MANNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-12 published
MANNING, Michael
(V.P. Cango Inc.)
On Wednesday, January 10th, 2007. Michael, devoted father of Matthew and Spencer and dear friend of their mother Debbie. Beloved son of Daisy and the late Graham. Much loved brother of Danny, Terry, Gail, and John and their spouses. Michael will be dearly missed by his companion Carole ROWDEN, and his many nieces, nephews and Friends. Friends will be received at the Accettone Funeral Home, 384 Finley Ave., Ajax, Ontario (905-428-9090) on Saturday January 13th, 2007 from 7-9 p.m. and Sunday January 14th, 2007 from 12 noon until the time of service in the chapel at 2 pm.

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MANNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-05 published
TRENHOLM, Ruth Marguerite (née MANNING)
Passed away on June 28, 2007 surrounded by her loving children. Born in Amherst, Nova Scotia she was a daughter of the late Wylie and Nell MANNING. A proud alumna of Acadia University she held the position of life secretary for her class of 1940. A resident of The Town of Mount Royal, Montreal for fifty-six years, she was very active at Mount Royal United Church, and Mount Royal Curling Club. Recently she relocated her residence to Oakville, Ontario. Ruth is survived by her sister Joyce BROOKS; her children, Linda BOSTON (David) Bridgewater, Nova Scotia, Ted (Gail) Oakville, Ontario, Anne (Clemente) Montreal, Karen LINKER (Steve) Toronto, twelve grandchildren and six great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by her husband William, daughter Joyce and brother Ralph MANNING. Ruth loved life. Her passion for family, community, church and Friends never wavered throughout her 88 years and her love for her hometown kept her returning to the shores of Tidnish beach every summer. A memorial service/celebration of her life will be held in her honor in Nova Scotia on August 11, 2007 at the Lorneville United Church at 1: 30 p.m. She will be missed and remembered by her family as a caring, compassionate and loving mother and grandmother. Forever in our hearts. Donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Email condolences may be sent through www.koprivataylor.com

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MANNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-13 published
JACK, The Reverend J.D.C.
(minister emeritus of Leaside Presbyterian Church)
Died peacefully on Wednesday, July 11, 2007 in his 87th year at Cummer Lodge in Toronto. James JACK, beloved husband of Mary WINCHESTER, dear father of Jim JACK (Lisa), Anne MANNING (Bob), Helen SMITH (Bob) and Elizabeth JACK (Bruce,) proud grandpa of Ian and Rachel, Holly, Robert, Sara, Nancy and John, Laura, Jim and Dwight, Sheena and Sharena, loving great-grandpa of Malcolm, Kate and Alex, Benjamin and Adeline. Cherished brother of the late Dave JACK, admired brother-in-law of Elma JACK, John and Ruth WINCHESTER, Jean and the late Allistair CRAWFORD, dear cousin of Auntie Mae WILEY. A memorial service will be held at Iona Presbyterian Church, 1080 Finch Avenue East, Toronto on Tuesday, July 17, 2007 at 3: 00 p.m. Visitation from 2:00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home.

