MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-10-17 published
ABERDEEN, " Jake" Gerald Marshall
Passed away peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale on Tuesday, October 9, 2007 of Holland Centre formerly of Flesherton in his 61st year. Best friend and loving husband of 25 years to Velma. Devoted father of Jim (Ann McKAY) of Owen Sound, Allan (Heather) of Holland Centre and Calvin (Sandra) ROBINSON of Flesherton. Loving grandfather of Cassandra, Jim Jr., Alex, Spencer, Jake KOLBY, Logan and Emmalia. Dear brother of David (Heather) ABERDEEN of Flesherton, Erma (Jim) STEPHENSON of Dundalk, Bill (Janet) ABERDEEN of Flesherton, Shirley PEEBLES of Durham, and Donelda (Bryan) WELLWOOD of Flesherton. Survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Alex and Jessie ABERDEEN (née MARSHALL- HOLLEY,) step-father Ivy HOLLEY and brother-in-law Doug PEEBLES. The family received Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton on Thursday, October 11 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service was held in the chapel on Friday, October 12, at 11 a.m. Memorial contributions to the Cancer Society or Centre Grey Health Services Foundation would be gratefully appreciated.
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MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-09 published
TORRIE, Dorothy Eileen (KENNEDY)
Passed away peacefully with her family by her side on Friday, November 2, 2007. The former Dorothy Eileen KENNEDY, of Guelph and formerly of Durham, in her 98th year.
Beloved wife of the late John TORRIE. Loving mother of Harold TORRIE and his wife Mabel of Barrie, Phyllis and her husband Harold McKENZIE of Guelph, Leone and her husband Tom MARSHALL of Oro Station, Arthur TORRIE and his wife Marylen of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Glen TORRIE and his wife Gwen of Orillia and Brian TORRIE and his wife Elizabeth of Stayner.
Fondly remembered by her 19 grandchildren and 29 great-grandchildren.
Predeceased by her parents Robert and Mary KENNEDY, her brothers: John, Fred, George, Jim, Ken and William KENNEDY; and her sisters: Mabel WALKER, Violet McEWEN and Roberta KENNEDY.
Visitation was held at the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham on Monday from 2: 30-4 p.m. and 7-9 pm.
A Celebration of Dorothy's Life was held at the Durham Baptist Church on Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock. Pastor Robert LITTLE and Pastor David CLARKE officiated. Joyce REAY played the organ. The congregation sang, “Amazing Grace” and “Room at the Cross for You.” Tributes were given by Glen TORRIE, Glen McKENZIE and Valerie CLARK. Sharon KENNEDY sang two solos and The Gospel Couriers sang, “My Shepherd is Leading Me Home” and “What a Day That Will Be.&rdquo
The pall bearers were Harold TORRIE, Arthur TORRIE, Glen TORRIE, Brian TORRIE, Tom MARSHALL and Harold McKENZIE.
Committal Service and interment was held at Maplewood Cemetery, Varney. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Durham Baptist Church Building Fund would be appreciated by the family.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-08 published
NEWELL, Stewart Alexander
(Royal Canadian Air Force 1951~1971)
In Durham Wednesday, June 6, 2007. Stewart NEWELL of Durham in his 80th year. Husband of the late Marion (née CORVEC.) Loving father of Kimberly (Kenneth) FRY of Durham, Kevin (Laine) of Victoria, British Columbia, Brian (Kimberly) of Halifax, Nova Scotia and Heather (Donald) MARSHALL of Durham. Dear brother of Margaret (Charles) MORRISON of Bakersfield, California. Sadly missed by his grandchildren Christopher, Angela and Cheryl Fry, Rachel NEWELL and Chris MARSHALL. Predeceased by his sister Louise BAWDEN and survived by his brother-in-law George. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and CREMATION CENTRE, Durham Friday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel at 11 a.m. on Saturday, June 9, 2007. Interment Durham Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Durham Cemetery would be appreciated.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-20 published
BELROSE, Ruth (née MARSHALL)
At the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto on Wednesday July 18, 2007. In her 69th year, Ruth BELROSE (née MARSHALL,) the loving wife of Larry BELROSE. Loving mother of Carol McLEAN (Brian SCHOFIELD,) Cathy and her husband Ray BRANTON. Loving grandmother of Andrew and Nicole McLEAN, Collin and Rose BRANTON. Dear sister of Jean and her husband Robert WILSON, and Harry MARSHALL and his wife Billie BRIDGEMAN. Fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at the funeral home on Saturday morning at 11 a.m. Doctor Brad CLARK officiating. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-01 published
TAILOR/TAYLOR, Margaret Elizabeth
In her 74th year, passed peacefully at her home in Kemble, the village that she loved. Beloved daughter of the late Wilbur and Nettie TAILOR/TAYLOR (née McKINLAY.) Loving mother of Kelly BABCOCK and his wife, Geri, Chris BABCOCK and his partner, Deanna MARTIN and Danny BABCOCK and his wife, Lois O'NEILL. Devoted granny of Gennie-Wren and Nicholas. Held in the hearts of her sister, Beverley DAVIS, of Tofield, Alberta and her brother, Donald TAILOR/TAYLOR, of Chatsworth. Predeceased by her in-laws, Delphine TAILOR/TAYLOR and Lloyd DAVIS and her nephew, Jim DAVIS. Good friend of Susan MARSHALL, of Kemble and Chasity STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, of Cambridge. Margaret spent her childhood on the family farms in Kemble. As a young mother she was in the forefront of the drives to build the new arena and to convert the hall into a Senior and Community Centre. She helped to produce Christmas Concerts, was a member of the Kemble Women's Institute, taught gardening for the 4-H Club, took her turn running the snack bar at the old arena and cleaning the church. She drove rural mail and was the Post Mistress for many years. She, along with her mother and others, researched and wrote the Chronicles of Kemble. Her love of the past was evident in her wealth of stories and her respect for old things led her to a second career as a respected antique dealer. Family and Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (519-376-7492) on Tuesday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service to celebrate the life of Margaret TAILOR/TAYLOR will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, October 3rd, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. with Rev. Deborah MURRAY officiating. Interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Georgian Bluffs. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Kemble Arena or the charity of your choice as your expression of sympathy.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-10 published
ABERDEIN, “Jake” Gerald Marshall
