LAW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-01 published
STURGIS, Lillian Jean (formerly CHESNEY, née LAW)
Age 74 of Dresden passed away Saturday, December 30, 2006 at Chatham-Kent Health Alliance, Public General Campus. She was born in Chatham daughter of the late George and Nellie QUICK) LAW. Lillian was a member of Evangel Pentecostal Tabernacle, Dresden. Beloved wife of Bill STURGIS; loving mother of Debbie and Peter EPP of Dresden and Jeff Chesney and Carrie BROWNING of Dresden dear step-mother of Patricia and Doug VANDENBROEK of Huntsville and Paula and Al CECCACCI of Chatham; special grandmother of Kristen EPP of Toronto, Nicholas EPP of Dresden and Lisa CAMPBELL of Corunna; dear step-grandmother of William CECCACCI of Chatham. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews. She is predeceased by her first husband William CHESNEY (1986.) Friends will be received at the Thomas L. DeBurger Funeral Home, 620 Cross Street, Dresden on Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted from the Evangel Pentecostal Tabernacle, Dresden on Tuesday, January 2, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. with Rev. Robert ELKA officiating. Interment in Dresden Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made by cheque to Gideon Bibles or Teen Challenge. Online condolences and memorial contributions may be left at www.deburgerfuneralhome.com.

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LAW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-04 published
SARMANIS, Antonija
At London Health Sciences Centre -- Victoria Campus, on Tuesday, January 2nd, 2007, Antonija SARMANIS of London in her 95th year. Beloved wife of Ojars ZERS. Dear sister of Bizuta KOMAROVSKIS of Toronto. Predeceased by her sister Velta and her brother Robert. Loving aunt of Renata KOMAROVSKIS, Zinta LAW and her husband Warren and Ingrid MANBERT all of Toronto, Zaiga OGLE and Uldis RIKMANIS both of Latvia. Friends will be received by the family one hour prior to the funeral service being conducted in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London on Friday, January 5th at 1: 00 p.m. with Reverend Aina AVOTINS officiating. Interment in Woodland Cemetery, London. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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LAW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-29 published
KNIGHT, Keith
On Wednesday, 22 August 2007, peacefully at home after a short courageous battle with cancer, in his 52nd year. son of the late Ronald and Edna KNIGHT, beloved husband of Jenifer McCULLOUGH, brother of Alan and Teresa KNIGHT and Shelley and Tim MATHERS, uncle of Kantlee, Melissa and Dan, nephew of Don and Bea LAW. He will be sorely missed by family, Friends, and the entire community of players with whom he so loved to ply his craft.

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LAW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-21 published
SODEN, Kerry John, B.A., C.A. (1944-2007)
Managing Partner Soden and Co. Chartered Accountants, Chief Agent for Canada Knights of Columbus, Former Belleville City Councillor Kerry died peacefully with his family by his side on Tuesday, November 13, 2007. He was greatly loved and will be sadly missed by his devoted wife, Sheila. Beloved son of Kenneth and the late Bonnie SODEN. Loving father of Brian (Todd) and Craig (Corinne.) Proud grandfather of Madison Margaret. Dear brother of Larry (Julie), Casey (Leanne) and Rosemary (David) VROOMAN. Fondly remembered by his ten nieces and nephews. Kerry attended Nicholson Catholic College, Belleville and graduated from Saint Michael's College School, Toronto. He attended University of Toronto, Saint Michael's College, where he earned his B.A. in Economics. After obtaining his C.A. degree with Price Waterhouse, he returned to Belleville to join the family firm Soden and Co. Chartered Accountants. Sports were always a part of Kerry's life. Tennis at the Quinte Tennis Club was the highlight of his summer activities. Winter holidays were made even more enjoyable by winning 'Round Robin Tournaments' at the Pelican Bay Tennis Club, Florida. He loved nature and greatly enjoyed his quiet times with his family at their Cedar Lane cottage on Lake Ontario near Presqu'ile. He was an avid reader who especially enjoyed political biographies. Kerry never lost his unique 'inner child'. He was an honourable man, and a pragmatic optimist who knew he had lived a good life. Because of his longstanding love of politics, he ran and was elected for four terms as city councillor from 1982-1994. He was known as the 'White Knight' on council. He championed such causes as saving the waterfront and the preservation of the Farmers' Market in the Market Square location. The family extends sincere gratitude to Doctor L. LIETAER, Belleville and to Doctor Y.J. KO, Doctor Calvin LAW, Sharon LEMON, R.N., and Stefano ZANNELLA, PhM of Sunnybrook Hospital for their compassion and support. The family deeply appreciates the loving care provided by Doctor Bob VAUGHAN, Liz McGARVEY, R.N., his cousin Meg GILBERT, his sister-in-law Mary Lee KONNRY, and Father Richard P. WHELAN. In Kerry's memory donations may be made to the Sunnybrook Foundation, Edmond Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, Ontario; Saint Michael the Archangel Church Capital Fund; Quinte Children's Foundation or the Victorian Order of Nurses, Belleville Branch. Friends and family will be received at Burke Funeral Home (613-968-6968) 150 Church Street, Belleville, on Friday, November 23rd from 5-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Michael the Archangel Catholic Church, 296 Church Street, Belleville, on Saturday, November 24, 2007 at 12: 00 noon. Interment at Saint_James Cemetery. Online condolences and memories may be forwarded to www.burkefuneral.ca
How 2 letter Surnames like KO work in OGSPI