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MANNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-20 published
Arctic pioneer married famous explorer on strength of a telegram
In 1938, she dropped everything and sailed north to wed a man she scarcely knew. Her honeymoon with the 'Lone Wolf of the Arctic' was spent mapping Baffin Island
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail; Globe and Mail archives, Page S10
Ottawa -- When Ella MANNING told her family and Friends she was pulling up stakes and moving to the North to marry Arctic explorer Tom MANNING, everyone tried to convince her not to go.
Seven decades ago, in the 1930s, well-brought-up ladies just didn't do something so adventurous and outrageous. Determined to go her own way and do exactly as she pleased, Mrs. MANNING didn't care what anyone thought. She was 32 and felt she was meant to share Mr. MANNING's life in the Arctic, and that's all there was to it.
His marriage proposal was a bit unconventional, to say the least. There was no courtship or declaration of undying love on bended knee. Instead, in April, 1938, she found a telegram waiting for her at her Montreal home. "If you wish to join me at Cape Dorset this summer for two years I shall be pleased. Think well. Fools rush in. I shall not be able to receive a reply. Tom MANNING."
Mr. MANNING, an ornithologist and explorer known as the "Lone Wolf of the Arctic," had asked an Inuit man to take his offer to the nearest radio transmitter. That took three months, but she eventually received it.
That was all the adventurous Ella, known as Jackie or Jenny to her Friends, needed to start making plans. She had met Mr. MANNING in 1935, and not seen him since, but she was content. Thoughts of buying a wedding dress and trousseau never entered her head. Her belongings, including a stock of toothbrushes, filled just half of a small kit bag, she wrote in her 1943 book, Igloo for the Night.
Packing was the easy part. After that, she had to convince the Hudson's Bay Company to assign her a berth on one of its ships, the Nascopie, due to sail from Montreal in early July on its annual journey to Hudson's Bay Company posts. That was the hard part because various officials, amazed at her request, seemed to enjoy giving her the runaround on "general principles," she wrote.
"No white woman had ever gone to the Arctic to live away from the posts; it was madness to try and keep up with the travels and share the hard life of the man who had asked me to go. So they made excuses: Mr. MANNING had not been heard of for a long time, and they didn't know where he had gone."
One unidentified Hudson's Bay Company official was even worried that Mrs. MANNING would not be able to replenish her makeup. "What will you do for fresh supplies of face powder, nail polish and cosmetics generally?"
Mrs. MANNING put him in his place with a characteristic, no-nonsense answer: "No one is going to know if I powder my nose or not. And, as for nail polish, I think its lack will be no great hardship."
As for her family and Friends, they "shook their heads gravely, and pondered to themselves - I'm sure they did - the improbability of my ultimate survival among the terrifying perils and hardships of an unknown land."
In the end, she sailed on the Nascopie on July 8, 1938. Sixteen days later, on July 24, she reached Cape Dorset. The wedding ceremony was conducted on board by the Bishop of the Arctic, Archibald Fleming. The best man was the son of Lord Tweedsmuir, then governor-general, who was a passenger. The ring came from a copper engine fitting. "My old Harris tweed suit took the place of satin and lace," wrote Mrs. MANNING. "I couldn't find my one-and-only pair of gloves. There were no flowers and music."
For a honeymoon, she helped her husband to continue his task of mapping the west coast of Baffin Island, and gathering bird specimens for museums down south. A larger-than-life figure who spoke sparingly, Mr. MANNING begun exploring the north in 1932, when he was just 21.
Now he had a partner in his new wife. Travelling in her husband's tiny boat, the Polecat, and later by dog sled, Mrs. MANNING quickly learned to do without the perks of civilization she'd been used to. "Goodbye to clean white sheets," she wrote ruefully. She wore a shirt, breeches and a duffle dicky, a parka-like garment. Outer pants were made of seal or bear skin. Boots were sealskin.
Their epic journey was a perilous one. "The country where we proposed to live was unknown to us, but also to the native who accompanied us. We expected to be at least 300 miles from the nearest Hudson's Bay Company post, and the supplies we were taking with us would have to last, with few additions, for over a year. There were no natives within 250 miles of us in any direction. All of this I accepted without a qualm."
The tiny Polecat was crammed with supplies: Flour, butter, jam, milk, tobacco, pemmican and about 800 litres of fuel. Also on board were seven dogs to pull the sled, and four puppies. More puppies were born later.
Mrs. MANNING quickly learned the many skills needed to survive in the Arctic, where the temperature in winter can dip to -40 and the weather can turn treacherous in a heartbeat. It took her seven attempts, but she finally made a pair of fur mittens. She learned how to keep a blubber lamp - essential to produce heat and light in an igloo or tent - burning, and how to make bannock, a dietary staple.
She often went for a walk at midday to escape the "smell and squalling and general offensiveness of the tent," accompanied by a black-and-white puppy named Mephistopheles "who looked uncommonly like a little devil and who loved me and nobody else."
Looking around her, Mrs. MANNING was struck by the grandeur of the North. "Everywhere was silence except for the cracking of the ice with the rise and fall of the tide. Occasionally, although no hostile sound broke the eternal frozen emptiness, I felt that I was being watched. Doubtless I was, but it was not the eyes of hare or fox that I sensed. I felt a Presence, something was observing, coldly judicial."
It was easy to let her imagination run riot, she wrote. "There was such supreme, desolate, foreign indifference towards my own puny insignificance; the longer I remained in the north, the more I realized how little the north cared for my life or death. I was not of any importance. Nowhere was there a shelter for the night, unless it was built with our hands; never was there food or warmth unless secured through our own unremitting efforts. There was no rest from the struggle to keep body and soul together."
It was a long way from her Nova Scotia childhood. After growing up on a farm, she attended Dalhousie University in Halifax and graduated with a degree in history and Latin in 1930. After that, she moved to Montreal and worked as a nurse and as a teacher.
Along the way, she met the dour but charismatic Mr. MANNING and something clicked. Their meeting turned out to be a singular experience, in more ways than one. After joining him at Cape Dorset, they spent almost two years together while surveying, and seldom encountered another human being. Finally, her husband had a disturbing dream, wrote Mrs. MANNING in Igloo for the Night, and that impelled them to return south by dog sled to Cape Dorset. They arrived on January 2, 1940, to be told that the Second World War had begun.
Eager to participate in the war effort, Mr. MANNING continued around the Foxe Basin on a journey by boat and dog team that covered 3,200 kilometres and lasted just over a year. When they arrived at Churchill, Manitoba, to take a train south, he met a United States Air Force officer who asked whether the story he had heard about Mr. MANNING's killing a polar bear with a boning knife was true. Mr. MANNING replied, "It was not a very big bear."
He subsequently enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy and helped direct the building of Arctic airfields and worked on developing cold-weather clothing.
Meanwhile, Mrs. MANNING spent most of the war in Ottawa. When peace returned she went back to the North while he, under the auspices of the Geodetic Survey of Canada, established ground control points for an Royal Canadian Air Force aerial photographic survey. A Summer on Hudson Bay, Mrs. MANNING's account of the undertaking, was published in 1949.
In the late 1960s, the MANNINGs separated but never divorced. Mrs. MANNING remained on good terms with her husband until his death in 1998, and spent her remaining years in Ottawa.
Ella Wallace Jackson MANNING was born October 26, 1906, in Mill Village, near Shubenacadie, Nova Scotia She died of congestive heart failure in Ottawa on September 25, a month short of her 101st birthday. Her husband predeceased her.

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MANNING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-03 published
SMITH, Annie, PhD
November 21, 1940 (Elmira, New York) - October 31, 2007 (Toronto)
Our 'Annie Bear', 'Doctor Bear', as she was affectionately known, set sail from our shores on Halloween, her gremlins set free at last. She was surrounded by loving Friends. Annie was predeceased by her parents, Doctor Earl and Ruth (MANNING) SMITH. She is survived by her brother, Neil and her very dear friend, Joan MULVENEY. Annie's other Friends and admirers are beyond count. Annie was an alumnus of Wellesley College, Stanford University and also of the University of Toronto where she earned her PhD. She was justifiably proud of her role in founding the Art and Art History Program at Sheridan College. This program is the first of its kind to link a fine art university program with a college of art and technology. It simultaneously offers students a B.A. from the University of Toronto at Mississauga and a diploma in Art and Art History from Sheridan College. 'The Annie Smith Arts Centre' at Sheridan is a tribute to Annie's influence in the field of art education. She was an outstanding, innovative teacher. A gifted author and artist in her own right, she published several books. The best known book is 'Bearing Up with Cancer', featuring her signature doodle, a cartoon bear. The bear is used to illustrate Annie's journey with cancer, from breast cancer in 1986 to ovarian cancer in 1999. Annie defied the odds and used her extraordinary talents to advantage as a speaker for the National Ovarian Cancer Association both at home and abroad. Annie inspired not only those dealing with cancer, but also their families and health care professionals. The most important place in the world to Annie was 'The Barn' at Sunny Point on Keuka Lake, New York State. It was her refuge, her joy, a place of beauty where she could be as one with nature and where she always felt restored in body and mind. A natural athlete, Annie especially loved to sail on Keuka Lake and to play tennis at The Toronto Lawn Tennis Club. As Annie wished, there will be no funeral service. A celebration of her life will be held at Sheridan Campus in the spring of 2008. Special thanks are given to the health care providers at Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto General Hospital and the Toronto Grace Health Centre. If you so wish, donations in Annie's memory may be made to 'The Annie Smith Bear Fund for Ovarian Cancer', Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 - 416-946-6560 and/or National Ovarian Cancer Association, who have recently amalgamated with Ovarian Cancer Canada at 145 Front Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5A 1E3 - 416-962-2700.

