MANKO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-18 published
The last survivor of Canada's camps for First World War 'alien enemies'
As a girl, she was one of 5,000 Ukrainian Canadians and about 3,500 Eastern Europeans who were interned under the War Measures Act and held prisoner behind barbed wire
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail; Globe and Mail archives, Page S8
Halifax -- After years of trying to convince her children that she had been imprisoned as a little girl in an internment camp in Spirit Lake, Quebec, Mary Manko HASKETT fought to ensure that all Canadians, would remember what had happened to her and thousands of others during the First World War.
At first, her children were unable to find the place on a map and assumed their mother was confused and had referred instead to something that happened in Ukraine. But in 1986, after reading a newspaper article, they finally understood the truth of her tragic story of being forced to live in a bush camp in rural Quebec in 1915.
She was one of 5,000 Ukrainian Canadians and about 3,500 Eastern Europeans who were interned under the War Measures Act and accommodated at 24 camps across the country until 1920. Another 80,000 people, the majority Ukrainian, were forced to register as "enemy aliens" and required to report to local authorities on a regular basis. Most had come to Canada at the turn of the century, when the government encouraged Ukrainian immigration with promises of freedom and free land.
"I have lived with memories of that injustice all my life," she once said. "I can never forget what was done to my family and me. We were innocent and yet we were treated as enemy aliens."
After the war ended, the matter was forgotten by the rest of Canada, said Ms. HASKETT, who was the last known survivor of the camps. "For many years, it was almost as if it was all a bad dream, a nightmare it would be best if we forgot, certainly not something other Canadians wanted to talk about with us, the victims."
For years, Ms. HASKETT served as the honorary chairperson of the National Redress Council of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association. "I don't want an apology. How can anyone today apologize for something that happened 80 years ago?" she once told Lubomyr Luciuk of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association. "I want people to remember."
Ms. HASKETT's parents, Andrew and Katherine MANKO, arrived in Canada from an area of Ukraine that belonged to Poland, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in the early 1900s. When war broke out against Germany, Austria, Hungary and other parts of Eastern Europe, her family and thousands of others like them were regarded as enemy aliens. Depending on where they lived, some were forced to turn over money and property - which, according to McGill University historian J.H. Thompson, the government later auctioned for 10 cents on the dollar or kept. Some of that wealth is still in federal coffers.
Starting in 1914, camps and work sites were set up in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Those of German heritage were sent to the more comfortable camps -- even though Imperial Germany was the wartime enemy -- while racist attitudes of the day pushed most of the Ukrainian detainees to the wilds of northern Quebec and the backcountry of British Columbia and Alberta.
In April, 1915, it was the Mankos' turn. The federal government rounded them up with several other Ukrainian families from a parish in Montreal's Point St. Charles area and put them on a train. They were taken hundreds of kilometres away to an internment camp behind barbed wire at Spirit Lake, known today as Lac Beauchamp, in Quebec's Abitibi region. It didn't matter that Mary, then 6, and two of her siblings were born in Canada.
"It wasn't fair they were taken out there. They had done no wrong," said her daughter, Fran HASKETT. "It was very sad."
At Spirit Lake, Mary and her brother, John, sisters Annie and Carolka, and her parents, all lived in a bunkhouse in the woods. Because she had been so young, Ms. HASKETT remembered very little of her time at the camp except for mental images of soldiers with bayonets standing guard, and of her father returning, half-frozen, after spending the day cutting firewood and clearing forests. The children were not allowed to attend school and the family was issued only two pairs of stockings. To make matters worse, Carolka died at the camp before she had reached her third birthday. The family was never able to locate her grave.
Hers was one of many deaths. Some internees were killed trying to scale the barbed-wire fence; others simply gave up and committed suicide. Overall, 107 detainees died in the camps.
Most internees were forced to do heavy labour and had their belongings confiscated, Doctor Luciuk said. At the Spirit Lake camp, the first internees had to clear the bush to create farm land. "It was an experimental farm carved out of the woods," he said.
On June 14, 1916, the Mankos were released. But it wasn't until 1920 that the last of the camps were closed.
"After a while, it became obvious that they posed no threat," said Doctor Luciuk, who teaches political geography at the Royal Military College in Kingston. For 20 years, he has scoured federal documents, interviewed survivors and written books about the events.
Why Ms. HASKETT and all the others were interned remains open to debate. Some historians point to xenophobia; others suggest wartime fervour. Canada was aligned with Britain against Austria-Hungary and was facing a labour shortage. The internment camps provided cheap or free labour to build the country's infrastructure and economy.
After the Manko family was released from the Spirit Lake camp, they made their way to Toronto and opened a grocery store in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood. They later moved to Mississauga, where Ms. HASKETT spent the majority of her life. "They never had much money," Fran HASKETT said. "They could stretch it."
Ms. HASKETT worked at a Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. plant for a time. In 1930, she married Frank HASKETT, a factory worker and union man. They had five children, losing one boy to a heart defect when he was less than a year old.
While raising her children and taking care of the family home, she formed a club with some women in the neighbourhood. They would regularly meet, away from their families, to talk, play cards or go to see a show. She always loved singing Ukrainian and other folk songs. "She was vivacious and had a wild sense of humour," Fran HASKETT said. "She was such a people person."
In 1986, Ms. HASKETT read a Globe and Mail article about the internment camps. The story had been written by Doctor Luciuk, and she tracked him down. "She was in no way bitter," he said. "She didn't see herself as a victim."
Ms. HASKETT wasn't interested in an apology or compensation for herself or any of the descendents of internees - she simply wanted the government to acknowledge that the internment had occurred, and that the value of the internees' confiscated wealth and forced labour to be put into an endowment fund to be used for educational purposes so that no other Canadians would ever again suffer in the same way.
On November 25, 2005, royal assent was given to Bill C 331, The Internment of Persons of Ukrainian Origin Recognition Act. The act acknowledges that persons of Ukrainian origin were interned in Canada during the First World War and legally obliges the government to negotiate "an agreement concerning measures that may be taken to recognize the internment" for educational and commemorative projects. So far, the latter mandate has not been fulfilled.
"We always hoped we would secure a timely and honourable redress settlement that Mary could bear witness to as the last known survivor of Canada's first national internment operations," Doctor Luciuk said. "I hope that when we secure our settlement, and we will, Mary will be there in spirit."