Passed away peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale on Tuesday, October 9, 2007 of Holland Centre, formerly of Flesherton in his 61st year. Best friend and loving husband of 25 years to Velma. Devoted father of Jim (Ann McKAY) of Owen Sound, Allan (Heather) of Holland Centre and Calvin (Sandra) ROBINSON of Flesherton. Loving grandfather of Cassandra, Jim Jr., Alex, Spencer, Jake Kolby, Logan and Emmalia. Dear brother of David (Heather) ABERDEIN of Flesherton, Erma (Jim) STEPHENSON of Dundalk, Bill (Janet) ABERDEIN of Flesherton, Shirley PEEBLES of Durham, and Donelda (Bryan) WELLWOOD of Flesherton. Survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Alex and Jessie ABERDEIN (née MARSHALL- HOLLEY,) step-father Ivy HOLLEY and brother-in-law Doug PEEBLES. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton on Thursday, October 11 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held in the chapel on Friday, October 12 at 11: 00 a.m. Memorial contributions to the Cancer Society or Centre Grey Health Services Foundation would be gratefully appreciated.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-05 published
TORRIE, Dorothy Eileen (née KENNEDY)
Passed away peacefully with her family by her side on Friday, November 2nd, 2007. The former Dorothy Eileen KENNEDY, of Guelph and formerly of Durham, in her 98th year. Beloved wife of the late John TORRIE. Loving mother of Harold TORRIE and his wife Mabel of Barrie, Phyllis and her husband Harold McKENZIE of Guelph, Leone and her husband Tom MARSHALL of Oro Station, Arthur TORRIE and his wife Marylen of Prince Albert, Saskatchewan, Glen TORRIE and his wife Gwen of Orillia, and Brian TORRIE and his wife Elizabeth of Stayner. Fondly remembered by her 19 grandchildren and 29 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by her parents Robert and Mary KENNEDY, her brothers: John, Fred, George, Jim, Ken and William Kennedy, and her sisters: Mabel WALKER, Violet McEWEN and Roberta KENNEDY. Friends may call at the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham on Monday from 2: 30-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Celebration of Dorothy's life will be held at the Durham Baptist Church on Tuesday morning at 11 o'clock. Interment at Maplewood Cemetery, Varney. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Durham Baptist Church Building Fund would be appreciated by the family.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-10 published
MARTIN, George Walter
At Southampton Care Centre on Thursday, December 6, 2007 George Walter MARTIN of Sauble Beach, Ontario, in his 78th year. son of the late George and Violet MARTIN of London, Ontario. Survived by his wife Shirley, sister Lois MARSHALL, brother James, son Gene and his wife Shirley, sister Lois MARSHALL, brother James, son Gene and his wife Jenni (Keelan/Seren), son Dan and his wife Jo-Ann (Jessie/Erin/Logan,) and daughter Carol WELLS (Rachel SYMON, Kristy and John DOBBYN, Richard and Melissa SYMON, (Kristin/Ethan WELLS.) A memorial gathering will be held Thursday, December 13th at Oxford Golf and Country Club, Woodstock, from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. Memorial donations (in lieu of flowers) to Alzheimer Society of Canada or the Salvation Army would be appreciated. Condolences can be sent to www.memorialfuneral.ca

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-19 published
VAICIUNAS, Christa E. (née HINZ)
Peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound on Monday December 17, 2007. In her 83rd year, Christa E. VAICIUNAS (née HINZ,) beloved wife of the late (Ken) Kestutis VAICIUNAS. Loving mother of Irene MUSGROVE, Ruth MARSHALL and Mary MARTIN. Loved grandmother of Daniel and his wife Dora, Kurt and his wife Cindy and Alexis. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Friday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Church, Owen Sound on Saturday morning December 22, 2007 at 9 a.m. Interment in Saint Mary's Cemetery, Owen Sound. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-06 published
HOSSACK, Isabel
The family of the late Isabel HOSSACK would like to express deep appreciation to family, Friends and neighbours for their kind expressions of sympathy. The funeral service was very memorable thanks to the personal words of Mark MARSHALL and Susan COLE and the beautiful music from Ruth CALDER. Thanks to you, we were truly able to celebrate Isabel's life. We also appreciate the compassionate help of the staff of the Harland Betzner Funeral Home. Finally, thank you to the ladies of the Westminster United Church for the lovely reception following the service. We would like to extend a special thanks to the staff at Woodingford Lodge Ingersoll for their kindness and care in Isabel's last years.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-13 published
MOIR, James " Jim" Ernest
Suddenly on December 24, 2006 after a short but courageous battle with cancer, James (Jim) Ernest MOIR in his 54th year passed away at his home in Marathon, Ontario. Jim will be sadly missed by his son John MOIR, daughter Kimberly BERDAN, granddaughter Justine; his sister Cathy and her husband Warren CAREY; nephews Matthew, Andrew and Brendan CAREY as well as all his surviving aunts, uncles and many cousins. Jim will also be sadly missed by all members of his extended family and co-workers in Marathon. A special thanks to Oral and Marillo SOROCHAN for their help and support of Jim while he was ill as well as their support to his family afterwards; and also to Doctor Barb ZELEK and the Marathon Family Health Team for their support of Jim in dealing with and managing his illness. It was very much appreciated. Cremation has taken place and a Memorial Service will be held on Tuesday, January 16, 2007 at 11 a.m. at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), London. Interment to follow directly after the service at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens where Jim will be placed along side his parents Hilda (MARSHALL) and Gordon MOIR to forever rest in peace. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-08-25 published
Dreams never came true
By April KEMICK, Sun Media, Sat., August 25, 2007
When Viola TOLEAH boarded a plane from Africa with her best friend's daughter three years ago, both their hearts were full of dreams for the future.
The 12-year-old girl, abandoned by her parents in war-torn Guinea, wanted to be a teacher, a doctor or child-welfare worker.
In London, they thought, those dreams could come true.
But Marie TOLEAH didn't even reach her 16th birthday.
The 15-year-old, who loved to dance and listen to music, was killed this week in a crash in Oxford County, in a stolen car driven by a man, 24, who faces multiple charges.
"I really feel the pain," Viola TOLEAH said yesterday, tears streaming down her face. "I brought her here to do something good. Now I lose her. She dies for nothing."
Though the pair came here with high hopes, TOLEAH said, her surrogate daughter began spiralling downward soon after they arrived.
Marie's difficult childhood in Guinea gave way to troubled teen years, she said.
The wide-eyed girl met the wrong people in the neighbourhood and at John Paul II high school, and was soon following their influence in a country she didn't quite understand.
She began smoking, taking drugs, arriving home red-eyed and looking to fight with the woman she used to call mom.
She skipped school and wouldn't listen to anyone. Her Friends were intimidating and abusive to TOLEAH.
She ran away constantly, the police got involved, and soon the teen was in the care of the Children's Aid Society, living in a group home.
"It was really painful for me. I used to cry day and night and pray for her," TOLEAH said. "I needed help and I wanted them to advise her."
Children's Aid Society officials wouldn't confirm whether Marie was living in one of their group homes when she ended up in a stolen car Tuesday with two other teenage girls and three men.