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MANNY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-22 published
MANNY, Drusilla " Deedles"

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MANOIAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
PEDLAR, Barbara Ann (née FLYNN)
On Thursday, January 4, 2007, Barbara Ann PEDLAR (née FLYNN) died at home, age 75, after a courageous and determined battle with cancer. She enjoyed a varied career as a nurse, a stewardess, and a swimming teacher. After retirement, she donated her time and energy as a volunteer to and supporter of several worthy causes. She will be sadly missed be her family and many Friends, but fondly remembered for her kindness, vivacity, and keen wit. Beloved wife of Stan. Loving mother of Stan (Joanne) and Carol. Cherished grandmother of Jordan and Sarah. Caring sister of Diann (Archie MANOIAN.) Fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her brother Garry. Friends may pay respects at the Kelly Funeral Home, 580 Eagleson Road, Kanata, Wednesday, January 10, 2007 after 10 a.m. A Service in Memory of Barbara will be held in the Chapel at 11 a.m. In memoriam donations to the charity of your choice appreciated by the family. Kelly Funeral Homes (613) 591-6580

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MANRIQUES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-05 published
EGAN, Wm. Dwight
Peacefully, at his home, Portland, Oregon on Tuesday, October 16, 2007, Wm. Dwight EGAN, in his 59th year, beloved husband of Joanne GRANT. Dear father of Laura and Miquel MANRIQUES, Capitola, California and grandfather of Victoria (Tia) MANRIQUES. Dear step-father of Charles (Chuck) and Nancy ADAM/ADAMS, Brian ADAM/ADAMS, Richard and Michelle ADAM/ADAMS. Dear grandfather of Tammi and Tim GAEA, Charles (Chuck) and Mindy ADAM/ADAMS, Katie ADAM/ADAMS and Kylee Marie ADAM/ADAMS. Cherished great-grandfather of Sean, Ryan and Evan GAEA. Loving son of the late William and Frances EGAN, Bolton. Dear brother of Lois and Thomas HEPPELL, Victoria, British Columbia; Paul and Lynne EGAN, Bolton; Deborah and Hal BROOK, Orangeville. Fondly remembered by his nieces and nephews. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213) Wednesday, November 7 from one o'clock until time of memorial service in the chapel at 2 o'clock. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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MANSARAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-08-23 published
Londoner charged in fatal
It appears the driver passed another driver on the right, lost control of the car on the gravel shoulder and rolled into a ditch, police say.
By Debora VAN BRENK, Sun Media, Thurs., August 23, 2007
A London man is charged with criminal negligence causing death and police are trying to figure out how a car reported stolen from Windsor on Tuesday ended up hours later in a Zorra Township ditch.
Police yesterday identified the victim as 15-year-old Marie TOLEAH of London, but released no further identifying details.
Six Londoners, including the teenager who died, were in the Pontiac Sunfire that crashed in the rural Oxford County township.
"It's very tragic," said Ontario Provincial Police Const. Dennis Harwood.
Harwood said witness statements and technical traffic investigators are to sort out what happened and why.
He said it appears the driver passed another driver on the right, lost control of the car on the gravel shoulder and rolled into a ditch on the south side of Oxford Road 2.
The people in the car included three men, ages 24 (two) and 32, and three teenage girls, 15 (two) and 18.
Some of the occupants wore seatbelts, Harwood said, but it was unclear how many.
The occupants all knew each other, directly or indirectly, he added.
Ibrahim Samory MANSARAY, 24, of London, is charged with criminal negligence causing death, possession of a stolen vehicle and breach of probation.
He was treated and released from Woodstock hospital.
witnesses: were horrified as the events unfolded in front of and beside them.
"He flew past me and lost control," said Florence HEEMAN, who saw the car flip two cars ahead of her.
"He tried to pass us and couldn't get in quick enough."
Tony OVERZET watched from his rearview mirror in the west lane.
"It flipped three times, side over side, and then two times nose over tail," he said of the wrecked car.
The driver, he said, "had lots of speed."

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MANSARAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-08-25 published
Dreams never came true
By April KEMICK, Sun Media, Sat., August 25, 2007
When Viola TOLEAH boarded a plane from Africa with her best friend's daughter three years ago, both their hearts were full of dreams for the future.
The 12-year-old girl, abandoned by her parents in war-torn Guinea, wanted to be a teacher, a doctor or child-welfare worker.
In London, they thought, those dreams could come true.
But Marie TOLEAH didn't even reach her 16th birthday.
The 15-year-old, who loved to dance and listen to music, was killed this week in a crash in Oxford County, in a stolen car driven by a man, 24, who faces multiple charges.
"I really feel the pain," Viola TOLEAH said yesterday, tears streaming down her face. "I brought her here to do something good. Now I lose her. She dies for nothing."
Though the pair came here with high hopes, TOLEAH said, her surrogate daughter began spiralling downward soon after they arrived.
Marie's difficult childhood in Guinea gave way to troubled teen years, she said.
The wide-eyed girl met the wrong people in the neighbourhood and at John Paul II high school, and was soon following their influence in a country she didn't quite understand.
She began smoking, taking drugs, arriving home red-eyed and looking to fight with the woman she used to call mom.
She skipped school and wouldn't listen to anyone. Her Friends were intimidating and abusive to TOLEAH.
She ran away constantly, the police got involved, and soon the teen was in the care of the Children's Aid Society, living in a group home.
"It was really painful for me. I used to cry day and night and pray for her," TOLEAH said. "I needed help and I wanted them to advise her."
Children's Aid Society officials wouldn't confirm whether Marie was living in one of their group homes when she ended up in a stolen car Tuesday with two other teenage girls and three men.
The car -- reported stolen from Windsor -- was passing another car on the gravel shoulder when it rolled into a ditch on Oxford Road 2 in Zorra Township, west of Woodstock.
Marie was the only person killed in the crash.
Ibrahim Samory MANSARAY, 24, of London, is charged with criminal negligence causing death, possession of a stolen vehicle and breach of probation.
The comings and goings of children in the care of Children's Aid Society are monitored, but they aren't locked into group homes, said Larry MARSHALL, Children's Aid Society director of child and family services.
"We make every effort to keep kids in our facilities… but some children leave," he said. "You can try to stop a child, but there are also rules about what you can do to stop children (from leaving)."
TOLEAH said yesterday she doesn't blame the agency for her surrogate daughter's death. In fact, the agency is helping with a small funeral for Marie, she said.
She said she thinks the teen would have run wherever she was.
But she can't help but blame herself.
"If she listened to me, she might not die. It's too bad, too bad."