Mary Manko HASKETT was born in Montreal on August 10, 1908. She died of pneumonia at a long-term care facility in Mississauga on July 14, 2007. She was 98. She is survived by her son John and by daughters Fran and Dianne. She was predeceased by her husband, Frank, and by sons Ronald and Paul. A funeral mass will be held at St. Christopher's Catholic Church in Mississauga today at 10 a.m.

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MANLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-30 published
MANLEY, Robert Douglas (July 31, 1941-March 25, 2007)
Doug MANLEY of Pinehurst, North Carolina and Muskoka, Ontario, died March 25, 2007 at his home in Pinehurst.
Doug was truly an inspiration for so many people. His kindness, career achievements and his amazing ability to make the best of any situation faced will always be present. He will forever be acknowledged and cherished with dignity, honour and respect by his daughters: Heather MANLEY, Melissa MANLEY and Lindsay LOHMEIER, his brothers Richard and Ron MANLEY, extended family and his Friends.

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MANLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-28 published
He represented 'Toronto the clean' - at least abroad
He talked trash with the Soviets and lunched with the Queen while dealing with garbage strikes and layoffs
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- The man who made green garbage bags fashionable for curbside pickup back in the 1960s was Toronto streets commissioner Harold ATYEO. His mandate also included snow removal and the earliest attempts at recycling - for instance, "bundle up for Wednesday" newspaper pickup. According to former mayor David CROMBIE, who worked with Mr. ATYEO, his colleague's efforts were the likely inspiration behind Peter Ustinov's oft-quoted description of the city as "New York run by the Swiss."
Mr. ATYEO "was an excellent public servant with a strong interest in the city," Mr. CROMBIE said. "In those days, Toronto had a great reputation as a city that works, as 'Toronto the clean,' and Harold made an enormous contribution toward that."
One of his more popular legacies was a service that allowed senior citizens to have their sidewalks shovelled for them, free of charge. He was also involved in restoring the historic St. Lawrence Market and Town Hall to their 19th-century splendour.
It wasn't all laurels, however. As streets commissioner, Mr. ATYEO faced garbage strikes, inclement weather and bad tempers as one of the most picked-on bureaucrats at city hall, frequently blamed for snowdrifts, stinky streets and litter.
Opinions differ as to whether Mr. ATYEO was a visionary or a pragmatist, but his efforts took him as far afield as the Kremlin, New York and Buckingham Palace.
"He was a strong proponent of things that simply made sense," said his son Mark. "In Moscow, he was struck by the non-unionized babushkas picking up street litter with corn brooms."
Harold ATYEO was the second of three children born in Camden, Ontario, to Jesse May (MANLEY) and Frank Wesley ATYEO. In 1920, when he was 2, his family purchased a farm in Lethbridge, Alberta. He told stories about heading into town for supplies with his older brother William and passing a community of Blood Indians, who were living in tepees along the Oldman River Valley.
In 1923, the family moved back to St. Catharines, Ontario, where his father worked first as a blacksmith, then as a hydro linesman until an injury ended his career. As a teenager during the Depression, Harold delivered newspapers and stocked grocery shelves to help support the family. In 1938, he attended teachers college at the Toronto Normal School (now part of Ryerson University) and began his first assignment a year later, on the day Germany invaded Poland and the Second World War began.
He soon became principal of a two-room schoolhouse in Amherstburg, Ontario In 1943, conflicted about not being part of the war, he left teaching and joined Ferry Command in Montreal, where he worked as an air navigation instructor. In 1944, at the age of 26, he realized that because of a punctured eardrum, he'd never get his wings. Hoping to at least get closer to the action, he joined the merchant marine.
The war ended shortly after his first trip across the Atlantic, however, and he returned to the family home, which by then was in Windsor, Ontario He took a job as an inventory clerk at a department store. The war widow who hired him was Margaret Loretta CASSON - they married in 1948 and moved to Fredericton, where he obtained an engineering degree. After moving back to Ontario two years later, he began his career in municipal engineering.
In 1953, he took a position as an engineer with the Township of North York, which was amalgamated into the City of Toronto the following year. In 1964, he took a job as commissioner of the streets department in the city of Toronto and moved into an office in the new City Hall. One of his early tasks included posting newspaper notices urging citizens to "clean up, paint up, don't be a litter bug."
From there, he moved on to being a kind of ambassador for the city, culminating in a trip to Moscow in 1968, in the thick of the Cold War, to meet with Soviet premier Alexey Kosygin and make suggestions about such issues as street cleaning, snow removal and synchronized traffic lights.
Ben GRYS, who was chairman of Toronto's public works department at the time, joined Mr. ATYEO in Moscow. He remembers his colleague as approachable and open-minded, but noted: "He wouldn't mind getting into a real knock-'em-out discussion to prove his point, and in most cases, he was right."
On the way back from the Soviet Union, Mr. and Mrs. ATYEO stopped off for a luncheon hosted by the Queen at Buckingham Palace. Although this luncheon made for a good family story, his son said nobody knew exactly why his parents were invited in the first place.
In 1972, Mr. ATYEO instituted another significant change by reducing Toronto's curbside garbage pickup to once a week, from twice. "It would be a nice, clean operation," he told The Globe and Mail at the time.
The schedule shift was an important step along the road toward the kind of recycling and composting initiatives the city has in place today, with garbage now picked up only once every two weeks. Nevertheless, when it was implemented, critics saw it as anything but clean. A union spokesman representing garbage collectors told the Toronto Star that once-a-week pickups would result in the trash "being carted off by maggots… hopefully they'll walk in the direction of the garbage trucks." There were also layoffs.
The streets and works departments merged in 1972 and fell under the jurisdiction of commissioner Ray BREMNER. Mr. ATYEO lost his title and reluctantly moved into a new position in the property department.
One of his last major projects for the city was in 1974, restructuring St. Lawrence Market and Town Hall. "They re-established the St. Lawrence Hall and did a lot of renovation in the South Market," Mr. CROMBIE said. "And here we are, 33 years later, [planning to] change the St. Lawrence Hall into the Toronto museum… Harold would have understood the vision."
Mr. ATYEO left Toronto in 1976 to take a job as superintendent of works in Gravenhurst, Ontario, where he worked until retiring a decade later. The end of his career, however, harked back to his schoolhouse roots: He temporarily went back to work as a supply teacher, teaching shop.