The car -- reported stolen from Windsor -- was passing another car on the gravel shoulder when it rolled into a ditch on Oxford Road 2 in Zorra Township, west of Woodstock.
Marie was the only person killed in the crash.
Ibrahim Samory MANSARAY, 24, of London, is charged with criminal negligence causing death, possession of a stolen vehicle and breach of probation.
The comings and goings of children in the care of Children's Aid Society are monitored, but they aren't locked into group homes, said Larry MARSHALL, Children's Aid Society director of child and family services.
"We make every effort to keep kids in our facilities… but some children leave," he said. "You can try to stop a child, but there are also rules about what you can do to stop children (from leaving)."
TOLEAH said yesterday she doesn't blame the agency for her surrogate daughter's death. In fact, the agency is helping with a small funeral for Marie, she said.
She said she thinks the teen would have run wherever she was.
But she can't help but blame herself.
"If she listened to me, she might not die. It's too bad, too bad."

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-09-30 published
Sarnia chief always put firefighters first
By Daniela SIMUNAC, Sun Media, Sun., September 30, 2007
A 34-year veteran firefighter, James David KNIGHT climbed many ladders, becoming chief of the Sarnia fire department in 1987.
He died September 15, surrounded by family and Friends, at 70.
His death, as with many career firefighters, was recognized by Ontario's Workplace Safety and Insurance Board as a line-of-duty death resulting from an occupational disease.
"The fire department meant everything to him," said Tom MARSHALL, public education officer with the Sarnia department. "He loved his career as a firefighter. He loved his fire department."
KNIGHT had retired five years ago, but his presence was still felt at the firehouse.
Friendly and outgoing, he was known to everyone at the station, MARSHALL said. "He was a hard man not to know."
KNIGHT's love of his work was so strong, it inspired his son Dave KNIGHT to follow in his father's footsteps.
"He really wanted to help people," Dave KNIGHT said. "It's just the type of person he was."
An avid golfer and curler, KNIGHT always encouraged fellow firefighters to get physically active.
He was concerned about their health because of the strenuous nature of the job, and always wanted them to be in top condition
"He always put the guys first," his son said. "He was good to them and they were good to him."
The community-oriented KNIGHT enjoyed serving as the marshal in Canada Day parades and setting off the fireworks, the younger KNIGHT said.
He worked as a fire consultant at the Bruce nuclear plant for two years after retiring.
Married in 1961, KNIGHT was predeceased by wife Patricia.
He was the father of three children and grandfather of four.
"He was just a great guy," MARSHALL said.
"He'll be missed."

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-09 published
DICK, The Honourable Kenneth Y.
Died quietly in his sleep at dawn Friday, 5 January 2007 at Saint Michael's Hospital. Born 11 December 1909 and raised in Milton, he was predeceased by three brothers and two sisters and his wife Helen née WINFIELD. He is survived by sisters Kathleen (Kitty) GIBB of Toronto, Willamine (Billie) MARSHALL of Milton; daughter Sally ORVISS (Claire,) Toronto, son Kenneth (Carol) of Guelph; grandchildren Andrea (Hans), Vancouver; Sara (Shane), Houston, Texas; Laura (Steve), Whitehorse; Avril (Jason) and Gordon of Guelph; and great-grand_sons Dylan, Jackson and Jakob. Graduate of Osgoode Hall, University of Toronto, he practiced law in Milton both before and after World War 2, during which he served as an Officer with the Lorne Scots and the Sherbrooke Fusilliers. Upon his appointment to the bench in Oxford County, mother and dad moved to Woodstock in the middle '60s. Sally and I extend great gratitude to the staff and Chaplaincy (Toni) of Saint Michael's. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Following cremation, a memorial service will be held at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church (King and Simcoe), 2 p.m. Saturday, 20 January 2007. Arrangements entrusted to Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-07 published
Charmer, rascal, film producer, ad pioneer
He had hit movies and renegade ideas, but was best at making the deals, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
An advertising and film pioneer, Peter SIMPSON loved making deals and bringing projects together, but he hated the red tape that is so much a part of the Canadian film industry.
He was a charmer and a rascal who loved talking, drinking and eating, but he also expanded the business of filmmaking in Canada and probably hired more actors, directors and technical people than any other producer. His credits range from establishing the first international media buying agency to producing horror films such as the Prom Night franchise to Regeneration (based on novelist Pat Barker's trilogy) to the CTV television series The Eleventh Hour.
Vancouver-born actor Jason Priestly met Mr. SIMPSON in Los Angeles in 1997 about a role in The Highwayman, the first of four films the two made together. "He had an incredible ability to walk into a room and sell people on a project," Mr. Priestly said.
Although they met through work, they became Friends. "He was an incredibly avuncular and jovial man. He loved to laugh, to eat sushi and to drink Heineken. He was a spectacular man."
Peter SIMPSON was born in Port Glasgow, Scotland, the youngest of three sons of a grocer. His father immigrated to Toronto in 1952 and found a job at Eaton's and a place to live in Downsview, in the northern part of Toronto. His mother arrived at the end of the school year with 10-year-old Peter and his brothers. A sister, Marjorie, who died in a car accident in 1969, was born in Canada.
After graduating from high school, Peter attended the University of Toronto, but left to work as a junior buyer for the Young and Rubicam advertising agency.
That's where he met David HARRISON, another "renegade" who shared his love of the zeitgeist, Heineken and the ad business. Mr. SIMPSON quickly moved on to Ogilvy and Mather, then became media director at Stanfield, Johnson and Hill.
During this period, Mr. SIMPSON met and married his first wife, Gordene BYERS. Together, they had four sons: Kerry, Brock, Colin and Bradley. After 14 years, the marriage broke up. In the mid-1980s, Mr. SIMPSON married television producer Ilana FRANK. They had two children: daughter Quinn and son Hayden.
In the 1960s, ad agencies created ads, planned campaigns and placed ads, but the business was getting too complex for this concentration to be efficient. Mr. SIMPSON had the idea to separate these functions and, in 1969, he founded Media Buying Services to purchase advertising space and time for clients. "He was the pioneer," Mr. HARRISON said. "He was a very important guy in the entertainment business."
Media Buying Services quickly acquired clients such as Playtex, Dominion Stores and K-tel, a Winnipeg company headed by Philip Kives that was opening an office in Britain.
"The expertise Peter put in place was not a small factor in the success of K-tel, first in the United Kingdom and then all over Europe," said Ian Howard, the first managing director of K-tel International (UK) Ltd., in an e-mail message. "I could never have concentrated on the rapid growth of the company if the television buying was also a part of the infrastructure." Within five years of its founding, Media Buying Services had seven offices in Canada, Britain and the United States.