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MANSBRIDGE o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-08-15 published
WINES, Robert " Elwood"
Passed away peacefully on Saturday August 4, 2007 at the General and Marine Hospital in Collingwood in his 87th year. Elwood, beloved husband of Mary (née LEGATE.) Dear brother of Mildred and her late husband Bunn JARDINE, George and his wife Eleanor WINES, Elizabeth WINES and Burnfield and his wife Orma WINES. Brother-in-law of the late Allan and his wife Dorothy LEGATE and Jean and her late husband Harry MANSBRIDGE. Mr. WINES will be sadly missed by his many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. Predeceased also by his parents Fred and Ellen WINES. Visitation will be held on Monday August 6, 2007 from 6-9 in the evening at Fawcett Funeral Homes, Creemore Chapel, 182 Mill Street. A Funeral service will take place on Tuesday August 7, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. in the chapel. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Elwood's memory to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. The family invites Friends and family to sign the online guestbook by visiting www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com

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MANSER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-05-31 published
'Profound sadness' at GREENBERG's death
Memorial Sunday for former professor, local lecturer
By Denis LANGLOIS, Thursday, May 31, 2007
Well-known architecture expert, lecturer and retired university professor Bob GREENBERG has died from cancer.
People close to GREENBERG say he was a great teacher and a man who cared deeply about architectural preservation and an increased appreciation of architecture.
"We've lost a very rare and unique person," local heritage advocate John HARRISON said in an interview Wednesday.
GREENBERG, who was born in Bronx, New York in 1942, died Monday.
He was instrumental in establishing a degree architecture program at Ryerson University in 1972 and retired from the university in 1999 after a 28-year career. He and his wife Georgina bought a house near Dobbinton in 1992.
GREENBERG has a long list of accomplishments in Grey-Bruce and worked for many years on architectural heritage in the area. He also worked on projects at both Grey Roots and the Bruce County museum and was a founding Bluewater Association of Lifelong Learning lecturer.
He was vocal during the debate over the demolition of the historic Queen's Hotel in Owen Sound.
HARRISON said GREENBERG aroused an interest in people in historical architecture.
"He was a renaissance man in the truest case," he added. "He was a tremendous teacher of architecture."
GREENBERG is survived by five children - Noah, 34, Zoe, 31, Naomi, 22, Paula, 19, and Eli, 15.
Noah GREENBERG, an architect in Seattle, Washington., said Wednesday his father saw the "big picture" and a need to spread an understanding of the importance of architecture.
He said his father's home is filled with architectural drawings, sketch books, scrolls and educational books - enough to fill a library.
Noah said his father was "very close and patient" as a parent..
Georgina recalled her husband had a minor roll in the development of the World Trade Center in New York City, as a junior draftsman creating flow charts on pedestrian traffic. He was designed the award-winning St. Elias Ukranian Catholic Church in Brampton, Ontario, where a celebration of his life will be held this summer.
She said the local heritage work her husband was involved with became like a second career after retirement. He sort of "fell into it" after being approached by people in the community.
Ed WOJS, a Ryerson University professor who was taught by GREENBERG, said he has been receiving e-mails since GREENBERG's death from around the world from his former students.
"There's a profound sadness," he said. "He is the father of our program here at Ryerson."
GREENBERG served as an architecture heritage advisor in both Owen Sound and Collingwood. He worked on the city's facade program, was a consultant on heritage issues and involved in Doors Open and the city's historic walking tour.
"He had a wealth of knowledge and an ability to teach and impart that knowledge to all of us," Owen Sound Mayor Ruth LOVELL said.
GREENBERG advised on such local projects as the Intrawest development at Blue Mountain, the Loblaw's grocery store in Collingwood, the planned expansion of the Owen Sound Farmer's Market and early talks to move and restore a 19th century Mennonite church west of Rockford.
GREENBERG spent more than 600 hours designing and building a scale model of Grey Roots' Moreston village.
Grey Roots' manager Brian MANSER said GREENBERG, who sat on the museum's fundraising committee and lectured there, had a great interest in Grey County architecture and saving historic buildings and 'gave himself completely" to projects.
"It's tough moving forward without him."
GREENBERG also helped design "L'Chaim, the story of the Beth Ezekiel Synagogue," exhibit at Grey Roots.
"The exhibit is a success because of his efforts," synagogue president Jeff ELIE said, adding GREENBERG's knowledge of Judaism, sensitivity and insight proved invaluable.
ELIE said GREENBERG was Jewish by birth, but was not a member of the synagogue although he cared deeply about it. When the building was in danger of collapse, GREENBERG offered his architectural services free of charge.
The Beth Ezekiel Synagogue will hold a memorial service for GREENBERG on Sunday starting at 4: 30 p.m.

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MANSFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-06 published
BLACKWELL, Florence Rosalie (née KING)
On November 2, 2007, in Toronto, in her 95th year. Predeceased by her husband Phillip John BLACKWELL in 1995. Lovingly remembered by her sons, Stephen BLACKWELL and his wife Lorraine of Calgary, and Richard BLACKWELL and his wife Kathleen McKENNA of Toronto grandchildren Michelle, Carolyn, Alex, Liam and Julia; many nieces, nephews, grandnieces and grandnephews. Beloved Sister of Joseph KING (Gwen,) Ruth MANSFIELD (Jim) and Edward KING (Catherine.) The family wishes to thank the staff on the seventh floor of the Westbury nursing home, and Judy BAKER, for their care and support. No Visitation. A memorial service will be held on Saturday, November 10 at 11 a.m. at the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto, 175 St. Clair Ave. West, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to USC Canada, 56 Sparks Street, Suite 705, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5B1