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LAW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-10 published
LENNOX, Elizabeth Graham (née LAW)
Born July 27, 1924, died peacefully on December 8, 2007 in Ottawa with family by her side. Daughter of the late Ronald Graham and Janet Paton LAW. Pre-deceased by her husband, Bob LENNOX in 2002. Loving Mother of Ross (Janet), Anne (Paul), Bruce (Harriet) and James (Lynda). Doting grandmother of Brent, Jill, Robert, Michael, Fiona, Cameron and Laurel. Sister of Robin (Susanne) LAW of Toronto and Nancy (late Bob) LOVE of Victoria. Visitation at the West Chapel of Hulse, Playfair, and McGarry, 150 Woodroffe Ave. at Richmond Road, Ottawa. Visitation with the family will be held on Monday December 10 from 7-9 p.m. and on Tuesday December 11 from 11: 00 until the service time in the chapel at 1:00 p.m. Reception to follow. Thanks to staff at the Ottawa Civic Hospital and Park Place Retirement Residence for their compassionate care. A very special thank-you to Hannah, her devoted caregiver for the last ten years. Graham was a graduate of the Royal Victoria Hospital (Montreal 1945). A scholarship has been established in our Mother's name at the School of Nursing at McGill University. Donations to the McGill scholarship fund or the Ottawa Hospital Foundation Legacy Campaign at 237 Parkdale Ave. 1St Floor, Ottawa, Ontario K1Y 1J8 would be appreciated. Condolences/ Donations at: mcgarryfamily.ca (613) 233-1143.