By the early 1970s, Mr. SIMPSON had moved into the film promotion business and was spending a lot of time in Los Angeles. After forming Norstar Filmed Entertainment, he started making movies. He became a pioneer again, in making made-for-television movies such as The Sea Gypsies, which he sold to Warner Brothers and which earned a 30-per-cent share when it was broadcast on NBC.
His second film was an even bigger success. Prom Night, which borrowed on the success of Brian de Palma's 1976 film Carrie, starred Jamie Lee Curtis and Leslie Nielson. Released in 1980, it was unabashedly commercial, spawned three sequels and set Canadian film box-office records.
From promotion to production to distribution, Mr. SIMPSON was involved in every part of the nascent Canadian film business, including the Toronto Film Festival, where he served on the board from 1981 to 1990. That's one of the ways he came to know another Scottish immigrant, filmmaker Bill MARSHALL.
"When I started the film festival," Mr. MARSHALL recalled in a telephone conversation, "we used to have a daily session that was on Rogers [cable television] and Peter and I would drink Heineken and excoriate the industry," including the television networks, the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission and the federal Telefilm funding agency. "Nobody was safe from our rude and grumpy comments."
They wanted to make films, and railed at public officials who weren't eager to finance their projects, no questions asked. "He wouldn't do anything unless it was his way," Mr. MARSHALL said.
"His first big hit was Prom Night, so he always thought he was a great movie picker," Mr. MARSHALL said. But what he was really good at was putting the financing together - although he "was never very good at getting money out of Telefilm." For one of his films, he put in the credits that it was made "in spite of the Canadian Film Development Corporation," Telefilm's earlier name.
Despite that conflict, "I always enjoyed my encounters with Peter SIMPSON. He was as frisky as they come," said filmmaker Peter Pearson, Telefilm's executive director from 1985 to 1987.
Politically, Mr. SIMPSON supported the Progressive Conservative Party. In the 1980s, when Brian Mulroney was prime minister, Mr. SIMPSON and partner Roger Nantel of Montreal set up Media Canada, which won a contract to place all federal government advertising in newspapers and magazines and on radio and television.
In all, Mr. SIMPSON made close to 40 movies and television films, including The Rage, Men with Guns, Pale Saints, Grizzly Falls and Cold Comfort. He was nominated for the Alexander Korda Award for best British film for Regeneration in 1998, won a Gemini for The Eleventh Hour in 2005 and received a Lifetime Achievement Award for his "unwavering commitment" from the Academy of Canadian Cinema in 2004.
Although he gave up smoking two decades ago, he was diagnosed with lung cancer last September. Treatment failed to defeat the disease, and it was evident by February that the cancer was spreading. Even so, Mr. SIMPSON was keenly involved in putting together a television movie about comedian John Candy before he was admitted to hospital about two weeks ago.
Peter SIMPSON was born in Port Glasgow, Scotland, on May 29, 1943. He died at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto on June 5, 2007. He was 64. He leaves his second wife, Ilana Frank, six children and three brothers. A private funeral is planned, to be followed by a memorial service in September.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-25 published
GREGUS, Walter Joseph, D.D.S.
Walter passed away peacefully with his family by his side on Friday, June 22, 2007 at the age of 82. Beloved husband of Helen. Much loved and devoted father of Patricia (Greg) GILLIS, Paul, Joanne, Sandra (George) POSTALIAN, Marilyn (Dave) IPPOLITO, Michael and William (Sue). Proud grandfather of Matthew, Michael, Catherine, Adam, Brian, Tyler, Sean, Greg, Leah, Jack and Julia. He will be fondly remembered by his sisters Mary WATSON and Betty MARSHALL and his many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Josephine BURBIDGE. Walter served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War 2. He practiced dentistry in Hamilton for 37 years and was a past president of the Hamilton Academy of Dentistry. Following a debilitating stroke in 1989 Walter returned with courage and determination to lead a full life and enjoy his passions - golf, gardening and bridge and poker games with his Friends. A quiet hero has gone to heaven. Family will receive Friends for visitation at Cresmount Funeral Home, 322 Fennell Avenue East, Hamilton on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Prayers at 8: 30 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Sts. Peter and Paul Roman Catholic Church (50 Brucedale Ave East, Hamilton) on Wednesday at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-31 published
BEST, James " Calbert"
Peacefully, on July 30, 2007, age 81. Calbert was the son of the late Doctor Carrie BEST and Albert T. BEST of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia. Predeceased by his adored wife Doreen (Phills). He will be deeply missed by his loving children Christene, Jamie (Nancy) grandchildren Nicola and Sarah; Stephen (Frances) and grandchildren Evan, Aidan, and Avery; and Kevin (Arwa) as well as by his close friend Suzanne Lozano and foster sisters Berma and Sharon MARSHALL. He will be fondly remembered by his cousins Brenda CLAYTON and Edith HOLMES and by the entire Phills family. As a young man, Cal and his mother Carrie founded the first African-Canadian owned newspaper, the Clarion, in New Glasgow. After graduating with a B.A. in Political Science and diploma in journalism from King's College, Dalhousie University in 1948, he did post-graduate work in Public Administration before moving to Ottawa in 1949. His distinguished 49 year career as civil servant and diplomat began in the Department of Labour. It was there that he co-founded the Civil Service Association of Canada, which evolved into the Public Service Association of Canada. He served as the Civil Service Association of Canada's first president from 1957-66. Subsequently he served as Director, Personnel and Administration, Office of the Comptroller of Treasury (1966-69); Director-General Administration, Dept. of Supply and Services (1969-70); Assistant Deputy, Dept. of Manpower and Immigration (1970-75). He was seconded to the Commonwealth Secretariat in 1975 and spent two years in London, England as Director, Applied Studies in Government. During that time he traveled the Commonwealth, sharing his expertise as far afield as India, Papua New Guinea and Uganda. He was Executive Director for Immigration from 1978-85. In 1985, Cal was appointed Canadian High Commissioner to Trinidad and Tobago. Cal retired upon his return, but his public service continued. He chaired the Minister's Taskforce on Sport which published the report Sport - The Way Ahead in 1992 and was Commissioner, Core Sport Study 1993-94. In 1999 he was a member of the Treasury Board President's Task Force on the Participation of Visible Minorities in the Federal Public Service. Cal also conducted an investigation into allegations of discrimination involving Canada's Men's National Basketball team. Cal was awarded an honorary LLB from King's College, Dalhousie University where he also served on the Board of Governors. He received the Centennial Medal in 1967. Friends are invited to visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa on Wednesday, August 1 from 7 to 9 p.m. and on Thursday, August 2 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Friday, August 3 at 11: 30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Condolences/tributes: mcgarryfamily.ca

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-09 published
MARSHALL, Helen Patricia
Passed away peacefully on August 7th at Toronto East General at the age of 92. Beloved wife of the late Allan MARSHALL of Acton, loving mother of John MARSHALL (Heather DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS) and the late Bill MARSHALL (Lorraine,) also survived by her brother and sister-in-law Ted and Elizabeth MULLENS. Dear grandmother of David, Emily, Christine, Daniel and Alissa MARSHALL. Great-grandmother of Dylan. Helen will be fondly remembered by her many relatives and Friends. A special heartfelt thanks to Helen's amazing circle of Friends and the staff at The Wexford Residence for their excellent care and support. Family and Friends will be received at the McDougall and Brown Funeral Home "Scarborough Chapel", 2900 Kingston Road (just east of St. Clair Ave. E.) on Saturday from 2-3 p.m. with a memorial service to follow in the chapel at 3 p.m. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-23 published
MARSHALL, Doctor Kenneth
Ken died peacefully at home of metastatic malignant melanoma on Wednesday August 22, 2007. He shared 31 wonderful years of marriage with his wife Marilyn, first in Montreal and for the last 11 years in Stratford. He leaves with regret his three children and two grandchildren: Doctor Kate MARSHALL of Toronto and her children Kerry and Jeffrey, Mark MARSHALL, also of Toronto, and Harry MARSHALL, a medical student at the University of Western Ontario.