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MANSI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-06 published
NEIL, Violet Nye (née SARGEANT)
Peacefully, with her daughter by her side at Park Lane Terrace, Paris on Thursday, January 4, 2007 in her 87th year, devoted wife of the late Stanley NEIL (2005.) Loving mother of Carol Anne (Allan) KING of Midland, Joanne (Frank) BUCEK of Princeton and Roseanne (Rod) BAIRD of London. Loving grandmother of Melanie (Frank) MANSI, Shayne KING, Mark BUCEK, Nicholas BAIRD and his fiance Jess STENABAUGH and Violet Anne BAIRD. Dear sister of Roseline (late Stan) REILLY, Norma (late Bob) SUMMERHAYS, Joan (late Howard) COOK, Nick (late Josie) SARGEANT, Norman SARGEANT, Digby (Anne) SARGEANT. Predeceased by parents Jesse (1939) and Nora (1959) SARGEANT, sister Jean (SARGEANT1976,) sister-in-law and brother-in-law Audrey and Dave SACERTY. Survived by several nieces and nephews. The family wish to thank the nurses and staff of Park Lane Terrace for their kindness and compassion shown to Violet and her family. Friends will be received at the McCleister Funeral Home, 495 Park Road North, Brantford, Ontario on Sunday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Monday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Mt. Hope Cemetery. If wished, memorial donations to the Alzheimer Society or charity of your choice appreciated by the family. McCleister (519) 758-1553 or mccleisterfuneralhome@rogers.com

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MANTEI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-15 published
McCRODAN, Margaret Jane
Died suddenly November 8, 2007 at the age of 82. She is pre-deceased by her husband Peter Byron (2001) and her son John Guy Philp (1978,) and is survived by daughters Susan, Deborah (John LEVESQUE,) and Michael McCRODAN, by her grandchildren Chris HUGGINS (Shelley MANTEI) and Alyssa HUGGINS. A celebration of her life will be held at 1: 30 p.m. Friday, November 16th at the Vancouver Lawn and Tennis Club at 1630 West 15th at Fir Street, Vancouver. In lieu of flowers donations may be sent to Saint Mary's Hospital, Box 7777, Sechelt, British Columbia V0N 3A0.

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MANTHAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-14 published
With broken ankles, crash survivor crawls to safety
By Kenyon WALLACE with a report from James BRADSHAW, Page A18
One man is dead and another is in hospital after a single-vehicle crash early yesterday morning in which police say the survivor, who suffered two broken ankles, pulled himself from the wreckage and crawled half a kilometre through the snow to a nearby gun club.
Brandon MANTHAU, 22, was a passenger in Nathan MAGEE's black 2003 Chevrolet Avalanche when the eastbound sport utility vehicle plowed into a dense wood beside Herald Road, just past Kennedy Road near Newmarket, around 1 a.m.
York Regional Police said they were notified of the crash when the vehicle's OnStar navigational system, triggered by the release of the airbags, could not make contact with the two Friends.
But when police arrived at what they believed to be the crash site, they could not find the wreck anywhere. "The location police were given by OnStar was not correct," said Constable Marina ORLOVSKY, media-relations officer for the York police.
Police spent nearly 1½ hours combing an area about 10 kilometres west of the actual crash site. Meanwhile, Mr. MANTHAU reached the gun club about two hours after the accident and set off the building's security alarm. A man at the gun club called police, and Mr. MANTHAU was able to lead them to the crash site, Constable ORLOVSKY said.
Mr. MAGEE, 24, a heavy-machinery operator at a King City pipeline and utility contractor, was pronounced dead at the scene. Mr. MANTHAU was taken to Saint Michael's Hospital in Toronto, where he remained last night.
"He's a very strong young man who comes from hearty stock," said Judy MANTHAU, Mr. MANTHAU's aunt. "When you're his age, you'll do what you have to do if the adrenalin takes over. It's really a case of mind over matter."
Police would not say how fast the sport utility vehicle was moving or if alcohol was involved.
An OnStar representative in Detroit was unable to comment about what might have caused Mr. MAGEE's system to provide an incorrect location.
The OnStar system uses four separate satellites and a Global Position System receiver to pinpoint a car's location. The Global Position System system uses the amount of time taken for a radio signal to travel from a satellite to a specific location in order to calculate distances.
The technology should be able to determine location to a margin of error of only a few metres. However, certain conditions could have affected the system's accuracy.
"It is possible that anything from a heavily wooded area to inclement weather could impact satellite signals," said Patty Faith, public-relations manager for General Motors Canada.
Downed trees almost two feet in diameter, flattened bushes and deep tire tracks in the snow marked the spot yesterday afternoon where Mr. MAGEE's sport utility vehicle left Herald Road. Friends and co-workers of the Willow Beach native comforted one another at the accident site and recalled a happy and hardworking young man.
A bouquet of flowers with a red ribbon inscribed with the words "Pals Forever" was nailed to a nearby tree.
"You'd never find a better kid in your whole life," said a close family friend who wished to remain anonymous. "I've known him since he was just a boy and he was the nicest person. I'm just devastated."
But some locals weren't surprised to hear about the accident. Rusty SMITH works at 404 Auto Recycling, which sits at the top of the hillside at the corner of Herald and Kennedy Roads. He recalled rolling his van near the intersection two summers ago after a near-miss with another vehicle driving in his lane.
"That road is just treacherous," he said. "It's really narrow and there aren't any shoulders."
The speed limit along Herald Road is 50 kilometres an hour, but Mr. SMITH said "people always speed along the road." The road can get very slippery in snow or rain, he added.

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MANTHORPE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-25 published
MANTHORPE, Walter Frederick
The funeral was held at the Gildencroft Quaker Burial Ground, Norwich, England, on June 21st of Walter Frederick MANTHORPE, F.R.I.C.S., F.R.T.P.I., the first Development Commissioner for the City of Toronto. A Memorial service was held later the same day at St. Stephen's Anglican Church, Theatre Street, Norwich. Mr. Manthorpe was born in Norwich on November 15th, 1916, and died in the same city on June 13, 2007.