Harold ATYEO was born June 24, 1918, in Camden, Ontario, and died of cancer August 26, 2007. He was 89. He is predeceased by wife Margaret and leaves children Frank, Candace, Susan, Debra, Mark and Jo.

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MANN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-27 published
VANDERMEY, Kryn " Chris"
The family of the late Kryn VANDERMEY would like to thank family Friends and neighbours for their support during this time. Special thanks to those who visited Kryn and Rita during his last days. Kryn died peacefully with family at his side. Thank you for the wonderful care of Kryn's "Grey Gables family" and Doctor Harvey WINFIELD for his compassionate care over many years. Thanks to our church family and the special funeral celebration provided by Rev. Donna MANN, with music by Jodee JACK, Nancy GULDNER, Bill HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and lunch served by Saint_John's United Church women. Beautiful floral tributes were created by Eckhardts, Flesherton. Many thanks to Rob and the staff of Fawcett Funeral Home for their caring and accommodating services. Thank you for the many contributions in Kryn's memory to support Grey Gables. Kryn worked hard, lived well and long. A man of family and a man of God. Kryn is greatly missed and always remembered.
- Rita and family.
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MANN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-19 published
STODDART, Bob
It is with greatest appreciation we wish to thank all our Friends and neighbours for the many cards, flowers, donations, telephone calls and visits during Bob's illness and passing. A thank you to Grey Highlands Fire Department, Owen Sound and Markdale, Hospitals. Rob and staff at Fawcett's Funeral Home, Rev. Donna MANN and David FRIES for their comforting words and music, Saint_John's Ladies for the luncheon after the service. A special thank you to the Baker's for being with me when I needed them the most. God Bless You All.
- Joan STODDART, Michael, Lori and Families.
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MANN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-19 published
STODDART, William Robert " Bob"
William Robert STODDART was born April 4, 1932 in Flesherton, the eldest son of Norman and Hazel STODDART. He spent his early years in Flesherton working construction. Bob met a "little country girl" from Springhill prior to leaving for Toronto and she convinced him that it would be worth his while to come to Toronto where she already resided.
In 1951 he began what would be a 42 year career in the rubber retread industry, where he was a hard working and dedicated individual. Bob and Joan were married on September 4, 1954 in Flesherton and continued to reside in Toronto. In November 1956 a son Michael arrived followed by a daughter Lori in June 1962. In July 1963 Bob and Joan decided to move west to a little satellite city formerly known as Bramalea, now a part of the City of Brampton. They were blessed with two grandchildren, Kyle and Alyssa. Bob, better known as "Gamps", enjoyed taking on many roles from contestant on The Price is Right to a professional pumpkin carver on Halloween.
In 1994 Bob and Joan retired sold their home and moved back to their old haunts. They built their new home at Lake Eugenia where they made many new Friends. Bob loved the outdoors, enjoyed becoming a snow bird in Florida and most of all spending time with his family and Friends.
A service was held at the Fawcett Funeral Home, conduct ed by Rev. Donna MANN Pallbearers were Kevin AKINS, Bob AKINS, Brad AKINS, Garry BAKER, Ken STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Shawn STODDART. Honorary pallbearers were Ted STODDART and Jim THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. Flowerbearers were Alyssa CORCORAN and Kyle CORCORAN.
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MANN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-11-07 published
WADE, " Ted" Albert Edward
(Vet. World War 2)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services Markdale on Saturday November 3, 2007 of Flesherton in his 85th year. Loving husband of Ethel MARTIN. Dear father of Larry (Shirley) of Priceville and Linda TEETER (Allan DOWN) of Annan. He will be loved and remembered by grandchildren Sherry (Jon), Sabrina, Samantha; Michael (Juliet), A.J. (Amy), Adam (Heather); step-grandchildren Jeff, Brent and Chris, great-granddaughter to Kyrsten. Dear brother of Doris MANN of Scarborough and the late Jean BLUETT, Madeline ORMSBY, Doug, Eleanor WILLIS, Edith LONERGAN, Evelyn GILL and predeceased by son-in-law Steve TEETER. The family received Friends at Fawcett Funeral Home Flesherton on Tuesday November 6 where services will be held on Wednesday November 7 at 1 p.m. Interment Lakeview Cemetery, in Meaford. Memorial contributions to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation would be appreciated.
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MANN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-12 published
FRYER, Douglas Henry
Passed away on June 27th in his 77th year. son of the late Ruth and Albert FRYER, he is survived by his three sisters Rose, Ina and Irene. Ex-husband of Patricia MANN, with whom he shares three children, Cathy, Peter and Joe. He will live on in his grandchildren, Bronwyn, Emma, James, Peter, Dougie Brian, Taby, Ross, Shane, and Jessie and in his great-grandchildren Tristan and Kahlan. Close Friends of Eva and Norm. Doug will be sadly missed by Friends from across the country. Friends are invited to a gathering in his memory that will take place at Aunt Mabels' Country Kitchen (formerly Johnny G's Tavern), Hwy. 21 at the south end of Port Elgin, on July 15th, at 3-5 p.m. Funeral arrangements in the care of the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin. Memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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MANN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-10 published
WATERTON, Bernard Owen
(Veteran of World War 2)
Passed away at the South Bruce Grey Health Centre, Durham on Thursday, August 9th, 2007. Bernard Owen WATERTON, of R.R.#3 Durham, in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of the former Joyce GODDARD. Loving father of Janet and her husband Jim MANN of Owen Sound, and Paul WATERTON and his wife Teri of Durham. Fondly remembered by his grandchildren and great-grandchildren: Jesse, Kelly and Charlie, Julie and Jeff, and Jill, Travis and Marley. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Anglican Church, Durham on Sunday, August 12th at 2 p.m. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements entrusted to the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham.