Ken began his professional career as a pathologist. In 1967 he was appointed director of cytopathology at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal and established a training school for cytotechnologists A few years later he became chairman of the McGill faculty curriculum committee and then was asked by the dean to take on the role of associate dean of medical students for a three year period.
In 1976 Ken changed careers and took a year of further training to become a family physician. He turned out to be an enthusiastic family physician and teacher first at McGill and later at the University of Western Ontario where he was promoted to full professor. He published an extensive series of articles on physical diagnosis, as well as compiling and publishing three volumes of a largely evidence based family medicine text book, The Family Practice sourcebook.
In Stratford Ken was a strong supporter of the United Way, sitting on the board for 6 years. He was a member of the Allocations Committee and played a major role in compiling a manual outlining criteria for allocating funds. He was also an enthusiastic bicyclist.
A memorial service for Ken will be held in the next few weeks.
Those who wish to contribute to Ken's memory may make donations to the United Way of Perth County through the W.G. Young Funeral Home, 430 Huron Street, Stratford.
wgyoungfuneralhome.com

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-30 published
Gifted keyboard artist, arranger and composer 'could play everything'
Known as Doctor Music, he was music director of shows for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and CTV, and backed up Ray Charles and scores of other performers, writes Sandra MARTIN. He also fronted his own 16-piece band
By Sandra MARTIN with a report from Canadian Press, Page S9
Composer, pianist and record producer Doug RILEY was a classically trained musician and a prolific jingle composer who had a major influence on the sound of popular Canadian music beginning in the 1970s. Best known by his nickname, Doctor Music, he worked with many jazz and pop artists and was the leader of a 16-piece vocal and instrumental ensemble. He produced and performed with Ray Charles, David Clayton-Thomas, Bob Seger, Ringo Starr, Gordon Lightfoot, Anne Murray, Moe Koffman and many others.
Mr. Clayton-Thomas, former lead singer of Blood, Sweat and Tears, described Mr. RILEY as a close friend and a brilliant technician who "could play everything from Tchaikovsky to Thelonious Monk and then could get down and rock 'n' roll and play the blues, too. He's irreplaceable. There's only one Doc RILEY."
Canadian keyboardist Paul Shaffer, musical director of the Late Show with David Letterman, said Mr. RILEY was a big influence on his playing after they met in Toronto in 1968 during auditions for the musical Hair. They were both accompanying would-be performers on piano. "He really was an inspiration for those of us thinking about going into music ourselves."
Doug RILEY grew up in Toronto as the middle of three children of businessman Norman RILEY and his wife Lillian (MARSHALL) RILEY. When he was 2, he contracted polio, which meant he couldn't walk until he underwent a revolutionary operation at the Hospital for Sick Children when he was 9. (He walked with a limp for the rest of his life.) Born with perfect pitch, he seemed to have emerged from the womb playing the piano, an instrument he began studying when he was 3. By 5, he was taking lessons at the Royal Conservatory of Music, eventually studying pipe organ with Harry Duckworth at Saint Anne de Belleville Church near Montreal, and piano with Paul DeMarky, Oscar Peterson's piano teacher. At 6, he discovered jazz by listening to records - mostly his father's collection of stride and piano boogie 78s that featured such players as Meade Lux Lewis, Albert Ammons, James P. Johnson and Fats Waller.
As a teenager, he played rhythm and blues with a group called The Silhouettes at the Toronto nightclub the Blue Note. He attended the University of Toronto, graduating with a bachelor of music degree in 1965, after having studied composition with John Weinzweig and ethnomusicology with Mieczyslaw Kolinski. Later, he did postgraduate work with Prof. Kolinski on the music of the Iroquois.
Even while at university, he was a prolific composer of jingles, working with Mort Ross, Tommy Ambrose and Larry Trudel (through Trudel Productions). By the early 1990s, he had composed more than 2,000 catchy commercial tunes.
Drummer Bob MacLaren played in a jazz group led by Mr. RILEY and worked steadily with him recording jingles in the 1970s and 1980s, including a campaign for Labatt Blue and Carlsberg. "He would go to the production meeting one day and write the music that night, and the next morning we would record it and the singers would come in and the voice over would be done by the afternoon." The next day, they would repeat the process. "He was a workhorse," said Mr. MacLaren.
"He had an ear for the commercial, but he was also a writer and a player and a bandleader. He had all these things going at the same time and he had respect from the commercial community that was hiring him and respect from the musicians," he said. "Once he was on the bandstand and the music started, he was 100-per-cent player. He loved playing and that's why he never retired."
In one of Mr. RILEY's earliest recordings, he was the arranger and second keyboard player for Ray Charles's album, Doing His Thing. "Ray Charles was my first influence outside of boogie-woogie and stride pianists like Albert Ammons and Fats Waller," he told the Toronto Star last year. "I was enthralled by his jazz, blues and gospel music, and really his roots and my roots were the same. It was the biggest break of my life when I played organ and piano and arranged his 1969 album Doing His Thing."
Mr. Charles asked Mr. RILEY, who was 22 at the time, to join his band, but after a lot of soul-searching, he decided to stay in Toronto and write music.
He found steady work as a studio musician in television working as an arranger and pianist for The Ray Stevens Show from 1969 to 1970 and Rolling on the River from 1970 to 1972, both of which aired on CTV. He also served as music director for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Music Machine from 1973 to 1974 and Tommy Ambrose's Celebration from 1975 to 1976 and The Wolfman Jack Show the following year. He went back to CTV in 1981 to work for a season on Ronnie Hawkins's Honky Tonk and also did specials with Anne Murray, Lou Rawls and others.