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MANTHORPE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-23 published
Dreams of Toronto city planner turned into a nightmare of red tape
Visionary and prophetic British-trained surveyor and urban developer battled bureaucracy to make an important contribution to the development of the city in the Sixties
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
As Toronto's first Commissioner of Development, Walter MANTHORPE had a hand in a stunning new city hall complex, envisioned a metropolitan skyline dominated by soaring towers, understood the value of downtown residential neighbourhoods and was among the first to have notions of a domed stadium.
Yet, as a guiding light, he was also an engineer whose vision was infused with controversy. He rode fluctuating waves of public opinion, fashioned creative solutions but still managed to gain the respect of his political opponents. "He and I tangled greatly in the late sixties and early 1970s," said former Toronto mayor, John Sewell. "He believed very strongly, as many people did, in the idea that modernist approaches to the city were a really good idea - high-rise apartments, towers in parks, getting rid of streets. Those kinds of things.
"We were on the cusp of the big change that was happening in Toronto, that gave Toronto the central area plan," Mr. Sewell added.
Walter MANTHORPE cut his teeth on controversy. He was one of two sons born into a family with strong Quaker connections in Norwich, England, during the First World War. His grocer father was a conscientious objector who was sentenced to several years' hard labour in Dartmoor Prison. Meanwhile, his mother ran the family business, which was an early health-food store, and raised her sons as vegetarians during a time when such a path was strongly criticized.
After articling with a firm in Norwich, Mr. MANTHORPE qualified as a surveyor in 1936. But instead of immediately picking up a pencil, he joined Maddermarket Theatre, a local venue that in 1921 had become the first permanent recreation of an Elizabethan Theatre. Under the founder and director, Nugent Monck, Mr. MANTHORPE also acted in early productions of plays by George Bernard Shaw.
Shortly afterward, he found a job in London at the Office of Works, which looked after government property and, in particular, public parks. He then took another surprising turn and moved into a place called the Youth House, a residence established by a group of theosophists who valued the principles of internationalism. While living here, Mr. MANTHORPE helped provide accommodation and find jobs for German and Austrian students who were fleeing the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler. He met his future wife, Anne PARKER, at Youth House.
When the Second World War started Mr. MANTHORPE, like his father, chose to be a conscientious objector, and the ramifications of this decision were significant. Questions were asked in the House of Commons as to the validity of his case, since he was one of the first people in Britain to argue conscientious objector status on philosophical rather than religious grounds. He had to appear before a tribunal as well as resign from his government job. Instead, he did first aid work and become an air raid warden. Meanwhile, his brother Jack enlisted in the Royal Air Force and was later killed.
In 1951, Mr. MANTHORPE joined the Central Office of Information in London and became involved in designing the Festival of Britain. This festival, popularly referred to as "a tonic for the nation," was an attempt to boost the morale of bombed-out Londoners. An elaborate exhibition was developed on the south bank of the River Thames. Controversy plagued the festival. Irate tenants who were being evicted from their homes to make way for the highly publicized development took their fight to the streets, and many believed the millions budgeted for the event would have been better spent on new housing. In the process, Mr. MANTHORPE had caught sight of his future; he attended London University at night and qualified as a town planner. One of his early jobs was to design the dry dock at Greenwich for the Cutty Sark, the last of the three-masted tea clippers. Perhaps it was on the deck of this ship that he first considered crossing oceans and taking his city-planning skills to Canada.
In 1955, he landed a job as Toronto's deputy planning commissioner. He and Anne, along with their daughter Vicky and son Jonathan, who later became a reporter at the Globe and Mail, emigrated to Toronto just as the city was staging an international competition for the design of the new city hall. His career took off and in 1962 he was appointed Toronto's first Commissioner of Development.
"He was at the centre of a community of planners and architects who paved the way for Toronto's progress toward becoming one of the most cosmopolitan and attractive cities in North America," said Vicky. "It was a period of ferment, creativity and excitement."
Mr. MANTHORPE developed a passion for functional architecture in the style of modernist architect Walter GROPIUS, with whom he worked on a Toronto waterfront development later in his career. He viewed the development of high-rise apartments as a necessary component. "His outlook was very cosmopolitan. He was keen on people being able to flow around the world," said Vicky. "In Toronto, he foresaw that there would be great immigration… and that lots of apartments would be required."
He also was one of the first to come up with the idea of a domed sports stadium in downtown Toronto, and believed that derelict railway yards that lay between Front Street and the lake shore was just the place to put it. The idea, however, was years ahead of its time and decades elapsed before the SkyDome took shape.
Fed up with bureaucratic limitations and what he considered to be backward thinking, Mr. MANTHORPE resigned his post as commissioner in 1967. Mr. MANTHORPE was fond of an editorial cartoon that appeared in The Globe and Mail. It shows him slipping out of a meeting of the board of control whose members are all asleep. "Great things are going to happen in this city and I want to be part of them," he whispers.
An editorial published in The Globe and Mail at that time said Mr. MANTHORPE had been hired to attract developers to Toronto and "clear the track ahead of them," but instead of being free to get on with his job, he found himself mired in red tape. So he tiptoed out of city hall and into the offices of Meridian Property Management Ltd. to become a consultant.
Controversy continued to dog him. For instance, a high-rise building development planned for Toronto's South Saint_James Town neighbourhood quickly developed into a highly publicized fracas. In 1970, more than 100 tenants living in low-rise buildings in this downtown neighbourhood were given eviction notices by their landlord, the Meridian Group, to make way for the construction project. They formed a tenants' union and John Sewell - who at that time was a Toronto city alderman - spearheaded their fight against the developer. Mr. Sewell and Mr. MANTHORPE devised an experimental program whereupon Mr. Sewell became the middleman between the company and the tenants. Rents were paid to Mr. Sewell and then passed on to the Meridian Group. While zoning decisions were being made at city hall concerning low-rise or high-rise developments, tenants were protected from immediate eviction. Meanwhile, planning went ahead.
Where Mr. Sewell and Mr. MANTHORPE differed was not that new zoning laws had to be established, but rather what kind of development would fill the space and whether residents would have a say in the planning. "[Meridian] want high density. We say fine. There's no problem with high density at all as long as that doesn't mean high rise," Mr. Sewell said at that time.
Mr. MANTHORPE's position at Meridian gave him a platform upon which to try and shame the city into looking to the future and accepting that higher was better. "It's understandable that people in downtown residential areas are frightened," he said. "Practically every other city has a downtown core that is rotting away, a battlefield that no one dares cross. But Toronto is on the right track and if you're winning, it's the wrong time to turn tail and run away."
His approach did not always win Friends but it did gain him respect. "He was actually a nice man; I liked him," said Mr. Sewell earlier this month. "I got along with him in a personal way, but we believed in fundamentally different directions."
While critics point to Saint_James Town as a failure, the low-cost housing development may also be seen as another example of Mr. MANTHORPE's prescience. Many years later, residential downtown towers are now flourishing in the form of expensive condominiums.
After the debate surrounding Saint_James Town died down, Mr. MANTHORPE continued working as a town planning consultant on various projects, both in Toronto and in Great Britain. He was an authority on planning law and was much in demand as an expert witness at hearings and tribunals. In the mid-1980s, he managed the redevelopment of the Hudson's Bay headquarters in London and in the early 1990s, he returned to Southern Ontario to work on development planning with the Anglican Church.
At 80, he finally retired and spent his final years back home in Norwich.
Walter MANTHORPE was born in Norwich, England, on November 15, 1916. He died in Norwich on June 13, 2007. He was 90. He is survived by his wife, Anne, his son, Jonathan, and daughter Vicky.

