written over 20 cookbooks, trained students in his popular Montreal cooking school, hosted a successful syndicated television cooking show, and been a familiar voice on radio. His approach to demystifying the art of cooking has influenced a generation of novices and professionals alike. A celebration of a life well lived will be held privately. The family wishes to thank Pol's Friends, neighbours and those involved with Pol's health care for their support and compassion. Special thanks to Doctor McMeekin, Dr. Hattersley, Community Care Access Centre case workers and the nurses who were invaluable to Pol and his family. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre would be appreciated. Messages and condolences can be submitted via www.kitchingsteepeandludwig.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-19 published
STEVENSON, Mary R. (née FLOYD)
Suddenly after a brief illness on Monday, September 17, 2007 at Saint Michael's Hospital in her 90th year, after a Muskoka summer surrounded by all her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren (and dogs). Mary, the beautiful and dearly loved wife of Harry (d. 1999) for 61 years, adored mother of Cynthia CARSLEY (Scott MARTIN), Alice COOPER (Douglas), Douglas STEVENSON (Sonia) and Leigh Anne STEVENSON. Grandmother of Louis CARSLEY (Susanne,) Andrew CARSLEY, Douglas CARSLEY (Penny), Steve WALKER (Tracy), Todd WALKER (Tatjana), Joshua WALKER (Devorah), George COOPER, Rob STEVENSON (Cynthia,) Monique STEVENSON, and John Stevenson TAMES. Great-grandmother of Timothy, Reed, Eden, Nicola, Oscar, Carson and Boaz. Beloved sister of Frank FLOYD and Ruth SMITH. Predeceased by her brother Richard FLOYD.
Mary will be long honoured, remembered and dearly missed by her family and Friends everywhere. Mary and Harry's life together, living in Toronto, Muskoka, Coral Gables, Naples, Barbados, New York, Athens, London and Ottawa gave them the opportunity to make extraordinary Friends -- whom they treasured.
Mary had deep commitments to Christ Church Deer Park, The Cradleship Creche, Belmont House, and the Church of the Kettles. She was the conservator and doyenne of the Stevenson family cottage. At her happiest, she was sitting on her deck (with Harry) in Muskoka, notebook in hand, surrounded by the activities and perambulations of countless boats, dogs, and her beloved family. Writing was always close to her heart, and in her last eight years she never passed a day without setting pen to paper. Her book "The Church of the Kettles, Muskoka" published in her 86th year was the highlight of her writing career. Still to be published is her book on the history of Belmont House.
On her last night with us she recited a poem she wrote:
Muskoka -- By the way:
If ever in the night you hear,
The dove-soft whistle
of a northbound train,
Remember all the summer years
We loved, we loved and laughed
and know that now
Though wrapped in shrouds
of dream filled sleep
we hear it still.
A service will be held at Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St. (at Heath St.) on Friday, September 21 at 11 a.m. Remembrances can be sent on behalf of Mary to Belmont House and Christ Church Deer Park.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-22 published
MARTIN, Pol (HALNA DU FRETAY)
Peacefully on September 16, 2007 with his loving wife Suzanne (Josée) steadfast by his side, after a valiant battle with cancer. Beloved father to Melissa, Brett and Abigail. Father-in-law to Douglas, Jennifer and Jason. Proud grandfather to Zachary and Alexander. Brother to Roland of Noailhac, France, his wife Gabrielle and special uncle to Marc of Le Loroux Bottereau, France, his wife Geneviève and their children Hugo and Pol. Throughout his life, Pol had a depth of passion for adventure, laughter, sailing, automobiles, entertaining and always great food. Those who were lucky to know him experienced his wonderful hospitality, graciousness and revelled at his great story telling. Life-long Friendships gave him much joy developing strong relationships that he held dearly. Pol MARTIN was a celebrated chef, restaurateur and author. He has written over 20 cookbooks, trained students in his popular Montreal cooking school, hosted a successful syndicated television cooking show, and been a familiar voice on radio. His approach to demystifying the art of cooking has influenced a generation of novices and professionals alike. A celebration of a life well lived will be held privately. The family wishes to thank Pol's Friends, neighbours and those involved with Pol's health care for their support and compassion. Special thanks to Doctor McMeekin, Dr. Hattersley, Community Care Access Centre case workers and the nurses who were invaluable to Pol and his family. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society and Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre would be appreciated. Messages and condolences can be submitted via www.kitchingsteepeandludwig.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-22 published
STEVENSON, Mary R. (née FLOYD)
Suddenly after a brief illness on Monday, September 17, 2007 at Saint Michael's Hospital in her 90th year, after a Muskoka summer surrounded by all her children, grandchildren and great-grandchildren (and dogs). Mary, the beautiful and dearly loved wife of Harry (d. 1999) for 61 years, adored mother of Cynthia CARSLEY (Scott MARTIN), Alice COOPER (Douglas), Douglas STEVENSON (Sonia) and Leigh Anne STEVENSON. Grandmother of Louis CARSLEY (Susanne,) Andrew CARSLEY, Douglas CARSLEY (Penny), Steve WALKER (Tracy), Todd WALKER (Tatjana), Joshua WALKER (Devorah), George COOPER, Rob STEVENSON (Cynthia,) Monique STEVENSON, and John Stevenson TAMES. Great-grandmother of Timothy, Reed, Eden, Nicola, Oscar, Carson, Beck and Boaz. Beloved sister of Frank FLOYD and Ruth SMITH. Predeceased by her brother Richard FLOYD.
Mary will be long honoured, remembered and dearly missed by her family and Friends everywhere. Mary and Harry's life together, living in Toronto, Muskoka, Coral Gables, Naples, Barbados, New York, Athens, London and Ottawa gave them the opportunity to make extraordinary Friends -- whom they treasured.
Mary had deep commitments to Christ Church Deer Park, The Cradleship Creche, Belmont House, and the Church of the Kettles. She was the conservator and doyenne of the Stevenson family cottage. At her happiest, she was sitting on her deck (with Harry) in Muskoka, notebook in hand, surrounded by the activities and perambulations of countless boats, dogs, and her beloved family. Writing was always close to her heart, and in her last eight years she never passed a day without setting pen to paper. Her book "The Church of the Kettles, Muskoka" published in her 86th year was the highlight of her writing career. Still to be published is her book on the history of Belmont House.
On her last night with us she recited a poem she wrote:
Muskoka -- By the way:
If ever in the night you hear,
The dove-soft whistle
of a northbound train,
Remember all the summer years
We loved, we loved and laughed
and know that now
Though wrapped in shrouds
of dream filled sleep
we hear it still.
A service has been held at Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge St. (at Heath St.) on Friday, September 21 at 11 a.m. Remembrances can be sent on behalf of Mary to Belmont House and Christ Church Deer Park.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-22 published
Socialite's Brazilian Carnival Ball raised millions for Toronto charities
Using organizational skills and strategy worthy of a Bay Street Chief Executive Officer, she transformed a church-basement affair into the social event of the season, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
Italian and Brazilian in ancestry, Anna Maria DE SOUZA heated up the staid fundraising climate in Toronto with the Brazilian Carnival Ball, probably the most significant philanthropic gala on the Canadian social calendar. A warm-blooded, energetic outsider, she had the entrepreneurial zeal, organizing skills and shrewd ambition of a self-made Chief Executive Officer. But, instead of starting a company or a launching a hedge fund, she camouflaged those skills under the patina of a society hostess. Using old-fashioned influence, rather than naked power, she forged alliances with charitable foundations in campaigns that raised their profiles, her status, and close to $45-million for Toronto hospitals, universities and arts and culture organizations over the past 40 years.
For all her flamboyance, Ms. DE SOUZA was intensely private. Nobody knew her real age - not even her husband Ivan, as she loved to boast. "I've known her for 35 years and it never occurred to me to wonder," said her friend Catherine NUGENT. " She was one of those people who was ageless."
Along with Ms. DE SOUZA's success came complaints about her management style. She seemed unapologetic to criticisms that she was territorial and a micro-manager who autocratically chose the event's annual beneficiary. "This is big business, and the organization requires that we have a good board to sell the ball, a recipient who will pay for our computers, our secretarial staff," she told Maclean's last year. "This work requires a huge infrastructure." And even knowing how much work was involved, if Ms. DE SOUZA asked if you wanted to be the beneficiary of the Brazilian Carnival Ball, "there was absolutely no reason to say no," said Paul ALOFS, president of the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation "because it is such a massive fundraising and awareness-generating opportunity for a not-for-profit."
Although the ball was her biggest activity, it wasn't her only one. She also volunteered on the women's committee of the Canadian Opera Company and was the curator of the Henry Birks Antique Collection of Silver in the late 1970s. A passionate gardener and a keen tennis player, she loved to entertain and to cook for her guests. "She was the most generous, vivacious person I know," said Ms. NUGENT. " She loved to introduce people to each other and to grow her circle of Friends, but she was also shy."
Anna Maria DE SOUZA, the daughter of Amadeu GUIDI and his wife Honorica (née MARCOLLINI,) was born in Sao Sebastiao de Parasio in the mountainous state of Minas Geras in the interior of Brazil. She grew up in a family of four brothers and one sister. Her grandfather on her mother's side had immigrated from Genoa, Italy, as a teenager and found a job as a construction worker building homes for plantation workers, according to Rosemary Sexton in The Glitter Girls, Charity and Vanity: Chronicles of an Age of Excess.
When money was scarce, her grandfather was paid in land. Eventually he accumulated enough acreage to start his own plantation and enough wealth to take his family back to Genoa on a trip. There, he bought a villa. For the rest of his life he spent half the year in Italy and the other in Brazil. When his daughter, Honorica, married, Mr. MARCOLLINI handed over control of his Brazilian plantation to her new husband, Amadeu. That's where his granddaughter, Anna Maria, grew up, in what she later compared to paradise. It was a time in which life "was gracious and slow and everything was looked after." She was educated at the Collegio Paula Frassinette in Brazil where she earned a teaching degree, and then attended the Escola Técnica de Comercio C.A.
At 18, she married William John GRIFFITHS, an English mining engineer for Wimpey Construction, a British firm that had a contract to build a dam in Brazil. Anna Maria went into labour with their first child on Good Friday, a holiday in Brazil. Her doctor was away, the birth was arduous and afterward Anna Maria was unable to bear more children. The baby, a daughter, lived for only 23 days. To compound the tragedy, her husband died in a work-related accident 10 months later.
Widowed, and still in her teens, Anna Maria went to live with her grandmother in Italy where she attended finishing school. Afterward, sailing back to Brazil on a cruise ship, she met a Brazilian plantation owner who urged her to get involved in the coffee exporting business. As chance would have it, at a party in Rio de Janeiro on New Year's Eve in 1964, Anna Maria met a man named John MARSTON, who said he imported bulk foods into Canada. If she had products to sell, he was interested in seeing them.
With an insouciant entrepreneurship, she gathered some samples from the family coffee plantation and set out for Canada, arriving in Toronto in gloomiest February, 1965. She looked up Mr. MARSTON and married him three months later in a Protestant ceremony, which her mother, a Catholic, boycotted. "I fell in love with Toronto and the only thing I could do to stay was to get married," she once confided. By 1974, the MARSTONs had divorced, Anna Maria complaining later that her husband was a workaholic who had little interest in married life.
Anna Maria had long since found ways to make her own life more interesting. Homesickness propelled her "to kill the longing" by organizing her first Brazilian Ball in 1966, the winter after she arrived in Canada, in a church basement at Dundas and Grace Streets, a largely Portuguese area of Toronto. Tickets cost $5, the food for the 50 guests was prepared by Anna Maria and her Friends, and the aim was merely to cover costs and bring a little Mardi Gras colour to the dreary Toronto winter. The ball quickly became a tradition.