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MANN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-26 published
DAILEY, Earl William Wallace
At the Lee Manor, Owen Sound on Monday, September 24th, 2007, with his family by his side. Earl DAILEY in his 92nd year. Beloved husband of Marion DAILEY (PATCHELL.) Loving father of Tom (Gloria,) Doug, Don (Wanda) and Dave (Brenda). Cherished grandfather of Joanne BEATTIE (Chris), Raymond DAILEY (Dee), Andrea KESSLER (Jeremy), Jennifer WILSON (Paul), Ryan DAILEY and Denise THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Brandon) and step-grandfather of Linda MONK, Kathy BALLS, Jamie PORTER and Mike PORTER. Great-grandfather to Jake, Quinton, Taylor, Jensen, Luke, Peyton and Alexa. Survived by one brother Orval. Predeceased by daughter-in-law Sharon, brothers Homer, Cecil and Edgar. Sisters Edna MANN, Marguerita RUTHVEN and Essie MANNEROW. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home, Hepworth, Thursday from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted from the Funeral Home, Friday, September 28 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Boyd Cemetery, Shallow Lake. Memorial contributions to Lee Manor's Day Away Program or Kemble United Church would be appreciated as your expresion of sympathy. Sarawak Loyal Orange Lodge #1302 Service on Thursday at 7: 00 p.m. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Earl by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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MANN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-05 published
WADE, “Ted“ Albert Edward
(Veteran World War 2)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale on Saturday, November 3, 2007 of Flesherton in his 85th year. Loving husband of Ethel MARTIN. Dear Father of Larry (Shirley) of Priceville and Linda TEETER (Allan DOWN) of Annan. He will be loved and remembered by grandchildren Sherry (Jon), Sabrina, Samantha; Michael (Juliet), A.J. (Amy), Adam (Heather); step-grandchildren Jeff, Brent and Chris, great-granddaughter Kyrsten. Dear brother of Doris MANN of Scarborough and the late Jean BLUETT, Madeline ORMSBY, Doug, Eleanor WILLIS, Edith LONERGAN, Evelyn GILL and predeceased by son-in-law Steve TEETER. The family will receive Friends at Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton on Tuesday, November 6, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held at 1: 00 p.m. on Wednesday, November 7. Interment Lakeview Cemetery, Meaford. Memorial contributions to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

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MANN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-11 published
BOS, John T.
At the farm, on Tuesday January 9th, 2007, John T. BOS of Strathroy in his 79th year. Beloved husband of Nolda (DORTMANS) for 51 years. Dear father of Willy and Patricia (PARISH) of Strathroy and dear grandfather of Jamie Ann MANN and her husband Bryan, Hollie BOS (Mike WHITE/WHYTE) and Scott BOS (Laura MITCHELL.) Also survived by three sisters and one brother in Holland. Predeceased by a daughter Betty Ann (1966) and a son Harry (1974) and three brothers in Holland. Visitation will be held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, 32 Metcalfe Street West, Strathroy on Thursday January 11th from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at All Saints Roman Catholic Church on Friday January 12th at 11: 00 a.m. Father Jorge CHIMBINDA, Celebrant. Parish prayers Thursday at 6: 45 p.m. Private family interment, following at All Saints Roman Catholic Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to John.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-30 published
STEELE, Isobel Ferguson " Tibbie"
b. July 9, 1910; died peacefully at Kiwanis Care Home in New Westminster, British Columbia on June 25, 2007, two weeks short of her 97th birthday. She is survived by her loving family, sisters Margaret (Ed) HOGG and Maisie (Charlie) CARNCROSS, nieces and nephews Catherine GUNTER, Bill HOGG, Elizabeth MUNROE, Pat BUNNELL, Gord CARNCROSS, Barbie CARNCROSS and their families; cousins Margaret MANN, Tom STEELE and Marion BRYCE. Tibbie is predeceased by nieces Barbara (HOGG) MacPHEE and Nancy (CARNCROSS) CLARK. At age six, Tibbie emigrated from Scotland with her family, taking up residence in New Westminster, where she lived for most of her life. She will be remembered for her gracious manner, her inquiring mind, and her lively interest in the lives of her family, Friends, and former students. Tibbie began her long teaching career at age 19, in a 1 room schoolhouse on Gabriola Island, moving to Courtney and returning during the war years to teach in New Westminster, where she remained until she retired in 1973. Her determination and love of learning, particularly history, led her to gradually complete both Bachelors and Masters degrees at University of British Columbia. In her active retirement years she continually sought out ways to pursue her intellectual, social and spiritual interests (University Women's Club; Philanthropic Educational Opportunity Chapter "P"Sisterhood; St. Aiden's Presbyterian church), and spent many enjoyable months each year at the family summer home at Gower Point on the Sunshine Coast, where she made lifelong Friends among the summer resident families there. The family wishes to thank the staff of Kiwanis Care for the kindness and love they showed towards Tibbie, and for the excellent all-round environment of both peaceful care and stimulating activity which made her last years so enjoyable for her. A family Memorial Service will be held for Tibbie at Kiwanis Care Centre.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-16 published
BETHUNE, John Alex Charles (1913-2007)
Stage, radio and television writer, actor and director John Alex Charles BETHUNE passed away July 21, 2007 in Toronto after a lengthy illness. He was pre-deceased by his wife Aileen SEATON in 2004. John was born October 21, 1913 in Kamloops, British Columbia to Marion C.C. MANN of Saint Thomas, Ontario and Reginald A. BETHUNE of Port Hope, Ontario. Mr. BETHUNE was a great-grand_son of former Lord Bishop BETHUNE of Toronto, and the grand_son of Mary Bolton BETHUNE who grew up in the Grange, now part of the Art Gallery of Ontario. He completed his schooling at Trinity College, Port Hope where his grandfather, son of the Lord Bishop of Toronto, was headmaster. After a short career with the Royal Trust Company he traded finance for the theater world where he was instrumental in the growth of 'Theater Under the Stars' in Vancouver's Stanley Park, followed by a move to Toronto as a longtime contributor to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. His particular specialty was revising and adapting literary and stage classics to conform to the varied requirements of radio and television. He is survived by his brother, Edward (Ted) BETHUNE of Palm Desert, California.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-23 published
McDONALD, Capt. Kenneth John, GP., OBE, DFC
Royal Air Force (Ret'd)