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MANTIONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-19 published
MORAN, Anne M.
Passed away peacefully at the Royal Victoria Hospital on Sunday, September 16, 2007 at the age of 87. Beloved wife of the late Bill. Loving mother of Judy and John FUKE, Doctor Kevin and Uta MORAN, Darlene and Sam MANTIONE, David (predeceased) and Myrna, and Gary (predeceased). Proud grandmother of Christine, Matthew, Michael, Annemarie, Margaret, Liam, and Erica. Great-grandmother of Kaitlyn. Survived by her sister Kaye and husband Hugh CUDDIE. Friends may call at the Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Home (Clapperton and Worsley Streets) Barrie, from 7-9 p.m. Thursday, and 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Friday. Funeral Mass at Saint Mary's Catholic Church, 65 Amelia Street, on Saturday September 22, 2007 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Saint Mary's Cemetery. Donations to the Multiple Sclerosis Society or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. Condolences may be forwarded through www.steckleygooderham.com

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MANTO o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-01-03 published
MANTO, Norma Jean (née BEIRNES)
Of Walkerton, passed away at South Bruce Grey Health Centre, Walkerton on Tuesday, January 02, 2007 in her 75th year. Beloved mother of Kathy and Bob DAVIS of Elmwood, Don of Brant Twp., Roger and Vicki of Clifford; grandmother of Nicole and Michael and special friend Bobbi-Lynn PHILLIPPI. Dear sister of Jack BEIRNES of Lucknow, Bill BEIRNES of Wingham and Helen and Bev BANKS of Hanover. Pre-deceased by her husband Eldon; brother Clifford and parents William and Elizabeth (SHIELDS) BEIRNES. Visitation at Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton, on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held on Thursday, January 04, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. at Saint Peter's Lutheran Church, Brant Twp. Interment in Saint Peter's Cemetery, Brant Township. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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MANTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
POKRUPA, Esther C. (née MANTS,) R.N., B.A.
Passed away peacefully October 22, 2007 in her 90th year. After 57 years of happy marriage, she is survived by her husband, Peter and her sons Ronald (married to Karen M. SMITH) and Paul (companion to Elaine,) two granddaughters, Tamara POKRUPA and Celina NAHANNI (both at Queen's University) and grand_son Taj NAHANNI, his wife Adrienne and three great-grandchildren; Tristan, Russell and Sierra of Montreal. Her brother Jim MANTS of Winnipeg and sister Norah MULLAN of Minneapolis also survive her. Born in Saskatchewan, Esther graduated as a registered nurse. During World War 2 she joined the Canadian Army and tended casualties at the Canadian Military Hospital in Basingstoke. After the war she was one of very few women to study at the Canadian Khaki University in Watford, United Kingdom. She transferred to the University of Saskatchewan where she completed her B.A. and met her future husband. According to her wishes she was cremated. There will be a memorial gathering at the University Club at Queen's, 168 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario, Friday November 30 from 4-7 p.m. In lieu of flowers contributions can be made to the "Pokrupa-Smith Medical Student Bursary" and endowment fund at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6. Thanks are given to the staff of Kingston General Hospital, Saint Mary's of the Lake Hospital and Helen Henderson Nursing Home who cared for here in her declining months.
www.jamesreidfuneralhome.com