By the early 1970s, the ball, which had quickly moved above ground to the Sutton Place Hotel and then the Sheraton Centre, was making a small profit, with the proceeds going to a Brazilian orphanage. That tradition has continued with five per cent of the annual profits benefiting leper colonies, old age homes and other causes in or around her hometown. When Toronto charities began asking if they could reap the ball's annual largesse, Anna Maria astutely decided to bestow the fundraising benefits on a different cause every time, thereby hooking into a fresh network and set of volunteers annually.
Krystyne GRIFFIN attended her first Brazilian Ball in 1977, the year she left Paris, married businessman and Griffin Poetry Prize founder and benefactor Scott GRIFFIN, and moved to Toronto. "Everybody told me this was the party to go to because it showed that Toronto could be fun." They were correct. "A guy in drag dressed like Queen Alexandra walked up and smacked Scott right on the lips. That was my introduction to Anna Maria's parties," said Ms. GRIFFIN. "I liked her without knowing her well."
The ball celebrated its 14th anniversary in 1980 at the Four Seasons Hotel on Avenue Road in Toronto and netted $50,000. That's where it stayed until 1988, when it moved to the yawning depths of the Metro Toronto Convention Hotel, the only venue that could accommodate crowds upward of 1,000.
Disaffected by her globe-trotting, work-obsessed husband, Anna Maria met the late Montagu Black at the Brazilian Carnival Ball in the early 1970s, and he thought she should meet his younger brother, Conrad, who was then plying his way as an aspiring tycoon and researching his biography of Quebec premier Maurice Duplessis. Eventually, lawyer Igor Kaplan introduced them and they dated for about two years after her 1974 divorce. "She was a delightful, refreshing, and enterprising person, and was a very popular and respected person in a community where she started as a stranger and, at first, hardly spoke the language," Conrad Black wrote in an e-mail message yesterday. "I saw her a lot at the time my parents died, 10 days apart, in 1976, and she could not have been more supportive."
Anna Maria's lasting love, however, was businessman Ivan DE SOUZA. Introduced by Marvelle KOFFLER, wife of Murray KOFFLER of Shoppers Drug Mart, they had much in common, both being Portuguese-speaking and Catholic. They were married on December 22, 1982, and were devoted to each other.
More than the venue of the ball changed over the years. As it became more lavish and raised more money (much of it matched by government programs with costs underwritten by corporate sponsors), so, too, did the entertainment. Instead of handmade decorations on a carnival theme, Ms. DE SOUZA began importing carnival dancers from Brazil. That meant switching the date from Mardi Gras (the carnival on the eve of Lent, the 40-day period of penance preceding Easter in the Catholic calendar) to April or May so that the dancers could travel to Toronto in their off-season.
At the 40th anniversary of the ball in 2006, the $2-million in net proceeds went to York University's Accolade Project and the 1,600 guests were entertained by a 30-minute samba parade from the Rio Carnival - including 50 dancers in feathered, beaded and bejewelled costumes processing on foot or on wooden horses - to the beat of the batucada rhythm supplied by the Cocktail Brazil Band.
Last November, Ms. DE SOUZA was diagnosed with rampaging cancer and underwent rigorous treatment that included chemotherapy at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. She looked frail, but valiant, at the 2007 ball, which was held April 21 and raised $2.6-million net for the Arthritis and Autoimmunity Research Centre in Toronto. "She and the ball were a brand, and for a very small organization like us, she had a tremendous impact. She did a great job," said Gerri Grant, executive director of the AARC.
About a month ago, Ms. DE SOUZA went back into hospital for more treatment, but was well enough to decide that oncology nursing, through the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, should be the focus and the beneficiary of the 2008 Brazilian ball - the first one that will occur without her dominant presence.
Anna Maria DE SOUZA was born in Brazil, probably in 1941. She died in Toronto on September 18, 2007. She was in her mid-60s. She is survived by her third husband, Ivan DE SOUZA, her step-son John, and her extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-25 published
Realist created iconic painting, found wide appeal
He was at odds with abstract expressionism and found the confidence to follow his instincts, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
As an artist, Ken DANBY's work was loved more by the people than it was revered by the critics. Although his works were bought by museums, he found his best, most rewarding and lasting appeal among private collectors and purveyors of popular culture. A superb draftsman and a prodigious and prolific artist of his own time, he was a realistic painter who reflected quotidian events, natural landscapes and athletic prowess to mass audiences, rather than an abstract expressionist who created troubling, edgy canvasses for an intellectual elite.
"His way of doing things was not in the wind, and that immediately interested me," said Walter Moos of Gallery Moos, the first major Canadian dealer to take Mr. DANBY on in the early 1960s. "I think he will finally get the appreciation in this country which it merits - I'm talking from museum officialdom. His artistic legacy is immense."
Kenneth Edison DANBY, who was born in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, the year after the Second World War ended, was the younger son of M.G. Edison DANBY, an assessment commissioner, and his wife Gertrude (BUCKLEY.) At first it seemed that his older brother Marvin was the artistic one; Ken certainly always credited him with inspiring his own early attempts.
Ken attended Cody Public School, where he became known as the school artist. By the time he was in Grade 6, he had won first prize in the school hobby show, was regularly creating murals for special events and was talking about a career as an artist. He graduated to Sault Technical and Commercial High School and then the Sault Collegiate Institute, where he won a high-school poster contest when he was 16. Art was a major part of his life, but not the only one - he joined the air cadets and spent much of his free time hiking and canoeing.
At 18, he enrolled in the Ontario College of Art and Design in Toronto, where one of his teachers was Group of Seven member J.E.H. Macdonald. Other students called him Vincent because of his goatee and the fact that he was a loner who seemed to be obsessive about drawing and painting. "I was intense and almost fanatical about drawing and did hundreds of studies, mostly in pen, during my first year," he told his biographer, art critic Paul Duval.
Mr. DANBY was at odds with Ontario College of Art and Design, mostly because he was a realist painter and the school was interested in design and experimentation. Abstract expressionism, which had become wildly popular in the United States after the Second World War, and the colour field and pop art styles that it spawned, were about as artistically distanced from his preferred precise figurative works as Vancouver is from Toronto. Frustrated and disenchanted, he quit art school in 1960 after completing his second year and went home for the summer to work as a set designer at a local television studio. He returned to Toronto in the fall and immersed himself in the coffee-house culture of Toronto's Yorkville district, while taking on a succession of stop-gap jobs: painting sets for CFTO television studios in Kleinburg setting up window displays for D'Allaird's, a chain of women's clothing stores; and working as art director for the Mariposa Folk Festival, designing all its posters, advertisements and brochures.
He landed a full-time job doing layout and illustrations for the now defunct Toronto Telegram in 1961. About the same time, he had his first solo exhibition of 13 abstract and non-objective paintings at the Pollock Gallery in Toronto. The combination of the job, the gallery show and a visit to the Albright-Knox Art Gallery in Buffalo - where he saw an exhibition of the work of U.S. realist painter Andrew Wyeth - gave him enough confidence to turn away from abstraction and follow his original instincts, concentrating on representational painting in a realist mode.
The next spring, he quit the Telegram to turn freelance. Still struggling six months later, he consulted art dealer Walter Moos, who agreed to become his dealer, an arrangement that lasted for the next three decades. The following year, Mr. Moos showed him as part of a three-man exhibit at Gallery Moos. By now Mr. DANBY had found his palette and his medium. Using his black cat Kimbo as a model, he made a painting with a cloudless blue sky executed in egg tempera, a medium he would use many times and in many of his most successful paintings. The painting, Fur and Bricks, won the Jessie Dow Prize at the Spring Exhibition at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts.
After a summer painting on Manitoulin Island, Mr. DANBY had a one-man show at Gallery Moos and proved his commercial appeal when the work sold out on opening night. Prolific and industrious, he held an annual show at Gallery Moos for many years. Mostly, he continued to paint nature scenes in egg tempura, although he accepted a commission to create a portrait of Pierre Trudeau for a Time magazine cover in 1968 and began experimenting with silk-screening to produce multicoloured prints and serigraphs. He began showing and selling them in the early 1970s in Canada, Germany and the United States.
In 1972, Mr. DANBY created what many consider the iconic hockey painting. At the Crease shows a masked goalie crouched in the net, left hand outstretched, right hand clutching his stick. The anonymous player represents every goalie who has ever waited for a shot to test his or her mettle, but it also captures the tension of that moment when the arena goes silent and fans stop breathing as all become one with the solitary figure down on the ice. The painting is owned by a private Toronto collector.
At the Crease has such resonance that it has been widely reproduced in books and magazines. Indeed, Mr. DANBY's early artistic hero, Mr. Wyeth, saw the image in print some years after it was first exhibited at Gallery Moos and he wrote the artist a letter saying, "I think your painting, At the Crease, a terrifying and exciting picture." Some fans have insisted that the goalie is modelled on Ken Dryden, the former Montreal Canadiens netminder, but Mr. DANBY always refused to say, believing that the player should be whomever the viewer wishes him to be. As an indication of the painting's significance in popular culture, Mr. DANBY put the image on a hockey mask as a fundraiser for spinal cord research and it raised $15,100 (U.S.) at a charity auction on NHL.com in November, Although Mr. DANBY continued to use his trademark egg tempera, he never stopped working with other media. He designed a set of Olympic coins, he painted a series of Olympic athletes in watercolour, he made portraits and prints and he also turned to oil when he began to paint large canvases in his final decade. He received many honours, including the Order of Ontario and the Order of Canada.
Sunday, Mr. DANBY, his wife, Gillian, and some Friends arrived in Algonquin Park for a three-day canoe trip on North Tea Lake. Mr. DANBY was hoping to collect images of fall colours for a planned series of paintings when he suffered an apparent fatal heart attack and collapsed. After his party summoned help, an air ambulance arrived and lowered two paramedics to the lake before airlifting him to North Bay General Hospital.
It is tempting to imagine ironies both cruel and poetic in the death of Mr. DANBY, the realist, while canoeing in the same wilderness (although at a different lake) where expressionist landscape painter Tom THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON drowned 90 years ago. The coincidences and the metaphors may not bear serious scrutiny - they interpreted and represented nature in different ways - but both men loved the wilderness and were exploring its richness when they died suddenly and before their time, causing great shock and grief to their families, Friends and admirers.
Kenneth Edison DANBY was born in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, on March 6, 1940. He died in Algonquin Park on September 23, 2007, probably of a heart attack. He was 67. He leaves his second wife Gillian, his three sons and his extended family. Funeral arrangements are not yet complete.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-26 published
Audrey CAMPBELL, 90 Philanthropist
Newspaper magnate's daughter left own legacy in health care, racing
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
A horse breeder, a philanthropist and a nurturer of family and Friends, Audrey CAMPBELL was the last surviving child of newspaper magnate Roy THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Together with her three daughters, she gave $25-million to establish the Campbell Family Institute for Breast Cancer Research at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto. The gift "really was transformational because it was the largest private donation for breast cancer at that point and also because it helped to support the work of Doctor Tak MAK… and allowed him to grow his team and his research organization," said Paul ALOFS, president of the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, referring to the renowned cancer researcher.
Mrs. CAMPBELL's younger brother, Ken THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, celebrated her generosity with a public tribute.
"From the time of my first memories, I have looked up to Audrey as my big sister, the person who, along with my parents, looked after me and always had my best interests at heart," he said. "She prefers a low profile and I'm sure all this recognition embarrasses her… [but] she has made me proud of her again."
Phyllis Audrey THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON was born in Toronto on July 6, 1917, the eldest child of Roy and Edna (IRVINE) THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Her sister Irma (later BRYDSON) was born in 1918 (died 1966,) and her brother Kenneth in 1923 (obituary June 13, 2006).