On August 20th following a brief illness at North York General Hospital, aged 93 predeceased by his beloved wife Ruth (2002). Lovingly remembered by sons Peter (Keith, Toronto) and John (Susan, Calgary,) and daughter Martha SIMMONS (Gordon, Port Hope;) by grand_sons Eric MANN, Duncan McDONALD (Julie, Calgary), Steve SIMMONS (Kristen, Ottawa), Scott SIMMONS (Amy, Whitby): granddaughter Sarah BERTHELSEN (Peter, Edmonton;) great-granddaughters Kristin, Lindsey and Erin Berthelsen (Edmonton), and great-grand_sons Emmett and Stirling McDONALD (Calgary,) great-grand_sons Carter and Jacob SIMMONS (Whitby,) and great-grand_sons Everett, and Quinn and great-granddaughter Avery SIMMONS (Ottawa.) Grateful thanks to the caring nursing staff of 3 West at North York General. Born in Bristol, England, Ken was commissioned as a pilot in the Royal Air Force in 1936. His service included wartime flying in Bomber Command, two tours of duty in Canada, and one as commander of the Royal Air Force's main base in the Far East. Retiring in 1957 to settle in Canada, he worked as a Senior Sales Executive for Canadair Ltd. in Montreal until 1969 when he retired again to write full time. For years Ken was a regular contributor to The Globe and Mail's Report on Business, The Toronto Star and Executive magazine. He edited the National Citizens Coalition's newsletters from their inception in 1976 until 1987 and authored several best selling books on Canada's political economy as well as his autobiography, A Wind on the Heath. He was a very active member of the Royal Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force Associations and the Fort York Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion, and was the Honorary President of the Aircrew Association's Toronto Branch. A memorial service will be held at Forest Grove United Church, 43 Forest Grove Drive, North York, on Friday, August 24, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be directed to The Air Cadet League of Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, Suite 600, North York, Ontario, M2N 6B7.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-24 published
McDONALD, Gp. Capt. Kenneth John, OBE, DFC
Royal Air Force (Ret'd)
On August 20th following a brief illness at North York General Hospital, aged 93 predeceased by his beloved wife Ruth (2002). Lovingly remembered by sons Peter (Keith, Toronto) and John (Susan, Calgary,) and daughter Martha SIMMONS (Gordon, Port Hope;) by grand_sons Eric MANN, Duncan McDONALD (Julie, Calgary), Steve SIMMONS (Kristen, Ottawa), Scott SIMMONS (Amy, Whitby): granddaughter Sarah BERTHELSEN (Peter, Edmonton;) great-granddaughters Kristin, Lindsey and Erin BERTHELSEN (Edmonton,) and great-grand_sons Emmett and Stirling McDONALD (Calgary,) great-grand_sons Carter and Jacob SIMMONS (Whitby,) and great-grand_sons Everett, and Quinn and great-granddaughter Avery SIMMONS (Ottawa.) Grateful thanks to the caring nursing staff of 3 West at North York General. Born in Bristol, England, Ken was commissioned as a pilot in the Royal Air Force in 1936. His service included wartime flying in Bomber Command, two tours of duty in Canada, and one as commander of the Royal Air Force's main base in the Far East. Retiring in 1957 to settle in Canada, he worked as a Senior Sales Executive for Canadair Ltd. in Montreal until 1969 when he retired again to write full time. For years Ken was a regular contributor to The Globe and Mail's Report on Business, The Toronto Star and Executive magazine. He edited the National Citizens Coalition's newsletters from their inception in 1976 until 1987 and authored several best selling books on Canada's political economy as well as his autobiography, A Wind on the Heath. He was a very active member of the Royal Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force Associations and the Fort York Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion, and was the Honorary President of the Aircrew Association's Toronto Branch. A memorial service will be held at Forest Grove United Church, 43 Forest Grove Drive, North York, on Friday, August 24, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations may be directed to The Air Cadet League of Canada, 4900 Yonge Street, Suite 600, North York, Ontario, M2N 6B7.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-30 published
WILEY, Elizabeth Sarah Anne (née MANN)
Beth died peacefully in the company of her loving mother on August 24th at St Vincent's Hospice, Indianapolis, Indiana. Born on February 5th, 1967 in New Zealand to Toronto parents, she is survived by her husband David, her father Paul MANN and Leslie Macament MANN (Albuquerque, New Mexico,) her mother and stepfather Kit and Paul RACETTE (North Wales, Pennsylvania,) her brother Kristopher, sister-in-law Anna and nephew Jayden (Australia), her aunt and uncle Sarah and Phil CLEPHAN and her grandmother Barbara BUNTING (all of Toronto) plus extended family worldwide. Having spent her youth in New Zealand, Toronto and Montreal, Beth attended the International School of Brussels and l'Universite de Louvain la Neuve in Belgium, Northwestern University in Chicago and Indiana University in Bloomington. During this latter period, Beth returned to Toronto for a year and worked at the Credit Suisse. Her passion in life was her horsemanship. She was an accomplished rider and had high ambitions as a show-jumper. She loved her cats and dogs (mostly strays) as if they were her children, and spent many happy hours in her flower garden. Donations in Beth's memory can be made to Mourning Dove Therapeutic Riding Inc., 5930 East 550 South, Whitestown, Indiana 46075. Family and Friends will gather on Sunday afternoon September 2nd at Beth's home for a celebration of her life. 1-317501-2832.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-10 published
MANN, Kathleen Mary
Passed away peacefully on December 8, 2007 at Saint Michael's Hospital following a lengthy illness in her 89th year. She will be greatly missed by her sister Doris McGRATH, many nieces, nephews and many Friends. She is predeceased by her brothers Leo and Raymond KILLORAN. Kathleen will be remembered for over 60 years of dedication and commitment to Saint Michael's Choir School and "her boys." Friends may visit at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel 467 Sherbourne St. (south of Wellesley) on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral mass celebrated at Saint Michael's Cathedral (Bond at Shuter Sts.) on Thursday at 10 a.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. If so desired donations to Saint Michael's Choir School would be appreciated.

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MANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-27 published
Backbone of Saint Michael's Choir School groomed 'young gentlemen'
For more than 60 years, 'the guardian of the school's character' served in many capacities but mostly she taught the students liturgical music and religion, as well as their ABCs
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Toronto -- Kathleen (Kay) MANN could have easily become a Roman Catholic nun, but chose instead to teach. The decision proved almost moot; she viewed her job as a religious calling. Besides, teaching was no mere whim - she did it for an astonishing 65 years at the same school.
"My work is equivalent to that of an apostolate," she reflected in 1987. "It gives me great joy. I love my work and my faith."
Ms. MANN combined those as can few who do not take religious vows. She was a fixture at Toronto's famed Saint Michael's Choir School as a firm but much-loved teacher, administrator and conductor, and maintained a spotless attendance record since the school's founding in 1937 - missing only one day, when she fractured her elbow playing softball, her other passion.