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LAWES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-09 published
EL BAROUDI, Gail Ray (née SULLIVAN) (August 2, 1936-August 3, Died peacefully in her seventy-second year at the Toronto East General Hospital. Beloved wife and best friend of Sandy EL BAROUDI for forty-eight years. Dearest daughter of Michael and Isabel (BINNS) SULLIVAN. Also predeceased by her brothers Brian and Patrick SULLIVAN. Cherished mother of Mona MacKENZIE (Gordon,) Helen THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Christopher), Mark EL BAROUDI (Shelley WOLOSKI), Susanne CARSLEY (Louis,) and Laura EL BAROUDI. Devoted grandmother of Alexa-Reigh THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Cole THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Devon THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Madeleine EL BAROUDI, Timothy CARSLEY, Jacqueline MacKENZIE, Nicola CARSLEY, Griffin EL BAROUDI, and Mercedes MacKENZIE. Sadly missed by her brother Dennis SULLIVAN (Aileen; Carey and Jeanette;) her sister-in-law Sandra SULLIVAN (Patrick; Todd, Sheena, Tammy and Scott); and her sister-in-law Nelly FERGUSSON (Blair; Kira and Andrew). Remembered with fondness and Friendship by her cousins Charlotte GRAHAM Virginia ALLENDER (WELSH), Carolyn LOUGHLIN (WELSH) and Robert WELSH; Maureen KOLPAK (SULLIVAN) and Brenda METZNER (SULLIVAN) Marjorie STEAD (BINNS) and Sylvia LAWES (BINNS;) Timothy BREWER, M.D. Gail attended Middlebury College and received her M.B.A. (Finance) degree from McGill University. She was born in Long Island, New York and resided all of her married life in Canada, the last thirty-six years on Heath Street West in Toronto. She was generous with those who were in need wherever they might be in the world and she dedicated her life to the care of her family. As a member of Our Lady of Perpetual Help, she worked quietly and diligently to help bring the churches in her community closer together through events like the Good Friday Walk. As her children grew up, Gail developed a passion for the investment business and economics. She became a stockbroker, then a teacher (Investing for Women; Branksome Hall) and later took up writing for newspapers in Montreal and Toronto, latterly becoming a free-lance reporter for the Report on Business in the Globe and Mail. She was passionate about her garden, flowers and plants. She adored her pets, cats in early years (Johnny and Fluffy) and Labrador Retrievers in later years (Anna, Lucy and Holly). She loved walking with her dogs, and spending parts of her summers on Lake Huron (Grand Bend) and Lake Simcoe (Shanty Bay). She was delighted by the Opera Atelier and attending the theatre. She cherished entertaining family and getting together with old Friends. Gail was uncomplaining and encouraging to those around her as she faced a difficult and debilitating challenge over the last months. A private service was held for the immediate family after her death and a celebration of her life will take place in October (details of the arrangements for this event will appear in these columns in late September/ early October). In lieu of flowers, donations in Gail's memory for the general maintenance of the G5 roof-top garden at the Toronto East General Hospital are welcome www.tegh.on.ca Those wishing to offer condolences are invited to e-mail www.trullfuneralsyonge.com

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LAWHEAD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-07-31 published
United in their grief
Strength in numbers: More than 1,000 attend the funeral of slain couple Hélène and Bill REGIER.
By John MINER, Sun Media, Tues., July 31, 2007
More than 1,000 people attend the funeral and burial services yesterday of Bill and Hélène REGIER at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. The couple was found slain in their Mount Carmel home last Monday. Police have issued a Canada-wide warrant for 22-year-old Jesse Norman IMESON of Windsor, in connection with the deaths. (Derek RUTTAN, Sun Media)
Mount Carmel -- With prayers, hymns and tears, Hélène and Bill REGIER were laid to rest yesterday within sight of their Huron County farmstead, where they were found slain a week ago.
More than 1,000 mourners gathered for the funeral, many arriving 90 minutes early.
The crowd filled Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Church and its yard, some standing for more than two hours when the seats filled up.
Two Ontario Provincial Police officers in dress uniform flanked the church entrance, saluting as the two caskets were carried by grand_sons and nephews into the service that was also attended by Bishop Ronald FABBRO of the London Catholic diocese.
The REGIERs had been active church members in Mount Carmel, north of London.
Bill REGIER was an active member of the Knights of Columbus and a huge advocate of restoration of Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church.
Hélène served with the Catholic Women's League for more than 50 years and was a past London diocesan president.
Despite the brutal killing of their loved ones, the REGIER family spoke of forgiveness and hope yesterday, remembering the deep faith, love of life and generosity of the couple, in their early 70s.
"They have taught all of us throughout the years about strength, faith, family values and most importantly forgiveness. That is what we must remember now," said granddaughter Nikki DENOMY in a tribute as the service began.
DENOMY said her grandparents faced their own tragedy when a fire 32 years ago destroyed the family home and killed a grandmother.
"Grandma and grandpa (Bill and Hélène REGIER,) with six children, surrounded themselves with God, kept on praying and continued farming. Soon enough they had rebuilt their family home and were a closer family than ever before," said DENOMY.
"Our family will once again bind together, carrying on all the values that the most beautiful couple in the world taught us."
Together as a family we will watch the wheat grow, the corn harvest, listen to the birds sing, watch the sun rise and sun set, because difficult times don't last forever," she said.
Grandson Nathan REGIER thanked the community for its support in tragic times.
While it might be hard to find a silver lining in the dark cloud of the horrible event, REGIER said there was one.
"Grandpa and grandma were practically inseparable since the day they met. You would never think of one without the other close in mind. If one were to have passed before the other, the other one would not have been the same," he said.
Both grandchildren said it was difficult to be in a sour mood around their grandparents.
REGIER described stopping in at his grandparents on the way home from work, catching up on the farm news from his grandfather while his grandmother would be in constant motion, making sure he had two days' worth of food in his stomach.
"When she finally realized she had cooked enough for six people, I wasn't allowed to go home without three days worth of leftovers," he said.
DENOMY said that Helene's grandchildren all knew grandma had a drawer filled with little gifts.
"If you ever mentioned you liked something in the house, you pretty much knew you were taking it home. It never failed: She would say, 'you like it, you want it, you have it.' "
She said the sun just seemed to shine a little brighter around her grandparents.
"Let's not be sad or angry that they are gone, but just thankful that we are blessed to have them here in the first place," she said.
Rev. Ray LAWHEAD, the parish priest at Mount Carmel, said the REGIERs' death had rocked the community, family and Friends.
"It was not nice news," he said.
LAWHEAD referred to the killing as a "horrendous act" and "evil."
"What do you do, how do we respond? As Jesus would say, and I am sure Bill and Hélène would say, there is only one response to evil like this and that is love."
Bill and Hélène were buried in the cemetery next to the church.
Jesse Norman IMESON, 22, wanted in the slayings of the REGIERs and a Windsor bartender days earlier, remains on the lam, despite intensive police efforts to find him.