Audrey's early years were far from luxurious - her father, the son of a barber, struggled to make enough money for food and rent. The THOMSONs moved to Ottawa in 1925, when she was 8, and to North Bay three years later. Her father worked as a travelling salesman before he paid $1 for a broadcasting licence, bought a 50-watt transmitter on three months credit and started his first radio station, CFCH, in North Bay. Soon, he also bought radio station CKGB in Timmins and then moved into print by acquiring the Timmins Daily Press in 1934.
Three years later, the family moved back to Toronto. Audrey, now 20, attended the University of Toronto and earned a bachelor of arts degree. After the Second World War, she met Queen's University engineering graduate Elwood CAMPBELL, later a high-school math and physics teacher. They married in 1947 and bought a three-bedroom bungalow in Port Credit, where they raised their three daughters, Linda, Gaye and Susan.
Despite her father's immense wealth from his North American and European newspaper interests and his stake in North Sea oil and gas, Mrs. CAMPBELL lived a quiet suburban life, immersed in family and her daughters' activities. While she attended meetings of Woodbridge, the family holding company, she was not involved in the running of the Thomson corporate empire. "I may have inherited my father's title and had many benefits conferred upon me in the business and social world, but Audrey is mind, heart and head of the family," Ken THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said of his older sister in Mrs. CAMPBELL's two younger daughters were interested in riding ponies, which triggered her own interest in standardbred horses. She and her husband started small in the early 1970s, with a part ownership in a single animal. She found early success with horses Armbro Dallas and Arcane Hanover and eventually established the Lothlorien Equestrian Centre in Cheltenham, Ontario, an offshoot of her daughter Susan's own stable of hunters and jumpers called Lothlorien Farms. "Lothlorien" is the name of a forest in J.R.R. Tolkien's fictional Middle-earth.
Breeding and racing horses became an enduring passion for Mrs. CAMPBELL, who eventually had a stable of more than a dozen horses. In 2002, Red River Hanover, which she partly owned, won the $1.5-million prize for harness racing in Toronto. Three years later, Rocknroll Hanover won the Breeders Crown Race at New Jersey's Meadowlands Racetrack.
In 2004, Mrs. CAMPBELL and her daughters decided to invest in health care in a focused way, rather than just making a general donation to the system. They researched where their money might have the most impact and decided to support the work of Doctor MAK because they realized that his work on cancer cells would have far-reaching consequences in breast cancer, but other types of malignancies as well.
Phyllis Audrey CAMPBELL was born in Toronto on July 6, 1917. She died of metastasized melanoma in Toronto Western Hospital on September 23, 2007. She was 90. Predeceased by her husband, Elwood, she leaves her three daughters, 10 grandchildren, eight great-grandchildren and extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-29 published
DANE, Jacquelyn Gladys Alexandra (née HAWLEY)
Born March 6, 1922, Toronto. Passed away peacefully, surrounded by her family, August 31, 2007, Vancouver. Daughter of Elsie (MARTIN) and John C. HAWLEY. Sister of the late Douglas (Mabel) and Wanda THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (d. Andrew.) Mother of Carol DANE and Leona OLSEN (Bob.) Loving grandmother to Meredith (Todd KEMP) and Laura ARMSTRONG, Ole and Kristen OLSEN. Proud great-grandmother of Zoe Olsen KELLY. Loving aunt to many nieces and nephews. In memory of Jackie donations can be made to the Arthritis Society of Canada.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-02 published
MARTIN, Eva
Peacefully on Saturday, September 29, 2007 in her home. Eva MARTIN, beloved wife of the late Nicholas. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Doctor Peter and Barbara. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Martha and Otto DEVENY and the late Gyula HOWARD. Devoted grandmother of Alec. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Tuesday, October 2, 2007 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Memorial donations may be made to The Department of Cardiology c/o Sunnybrook Foundation 416-480-4483.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-02 published
In a famous role, the spy didn't love her
James Bond's flirtatious foil grew up in Ontario; she returned and penned tabloid columns, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
Gutsy, impetuous and adventurous, Lois MAXWELL ran away from home as a teenager to become an actress and became famous as Miss Moneypenny, M's flirtatious secretary in the James Bond films. Although she appeared in 14 Bond films, she had a tough life, supporting two young children after her husband died prematurely of heart disease. Writing a weekly newspaper column in Toronto and starting a company to build crowd-control barriers were just two of her schemes.
Lois Ruth HOOKER was born on February 14, 1927, in Kitchener, Ontario For the rest of her life, she loved to throw people off balance with her name, introducing herself by saying, "I'm a hooker." Her father was a school teacher and her mother a nurse she once described her family as religious and temperate while she was scrawny, freckled and saucy and sulky. When she was a child, the Hookers moved to Toronto. Lois attended John Wanless Public School and then Lawrence Park Collegiate.
Lively, rebellious and game for anything, she was much more interested in performing on stage than sitting in a classroom solving algebra equations. She played parts in radio dramas under the name Robin WELLS, at least partly so that her parents wouldn't find out. After winning a part in Maurice Maeterlinck's play The Blue Bird at Hart House, she was determined to become an actress. However, an oft-told story has her running away from home in 1942 to join the Canadian army. She would have been 15.
"Teenagers in those days were terrified that the war would end before they could get into it," explained journalist Peter WORTHINGTON, a friend and former newspaper colleague. There's another version of the story, which Ms. MAXWELL told when she began writing a weekly column in The Toronto Sun in 1979: She skipped school in 1943 to audition for the army's entertainment corps, earned a place and then went to England with the show, where she sang and danced and (according to some reports) often appeared on a bill with comedians Johnny Wayne and Frank Shuster.
Seven months later, army officials discovered she was underage and prepared to send her home. Undeterred, she knocked on the doors of the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, where she persuaded officials to name her "the first winner of the Lady Louis Mountbatten Scholarship," according to an account she wrote in The Sun. At Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, her favourite classmate was Roger Moore - she once played his uncle, complete with red beard, in a performance of Shakespeare's Henry V. After leaving Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, she found small parts in plays and films and was "discovered" by Canadian-born film mogul Jack Warner, who put her under contract and sent her to Hollywood. Her first major role was as a schoolteacher in That Hagen Girl (1947), starring Ronald Reagan and Shirley Temple. She was so impressive that she won a Golden Globe as "best newcomer." Two years later, Life magazine included her and Marilyn Monroe in a photo spread of eight starlets.
She never made the Hollywood big time and after appearing in two forgotten Warner Brothers films, The Big Punch and The Decision of Christopher Blake, she went to Italy with friend Geraldine Brooks. Ms. MAXWELL lived in Rome for five years, making British and Italian films.
During this time, she met British television executive Peter Churchill MARRIOTT - "a handsome sardonic stranger," as she later described him. They married in 1957 and moved to London, where they had two children: daughter Melinda in 1958 and son Christian in 1959.
In 1962, Mr. MARRIOTT collapsed with a serious heart condition and Ms. MAXWELL was forced to seek film work to support the family. That year, she was given a small part as a nurse in Stanley Kubrick's Lolita and the role of Ms. Moneypenny in Doctor No, the first Bond film. Apparently, director Terrence Young, who had once turned her down for a role because she looked like she "smelled of soap," offered her the part of either Moneypenny or Bond's girlfriend, Sylvia Trench. Ms. MAXWELL was squeamish about playing sex scenes, so she chose the part of the chaste secretary to the head of MI6. She supplied her own clothes and was guaranteed two days' work at what was then the daily rate of £100. At the wrap party at the end of filming, she met Ian Fleming, the creator of the James Bond books. "I visualized Moneypenny as a tall, elegant woman with the most kissable lips in the world," Ms. MAXWELL remembered him saying. "You, my dear, are perfect."
As Moneypenny, she created a character who was cheeky and flirtatious but also knowing and impervious to the seductive prowess of a series of Bonds, including Sean Connery and her old Royal Academy of Dramatic Art pal Roger Moore. Her last Bond film was A View to a Kill in 1985. She asked producer Cubby Broccoli if he would kill off her character, but he recast it instead. Miss Moneypenny was subsequently played by Caroline Bliss and Samantha Bond.
Ms. MAXWELL, who always had ambitions beyond her secretarial character, set her sights on M, but that part was out of bounds as an equal opportunity role until Judy Dench laid claim to the position.
"She was always fun and she was wonderful to be with and was always perfect casting," Mr. Moore told the British Broadcasting Corp.'s Radio 5 Live on the weekend. "… It was a great pity that after I moved out of Bond, they didn't take her on to continue in the Timothy Dalton films. I think it was a great disappointment to her that she had not been promoted to play M. She would have been a wonderful M."
The good part about playing Miss Moneypenny was that she was so identified with the role that she became a recognizable part of popular culture. The bad part, of course, was that she was so typecast as the smouldering secretary that it became hard to win other major roles.
After Ms. MAXWELL's husband died in 1973, she returned to Canada to film a television series, Adventures in Rainbow Country. She bought a property in cottage country and a bungalow in Fort Erie, Ontario, settled down with her young children and established a company called Great Barrier Industries, which manufactured crowd-control stands. She eventually opened a British subsidiary and planned to market her barriers in Europe.
In the late 1970s, she proposed writing a column for The Toronto Sun to editor Peter WORTHINGTON and publisher Donald Creighton. They took her for a boozy lunch at Winston's, according to Mr. WORTHINGTON, and long before the coffee was served, they had a deal. She wrote her chatty, gossipy, opinionated weekly column, called "Moneypenny," for almost a dozen years.
After Kim Campbell's Progressive Conservatives went down to an ignominious defeat in the 1993 federal election, Ms. MAXWELL confided that she had declined an invitation to run. "Kim Campbell's handlers threw her to the slavering wolves," she said. "She is a gutsy, bright strong woman who didn't deserve the treatment she received from her party."
As for Ms. MAXWELL, she had her own problems in the newsroom at The Sun, according to Mr. WORTHINGTON. " There was a certain resentment that she was a celebrity getting into the column business," he said. "She was also one of the better-read people and that was a problem, too."
Her final column appeared April 23, 1994. By then, her daughter, Melinda, the married mother of a small child, was living near the market town of Frome in Somerset, England. Ms. MAXWELL decided to join them, planning to live every day, "with gusto!"
Her last film was The Fourth Angel (2001) with Jeremy Irons. The same year, she underwent surgery for colorectal cancer and then moved to Perth, Australia, where her son, Christian, and his wife had settled.
Lois Ruth MAXWELL was born in Kitchener, Ontario, on February 14, 1927. She died of cancer in Fremantle Hospital in Perth, Australia, on September 29, 2007. She was 80. Ms. MAXWELL is survived by her daughter and son and extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-12 published
Alfred POWIS, 77
Mining Powerhouse Transformed Noranda
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
Toronto -- Mining executive Alfred POWIS, who built one of the largest natural-resource conglomerates in Canada when he was the chief executive officer of Noranda Mines, died of emphysema at Saint Michael's Hospital in Toronto on Wednesday morning. He was 77.
Born and educated in Montreal, he joined Noranda in 1955, becoming president and chief executive officer in 1968, and chairman in 1977. Under his direction, Noranda's assets increased from $700-million in 1968 to $11-billion in 1995. He also served as chair of the Mining Association of Canada, was a co-founder of the Business Council on National Issues and an adviser in the Canada-U.S. free-trade negotiations.
He is survived by his wife, Louise, three children, six grandchildren and his first wife, Shirley. A private family funeral is planned followed by a celebration of his life at the York Club in Toronto on October 23.
A full obituary is forthcoming.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-13 published
Astute, hard-living mining magnate made Noranda into a resource giant
Over a span of nearly four decades, he turned the company into one of the world's largest resource-based conglomerates, writes Sandra MARTIN. By the time he was through, he had helped increase assets from $700-million to $11-billion and become a very big man on Bay Street
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
A man who loved a balance sheet and who dedicated his working life to building Noranda into a diversified resources-based conglomerate, Alfred (Alf) POWIS was a new kind of mining executive when he became president of the company in 1968. Instead of clawing his way up the mine shaft and into the executive suite, he began as a mining analyst in the insurance business. While he wasn't an M.B.A. graduate, he thought like one. "He was one smart guy and he did a tremendous job for Noranda. He was a shooter," said long-time colleague, geologist and business executive William (Bill) James.