Over six decades, thousands of boys learned liturgical music and religion, as well as their ABCs, from Ms. MANN, who served the school in virtually every capacity and taught every one of its administrative and choir directors.
"I was her boss for 24 years, but she was always my teacher," remembered Harry HODSON, a pupil of Ms. MANN's in the early 1950s who went on to become the school's principal and director. "She was a guardian of the school's character."
Proper and punctilious, with a straight back and earnest smile, Ms. MANN (Miss MANN to her students) was a gentle and inspiring instructor, and kept her boys on the straight and narrow. "She was not a softie by any means," Mr. HODSON said. "She wanted the very best from her boys but was probably one of the fairest people you'll ever come across. She wanted to raise young gentlemen and, along the way, turn them into singers."
Several of her choirboys went on to find fame in singing, among them Michael Burgess, operatic tenor Michael Schade, jazz crooner Matt Dusk, members of the Crew-Cuts and Four Lads, and Kevin Hearn of Barenaked Ladies.
"She didn't joke around a lot. She was pretty serious and dedicated and made us work hard," recalled Mr. Hearn, a student from Grades 3 to 11. "When I look at my self-discipline skills, she's certainly the person who had a major influence on helping them develop. She was a beautiful person."
Mr. Hearn, who still does the vocal exercises he learned from Ms. MANN, went to visit his old teacher a few years ago. "She asked how I was doing and what I was doing. I said I was in a band. She asked what it was called. When I told her, she just sort of shook her head, looked at me and said," - and here he lowers his voice for effect - " 'Oh, Kevin …' "
Mr. Dusk, with three jazz CDs under his belt, remembers Ms. MANN as "a kind of second mother to us. She taught us that singing is praying twice, that music can be fun but spiritual."
For years, she was equally dedicated to softball, and even turned down a professional contract. "I thought my teaching was more important," she told the Toronto Star in 1987. "Playing ball would have only lasted a few years."
Born into a working-class family in Toronto, Ms. MANN displayed her mettle and sense of fair play early, once challenging a neighbourhood tough to "Take off your glasses and fight."
She learned to play baseball in the schoolyard at age 12, recalled her sister, Doris McGRATH. "In those days, there wasn't much to do but go to the school playground."
She entered a local girls' league, developed a wicked pitching arm and hot bat, and never looked back. Newspaper reports of the day described her as "a sterling pitcher… speed-ball hurler&hellip one of the best."
She played for 23 years, starting at age 13 with the Nationals, going on to the Toronto Ladies, followed by corporate teams such as Peoples Credit Jewellers, Simpsons and Clayton's. She guest pitched for several world tournaments in Detroit and was offered a contract to play in the women's big leagues in Chicago. She declined.
The softball-and-music combination led to decades of "perfect-pitch" puns.
Meantime, Toronto's Cathedral Schola Cantorum, founded in 1926 to train boys for Saint Michael's Cathedral's choir, added elementary grades in 1937 and was rechristened Saint Michael's Choir School. A 19-year-old Ms. MANN began as an assistant to founder Monsignor John Edward RONAN. She is remembered as the last of the school's co-founders.
Armed with a teaching certificate from the Toronto Normal School, she started instructing traditional academic subjects, as well as Gregorian chant, sight singing, choral music and voice. The life of a chorister was hard, Mr. HODSON recalled. It started in Grade 3, went to Grade 13, "and for nine of those, from Grade 5 on, you were singing every Sunday of the school year at the cathedral."
Although stern, Ms. MANN had a way of easing tension. She would hold up small cards facing the choir that said, "No smoking," or "chicken lips." Darren Dais, a former student and now a Dominican priest, recalled that she installed two rear-view mirrors on her piano, which faced away from the class, to keep an eye on trouble-makers. The jingle of the huge ring of keys she carried alerted the more rambunctious singers to settle down before her arrival.
Her interest in Gregorian chant led to additional studies in New York, the Catholic University of America in Washington, and Boys Town in Nebraska. She also held a Bachelor of Sacred Music degree from the Pontifical Institute of Sacred Music in Rome, through an affiliation with the choir school.
She was awarded two papal medals, the Bene Merenti in 1964, and the Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice ("For Church and Pope") in 1987, on the school's 50th anniversary. She was inducted into the Order of Ontario in 1997.
Ms. MANN was at the school seven days a week, usually arriving straight from 7: 30 a.m. mass at the cathedral next door. Weekends were spent on paperwork. For a time, she pinch-hit as the secretary at night. She taught at the summer school until the mid-1960s. And she taught singing to nurses at Saint Michael's Hospital and the Catholic Youth Organization's glee club.
Despite plenty of opportunities, she never married. Her students were "her boys" and she unabashedly mothered them. "Children nowadays need somebody to be firm, consistent and loving," she told the Star.
From 1967 until her first "retirement" in 1984, Ms. MANN was the school's vice-principal. In 1984, the school persuaded the archdiocese of Toronto to retain her as an "adviser in sacred music," a position she held for almost 15 years. And from 1985 on, she conducted the elementary and junior boys' choirs. She was 85 when she finally stopped working.
After slipping into a deep sleep on her final day of life, she waved her hands in the air for a few minutes. At first puzzled, her family realized that she was conducting. Then she crossed herself, folded her hands on her chest, and died.
At her packed funeral service, several men approached the family to say, "Kay is the reason I'm a gentleman."
Kathleen Mary MANN was born in Toronto on August 31, 1919. She died of cancer in Toronto on December 8, 2007. She was 88. She was predeceased by her brothers Leo and Raymond KILLORAN. She leaves her sister, Doris McGRATH.

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MANNEH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-23 published
JAMES, June Catherine
Peacefully on October 21, 2007 after many years of physical challenges, June JAMES, an incredible brave woman passed away at her home in Buckhorn. Cherished wife of Don since August 8, 1959. Devoted mother to Denise, Darlene (Ken MANNEH) and Dawn (Rick McCLENAGHAN.) Beloved grandmother to Kyle, Ricky, Ryan, Lauren, Katie and Evan. Loving sister to Mernie, Robin and Walter. Predeceased by her sister Donna. The family will receive Friends at the McDougall and Brown Funeral Home, Scarborough Chapel (2900 Kingston Road, one block east of St. Clair Ave. East - 416-267-4656) on Tuesday, October 23 from 7-9 p.m. and on Wednesday, October 24 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the McDougall and Brown Chapel on Thursday, October 25th, 2007 at 1 o'clock. June will be sadly missed by her immediate and extended family as well as many dear Friends, whose heart her kindness and love touched. At the families request, donations may be made in June's memory to the Toronto General Hospital or to the Bob Rumball Foundation for the deaf.