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LAWLER o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-06 published
LAWLER, Floyd
In loving memory of a dear father and grandfather, Floyd, who passed away June 9, 2000.
Remember him with a smile today,
He wasn't one of tears.
Reflect instead on memories,
Of all the happy years.
Recall his laugh, the way he spoke,
And the helpful things he did.
His strength, his skills, the way he teased&hellip
Remember those instead.
The good times that he shared with us,
His eyes that shone with fun,
So much of him that never died,
He left for everyone.
- Lovingly remembered by Diane, Jim and Andrew, Nancy, John, Emma and Luke, Valerie, Nev, Morgan and Jack, Lisa and Rob.
Page 3

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LAWLER o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-06 published
LAWLER, Floyd
In loving memory of my beloved husband Floyd, who passed away June 9, 2000.
I have lost my soul's companion,
A life linked with my own.
And every day I miss you
As I walk through life alone.
As years roll on and days pass by
My love for you will never die.
They say time heals all sorrow
And helps us to forget
But time so far has only shown
How much I miss you yet.
If tears could build a stairway
And heartache make a lane
I would walk the path to Heaven
And bring you home again.
Many people have walked in and out of my life
But you, Floyd, left footprints on my heart.
- Lovingly remembered and sadly missed by wife Norma
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LAWLER o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-20 published
LAWLER, Floyd
In loving memory of a dear brother who passed away June 9, 2000.
Sweet memories will linger forever
Time cannot change them that's true
Years that may come cannot sever
Our loving remembrances of you.
- All the Lawler family
Page 3

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LAWLER o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-11-21 published
LAWLER, Margaret Jean and Walter Edward
In memory of our parents, Margaret Jean LAWLER (died November 23, 1967) and Walter Edward LAWLER (died August 5, 1981)
Silently we grieve
And brush away the tears
The memories they left behind
will last throughout the years.
Forever remembered by all the LAWLER family.
Page 3