"He was a bridge between the business sector and the public sector, and he was a very influential and positive one," said Tom Kierans, chair of Council, Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. "That's not to say he didn't understand the mining business. He did."
Mr. POWIS also enjoyed a party as much as a director's meeting. An inveterate smoker, and a man who was known to take a drink, he had enormous stamina and drive and loved to be the last man standing, or playing the piano, at social gatherings.
Alfred POWIS was born in Montreal in 1930, the eldest of two sons of Alfred and Sarah (née McCULLOCH.) His father, who was in the insurance business (Chubb), was a whiz squash player, and his mother, a homemaker, was a talented pianist. He grew up in the tony English-speaking enclave of Westmount, playing sports (especially tennis), practising the piano and attending local public schools.
Part of the generation that was too young to fight in the Second World War, he graduated from Westmount High School in 1947, went immediately to McGill University, where he earned a bachelor of commerce degree in 1951, and then to a job as a mining analyst at Sun Life Assurance Co. of Canada. In 1953, he married Shirley HALDENBY, the daughter of an executive at Dominion Securities. Their eldest child, Tim, now a television producer, was born in 1955.
The insurance business led Mr. POWIS to Noranda (now Falconbridge) headquarters in Toronto. In 1955, Mr. POWIS made an appointment with John Ross Bradfield, intending to quiz the mining company's president about Noranda's financials on behalf of his own investor clients at Sun Life. During the interview, Mr. POWIS stumped Mr. Bradfield with so many tough questions that "he felt he better hire the guy," according to Mr. James.
Mr. POWIS took the job, doubling his salary from $300 to $600 a week, and moved his family to Toronto. He and his wife subsequently had two more children, Nancy and Charles (Chuck). His rise at Noranda under Mr. Bradfield, his mentor, was meteoric. In 1958, he was assistant treasurer of the company; 10 years later, he was appointed president and chief executive officer, making him, at 38, one of the youngest chief executive officers in the country. "When I was a kid, every year there seemed to be another announcement of a promotion," his son Tim said in an interview this week.
From then until the mid-1980s, Noranda opened and acquired more than 40 mines, including Mattagami Lake Mines and Brunswick Mining and Smelting, Canadian Electrolyte Zinc, Hemlo Gold Mines, and Noranda Aluminum. In 1977, the same year that Mr. POWIS became chair of the board of Noranda in addition to president and chief executive officer, he divorced his wife and married his secretary, Louise FINLAYSON.
During Mr. POWIS's 40-year tenure at Noranda - he stepped down as chief executive officer in 1990 and chair of the board five years later - the company became one of the world's largest producers of zinc, copper, nickel and aluminum and diversified into forest products and operations in Canada, the United States and Europe and natural gas fields in Alberta and British Columbia. Assets increased from $700-million in 1968 to $11-billion in 1995, according to a citation for Mr. POWIS in the Canadian Mining Hall of Fame.
And yet, such growth has a price. A resources-based company such as Noranda had its share of suitors and predators - especially when the economy flagged. Mr. POWIS "was an exceptionally capable executive" who "knew a great deal about all aspects of his far-flung business," said former Noranda shareholder Conrad Black in an e-mail message.
"I thought he was too preoccupied with who his shareholders were and whether he would retain independence, when his role should have been doing all he could for the share price. He also had great difficulty with the cyclicality of all the resource businesses he was in. When base metals and oil and gas were up, forest products and precious metals would be down, or some such thing. He was a brilliant managerial executive, but a rather impetuous strategic and financial strategist. I always found him a very intelligent, witty, and agreeable companion [and] always a good man to join for dinner or a glass of whisky."
In October of 1979, Brascan acquired Conrad Black's 11-per-cent stake in Noranda, tried to up its ownership to 20 per cent and asked for two seats on the board of directors and one on the executive committee. "We were trying to assert, what we thought was our right to representation on the board, and he resisted that with great charm and effectiveness for some time," said Senator Trevor Eyton, then a principal in Brascan. "He was a very likeable person and highly intelligent. He knew where everybody was buried and he knew all of the facts."
Mr. POWIS "resisted" or outmanoeuvred Brascan's overtures for about two years by increasing its share offerings (and thereby diluting Brascan's holdings in Noranda) and by acquiring half of MacMillan-Bloedel (now Weyerhaeuser), the giant British Columbia forestry-products company. Finally, Brascan joined forces with Caisse de dépot, a Noranda shareholder in Quebec, and formed a new company called Brascade, which owned slightly more than 21 per cent of Noranda's shares.
Armed with this financial battering ram, Brascade had an acrimonious showdown with Mr. POWIS in August of 1981. "Finally, he succumbed and we had the representation we thought we were entitled to," Mr. Eyton said. According to Patricia Best and Ann Shortell in The Brass Ring: Power Influence and the Brascan Empire, that included six seats on the board. But that concession didn't occur until after Mr. POWIS had taken Mr. Eyton into the boardroom, shown him the 12 directors' chairs and told him there was no more room at the table. To which Mr. Eyton says he replied: "We were quite happy to sit in the second row so long as we got in the same room as everybody else."
Over the next few years, which were very tough times in the resource industries as Canada weathered a deep recession in commodity prices, combined with high interest rates, Mr. Eyton came to know Mr. POWIS as a colleague rather than an adversary, from sitting around the (expanded) board table and visiting mine sites that came complete with tours and dinners with the locals. "He always took great pleasure in arriving at these receptions early and being the last to leave, but he'd be the first one at the bus at 7 a.m. the next morning, even though he probably had two or three hours less sleep than any of us," said Mr. Eyton. "I always used to marvel at his physique. It had to have been a very strong one and he must have had very good genes, because he smoked continuously and he drank his share and more," he said. "He had tremendous stamina, great endurance and a very strong will."
Even though Mr. POWIS had been forced to put an extra leaf in the board table, he and his two closest associates, Adam Zimmerman (a chartered accountant from Clarkson Gordon who joined Noranda in 1958 as assistant comptroller and worked as executive vice-president of forestry and aluminum) and Bill James (a consulting geologist who joined the Noranda board in 1968 and began working as executive vice-president of mining in 1974), retained their jobs.
Running Noranda and its satellite companies was more than a full-time job, especially in lean times. "This is no longer a business about acquisitions, but a business of survival," Mr. Kierans, then president of McLeod Young Weir (now ScotiaMcLeod) remembers Mr. POWIS saying at Noranda's annual meeting in 1984. But Mr. POWIS also found time to serve on a number of industry, corporate and broader public boards.
Catholic in his interests and open-minded, he was big on public policy, big as a founding member of the Business Council on National Issues (now the Canadian Council on Chief Executives), big as a founding member of the C.D. Howe Institute, big as a founding member of the British North America Committee and, of course, as anybody in the resources industries would be, big on free trade with the U.S.
"He was very literate in both a financial and economic sense. He had a good mind and he liked to spar and was intellectually curious," said Thomas d'Aquino, president of the Canadian Council on Chief Executives.
In 1977, Mr. POWIS and William (Bill) Twaits of Imperial Oil brought a group of business executives together to form the Business Council on National Issues to forge connections between business and government and to have a share and a voice in the making of public policy. "At the time, the concept of corporate and social responsibility had not yet been born, so it was unusual for people to raise their noses above running their individual companies to raise the biggest issues of the day," said Mr. d'Aquino. "It was a call to arms for chief executives saying this is going to be our organization. That was groundbreaking and what made Alf POWIS a pioneer."
Darcy McKeough, treasurer and economics minister under Ontario premier Bill Davis, said: "Noranda and the mining industry generally knew that they had to get along with government and with the communities they operated in, so he took an interest in public policy, probably with regard to the mining sector, but larger than that as well."
Mr. POWIS had got his feet wet in public policy discussions with government in the early 1970s when he served on the Ontario Committee on Government Productivity. The committee's "massive report" was largely implemented after Mr. Davis became premier in 1971, according to Mr. McKeough.
"Alf got a tremendous insight into the working of the provincial government from that and a great interest in it, and he was also involved in the Mining Association [he served as president of the Mining Association of Canada from 1974 to 1975], and then forestry, and that gave him a window into Ottawa," said Mr. McKeough, who served as a member of the board of Noranda after he left politics in 1978.
Having seen Mr. POWIS from both sides of the public-private divide, Mr. McKeough said he "behaved exactly the same way - interested, knowledgeable and trying to see both points of view." Assessing him as a person of great business and personal integrity, Mr. McKeough said: "The mining industry didn't have the best reputation in those days and Alf was way out in front, insuring that they did."
The last years were not kind to Mr. POWIS, as his body succumbed to a lifetime of hard work, smoking and drinking. He was in a wheelchair when he attended the funeral of Carter, his younger brother, in July. Nearly three weeks ago, he was admitted to hospital after a fall at home.
Alfred (Alf) POWIS was born on September 16, 1930, in Montreal. He died in Saint Michael's Hospital in Toronto of emphysema on October 10, 2007. He was 77. He is survived by his wife, Louise, three children and six grandchildren. He also leaves his first wife, Shirley.
A private family funeral is planned, followed by a celebration of his life at the York Club in Toronto on October 23.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-17 published
Venture capitalist understood both ends of the corporate ladder
A man who liked to say he didn't so much as invest in a company as back a friend, his greatest success came from backing an invention by a lifelong pal, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
An astute observer of human character and an extremely successful venture capitalist, Bram APPEL grew up on St. Urbain Street in Montreal - as unlike Mordecai Richler's Duddy Kravitz as it is possible to be. He trained as a chartered accountant, but what interested him most about doing someone's books was engaging in conversation about how a business worked, and learning its strengths and weaknesses. His inquisitive mind and ability to engage people made him an appealing conversationalist, but it was his integrity and deep sense of right and wrong that made him lasting Friends on both ends of the corporate ladder.
His earliest and biggest financial success came from backing an invention by his friend David PALL, a brilliant physical chemist he had met while they were both impoverished students at McGill University in the 1930s. That initial investment of $3,000 grew like yeast. Today, Pall Corp., a leader in filtration, separations and purification applications in industry and the biological and health sciences, has annual sales in excess of $2-billion (U.S.) and a market capitalization of more than $5-billion.
"The energy and enthusiasm he had for the whole proposition of inventing products, getting them to market widely and getting an organization to succeed and to do good, but to do it at a good profit," is what Eric KRASNOFF, chair and Chief Executive Officer of Pall, remembers most about Mr. APPEL, who only retired as founder-director at 90 in 2005.
"In board meetings, the focus is on the broad picture and new products and new markets, and in the audit meetings he would concentrate on the smallest details, such as how petty cash was managed at our plant in Japan," said Mr. KRASNOFF in a telephone interview. "He believed that you can't look at everything, but, if you look very closely at some of the small things, you get a real picture of how the whole operation is managed and what the culture is. He would come at business from the high, and from the bottom up."
Short of stature, quiet of voice, large of intellect, Mr. APPEL was known as the force behind the Force - the formidable volunteer and social, artistic and political activist Bluma APPEL (obituary, July 17, 2007). Married for 67 years, they were a devoted and complementary couple. Mrs. APPEL once joked that her husband made the money and she spent it. In fact, he was a philanthropist and a supporter of cultural ventures in his own right.
Abraham (Bram) APPEL was born in Montreal in 1915, the fourth son and fifth child of Israel and Sophia (née HECHT) APPEL. The APPELs were from Silesia (most of which is now in Poland) and had immigrated to Montreal in the early years of the last century, probably after the 1905 pogrom. They brought their skills with them - he was a blacksmith, and she sold groceries. They raised their family on St. Urbain Street near Fairmont, now a fashionable part of Montreal but then a working-class and immigrant neighbourhood.