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MANNEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-01 published
COCHRANE, Lee-Anne
Peacefully at Victoria Hospital on Friday, December 29, 2006 Lee-Anne COCHRANE of London in her 55th year. Loving daughter of Gertrude Marie COCHRANE of London and the late Allan COCHRANE (1995.) Dear sister of Dawn and John MANNEN of London. Loved by her nephews Scott MANNEN of Peterborough and David and Jennifer MANNEN of London, England. Special thanks to Jean TAILOR/TAYLOR and Dianna MacDOUGALL for their care and compassion. At Lee-Anne's request there will be no visitation or Funeral Service. Cremation. Donations to the charity of choice gratefully acknowledged. McFarlane and Roberts Funeral Home, Lambeth 519-652-2020 in care of arrangements.

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MANNEROW o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-30 published
MANNEROW, Kenneth George
Of Tara, passed away at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Friday, June 29, 2007 in his 74th year. Beloved husband and friend of Jean. Loving father and grandfather of Sheila (Ron) JAMES and their children, Chris and Ryan of Meaford, Lynn (Trent) BLAKE and their children, Brendon and Erin of Owen Sound and Steve (Wendy) and their children, Megan, Becky and Faith of R.R.#2 Chesley. Ken will be fondly remembered by his siblings, Isabelle (Leith) ELDER of Tara, Lloyd (Marjorie,) Dianne (Ross) KING and Reg (Dayle) all of the Chesley area. Predeceased by his parents, George and Essie (DAILEY) MANNEROW. Visitation will be held at Cameron Funeral Home, Chesley on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Royal Canadian Legion Branch #383 service will be held at the funeral home on Monday at 6: 45 p.m. followed by a Forest Lodge #393 Masonic service at 7 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Tuesday, July 3, 2007 at Geneva Presbyterian Church, Chesley at 11 a.m. Interment in Chesley Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, Community Care Access Centre or the Victorian Order of Nurses would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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MANNEROW o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-26 published
DAILEY, Earl William Wallace
At the Lee Manor, Owen Sound on Monday, September 24th, 2007, with his family by his side. Earl DAILEY in his 92nd year. Beloved husband of Marion DAILEY (PATCHELL.) Loving father of Tom (Gloria,) Doug, Don (Wanda) and Dave (Brenda). Cherished grandfather of Joanne BEATTIE (Chris), Raymond DAILEY (Dee), Andrea KESSLER (Jeremy), Jennifer WILSON (Paul), Ryan DAILEY and Denise THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Brandon) and step-grandfather of Linda MONK, Kathy BALLS, Jamie PORTER and Mike PORTER. Great-grandfather to Jake, Quinton, Taylor, Jensen, Luke, Peyton and Alexa. Survived by one brother Orval. Predeceased by daughter-in-law Sharon, brothers Homer, Cecil and Edgar. Sisters Edna MANN, Marguerita RUTHVEN and Essie MANNEROW. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home, Hepworth, Thursday from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted from the Funeral Home, Friday, September 28 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Boyd Cemetery, Shallow Lake. Memorial contributions to Lee Manor's Day Away Program or Kemble United Church would be appreciated as your expresion of sympathy. Sarawak Loyal Orange Lodge #1302 Service on Thursday at 7: 00 p.m. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Earl by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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MANNERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-04 published
Fatal chase sparks questions deaths
By Canadian Press, Mon., June 4, 2007
Toronto -- The loss of three more young lives from a north Toronto community has grieving parents demanding answers from the government as to how the latest tragedy could have been prevented.
Barely a week after 15-year-old Jordan MANNERS was shot dead inside his high school, a weeping Jannett SCOTT- JONES was told her daughter, 17-year-old Aleisha Ashley, was "brain-dead" and nothing could be done to save her.
The teenager had been in intensive care since early Saturday morning after a taxi she was riding in with her best friend, Monique McKNIGHT, 16, was struck by a teenage boy fleeing police in a stolen car.
McKNIGHT was killed, as was the stolen car's driver, 15-year-old Chevon JOSEPHS.
"I don't understand why three lives have to be lost because the police are chasing after a 15-year-old," SCOTT- JONES said as family and Friends tried to console her.
"Now a 15-year-old is dead, my daughter is dead and Monique is dead."
She questioned the wisdom of a police chase on city streets and demanded action to prevent similar tragedies.
"Does this sound like police that are here to serve and protect?"
SCOTT- JONES said the two girls were on their way home after watching television with Aleisha's aunt.

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MANNERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-01 published
Church overflowing for funeral of 'bright star'
'Don't let his name be forgotten,' uncle asks during two-hour ceremony
By Alex DOBROTA, Page A14
To his Friends and relatives, he was an artistic teenager with a fascination for snakes and pranks, who still sucked on his thumb at times - a star that burned out ahead of its time.
But to the hundreds of mourners who knew him little yet still showed up to celebrate his memory yesterday, Jordan MANNERS became an icon for the damage gun crime has wrought in their community.
Thirty minutes before the funeral of the 15-year-old began yesterday morning, the main room at Christian Centre Church, near Jane Street and Finch Avenue, was already filled to capacity.
Hundreds more people packed the hallways, the balconies and a nearby gymnasium to watch a live feed of the proceedings. About 200 stood outside the church braving scorching heat. About as many waited at Beechwood Cemetery.
"I think it really struck a chord in the minds of people," said Pastor Dino ANDREADIS, who officiated at the ceremony. "I've done high-profile funerals, but never like this. I think this will really make a difference."
The church has a capacity of about 1,000 and Mr. ANDREADIS estimates more than 1,500 showed up yesterday.
The teen was shot last Wednesday inside his school, C.W. Jefferys Collegiate Institute. Two 17-year-old youths have been charged with first-degree murder.
After collapsing with grief on a chair steps away from his coffin, his mother, Laureen SMALL, took one last look at her son. She then watched pallbearers close the casket and the two-hour-long ceremony began.
One of Jordan's aunts told how he sucked on his thumb at times during his sleep. One of his teachers described how he easily reproduced a complicated architecture diagram in less than an hour. And the story of how Jordan brought snakes into his house elicited a rare moment of laughter.