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MANTS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-09 published
She served in wartime Britain and attended the Khaki University
Raised in the dustbowl of Depression Saskatchewan, she tended to the wounded in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps hospitals and then took up the study of economics
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Esther POKRUPA found her way out of the swirl of Saskatchewan dust during the bleakest days of the Depression by paying careful attention to a future that led her to nursing, enlistment in the Canadian army and a degree in commerce and economics whose beginnings took shape in a unique institution called the Khaki University.
She had begun her life as a farmer's daughter in North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Her parents were homesteaders from Norfolk, England, who had crossed the Prairies by train after arriving in Halifax in 1905. Her father, Jack MANTS, kept a travel diary and, upon arriving in Saskatchewan, he wrote a succinct description of the landscape: "There are a lot of train wrecks here."
Farming in southern Saskatchewan was never easy. Land that had previously been disturbed only by grazing animals went under the plows of thousands of farmers. The top soil, made dry by drought, became airborne in immense black clouds of dirt so that dust lay thick on the kitchen counters during Esther's childhood. Later, in the bleakest days of the Depression, she was sent to work as a 14-year-old au pair in Edmonton. It was fortunate that her employer was also her high-school principal; she was able to stay in school as well as hold down a job.
Esther weighed her prospects. As she saw it, she had two choices: nursing or teaching. She chose nursing because it paid better. She attended Edmonton nursing college and, after graduating in 1941, started work as a public-health nurse in a town called Bonanza, near Peace River, Alberta. She lived alone in the bush and travelled from community to community but decided, after a while, that her nursing skills would be more useful elsewhere. By then it was the middle of the Second World War, so she enlisted in the military alongside her younger brother, Jim, who became a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force.
In 1944, Ms. POKRUPA joined Canada's Nursing Sisters and went overseas to serve in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps hospitals. First, however, she was sent to work for a short time at a prisoner of war camp at the exhibition grounds in Medicine Hat, Alberta. The camp housed more than 12,000 Germans, many of whom were ardent Nazis who that same year famously court-martialed and executed fellow PoWs for expressing defeatist views.
Once overseas, she ended up working in two well-established British army hospitals, one near Basingstoke, in northeast Hampshire, and the other near Horsham, in West Sussex. Basingstoke was the site of the No. 1 Canadian Neurological and Plastic Surgical Hospital.
"In Basingstoke, she worked with burn victims from airplanes used in [the air war mainly over Europe]," said her husband, Peter POKRUPA, a retired economist with Shell Canada. "After the D-Day invasion, she was in another hospital near Horsham, where the casualties were brought in."
As well as keeping up with the frantic pace of an army hospital in wartime, she also had to contend with peculiar restrictions placed on officers - some of them with a particularly repressive twist reserved for women. As a lieutenant, she was not permitted to marry; nor could she socialize with enlisted men.
After the war, she stayed in Britain and attended the Khaki University at Watford, just north of London. Established and managed by the Canadian Army in Britain at the end of the First World War, the school was revived in 1945 to help prepare servicemen for their return to civilian life.
While there were few women among the student body, and most of them women studied home economics, that was not for Esther POKRUPA. With a shrewd eye towards a career and financial independence, she took up economics. Her husband described a school photograph of her from that time: "There were hundreds of men and three women. [The women sat] with crossed legs in the front row. It was an incredible picture, very unusual to have women in university at all in the 1940s - especially in England - so it was quite unique."
Unfortunately, her studies were interrupted by a serious bout of tuberculosis, contracted while nursing at Basingstoke. She was sent home on a troopship and at Halifax she was carried down to the dock on a stretcher. There, someone in the crowd reached out and placed an apple on her blanket, a gesture she found deeply touching. She spent long months in a sanatorium before she could return to her books.
In 1948, she was finally well enough to resume her studies. She transferred her credits from the Khaki University to the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon and pursued her interest in economics. "Her reason for going into nursing… was not a hard-felt passion," said her son, Ronald POKRUPA, a neurosurgeon in Kingston. "She wanted to do something more than be a registered nurse."
While at University of Saskatchewan, she met Peter POKRUPA. By all accounts, he was first smitten with her because of her independence - and by the fact that she owned her own car. He was a war refugee from Czechoslovakia, also working towards at degree in economics, and they shared some classes.
They were married in 1950, the same year she graduated with an economics degree. The couple moved to Toronto and their two sons were born a short while after. A few years later, she suffered a serious relapse of tuberculosis. In 1956, she spent nine months in a Toronto sanatorium. "That was during the early years of chemotherapy for tuberculosis," Doctor POKRUPA said. "Before that it was a death sentence. She was in one of the lucky groups that got the drugs, and so she recovered."
Dr. POKRUPA remembers being six years old and visiting her at the sanatorium. Years later he realized the illness cost her dearly. "I always suspected that her having had tuberculosis damaged her ambitions… [it was a] sobering, frightening experience to go through, and had an impact on her attitude toward her children as well. She had been a doting mother, but for months she couldn't have contact [with us] for fear that we'd catch tuberculosis."
Later, she applied her nursing skills to her younger son, Paul. In 1970, while living in Tucson, Arizona., he was shot in a robbery and spent several weeks recuperating in hospital - with his mother nearby.
In 1971, Ms. POKRUPA moved to England with her husband for two years and spent some time travelling. One of their trips was to areas where she had nursed during the war to try and locate the actual hospitals. Sadly, she was disappointed. Some of the hospitals were large stately homes that had been pressed into service. At Horsham, the hospital was said to have been the home of the Duke of Wellington, victor of the Battle of Waterloo and later a prime minister of Britain, and that his horse was buried in the yard.
"We tried at Horsham," Mr. POKRUPA said. "We asked people and they said, 'Oh yes, there was a military hospital here, long ago… not exactly sure where it was.' "
After returning home, Ms. POKRUPA continued to work as a public health nurse in Toronto until she retired in 1984 but her joie de vivre continued long after. "Esther was interested in everything," her husband said. "Women's clubs, the Canadian Club in London&hellip she even went to tea at Buckingham Palace. She was interested in history, music; whenever we could, we would attend extension classes at the University of Toronto, York, Elderhostel." In a last gesture toward the living, Ms. POKRUPA and her husband planted 20,000 pine trees on the rocky stretch of the Canadian Shield north of Kingston.
Esther POKRUPA was born Esther MANTS in North Battleford, Saskatchewan., on August 3, 1918. She died peacefully in Kingston on October 22, 2007. She was 90. She is survived by her husband, Peter POKRUPA, and by her sons Peter and Ronald. She also leaves her brother, Jim MANTS, and her sister, Norah MULLAN, and by numerous grandchildren.

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MANTSINEN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-01-09 published
MANTSINEN, Timo
Of Sauble Beach passed away suddenly at his residence on Saturday, January 6, 2007 in his 30th year. Cherished son of Veikko and Kathleen MANTSINEN of Allenford and dear brother of Johanna MANTSINEN and her husband James BLAKE of North Vancouver, British Columbia. He was a special Uncle to niece Julia MANTSINEN and will be missed by several Aunts and Uncles. Cremation has taken place. There will be a private family memorial service at a later date. Arrangements entrusted to the George Funeral Home, Wiarton. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

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MANZON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-18 published
MORASUTTI, Pompea (née BRATTI)
Peacefully in her sleep at home in her 105th year on Sunday, July 15, 2007. Pompea, beloved wife of the late William (Guglielmo). Loving mother of Melvin and his wife Norma and Vivian and her husband Luciano MANZON. Nonna Pea will be missed by Susan and Simon ASARO, Cathy and Sal LUNETTA, Bill and Lisa, Bill and Mary, Janet and Dave BIDINI, and Melanie and Dwayne Gale. Great-grandmother of Nicholas, Billy, Daniella, Laura, Joanna, Stephanie, Jennifer, Julia, Cecilia, Lorenzo and Sophia. Predeceased by her 13 brothers and sisters. She will be missed by her many nieces and nephews. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home - Weston Chapel, 2035 Weston Road (North of Lawrence Ave.) on Wednesday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Our Lady of the Assumption, 2565 Bathurst Street, Toronto on Thursday, July 19, 2007 at 10 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. A special thank you to Maria for your care. Memorial contributions may be made to the Villa Leonardo Gambin, 40 Friuli Court, Woodbridge, Ontario L4L 9T3. Condolences may be sent to pompea.morasutti@wardfh.com

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