While his struggling father wanted his sons to get out of school and into the work force, Bram aspired to be a professional. With his persuasive tongue and logical mind, he might have made a fine lawyer, but he chose accountancy because it was a faster credential to acquire. He went to McGill in 1931 - when there was said to be a quota system requiring Jewish students to earn higher marks than Christians - held down three jobs (including setting pins in a bowling alley and working as a photographer's assistant), borrowed money and won a scholarship to finance his education. It was at McGill in 1933 that he met David PALL, an impoverished science student from rural Saskatchewan who would become his lifelong friend and business partner.
Mr. APPEL graduated near the top of his class with a bachelor of commerce degree in 1935 and earned his certification the following year to become one of the youngest chartered accountants in Quebec. Partly because he was a loner, partly because of anti-Semitism at the big firms, he opened his own office, Appel and Partners, a partnership that still bears his name.
That summer of 1936, David PALL lent him $35 to pay for a week at a Jewish summer resort in the Laurentians on what may well have been the vacation during which he met Bluma LEVITT, a dynamic young woman with a wry wit and a fervent passion for social justice. They married on July 11, 1940, and soon had two sons: David, who was born in 1941, and Mark, who followed three years later.
David PALL, meanwhile, had graduated with a PhD in physical chemistry from McGill in 1939 and had gone to New York - Mr. APPEL lent him money to buy some furniture for his apartment - to work on the top-secret Manhattan Project, doing research on the atomic bombs that were later dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end the Second World War. Doctor PALL, who would eventually be the named inventor on more than 180 U.S. patents, liked to chat with Bram about the commercial possibilities for some of his discoveries.
Mr. APPEL knew very little about chemistry, but he was adept at drawing people out about things that mattered to them. During a visit to New York in June of 1944, he listened to Doctor PALL talk about his belief that industry, which was becoming increasingly complicated, would need specialized filters able to cope with high pressures, elevated temperatures and corrosive atmospheres. Dr. PALL thought he would need $15,000 and two years working in his spare time to develop a porous, stainless-steel filter that he felt would have wide industrial applications. Mr. APPEL, who by then was a married man with a wife and two small children, had scraped together $3,000. "Let's go," he said, according to a well-told story. He always liked to say he didn't invest in a company, he backed his friend.
"And that is where it all begins," said his son, David. "They were silent heroes. They didn't look for any kind of recognition, they didn't have to tell you what they were doing, or how well they did. They preferred to operate in the shadows and support others, and very often a lot of what happened came through them and others got the credit."
The company, which initially was called Micro-Metallic Corp., was established in August of 1944. At first, Doctor PALL worked in his garage in Queens and Mr. APPEL travelled to New York on the overnight train once a month to do the books. Like most start-ups, the tiny company had rough times - each potential customer had idiosyncratic needs, and the filters had to be custom-designed in the late 1940s, the bookkeeper mistakenly wrote cheques overdrawing their bank account by $7,000. Mr. APPEL staved off that crisis by borrowing money from an American friend of his brother-in-law.
In 1952, Doctor PALL persuaded his next-door neighbour, Abe KRASNOFF, a Certified Public Accountant with enviable marketing acumen and organizational skills, to join the corporation. (His son Eric, who joined the company in the mid-1970s, is now the chair and Chief Executive Officer.) The company, which changed its name to Pall Corp., began to pay back on Mr. APPEL's original investment by 1958. For the rest of his life, Mr. APPEL loved to boast that he had never sold any of his shares.
Mr. APPEL was not just a businessman. He turned a chance meeting with Jean-Luc Pepin when both were passengers on a ship crossing the Atlantic in August of 1951 into another deep Friendship and career opportunity. When Mr. Pepin was appointed minister of energy, mines and resources by Lester Pearson in 1965, he called Mr. APPEL in Montreal on a Friday evening and said, according to Mr. APPEL's recounting, "You are bored as a chartered accountant, you don't need the dough - come and be my executive assistant," adding: "If you are not here Monday morning, I will have had my answer."
Mr. APPEL and his wife were there by Sunday night, in a city they barely knew, in a milieu that was foreign to them. He worked with Mr. Pepin for two years, served as a business consultant to the National Film Board's Labyrinth project for Expo 67 in Montreal, spent a year as a consultant to Gérard Pelletier in 1970 when he was secretary of state for external affairs in Pierre Trudeau's cabinet, then worked a further two years as a consultant to Mr. Pepin when he was minister of industry and trade. Mr. APPEL retired from the bureaucracy after Mr. Pepin lost his seat in the 1972 election, but the two men then joined forces in Interimco, an export trading house.
In the mid-1970s, the APPELs moved to Toronto, where they both became active (she front and centre, and he in the background) in cultural, medical, political, social and commercial projects. As a venture capitalist, Mr. APPEL backed other high-tech start-ups over the years, including Electroline Equipment, a company that manufactures devices for the cable-television industry, Interprovincial Cablevision (now Laurential Cablevision), ENS Biologicals Inc., Sciemetric Inc., and Hi-G-Tek Inc. By now a serious multimillionaire, he established Canmont Investment Corp. to manage his venture capital and portfolio investments.
In 1998, he began donating close to $200,000 a year to the Bram Appel School-Based Project in North Bay for students from junior kindergarten through Grade 1. All the children were given snacks and lunch, and signed up for cultural and sports activities after school and in the summers. The project, which Mr. APPEL funded for five years, has since become a model for a province-wide program.
Mrs. APPEL was diagnosed with lung cancer in May and died on July 14. Mr. APPEL, who was 92 and suffering from short-term memory problems, consoled himself in the lives of his children and grandchildren. On September 24, he fell and broke his hip. He survived the operation, but he couldn't rally and declined rapidly over the next two weeks.
Abraham (Bram) APPEL was born in Montreal on January 13, 1915. He died in Toronto Western Hospital on October 11, 2007. He was 92. Predeceased by his wife, Bluma, and his four siblings, he is survived by his sons David and Mark, five grandchildren and his extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-23 published
MOIR, Carol (née BLACK) (August 19, 1950-October 21, 2007)
It is with heavy hearts that we say goodbye to Carol (née BLACK) after a long and courageous battle with a rare neurological disorder.
She is survived by her mother Margaret; Husband Bill; kids Jeff, Jason, Lauren; Brother Don and wife Marg and kids Charyl (Neil), Trevor, Steven.
Carol, you have been an inspiration and joy to your family and Friends. Your dignity and grace through this has been remarkable and we have all been blessed to have been a part of your life.
The family wishes to thank the staff of the Complex Care facility at Trillium Hospital (M-site) for their compassion and care for Carol.
And to Maria ARAUJO, Elisa PERERA, Belen BRAELEY, Emma MONCAWE, Jane HALL, Nora ANG and Marna MARTIN, a simple thank you does not seem adequate enough to convey our feelings. The Friendship, care and love that you gave to Carol has been overwhelming and the family is deeply touched.
Thank you also to Doctor Tiffany CHOW, Baycrest and to Donna SCHELL of the Alzhiemer's Society of Peel for your understanding, help and guidance throughout.
Funeral Service will be held at the Glen Oaks Reception Centre Chapel, 3164 9th Line (at Dundas), Oakville (905-257-8822) on Thursday, October 25th, at 2: 30 p.m.
Donations in Carol's memory can be made to the Trillium Hospital Centre Foundation or the Alzheimer's Society of Peel.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-29 published
Pol MARTIN, 78: Epicure
By M.J. STONE, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
When a friend telephoned Pol MARTIN in the middle of her dinner party to lament the failed meal she was preparing, he told his panic-stricken friend to leave the back door open. He hurried over to her house, swept in unnoticed and deftly rescued the feast she had been attempting to orchestrate. The dinner party was a hit and none of the guests had the slightest clue that the meal had been created by one of North America's most celebrated chefs.
Although Mr. MARTIN could not make house calls to every cook in a crisis, he was welcomed into kitchens across North America, via his culinary television shows and the more than 30 cookbooks he authored. His sage advice about meal preparation centred on the basics. With proper guidance, good cooking is very simple, he said. "The more fun you have in the kitchen, the more you will want to try."
Born Pol HALNA DU FRETAY in Brittany, he was the son of an aristocratic French military officer. He grew up in a castle which he once almost set ablaze through an early attempt at cooking. He studied to become a chef at the École hôtelière de Paris and emigrated to Canada in 1954. He crossed the country working in the kitchens of the Canadian Pacific Hotel chain, before he was hired as a saucier at the Four Seasons Hotel in Manhattan. In 1967, he moved to Montreal where he managed the once chic and now-defunct restaurant, Mother Martin's. It was during his tenure there that he came to be known as Pol MARTIN. He said that his new name suited his adopted country, noting that Halna du Fretay was too high-brow for Canadian tastes.
In 1970, he began focusing on culinary education. He opened his Montreal cooking school, L'Ecole Culinaire Pol Martin, and began making appearances on French television in Quebec. In 1973, he published his first book The Art of Cooking and also hosted The Art of Cooking, a nationally broadcast CTV television program. Lighthearted, and blessed with an infectious sense of humour, his personality was a perfect fit for the small screen. In 1981, three years after the show went off the air, Mr. MARTIN closed his cooking school and moved to Port Credit, Ontario There, he devoted himself to writing such books as Love at First Bite and Smart and Simple Cooking while simultaneously managing two French-language culinary magazines, Télé-cuisine and Santé menu.
Mr. MARTIN remained a much sought-after guest on television and radio talk shows across North America. He was a huge hit on Live with Regis and Kathie Lee and is remembered today by the producer, Victoria Lang, as one of funniest chefs to appear on the show. She also liked his recipes. "Anybody can look at Easy Cooking and complete a recipe successfully. I have a lot of cookbooks, but I especially like this one."
What made his cookbooks so successful was a culinary philosophy that centred around the idea that should be mere starting points. They were not meant to be followed religiously. Mr. MARTIN described his recipes as dependable, simple dishes that allow cooks to improvise, so that it can be made by everyone, not just gourmets. "I have vulgarized French food," he once said during an interview.
His daughter, Melissa HALNA DU FRETAY, said that, as a child, the kitchen had been the centre of family life. "My brother and I served the multi-course dinners that my father and mother would host at our family home in Pointe Claire. We learned early about table etiquette and hospitality. Those dinners were always joyous events in an era when a five-hour dinner was normal. Or at least it was at our house."
Pol MARTIN was born in Nantes, France, on August 3, 1929. He died of cancer at home in Carlisle, Ontario, on September 16, 2007. He was 78. He is survived by his second wife, Suzanne, and by three children from a previous marriage, Melissa, Brett and Abigail.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-02 published
RICHARDSON, Gordon Macpherson
(Former President of Richardson Agencies Limited)
Passed away peacefully after a courageous battle with cancer at Southlake Regional Health Center, Newmarket, Ontario on Wednesday, October 31, 2007. Gord RICHARDSON, beloved husband of Beth RICHARDSON (née MARTIN.) Dear father of David (Reno, Nevada,) Gordon and his wife Christine (Erin, Ontario), Catherine and her husband Joseph BOLLA (Toronto, Ontario), Patricia Richardson CLARE (Newmarket, Ontario) and Charles "Chuck" (Toronto, Ontario). Fond grandfather of Taunya, Katie, Jessie, Jason, Alexandra, Sarah, Megan and Jillian. A family interment will be held in Briar Hill Cemetery, Sutton, Ontario. Memorial donations to Southlake Regional Health Center, Newmarket, would be appreciated by the family. Arrangement in care of the Forrest and Taylor Funeral Home, Sutton, 905-722-3274.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-06 published
SIMMONDS, Marlene Helen - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Marlene Helen SIMMONDS, late of the City of Toronto, who died April 4, 2006, must be in our hands by Friday, December 14, 2007, after which date the estate will be distributed.