As a player, he performed as a sideman for jazz and pop artists, including Tommy Ambrose, Dianne Brooks, Mr. Clayton-Thomas, Dan Hill, Klaatu, Mr. Koffman, Mr. Lightfoot, Bob McBride, Kathryn Moses, Ms. Murray, Walter Rossi, Sweet Blindness, Sylvia Tyson, the Brecker Brothers and Mr. Seger.
He also formed his own group, Doctor Music, a 16-piece vocal and instrumental ensemble. The band made three albums between 1972 and 1974: Doctor Music, Doctor Music II, and Bedtime Story. The last consisted largely of jazz compositions by Mr. RILEY and band members Claude Ranger and Don Thompson. His most popular singles were One More Mountain to Climb (1971), Sun Goes By (1972), and Long Time Comin' Home (1972), all of which were included on the compilation Retrospective (GRT). The group disbanded in 1997, soon after recording a fourth album.
In the 1990s, he began focusing on live performances and formed a quartet with saxophonist Phil Dwyer in 1993. Late in 1998, he and his second wife, Jan, bought a restored farmhouse near souris, Prince Edward Island, and settled there permanently in 2005. Walking on the beach near his farmhouse, he began to hear and feel the beginnings of what would become the Prince Edward Island Suite for Symphony and Jazz. The piece had its premiere at the Isabel Bader Theatre in Toronto and has since been known to evoke such emotion in Island audiences that tears begin to flow.
"His concerts had been a highlight of the season for the last several years," said University of Toronto historian Michael BLISS, who spends summers on Prince Edward Island and is a patron of the Indian River Festival. "He was just a wonderful pianist&hellip there have been concerts where Doug was simply the accompanist and done a much better job than the featured performer."
Prof. BLISS said the Island was very proud of Mr. RILEY. "He had an immediate and big impact on the musical scene here."
Mr. Clayton-Thomas considered Mr. RILEY his closest musical collaborator and friend. "Canada just lost a musical giant," he told Canadian Press in a telephone interview from Montreal on Tuesday, his voice shaking with emotion. "I can't imagine my life without him," he said. "I loved him beyond what I could tell you."
Mr. RILEY was supposed to have shifted into semi-retirement, playing golf and performing frequently with the Indian River Festival. But he loved playing so much that he couldn't resist invitations, and so Mr. RILEY, a smoker who enjoyed a drink and suffered from diabetes, spent a great deal of his time on airplanes travelling from one festival to another, one performance to another. That is what took him to Calgary late last week to play in a jazz and blues Festival.
He was jazz organist of the year from 1993 to 2000 at the annual Jazz Report Awards and was named a member of the Order of Canada in 2004.
Douglas Brian RILEY was born in Toronto on April 24, 1945. He died of a massive heart attack in an airplane on the tarmac in Calgary on Monday, August 26, 2007. He was 62. He is survived by wife Jan RILEY, sons Ben and Jesse from his first marriage, two siblings and his extended family. Musical celebrations of his life are being planned for October in Toronto and Charlottetown.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-12 published
MARSHALL, C. Douglas
President of Cummings-Cossitt Insurance Brokers Ltd., head Coach of Brockville Rowing Club. Entered into rest at the Kingston General Hospital on September 10, 2007 at the age of 70 years. Beloved husband of Patricia Power MARSHALL. Dear father of Chris (Kerryann,) Patty MARSHALL (Gary SUPPLE) and Phil (Corina WILKES.) Dear grandfather to Sidney and Colin MARSHALL and Liam SUPPLE. Predeceased by his sister Jean WARRINER and a brother William MARSHALL.
Family and Friends may pay their respects at the Irvine Funeral Home and Chapel, 4 James Street East, Brockville on Thursday from 7-9 p.m. and Friday from 2 until 6 p.m. A celebration of Doug's life will be held at the Parish of St. Lawrence Anglican Church (Trinity Anglican Church), Clarissa Street on at 11 a.m. Cremation will take place at the Roselawn Crematorium, Maitland. In memoriams to The Brockville Rowing Club, Kingston General Hospital or the Charity of your choice will be gratefully acknowledged.
Visit a Celebration of Life online memorial at: www.irvinefuneralhome.com

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-21 published
PARKER, Alice Elizabeth (née BUHLE)
(April 3, 1903-September 18, 2007)
This very special lady died peacefully at Providence Manor after a long and full life, filled with love for everyone and from everyone. Alice was welcomed in to the arms of God and to her dearest husband Harry Scott PARKER and to see again her parents Delia and William BUHLE, her sisters Florence BUHLE and Grace KONACHER who died so long ago. Caring step-mother of Archie (Alice) and the late Julia MARSHALL (Clare) and loving grandmother of Shiela THODER (Joe), Susan CLIFTON (Bill) Ann DAVIES (Brent), Steven, David and Christopher (Kim). Grandma will be deeply missed and remembered by her many great-grandchildren Brian, Mary, Sarah, Joey, Kevin, Mary- Kate, Lucy, Jessica, Colin, Evan, Eric, Garrett, Taylor, Lauren, Alicia, Christie, Emily, Erica and Aiden. Cherished aunt of Joyce HISEY (Sam,) Aunt Ollie will be remembered always with endearing love by the Hisey children, Steven (Cindy), Virginia (Brian), Dennis, Vivian (Christopher), and Brian (Sarah) and their off-spring Alex, Emily, Graeme, Neil, Corinne, Jacqueline and Patrick. Alice touched the lives of many. Her thoughtfullness and kindness will be remembered by Friends and families alike. In particular Mary BOUCHER, Wendy PARKER, Karen PARKER, Dixie Lee PARKER (deceased,) Evelyn Storey, the Salisbury and McGinn families are indicative of her caring. Born in New Jersey, raised in Pennsylvania, Alice came to Canada in the 1930's. Moving from Toronto to Tweed, Ontario and finally to Kingston. She was the loving custodian of the Lasalle Cottage on Earl St. for many years. Community and business involvement found her at the Kingston Chamber of Commerce, The Endowment Office at Queen's University, administrative work at Saint Mary's Cathedral and finally as a parish secretary. Cooking, music, theatre, and art filled in her "empty moments". She become the Kingston Grandma Moses to all of us! An exceptional lady who lead an exceptional life through her church, the community, and the people close to her. The family wishes to extend sincere thanks to the nursing staff on Montreal 3 at Providence Manor. There have been so many who have so carefully tended to her welfare for so many years. Thanks also to Friar David COLLINS whose prayers and blessings have helped during these last months. Friends and family will be received at the Gordon F. Tompkins Funeral Homes - Central Chapel 49 Colborne St. (at Clergy St.) on Friday September 21, 2007 from 4-9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Saint_James Chapel (at Johnson St. and Clergy Street, behind Saint Mary's Cathedral) on Saturday September 22, 2007 at 10: 00 a.m. Rite of Committal to follow with prayers at Mount Hope Cemetery, Toronto at 2: 45 p.m. For those wishing, donations may be made to the charity of choice.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-04 published
FRIEDMAN, Gregory " Sonny"
Retired Optometrist, peacefully, surrounded by family on Wednesday, October 3, 2007 at his home. Sonny FRIEDMAN, beloved husband of Bess (Bunny.) Loving father and father-in-law of Marla FRIEDMAN, Susan FRIEDMAN and Paul AXELROD, and Nathan FRIEDMAN and Sandra MARSHALL. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Gilda and the late Morris WARNICK, and the late Sylvia and Horace BOKSEN. Dear brother-in-law of Bernard and the late Helen GERSHMAN. Devoted grandfather of Rebecca, Kaitlyn, and Alexandra. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, October 7th at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Kiever Synagogue section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 55 Skymark Drive, #607. Memorial donations may be made to a charity of your own choice.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-04 published
Inspired to overcome racism, he became Canada's first black high commissioner
In Nova Scotia, he started an influential newspaper. In Ottawa, he became an important player in the civil service
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Halifax -- A career public servant who broke race barriers on his way to becoming Canada's first black high commissioner, James Calbert BEST didn't see himself as an activist.