"The world lost a bright, bright star," his aunt, Louisa MANNERS, said during her eulogy.
During one of the most emotional moments, Jordan's school mate and friend, Matthew ALAY, burst into tears and was unable to read a speech, which was delivered by a relative. "Jordan, may your soul rest in peace. I love you," the boy only managed to utter between sobs.
Other relatives said Jordan's death should serve as a call to action against gun violence in the community. "He's not a statistic," his uncle Gregory STOKES said. "Don't let his name be forgotten."
As the mourners spilled out in the parking lot after the ceremony, many young people expressed anger and disgust at the shooting.
"Our young man are dying and dying and this ain't right" said 14-year-old Jessica PAZMINO, who said she never met Jordan, but decided to come to the funeral to show support. "Hopefully, this will teach people a lesson."
"People are realizing that this is disgusting," said Martha BOTENG, 19. "I see people coming together more."
Beside her, the car carrying Jordan's casket set slowly in motion toward Beechwood Cemetery, followed by two lowriders - cars with modified hydraulics and suspension so as to allow the driver to bounce the vehicle up and down to the rhythm of hip-hop music.
In their wake, traffic on Jane Street backed up several blocks and the storm clouds gathering above shed a few drops.

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MANNERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-12 published
Fatal stabbing shakes Toronto schools
Scarborough student slain at lunchtime
By TIMOTHY APPLEBY with reports from Unnati GANDHI, Jennifer LEWINGTON, Karen HOWLETT and Shawn McCARTHY, Page A1
Toronto -- In a lunch-hour confrontation that dispatched fresh shock waves across Toronto's school system, a 16-year-old Scarborough student was stabbed to death yesterday on a walkway leading from his high school.
Homicide detectives were hunting at least one suspect, seen fleeing the crime scene at Winston Churchill Collegiate Institute in a speeding car, and offered little insight into why the youth - identified by CTV News last night as Denesh MURUGIAH - had been killed.
Suspicion, however, immediately fell on a long-simmering rivalry between Tamil factions, whose animosity is believed responsible for a firebombing and a stabbing in the same neighbourhood in April.
What was certain was that the teen's death came just four months after the shooting death of teenager Jordan MANNERS in a high school on the other side of the city. And, moreover, it had the hallmarks of being planned.
"My Friends told me they saw the victim standing there when two guys came up behind him and said, 'Do you want to do this now?' recounted Ajay MANGARA, 18, who lives a few doors from the school, near Lawrence Avenue and Kennedy Road.
"Then they saw the guy screaming on the ground, 'Help me, help me.' "
The teen was stabbed several times in the stomach and showed no vital signs when paramedics responded to the 12: 05 p.m. call. He died soon after in Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre.
Word on the street is that the killing stemmed from "Tamil reprisals," Mr. MANGARA said, echoing the opinion of a Lawrence Avenue pizza parlour operator that caters to many Winston Churchill pupils.
If so, it is not the first time police attention has been drawn to a Tamil-based gang conflict, loosely spread across half a dozen Scarborough schools.
Students milling around the collegiate in the bright sunshine yesterday seemed to know little about the victim, a new arrival in his second week of school, and some appeared strikingly unaffected.
As television cameras hovered, several urged their Friends, "Don't snitch, don't talk."
Yesterday's killing was Toronto's 57th of 2007 - 11 more than had occurred at the same time last year.
The principal suspect is thought to be a male with brown skin, 17 or 18 years old, about 5 foot 5, wearing black jeans, a black zip-up hoodie and a bandana covering his face.
Also sought is a light blue Honda, probably a mid-1990s Civic, in which the killer or killers are believed to have fled.
Whether any of them also attended Winston Churchill was unknown.
But 41-year-old floor installer Jim NIKOLAKAKOS, an alumnus who has lived close to the walkway for most of his life, said the school has become markedly rougher in recent years and that tensions were often evident.
"There's a lot of rivalry going on in the school - kids from this school, kids from other schools - they get together in little gangs and it's all, 'You said this, you said that,' " he said.
"The whole school has changed; inside there's graffiti all over the place, it's not kept up. There's no respect any more for anything… Things have changed."
Others familiar with the sprawling 1,200-student school disagreed.
Jessica COPELAND, 19, was a student for five years and wept yesterday as she arrived home to learn what had taken place almost on the doorstep of her Flora Drive home.
"I just can't believe something like this would happen at Churchill it was a really good school for me, the teachers were nice," she said.
"There were incidents, yeah, but they were really contained and personally I never saw anybody with any weapons, not in five years. Nothing ever got out of hand like this."
Toronto Police Service Inspector Kathryn MARTIN said much the same.
"I'm very familiar with the neighbourhood, I've spent 13 years working in 41 Division and this is a very good school… so I'm thinking this is an incident unrelated to the school itself."
Winston Churchill, however, is adjacent to a community centre that last year installed closed-circuit cameras because of fights. And in the past, local councillor Michael THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON has asked nearby retailers not to sell knives.
Mr. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said of yesterday's homicide that he was "not shocked but saddened."
Gerry CONNELLY, director of education at the Toronto District School Board, denied rumours that the victim had been transferred to Winston Churchill because of behavioural problems.
In fact, she said, the teen was a new student because he and his family had moved into the Lawrence and Kennedy area from Don Mills.
"I can't speak to behavioural issues, but he was not a transfer student," she said.
The fatal stabbing nonetheless reignited the issue of safe schools, which erupted in May after 15-year-old Jordan MANNERS was shot to death at his school in the Keele and Finch area.
As police quizzed witnesses: at nearby 41 Division yesterday, Detective Sergeant Gary GRINTON of the homicide squad alluded to Jordan's death, in which two 17-year-olds have been charged with first-degree murder, and appealed for public help.
"Do the right thing, come forward, man up," he urged the suspect.
Liberal Leader Dalton McGuinty commented on the stabbing during a campaign stop in Markham, Ontario, last night. "As Premier, and maybe more importantly just as a dad, I wanted to express my deepest sympathies to the family and Friends of this young man who lost his life today in a senseless tragedy," he said.
Progressive Conservative Leader John Tory described the homicide as symptomatic of a larger problem - the Liberal government's alleged failure to crack down on violent crime.
"We simply let this kind of thing go on," Mr. Tory said. "We simply have to deal with this kind of crime and the causes of this kind of crime."

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