Dated at Toronto, this 29th day of October, 2007
John MAYHUE, Estate Trustee For the Estate of Marlene Helen SIMMONDS c/o William D. MARTIN
Barrister and Solicitor
1152 Yonge Street
Toronto, Ontario M4W 2L9
Page B17

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-06 published
'Brilliant teacher' and professor explained politics to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation viewers
Political scientist triumphed not only as a scholar but also as a commentator. He could explain even the most erudite concepts succinctly and without condescension, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
In the great triumvirate of scholarship, administration and teaching, by which academics tend to be graded, political scientist Paul FOX's contribution lay in all three areas - but above all in the classroom.
"He was the most popular teacher in a very big department, one that prided itself on teaching," said his former colleague, the political scientist J.T. McLeod (who writes fiction under the name Jack MacLeod). "He had a wonderful ironic wit and he could make the study of politics very lively, and about people, not just about laws and constitutions. He was a brilliant teacher." Beginning in 1962, Prof. FOX was the lead editor of Politics: Canada, a collection of readings that went through eight editions and which for many years was the most widely used undergraduate textbook in the subject.
Prof. FOX "was one of those remarkable academic administrators who's a true gentleman," said philosopher Paul GOOCH, president of Victoria College in the University of Toronto. "He was a man of unfailing courtesy. That was my initial and lasting impression," he said of the man who served two terms as principal of Erindale College (from 1976-1986) on the Mississauga Campus of the University of Toronto and then sat on the Board of Regents at Victoria, after he retired from teaching.
The opposite of an ivory tower academic, Prof. FOX gave his discipline a public face through his accessibility to journalists - eager for sound bites and pithy comments - and his many appearances as a political commentator on radio and television and in print, especially during political campaigns and election-night coverage. Rail thin, with a glint of humour in his eyes, he could explain even the most erudite concepts succinctly and without condescension.
"He was humane, and he brought the world of politics to you in a way which made you feel that you could not only understand it, but participate in it," former governor-general Adrienne Clarkson said. The two met in 1965 when Ms. Clarkson was co-host of Take Thirty on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television. Prof. FOX, who shared in the "entertain-and-learn-along-the-way philosophy" of the program was a regular guest on Take Thirty for a decade. "I have not high enough words of praise for this man," Ms. Clarkson said.
Paul Wesley FOX was born in 1921, the younger of two sons of Paul Hazelton and Ida (née MEREDITH) FOX. On his father's side, his family pre-dated the United Empire Loyalists, having emigrated from the American Colonies to what is now Nova Scotia in the early 1760s. His mother's family heritage was English and Welsh. His father worked for the Canadian National Railway as an assistant superintendent of operations for several branch lines in eastern Ontario, and his mother was a homemaker.
Paul and his older brother Arthur were born in Orillia, Ontario, their mother's home town, probably because his father was at that time posted in northern Ontario. The family moved to Ottawa when Mr. FOX was transferred there by the Canadian National Railway. Paul went to First Avenue School, then Glebe Collegiate and finished high school in Barrie, after his father was transferred there.
He went to Victoria College in the University of Toronto in 1940 and volunteered in the Canadian officers Training Corps. An excellent student, Mr. FOX graduated in 1944 with the Ames gold medal in political economy and the Men's Senior Stick (an award given by the student body to the student they feel has made the greatest contribution) at Victoria College. He immediately was posted for officer training at an army camp in Brockville, Ontario, and then, with the rank of lieutenant, to what was then called Camp Utopia, near Gagetown, New Brunswick The war ended before he could be shipped overseas.
He went back to the University of Toronto in the fall of 1945 to undertake studies for a masters degree in political science, which he completed in 1947, while working in the department as a research associate. He won a British Council Scholarship and probably completed the residency requirements for his doctorate at the London School of Economics the following year, before interrupting his education to teach at what was then called Carleton College in Ottawa from 1948 to 1954. That's where he met Joan GLADWIN. They were married on June 20, 1951, and eventually had three sons, Rowley, Bruce and Nicholas.
The family moved to Toronto in 1954 after Mr. FOX accepted an appointment as an assistant professor at the University of Toronto in what was then called the Department of Economics and Political Economy. At the same time, he continued work on his doctoral thesis and received his doctorate from the University of London in 1959.
Prof. McLeod arrived at the University of Toronto from Saskatchewan in October, 1955 to begin his doctorate in political science and almost immediately met Prof. FOX. "He and his wife had me to dinner, the day we met, and I thought 'isn't Toronto such a friendly place,' and I never got invited any place else for about five years," Prof. McLeod said with a chuckle.
"He was a pleasure to work with and a privilege to know. Thoughtful, helpful co-operative and always ready to give sensible advice&hellip and a good man. I never heard anybody say anything critical of him."
Political scientist David COOK, now the principal of Victoria College, still remembers being in Prof. FOX's Politics 100 class when he was an undergraduate in the mid-sixties. The textbook was the second edition of Politics: Canada, edited by Prof. FOX. "He was a tremendous teacher with a wonderful sense of humour who knew many stories about political figures and could weave them into his teaching of the elementary aspects of Canadian government," according to Prof. COOK.
"He was able to establish an intimacy with the class" even in a large lecture hall. "You liked the man immediately."
Besides Politics: Canada, Prof. FOX was also the senior Canadian editor of The World Almanac from 1972-78, the general editor of the 24-book series, Politics, co-editor of the Canadian Journal of Political Science from 1974-77 and president of the Canadian Political Science Association from 1979-80. He also served on the Advisory Committee on Research for the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism 1964-68, the Ontario Advisory Committee on Confederation from 1965-71, and as chair of the Ontario Council on University Affairs from 1987-88.
He was a mentor to younger academic colleagues and a very successful principal of Erindale College, according to Prof. COOK, who spent many years in the central administration of the university and had many opportunities to observe Prof. FOX in action. "He had an amazing ability to make relationships work and he transformed Erindale's relationship with the community in Mississauga," Prof. COOK said. "He delegated well and he gave the college a sense of itself."
After teaching at the University of Toronto for more than 30 years, Prof. FOX officially retired in 1987 and was named an emeritus professor. He returned to the college where he had spent his undergraduate years and served as Senior Research Associate from 1988-2004 and on the board of Regents, including a term as chair.
About three years ago, Prof. FOX developed pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive disease in which the air sacs of the lungs become replaced by fibrotic tissue, making it very difficult for the lungs to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream. He managed with supplementary oxygen but declined in the last year and went into palliative care at Grace Hospital in Toronto just after Thanksgiving.
Paul Wesley FOX, O.C., was born in Orillia, Ont, on September 22, 1921 and died in Toronto on October 18, 2007, of complications from pulmonary fibrosis. He was 86. He is survived by his wife Joan, his three sons, two grand_sons, his older brother Arthur and his extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-10 published
Doctor won Military Cross for bravery in a raging tank battle in North Africa
Trained in Toronto, he was seconded to the British Army to become a battalion medical officer at Tobruk, writes Sandra MARTIN. He was captured and spent the rest of the war treating PoWs
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
Shy, smart and athletic, Allen GRAHAM graduated from medical school a few months before Canada entered the Second World War. Less than two years later he had exchanged his intern's whites for a khaki uniform. As a member of the medical corps, Lieutenant GRAHAM was not supposed to be directly involved in fighting the enemy. Instead, he was expected to provide medical services when soldiers fell ill, and to care for the wounded. Instead, he was decorated for bravery in North Africa, captured by the Germans and spent most of the war behind enemy lines treating the sick and dying in prisoner of war Camps.
Allen Frederic GRAHAM was born in the middle of the First World War, the third of four children of Doctor Joseph and Eleanor (née BOYD) GRAHAM. On his mother's side he was the grand_son of Sir John Alexander BOYD, a very prominent lawyer and judge in the late 19th century. After Allen's father died when he was 11, the bereaved boy's godfather, J.P. BICKELL, the millionaire mining executive and part-owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs, provided the funds to send him to St. Andrew's College in 1927.
Boxing Champion
In his six years at the boarding school for boys located in Aurora, Ontario, Allen excelled both academically and athletically. He played cricket and was on both the first rugby and hockey teams and was the boxing champion in June, 1932, according to the school's records. He was also a prefect and won the Old Boy's Medal in math when he graduated in 1933.
After St. Andrew's, he went to the University of Toronto, graduating in medicine in 1939. He had served in the General Reserve of Officers Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps (R.F.) while he was at university, and was an intern at the Toronto General Hospital when the Second World War broke out. On July 1, 1941, he enlisted as a lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps. He was quickly seconded to the Royal Army Medical Corps and shipped to England for training and then to Cairo. The British got a bonus in Lt. GRAHAM, according to his family, because he introduced his cricket-playing colleagues to the North American game of baseball.
He probably first saw action with British Forces at Tobruk, the heavily fortified and strategically located fortress in Libya that was hotly contested by Axis and Allied powers. But it was his courageous actions at the Gulf of Sidra, a body of water on the northern coast of Libya, that earned him promotion to the rank of captain and the Military Cross "in recognition of gallant and distinguished service in the Middle East."
The citation, which was published in the Canada Gazette on November 5, 1942, stated: "During the attack on El Sidra on 5 June 1942, this officer [Capt. Allen Frederic GRAHAM] was the battalion medical officer. He followed closely behind the attacking tanks, but realizing that a smokescreen put down by the enemy obscured his view, he brought his un-armoured vehicle to the forefront of the tank battle. There, in his truck or on foot, despite the battle raging around him, and the intense artillery and machine-gun fire of the enemy, he calmly proceeded from one damaged tank to another, evacuating the casualties and rendering first aid. He showed complete disregard for his own personal safety in the execution of his duty and his bravery was responsible for saving many lives."
Capt. GRAHAM was captured during the offensive led by The Desert Fox, German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, and his Afrika Korps Panzer tanks on Tobruk in May and June of 1942. (Tobruk remained under Axis control until the Allies re-took it after the Second Battle of El Alamein in November, 1942). After his capture, he continued working as a doctor, but tended to Allied prisoners of war from all over the world.
He was sent first to Italy "in such a dilapidated aircraft that he doubted they would reach their destination," according to an account written by W.G. Cosbie in his book, The Toronto General Hospital 1819-1965: A Chronicle, and then to Lamsdorf in Poland, the notorious Stalag VIII-B (later renumbered Stalag-344) that had been the site of PoW camps since the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. It was there that the Germans had incarcerated Polish PoWs after invading Poland in 1939. Approximately 100,000 Allied PoWs eventually spent time in this over-crowded camp.
After having been incarcerated in Lamsdorf for nine months, Captain GRAHAM was moved to Stalag Luft III, a primary PoW camp for Allied officers in Sagan, about 170 kilometres southeast of Berlin. This camp was famous for the number of times PoWs attempted to flee their captors, including the major break from the British compound on March 24, 1944 that was the basis for the book and the movie entitled The Great Escape. Of the almost 80 prisoners who crawled out of camp through a tunnel 102 metres feet in length, dug nine metres below ground level, only three made it to neutral territory. The rest were recaptured, and 50 of them were executed.
Death March
Capt. GRAHAM's main job, according to an interview that he gave to The Globe and Mail on his return to Canada in June, 1945, was taking care of prisoners "who were unable to march." As the balance of power shifted after the D-Day invasion of Normandy in June, 1944, and Allied forces moved eastward through France and westward from Russia hoping to join up west of Berlin, the Germans began evacuating some of their PoW camps by forcing their prisoners on "death marches," or by cramming them into box cars on railway lines. Capt. GRAHAM's patients were the PoWs who were too weak or sickly to be transported.
Like many veterans, Capt. GRAHAM didn't like to discuss the horrors he had seen and experienced, but he did tell his daughters how frustrating it had been to try to treat PoWs when he had virtually no medical supplies. He was always performing triage and making horrific decisions about who was likely to die and who might survive with a dose of his paltry drugs. When the first Red Cross parcels, containing the miracle drug penicillin, arrived late in the war, he was jubilant.