The only son of a spirited human-rights defender and a quiet railway porter, Mr. BEST, who was best known as Cal, entered the civil service as a young man in the late 1940s after he and his mother started Nova Scotia's first black newspaper.
In 1946, while still a university student in Halifax, he and his mother Carrie BEST, began publishing The Clarion. Aside from covering local news, sports and social happenings, the paper took on deeper racial issues facing black people in Nova Scotia and across North America.
"The town [New Glasgow] has a daily and weekly newspaper, but the publication that creates the most talk on the street is The Clarion, that has grown from a church bulletin to the most powerful Negro newspaper in Canada today," Will R. Bird wrote in his 1950 book, This is Nova Scotia.
Mr. BEST and his mother used their newspaper to publicize the case of a black Nova Scotian named Viola Desmond. In 1946, Ms. Desmond, who has been referred to as a Canadian Rosa Parks, was arrested and fined for sitting in the "whites only" section of the Roseland Theatre in New Glasgow.
"We do have many of the privileges which are denied our southern brothers, but we often wonder if the kind of segregation we receive here is not more cruel in the very subtlety of its nature. Nowhere do we encounter signs that read 'No Colored' or the more diplomatic little paste boards which say 'Select Clientele,' but at times it might be better. At least much consequent embarrassment might be saved for all concerned," Mr. BEST wrote after Ms. Desmond's arrest. The Clarion ceased publication in 1956.
Years before Ms. Desmond's case, Mr. BEST and his mother experienced a similar incident in a New Glasgow movie theatre. While sitting downstairs in the whites-only section, as they often did, management told them to go to the balcony. They were told that someone had complained. After refusing to move, they were evicted and the police were called. They were charged with disturbing the peace and eventually convicted and fined. They sued for loss of dignity, but lost.
"I wouldn't want this [experience] to be seen as colouring his life. I heard about this incident once in my life," said his daughter, Christene BEST. "It inspired him more than anything else. To get out of New Glasgow and to thumb his nose at anyone who thought he wasn't deserving of 'loss of dignity.' "
Born in 1926, Mr. BEST grew up on South Washington Street in what was considered an integrated part of New Glasgow. While the legal segregation of Nova Scotia's schools didn't end until 1954, long after he completed his education, Mr. BEST never spoke about the racism he must have faced growing up in a small, industrial town.
"My grandmother considered herself an activist; my father didn't," his daughter said.
While his mother was busy organizing protests or holding poetry readings to raise money to help pay a black family's taxes, Mr. BEST spent his time as a child playing baseball or hockey on the pond behind their house.
He identified more with his father Albert, a man he called "the kindest, gentlest man I've ever known." As a child, he loved to run down to the railway station when he knew his father was returning home after days away.
After high school, Mr. BEST headed to the bustling wartime city of Halifax. Having a thyroid condition, he was unable to serve in the military. In 1948, he graduated with a degree in political science and a diploma in journalism from the University of King's College and went on to postgraduate work in public administration. He initially believed that the only careers open to a young black man in Nova Scotia were in teaching or on the railway, but his mind changed when he saw an advertisement for junior positions in the public service. In 1949, he boarded the train with his father and headed to Ottawa to begin what would become a 49-year career as a senior public servant and, eventually, high commissioner to Trinidad and Tobago.
"It was exceedingly difficult to get into the public service if you were a person of colour" in the 1940s, said Senator Don Oliver, a former Halifax lawyer. "At a time when racism was rampant in the public service, he was able to virtually move to the top. Soon, people forgot to look at his colour."
When Mr. BEST arrived in Ottawa, he found few people who looked like him. In the Department of Labour, he may have been the only black person. It wasn't much different on the street. While riding the bus, he was occasionally asked how the Ottawa Rough Riders were doing that season - the assumption being that because he was black, he played football.
Nevertheless, he found postwar Ottawa exciting. The civil service was growing rapidly and Mr. BEST quickly became an important player in its development.
The same year he arrived in Ottawa, Mr. BEST met his future wife at a party and declared that "she was the prettiest girl I've ever met." In 1957, he and Doreen PHILLS married in Montreal and later had four children.
At the Department of Labour, Mr. BEST co-founded the Civil Service Association of Canada, which evolved into the Public Service Alliance of Canada, and served as its first president, from 1957 to 1966. "He played a huge role in bringing collective bargaining to the public service," said Patty Ducharme, Public Service Alliance of Canada's national executive vice-president.
In creating the organization, Mr. BEST used his diplomacy and strong negotiating skills to bring together two existing associations representing civil servants and to defuse the power struggles that threatened the new organization.
"He was such a dynamic person; such an intellectual," said Daryl Bean, a former Public Service Alliance of Canada president. "His influence and calming approach allowed for good debate. He seemed to be three steps ahead of most people."
After leaving the labour department, Mr. BEST served as a director in both the Office of the Comptroller of Treasury and the Department of Supply and Services before becoming assistant deputy minister in the Department of Manpower and Immigration in 1970. In 1978, he became executive director of immigration and demographic policy, holding that position until 1985.
In late 1978, he worked closely with minister Bud Cullen to relax immigration laws to bring about 600 Vietnamese refugees, who were stranded in Malaysian water aboard the tiny freighter Hai Hong, to Canada. Mr. BEST travelled to Asia to help process the boat people. One of the refugees painted a picture of him arriving on a boat with a Canadian flag.