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LAWLER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-28 published
PARKER, Roland Merton, Q.C.
After a brief battle with cancer at Parkwood Hospital, London on Monday, June 25, 2007 in his 80th year. Beloved husband for 55 years to Helen. Dear father of Paul PARKER (Catherine,) Janet LAWLER (Michael) and Jo PARKER (Robert.) Loving grandfather of Patrick, Julia, John, Fiona and Mykah. Roland is remembered by his sisters and brothers; Barbara (Bill), David (Sylvia), Walter (Donelda), Joan (Ivan), and Doreen (Charles). Dear brother-in-law of Mary MacDONALD and Robert WHITRED. He will be missed by his former colleagues at the Metro Toronto Legal Department where he served as Corporation Counsel. Friends may call on Thursday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 Saint_James Street at Richmond, London. The funeral service will be conducted at Metropolitan United Church, 468 Wellington Street at Dufferin, London on Friday, June 29 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Woodland Cemetery, London. Flowers are most welcome. Memorial contributions to the Collingwood Music Festival, P.O. Box 665, Collingwood, Ontario L9Y 4E8 would be gratefully acknowledged.

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LAWLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-27 published
PARKER, Roland Merton, Q.C.
After a brief battle with cancer at Parkwood Hospital, London on Monday, June 25, 2007 in his 80th year. Beloved husband for 55 years to Helen. Dear father of Paul PARKER (Catherine,) Janet LAWLER (Michael) and Jo PARKER (Robert.) Loving grandfather of Patrick, Julia, John, Fiona and Mykah. Roland is remembered by his sisters and brothers; Barbara (Bill), David (Sylvia), Walter (Donelda), Joan (Ivan), and Doreen (Charles). Dear brother-in-law of Mary MacDONALD and Robert WHITRED. He will be missed by his former colleagues at the Metro Toronto Legal Department where he served as Corporation Counsel. Friends may call on Thursday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 Saint_James Street at Richmond, London. The funeral service will be conducted at Metropolitan United Church, 468 Wellington Street at Dufferin, London on Friday, June 29 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Woodland Cemetery, London. Flowers are most welcome. Memorial contributions to the Collingwood Music Festival, P.O. Box 665, Collingwood, Ontario L9Y 4E8 would be gratefully acknowledged.

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LAWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
LAINE / VARKEY
Oscar Lee Thuthikattu joined big brother Owen, and parents Su and Rick on May 10, 2006. Family and Friends here, in India, Finland and abroad have warmly welcomed him into the fold. Oscar is named for Rick's paternal THUTHIKATTU family in Kerala, India, and in loving memory of Libardo (Lee) MELENDEZ and Oscar GOULD, who are surely smiling down on him. The wonderful Denise HOO was once again our unwavering guide, ensuring that Oscar was born into love, music, beauty and calm. We will always be grateful for the magical births we shared with her. Heartfelt thanks also go to Doctor BERNSTEIN, Doctor ENGLE and Deborah HAYNES of Mt. Sinai Hospital for their exceptional care. Oscar was baptized on February 11, 2007 by Rev. Jenny ANDISON (Saint Paul's Anglican, Toronto) and is a godson to Jenni LAWLESS (Kingston) and Wayne WOLANSKI (Forest.) And to our wonderful Oscar: your beautiful soul brings light to our hearts each and every day. Thank you for coming into our lives.