The Russians liberated Capt. GRAHAM's camp in March, 1945, and he finally began his long trek home. He told his family later that the Russians separated the officers from the enlisted ranks and fed them a meal of pigs' feet slathered with sour cream, washed down with vodka. It was far too rich for men accustomed to nothing more nutritious than black bread and water. Capt. GRAHAM was so nauseated that he went outside to be sick and fell head first into an open grave.
Many of the troops and the other PoWs began looting German houses, but all that Capt. GRAHAM wanted was a knife and a fork and a napkin ring - symbols of the civilized life he had left behind three years earlier. The GRAHAMs still have that "liberated" napkin ring, dated 1576.
Along with other Canadian PoWs, representing 48 different ranks, he travelled with Russian troops by box car, bicycle and on foot through war-devastated Poland and Ukraine. The Canadian PoWs embarked by ship from Odessa on the Black Sea. Capt. GRAHAM arrived at Union Station in Toronto on June 12, 1945, where he was greeted by his widowed mother and by a reporter and a photographer from The Globe and Mail.
Two months later, on Victory over Japan day in mid-August, 1945, he met Helen HAWKER at a celebratory party at his mother's big house on St. Clair Avenue in Toronto. Ms. HAWKER, who had arrived with another man, noticed tall, skinny Capt. GRAHAM sitting alone on a sofa under the stairs. Wondering who he was, she asked her friend, James GRAHAM, the veteran's name. "Oh, that's my brother, Allen," he replied, according to a well-told family story. "He's just back from the war. Don't pay any attention to him. He's boring." Ignoring this caution, Ms. HAWKER introduced herself and spent the rest of the evening by Capt. GRAHAM's side - while her date finally went home alone.
Elopement
Five months later, they eloped to New York, where they were married on January 28, 1946. This past January they celebrated their 61st wedding anniversary. Together, they raised two daughters, Shari Graham FELL and Annabel GRAHAM.
After Capt. GRAHAM was demobilized, he returned to his medical studies, qualified as a specialist in internal medicine and became a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (Canada) in the late 1940s. Doctor GRAHAM had privileges at Toronto General Hospital for many years, and saw patients at his offices in the Medical Arts Building at St. George and Bloor Streets in midtown Toronto for more than 50 years.
The GRAHAMs summered at Goodcheer Island in Georgian Bay and spent winters and weekends at "Hawksprings," their home in the Hockley Valley. Doctor GRAHAM finally retired when he was 80. After a long, healthy life, he fell ill last month with interstitial pneumonitis, a disease that is not usually responsive to antibiotics and causes a progressive shortness of breath.
Allen Frederic GRAHAM, M. C, was born in Toronto on October 2, 1915. He died in Toronto General Hospital on Wed., October 24, 2007. He was 92. Predeceased by his three siblings, he is survived by his wife Helen, his daughters Shari and Annabel, four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and his extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-13 published
SIMMONDS, Marlene Helen - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Marlene Helen SIMMONDS, late of the City of Toronto, who died April 4, 2006, must be in our hands by Friday, December 14, 2007, after which date the estate will be distributed.
Dated at Toronto, this 29th day of October, 2007
John MAYHUE, Estate Trustee For the Estate of Marlene Helen SIMMONDS c/o William D. MARTIN
Barrister and Solicitor
1152 Yonge Street
Toronto, Ontario M4W 2L9
Page B13

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-20 published
SIMMONDS, Marlene Helen - Estate of
Notice To Creditors And Others
All claims against the estate of Marlene Helen SIMMONDS, late of the City of Toronto, who died April 4, 2006, must be in our hands by Friday, December 14, 2007, after which date the estate will be distributed.
Dated at Toronto, this 29th day of October, 2007
John MAYHUE, Estate Trustee For the Estate of Marlene Helen SIMMONDS c/o William D. MARTIN
Barrister and Solicitor
1152 Yonge Street
Toronto, Ontario M4W 2L9
Page B17

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-24 published
'Ambassador of the saxophone' was a champion of his own virtuosity
Musician who fell in love with the sax as a boy probably performed more music for the instrument than anyone in history, writes Sandra MARTIN. He was also a tireless and polished self-promoter who even invented a fictional front man to ensure concert bookings
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
The man and his instrument. During his 50-year career as a professional musician, Paul BRODIE, "the ambassador of the saxophone," probably played more concerts, recorded more albums, toured more countries and taught more private students than any classical saxophonist of his or any other day. He was the champion not only of his own virtuosity as a player, but of the saxophone as a musical instrument.
The saxophone, invented by Belgian Adolphe Sax in Paris in the 1840s, is a hybrid that combines the volume and carrying power of brass with the intricate key work and technical finesse of woodwinds. Although some modern classical composers have written for the saxophone, it is still mainly played in military and blues bands and jazz combos. Mr. BRODIE tried to change that.
"He was a master promoter and the saxophone needed someone like Paul, because as an instrument, it was invented late in the history of music, so it was shut out of orchestral circles," said his former student, concert saxophonist and composer Daniel Rubinoff "The great composers had already established the orchestra and composers in Europe didn't really want to take a chance on this latecomer.
Mr. BRODIE was the first person to teach saxophone at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He was not himself a composer, but he persuaded composers such as Srul Irving Glick, John Weinzweig, Bruce Mather and Violet Archer to write daunting music for the saxophone. In his quest to promote the saxophone he co-founded the World Saxophone Congress with Eugene Rousseau in Chicago in 1969 to bring players, critics, composers and audiences together in a different city every four years.
"He built a career for himself. He was an incredible worker, he believed in himself totally and he never looked back," said Jean-Guy BRAULT, a flutist with the National Arts Centre Orchestra for more than 30 years. "He was an icon in the saxophone world - in the classical sense, but he also taught many jazz saxophonists," said Mr. BRAULT. "He changed my life. He opened my eyes to so many things - the realities of the professional music world," he said. "I owe a lot to him."
Paul (Zion) BRODIE was born in Montreal in the bitterest depths of the Depression, the younger son of Sam and Florence (née SCHILLER.) When Paul was 10 months old, his father, who ran a dry goods store, moved his family to the north end of Winnipeg, where he found work selling radios in an appliance store. The family moved again when Paul was 11, to Regina in neighbouring Saskatchewan.
He went to Strathcona School, sang in the junior choir at synagogue and played the clarinet in the Regina Lions Junior Band. In high school, the only subject that interested him was music. Sick in bed with a cold one day in Grade 10, he heard Freddie Gardner play I'm in the Mood for Love on the saxophone.
He was besotted with the sound and immediately decided to switch instruments. Goodbye clarinet. Hello saxophone.
He earned money to buy a saxophone working at a local deli, but he couldn't find a woodwind teacher and so transferred what he knew about playing the clarinet to the saxophone.
After graduating from high school in 1952, he packed his sax and his clarinet and headed to Winnipeg where he entered United College, but failed miserably in a pre-law program. With support from his high-school music teacher, he was accepted the following year at the University of Michigan, where Larry Teal taught the saxophone.
In one of his first classes in the history of music he heard a recording of French classical saxophone virtuoso Marcel Mule playing the alto sax. His ambitions changed; whereas he once hoped to be good enough to play in a band led by a musician of the calibre of Tommy Dorsey or Les Brown, he now considered the possibilities of becoming a classical saxophonist.
He joined the university band under conductor William Revelli and played the bass saxophone when they performed in Carnegie Hall in April, 1954. He also formed a dance combo called The Stardusters, which helped earn tuition money and taught him a great deal about the business of promoting and organizing a group.
After graduating with a bachelor's degree in music education and a master's degree in performance in December, 1957, he went to Paris to study with maestro Marcel Mule. Back in Canada, he moved to Toronto and looked for a job teaching saxophone.
"The Royal Conservatory of Music is now in its 72nd year and we have never allowed a saxophone in the building," protested Ettore MAZZOLINI, director of the Royal Conservatory of Music, but the ever-persuasive Mr. BRODIE succeeded in getting an audition and played so well he broke the embargo. He was a woodwinds instructor from 1959 to 1960. Soon, he was also playing on an occasional basis for the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and doing regional tours with Jeunesses Musicales du Canada, first with pianist George Brough and then with Colombe Pelletier as his accompanist.
Late in November, 1959, a musician friend introduced Mr. BRODIE to Rima GOODMAN, a modern dancer (and later a fibre artist) who worked in New York, but whose parents lived in Toronto. They were married on March 13, 1960. Their daughter, Claire, was born in October, 1964.
Mr. BRODIE made his debut as a soloist with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra at a Sunday afternoon concert on December 27, 1959, with Walter SUSKIND conducting and his New York debut at the Town Hall on November 18, 1960, with George Brough accompanying him on the piano and Mrs. BRODIE turning pages.
There were only about 45 people in the audience, but one of them was Raymond Erickson, the music critic for The New York Times. "Mr. BRODIE's skill made everything he played sound fluent and easy although the music was studded with technical difficulties&hellip producing a lovely soft tone when he wanted to… in his splendidly vital performance," he wrote. A jubilant Mr. BRODIE phoned the Canadian Wire Service and begged them to pick up Mr. Erickson's review, which they obligingly did, flashing the news about the Canadian native's success in the Big Apple. Mr. BRODIE carried that tattered clipping in his wallet for the rest of his life.
Because two performance careers in one family meant too much travelling for a couple that wanted to stay together, the BRODIEs decided to make their base in Toronto. There, they established the Brodie School of Music and Modern Dance early in 1961 in a former furniture store. The dance studio was on the ground floor, six music studios were in the basement and the second floor had two apartments. They lived in one and turned the other into an additional five music studios.
One of his first students was Jean-Guy BRAULT, who had played saxophone for fun while studying philosophy at university. He studied saxophone, clarinet and flute for about two years and then began teaching in the Brodie school before taking a master's degree at the University of Michigan with Mr. BRODIE's old teacher, Larry Teal. "He was a fantastic teacher," Mr. BRAULT said of his mentor, describing Mr. BRODIE as "encouraging and never flinching."
When the National Arts Centre was looking for players for its new orchestra in 1969, Mr. BRAULT auditioned and got a job as second flutist. He played with the orchestra for more than 30 years, retiring in 2002 after a concert with jazz singer Cleo Laine and her saxophonist husband, John Dankworth
The BRODIEs ran their school for nearly 20 years, employing about 20 music and dance teachers, and training about 650 students a season - among them Willem Moolenbeek, Lawrence Sereda, Robert Pusching, John Price and Robert Bauer. Mr. BRODIE also taught woodwinds at the University of Toronto from 1968 to 1973 and formed a quartet in 1972 to showcase his own playing and the work of a revolving group of three students. The Paul Brodie Saxophone Quartet played at the World Saxophone Congress in London in 1976 and in the 1981 film Circle of Two.
Never a slouch when it came to self-promotion, the canny Mr. BRODIE invented a fictitious character, Ronald Joy, to serve as his front man in booking concerts. After printing business cards and letterhead, the BRODIEs and some of their students stuffed envelopes and sent them to more than 5,000 concert sponsors throughout North America. When potential sponsors called the school asking for Mr. Joy, the call would be put through to Mr. BRODIE who would lower his voice by a couple of octaves and start bargaining performance fees, hotel rates and dates. Mr. Joy booked nearly 800 concerts for his "client" in the next two decades and also promoted Mrs. BRODIE's career as a sculptor and fibre artist.
Mr. BRODIE was playing his saxophone in his music studio one day in 1978, when the phone rang. The caller was actor Warren Beatty, casually inquiring if he could use a recording of Mr. BRODIE playing the saxophone in Heaven Can Wait, his movie about a football player who also plays the soprano sax. An amateur saxophonist, Mr. Beatty believed that Mr. BRODIE's recording of the fourth movement from Handel's Sonata No. 3 would be perfect background music for the scene in which Mr. Beatty's character plays football with his servants.