In 1985, Mr. BEST was appointed Canadian high commissioner to Trinidad and Tobago. He retired after returning to Canada in 1988, but his public service continued. "He was incredibly proud to serve. He would always say, 'The Canadian people pay my salary,' Ms. BEST said. He was such a scrupulous civil servant that his daughter never knew how her father voted politically until after he retired.
Mr. BEST was appointed chair of a federal task force to look into the future of sports in Canada after the Ben Johnson steroid scandal. In 1992, the three-person task force produced the report "Sport - the Way Ahead." The report, which cost a reported $1-million to produce, was intended to be a guideline for the future development of sport in Canada. Among the recommendations were that Ottawa fund fewer sport agencies.
"He was the tall, silent type," said Lyle Makosky, a former assistant deputy minister of fitness and amateur sport, who recruited Mr. BEST for the task force. "He was an imposing man but he had a quiet gentleness about him."
Mr. BEST later conducted an investigation into allegations of racism involving the Canadian men's national basketball team. head coach Ken Shields was alleged to have been prejudiced against black players. Mr. BEST's investigation absolved Mr. Shields. In 1999, he served on another task force, this one looking into the participation of visible minorities in the federal public service.
"When he talked, you always knew he had something important to say," Mr. Makosky said.
For his work, Mr. BEST was awarded an honorary law degree from the University of King's College, where he served on the board of governors.
James Calbert BEST was born July 12, 1926, in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia He died of cancer in Ottawa on July 30, 2007. He was 81. Predeceased by his wife Doreen, he leaves his children Christene, Jamie, Stephen and Kevin; five grandchildren, close friend Suzanne LOZANO and foster sisters Berma and Sharon MARSHALL.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-03 published
ARDILL, Lynne Carole (1942-2007)
We are sad to announce the death of Lynne ARDILL on October 31st after a brief battle with cancer. Lynne was the beloved wife of Peter ARDILL, dear mother to Peter John ARDILL (Christina) and Jennifer ARDILL (Stephen) loving grandmother to Samantha, Kaitlyn and Matthew. Lynne is survived by her Mother Elsie TAIT/TAITE/TATE and Brothers David (Grace) and John. Lynne taught with enthusiasm for 21 years in Aurora. Retiring to Collingwood Lynne skied at Craigleith Ski Club, played tennis, bridge and sang with Sweet Adelines. Lynne was recently recognized as a 20 year volunteer of the Cancer Society. Thanks to Doctor B. MARSHALL and nurses for their wonderful care. A celebration of life will be held November 8th 2 p.m. at Craigleith Ski Club South Lodge. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital.

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-12 published
PECK, Marjorie Irene (née HIGNELL)
(May 21, 1922-November 10, 2007)
After a wonderful life, Marjorie PECK passed away in her 86th year. Beloved wife of Gordon PECK for 60 years. Loving mother of Susan ANNAND (Douglas) and Michael PECK (Rosemary FITZGERALD.) Will be greatly missed by granddaughters Jessica and Meghan ANNAND and grand_sons Gordon, Andrew and Thomas PECK. Marjorie was born in Toronto to the late Wilbert and Irene HIGNELL. Predeceased by her sister Blanche MARSHALL. Marjorie lived an active life. After her childrearing years, she owned a card and gift store in Sherway Gardens which she enjoyed immensely. Marjorie was a talented decorator and ran an impeccable home. She loved spending time at Craigleith even when her skiing days were over. Marjorie especially loved the summers at Lake Rosseau and was always ready for a boat ride in the Bluebird. She traveled extensively with Gordon and was able to spend her last birthday on an Alaskan cruise. She will be missed at Lambton Golf and Country Club where she spent many lovely evenings with Gordon. Marjorie spent the last two months at Lakeshore Lodge following a hip fracture in July. Thank you to the health professionals who cared for her in her last few months. Friends and family will be received at the Turner and Porter 'Yorke Chapel', 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Tuesday, November 13 from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at St. George's on-the-Hill Anglican Church, 4600 Dundas St. W. on Wednesday, November 14 at 11 a.m. Memorial donations may be made to the Dorothy Ley Hospice, 170 Sherway Drive, Suite 3, Toronto, Ontario M9C 4V5. Visitation following the service at the Lambton Golf and Country Club, 100 Scarlet Rd., Toronto

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-11 published
EXNER, Helen G. (née DAVIS)
Peacefully at the Toronto Western Hospital on Sunday December 9th, 2007 in her 88th year. Beloved wife of the late Mr. Francis J. EXNER (January 13th, 1990.) She is survived by her special friend Charles LANGDON and as well as her longtime friend Dorothy MARSHALL. A funeral service will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), on Thursday December 13th, 2007 at 2 o'clock p.m. If desired memorial tributes in memory of Helen may be made to The Toronto Hospital for Sick Children. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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MARSHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-29 published
WEST, Sara (née TIBOLDO)
Peacefully on Friday December 21, 2007 at Providence Manor, Kingston, Ontario.
Beloved mamy of Roxroy O.O. WEST (Diane PAYMENT) of Winnipeg and Fanny LEUENBERGER (Hansruedi) of Eglisau (Switzerland;) cherished gross-mamy of Myriam and Nicole; special sister of Hans LEROY (Julia) of Post Falls (Idaho) and loving god-mother of Clélia BECK (Mauborget, Switzerland.) Pre-deceased by her loving husband Dr. Roxroy O. WEST in 1991 and her elder brother, Roberto ALOVISETTI in 1990, she leaves relatives in Switzerland and Italy, a niece, Sara LEROY and two nephews, Max and Roberto ALOVISETTI in the United States and and sisters-in-law Lydia ALOVISETTI, of New York City, and Barbara MARSHALL and Doreen WEST of Trinidad.
Born in Bex (Vaud, Switzerland) on November 20, 1919, daughter of Giovanni TIBOLDO and Fanny UHLER, she immigrated to Canada with her husband and children in 1958 and was a long-time resident of Kingston. A strong, generous and enterprising woman, she was an avid gardener, professional seamstress and gourmet cook. Fluent in four languages, she made special Friends among the Italian community in Kingston. Forever proud of her Swiss culture, she developed a special love for the Canadian landscape and her little paradise at Lacey Lake exploring with pals Caleb and Rerun. She travelled the world with her husband and in her later years, found inspiration and happiness in her many car trips across the country.
As she wished, a private celebration of her life will be held in the spring. Cards and flowers are gratefully declined and if desired, donations can be made to the Doctor Roxroy O. West Foundation, Pacemaker Clinic, Kingston General Hospital, 76 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario K7L 2V7.
The family would like to thank all those who were there for mamy, in particular devoted Friends Wolfgang and Maureen Weber and Dante and Marianna Del Mistro.
Buon viaggio Meity! Nous t'aimons et tu seras toujours dans nos coeurs…c'est comme ça&hellip

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