After agreeing on terms, Mr. BRODIE put his promotional skills to work. Before long "the Canadian media somehow got the idea that a Canadian saxophonist was being featured throughout the film," according to the account that Mr. BRODIE related in his autobiography, Ambassador of the Saxophone. When Heaven Can Wait was nominated for several academy awards, the BRODIEs and Claire (then 13) flew to Los Angeles, where Mr. BRODIE sent 250 postcards pumping his connection with the film To Canadian media and arranged to do a live telephone interview with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television the day after the ceremonies.
The following year, the BRODIEs closed down their school and the quartet. The lease was up, he was in "phone ringing-off-the-hook" demand after the release of Heaven Can Wait and she was "wildly busy" with commissions for her work as a fibre artist. He never stopped teaching, however, either privately in a smaller studio or at York University, where he taught from 1982 until the late 1990s.
Concert saxophonist and composer Daniel Rubinoff was one of his last students. "I needed a mentor and I found one," he said in a telephone interview. After studying in Europe, he worked with Mr. BRODIE for 18 months beginning in 1995 and won the gold medal at the Royal Conservatory for the ARCT exams in 1997.
"One of the things about Paul's legacy is that he realized that you had to practice the saxophone to become as good a performer as you could possibly be, but you also had to be a tireless promoter," Mr. Rubinoff said. "He was a wonderful business person and he passed that on to people like me." How to have a career as a concert saxophonist, how to talk to an audience, how to be tough about criticism, how to cold call a concert promoter and how to set up a teaching studio, were among the synergistic "life lessons" that Mr. Rubinoff learned from Mr. BRODIE.
About seven years ago, Mr. BRODIE, who was suffering from high blood pressure and diabetes, developed an aortic dissection - a tear in the walls of the aorta which is frequently fatal. "Miraculously" without surgery "his body glued itself back together," according to Mr. BRODIE's daughter, Claire. "The last seven years were a gift."
Earlier this fall, a Magnetic Resonance Image revealed an enormous aneurysm in Mr. BRODIE's aorta. Mr. BRODIE asked if he had time to make a CD of favourite pieces with harpist Erica GOODMAN before undergoing surgery. (The CD, which was recorded at Grace Church on the Hill in Toronto, will be released shortly.) On Monday morning Mr. BRODIE was wheeled into surgery, but three-quarters of the way through the long operation, his heart gave out.
Paul Zion BRODIE, O.C., was born in Montreal on April 10, 1934. He died during heart surgery at Sunnybrook Hospital on November 19, 2007. He was 73. Predeceased by his parents, he leaves his wife, Rima, his daughter Claire and an older brother.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-03 published
He served with the British at Tobruk and became major-general in North Atlantic Treaty Organization
As an officer cadet at Royal Military College in Kingston, he was so impatient to fight in the Second World War that he joined the British Army, writes Sandra MARTIN. As a prisoner of war, he was branded an 'incorrigible escaper'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
A charismatic career soldier, James GARDNER enlisted in the British Army early in the Second World War because he wanted to fight in a tank corps, but spent most of the war as an incorrigible escaper from German prisoner of war camps. He lived to tell many tales of his escapades behind enemy lines and to serve with great distinction in the peacetime army of the Canadian Forces.
James Charlton GARDNER was born in Regina in 1920, the middle child and only son of Norman and Gertrude (née MORGAN) GARDNER. His father was a businessman and his mother was a nurse. When he was in grade 11 at Regina's Central Collegiate he met Joyce (Joy) Morgan, who was a year younger, and they began dating. After high school, he entered The Royal Military College in Kingston in the fall of 1938 because he had "always wanted to join the military and serve his country."
He was eager to go overseas after the war erupted in September, 1939, and keenly wanted to join a tank corps. Canada didn't have one, so in 1940 he quit Royal Military College and enlisted in the British Army, where he was posted to the Royal Tank Regiment and served in the Eighth Army in North Africa. He saw action and was captured when the Eighth Army crossed from Egypt into Libya in November, 1941, and tried to relieve Tobruk, which was besieged by German forces under the command of General Erwin Rommel.
By all accounts, Lieutenant GARDNER was a resolute, athletic and patriotic young man who was determined to escape his German captors and get back to the front lines. After making it back to his regiment, he was captured again.
Stories abound about his escapades as a prisoner of war over the next three years. A skilled bridge player, he was invited to be the fourth in a regular match with three well-heeled British aristocrats. Once, after trying and failing to escape, he heard one of the other players shout, " GARDNER, you have ruined our bridge game," as he was marched back into the prisoner of war camp for a stint in solitary confinement.
As the war continued and the Allies, under Gen. Bernard Montgomery, began to make inroads against Gen. Rommel, the Germans decided to transfer their prisoners of war by ship from Africa to Italy. The prisoners, who included a goodly number of sailors, plotted to overtake the ship once it was at sea. A mole reported the scheme to the Germans, who immediately changed plans to send the prisoners of war by submarine, according to a tale that Lieut. GARDNER loved to tell years later in the officers mess. After that experience, he said he never wanted to sail in a submarine again.
However he made it across the Mediterranean Sea, he was delivered to a prisoner of war camp in southern Italy. He escaped from there and began walking "up the boot" hoping to connect with Allied forces, having heard rumours that they had made large-scale amphibious landings at Salerno near Naples in September, 1943.
Another story has him identified as "an incorrigible escaper" who was being sent by train to Germany to a more secure prisoner of war camp along the lines of Colditz Castle near Dresden. Somewhere south of Milan, he managed to jump off the train onto a truck and slide under its tarpaulin until he could evade his captors.
According to another account, Lieut. GARDNER was hiding in woods by the side of a road when a strange vehicle, which turned out to be a jeep, which had gone into full production while he was a prisoner of war, stopped and two English-speaking soldiers got out. They were laying line for an observation post. Recognizing the soldiers by their English accents and their "blue" language, he surrendered, was interrogated and was shipped to a base hospital in Algiers. He was finally transferred to the Canadian forces and sent home in late spring, 1944.
In June, he became engaged to Joyce, his loyal Regina girlfriend, and that November they were married in Winnipeg. They went east to his first posting as a lieutenant at Camp Borden near Barrie, Ontario
Lieut. GARDNER was unusual as an aspiring officer in the postwar Canadian military. He had no common experience with the other applicants for the regular army because his active service had all been with the British Forces, said retired Major-General Philip Neatby. "He was an anomaly in that all the other applicants were 'macaroni eaters' in the Italian campaign or else they had served in northwest Europe, but he had done neither," he said. "Therefore his peers had no notion of how good a soldier he had been and what his experience had been, so his reputation, which developed rapidly, was based on his [performance] as a very, very solid, competent staff officer."
He was posted to Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians) and was made second-in-command by 1956. Two years later he was promoted to lieutenant-colonel. "He was a firm believer that soldiers expect to be properly trained, properly led and properly equipped. And by properly led [I mean] by people who are competent, who anticipate what the challenges are going to be and who train the men properly for them and [ensure] that they are never committed to unnecessary risk or unnecessary work," Maj.-Gen. Neatby said. "Everything is purposeful and that is exactly the way he operated."
As the Cold War ramped up in the mid-1950s, the Department of National Defence decided to add a fourth armoured regiment to the regular army. On October 10, 1958, the brass announced that the new regiment, which was called the 1st Fort Garry Horse, would be based at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa in the Ottawa Valley under the command of Lt.-Col. GARDNER. (The militia regiment in Winnipeg became the 2nd Fort Garry Horse.) The regiment's first Centurion tank rolled past George Pearkes, the defence minister in prime minister John Diefenbaker's government, on November 19, 1958.
"He was a totally dedicated individual and probably one of the finest trainers I ever served under," said Colonel John Roderick, who joined the Fort Garry Horse in 1961. "We were training for war, notwithstanding we were in Camp Petawawa. It was as though we were facing the Russians on the other side of the Ottawa River. It was that level of intensity," he said. "He set the standards for the rest of my career."
Because of Lt.-Col. GARDNER's lofty reputation as a military instructor, he was replaced at the Fort Garry Horse in August, 1961, and sent back to Royal Military College, the same school he had left two decades earlier without a degree. There he worked as director of cadets, a position he held for three years.
It was an unusual posting for a former commanding officer, according to Col. Roderick. "He was sent in to put the military back in the Royal Military College. If you wanted something done right you got Jimmie GARDNER to do it."
The Fort Garry Horse was disbanded in 1970 in an overall reduction of the armed forces ordered by then prime minister Pierre Trudeau its remaining members were absorbed into Lord Strathcona's Horse.
After Royal Military College and a brief posting in Ottawa, Lt.-Col. GARDNER was one of more than 30 military personnel who went to Tanzania as military advisers as part of Canada's contribution to the newly sovereign country's defence and security forces. He was in Tanzania for about two years from 1964 to early 1966.
Another short posting in Ottawa followed. He was promoted to colonel and sent to Britain to the Imperial Defence College (now the Royal College of Defence Studies), an organization that trains senior officers for executive responsibility by "developing their analytical powers, knowledge of defence and international security, and strategic vision."
After finishing his course work, he was promoted to brigadier-general and sent to Germany as commander of the 4 Canadian Mechanized Brigade Group in Soest from 1968 to July, 1970. Canada's North Atlantic Treaty Organization Brigade served in Germany from 1951 to 1993 - from the beginnings of the Cold War through the collapse of the Soviet Union.
Again he went back to Ottawa for another two years, then to Brussels in about 1973, serving with North Atlantic Treaty Organization until 1975, when he retired from active service with the Canadian Armed Forces at 55 as a major-general.
Lord Strathcona's Horse appointed him colonel of the regiment, a position he held from November, 1978, to 1982. Two momentous events occurred during his tenure. A Canadian Pacific train carrying explosive and poisonous chemicals derailed in Mississauga on November 10, 1979. The toxic spill precipitated the evacuation of more than 200,000 people, and Maj.-Gen. GARDNER was called in to help plan and execute what was then the largest-ever peacetime exodus. Less than two years later, he and his wife were invited to the wedding of Prince Charles, the regiment's colonel-in-chief, and Lady Diana Spencer at Saint Paul's Cathedral in London on July 29, Unlike many former soldiers who retired from the armed forces, he had no urge to work in academia or the private sector. His goal was to play golf and enjoy life. He and his wife moved to Barrie in the mid-1970s. After she suffered a stroke in the late 1980s, he became her principal caregiver. In May, 1994, Royal Military College retroactively awarded him a bachelor of military science in recognition of his war service.
James Charlton GARDNER was born in Regina on December 6, 1920. He died at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Barrie, Ontario, on October 29, 2007. He was 86. Predeceased by his sisters Lois and Klela, he is survived by his wife, Joyce, his son, Bob, his twin daughters, Dianne and Deborah, and his extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-19 published
John HARKNESS: 53
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
Toronto -- John HARKNESS, the film Critic for Now Magazine since its founding in 1981, was found dead in his Toronto home yesterday, according to Michael HOLLETT, the tabloid's editor and publisher. He was 53.
Mr. HARKNESS had been suffering from high cholesterol. "He had never missed a deadline in 26 years," Mr. HOLLETT said, "so we sent somebody to his house when his copy didn't arrive." That is when they found his body and called police.
Born in Montreal in 1954, Mr. HARKNESS grew up in Halifax and in Sarnia, Ontario He earned a degree in literature from Carleton University in Ottawa before doing graduate work in cinema studies at Columbia University in New York, where he studied under critic Andrew Sarris.
Mr. HARKNESS also wrote for Sight and Sound, Take One, and the Cinematheque Ontario program, and spent several years as a trade reporter for Screen International and Cinema Canada. His book on the Oscars, The Academy Awards Handbook, is in its eighth edition.

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