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LAWLESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-26 published
WOODS, Thomas Peter (1929-2007)
Peter passed away peacefully on the morning of Christmas Eve, at 921 Millwood Retirement Home, Toronto, after a determined struggle with cancer and complications from a stroke he suffered twelve years ago. Born in Liverpool, England of Irish parents Owen WOODS and Annie WOODS (née LAWLESS,) he moved to Ireland at the age of 12 to Louth Village, County Louth, Ireland. Predeceased by his wife Brenda ALLAN. Survived by his sisters Brigid McKEOWN (husband Kevin,) Phyllis NEARY (husband Don, deceased;) brother Owen (deceased) and his wife Kitty; nieces and nephews Kevin (deceased), Marie, Patricia and Ann; Pauline, Susan, Don and Christopher; Eugene, Eamon, Donal, Ciaran, Paul and Fiona. He will be missed by his Friends, Tom Daly, Jeffrey Garbert, Al Gardner and Michael Cahill. Peter was an accomplished athlete as a young man in Ireland, where he played Gaelic football for County Louth. He was also an avid reader of literature and poetry, and dedicated many years of his retirement to exploring mathematical problems. Special thanks to the dedicated doctors, nurses and staff at 921 Millwood, where Peter spent the last six years of his life. Your kindness and dedication was much appreciated by Peter and those who cared for him. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7-9 p.m. Thursday, December 27th. Funeral Mass to be held in St. Anselm Church, Millwood Road at Macnaughton Road, on Friday, December 28th at 12 noon. If desired, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto M4S 3B1. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-05-31 published
He was decorated for 'gallantry and leadership' at Battle of Falaise Gap
He seldom spoke of his experiences and chose not to take part in Remembrance Day ceremonies
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Halifax -- Facing continuous enemy shell and mortar fire in northern France in August, 1944, during a operation that would become known as the Battle of the Falaise Gap, John HOCKIN was decorated by the French and Belgians for "qualities of gallantry and leadership."
The Falaise Gap was the area between four towns near Falaise, France, where Allied forces tried to destroy the German Seventh Army and the Fifth Panzer Army. The operations took place as part of the Battle of Normandy, which unfolded after the D-Day invasion of Europe. For months, the Germans had prevented the Allies from breaking out of Normandy; for a time, it even appeared the invasion might fail. Eventually, a German commander made a strategic error and moved the bulk of his forces to the west when they should have retreated east to a stronger position. The mistake left them weakened and the Allies seized on the opportunity to mount a classic encirclement.
The job of the closing the gap was given to the Canadians and Americans, but a delay of several days by U.S. forces allowed an estimated 100,000 German troops to escape. The Canadians fought on almost alone; in one famous engagement, a force of 200 under the command of Major David CURRIE of the South Alberta Regiment captured and wounded about 3,000 enemy soldiers. (He was later awarded the Victoria Cross for his leadership.) In closing the gap, the Allies took roughly 50,000 prisoners and killed another 10,000. The Germans also left behind thousands of vehicles and heavy weapons. It was also a deadly battle for the Canadians, of whom more than 18,000 were killed or wounded.
Having commanded 16 Canadian Light Anti-Aircraft Battery throughout its operations in France, from July 10 to July 21, 1944, Mr. HOCKIN's battery was deployed in the area of Carpiquet, in northern France.
"During this time, all his gun positions, some of which were under enemy observation, were subjected to continuous shell and mortar fire. Throughout these trying days, Major HOCKIN displayed qualities of gallantry and leadership which were outstanding. Regardless of his personal safety and though many times under fire, he was continuously on the move around troop positions, encouraging his men and on several occasions taking part in successful engagements," reads his citation for the Croix de Guerre with Gilt Star.
The Croix de Guerre, a military decoration of both France and Belgium, was awarded to individuals who distinguished themselves with acts of heroism in combat with enemy forces. Awarded during both world wars, the medal was also commonly bestowed on members of foreign military forces allied to France and Belgium.
"On the night of August 13, 1944, directional fire with tracer shells was required for 5 Canadian Infantry Brigade, which was attacking from Barbery to Clair Tizon through wooded country," the citation reads.
"Major HOCKIN, in complete darkness and under enemy shell and mortar fire, personally deployed two of his guns to mark the axis of the brigade advance. Directional fire was required for a period of five hours. Although his gun positions were shelled continuously during this time, this officer personally supervised the shooting and kept his guns in action throughout the whole period. His personal supervision of the directional fire, while showing complete disregard of enemy retaliation, on the 13th of August directly contributed to the success of 5 Canadian Infantry Brigade in that operation."
John Murray HOCKIN's grandfather arrived in Canada from Cornwall, England, and opened a general store in the small town of Dutton, Ontario, southwest of London. Growing up, John spent many hours in the T. Hockin Company Store, which sold everything from groceries to dry goods to shoes.
Filled with wanderlust, he dropped out of school and fled Dutton at 17. Fascinated by the sea, he boarded a ship headed for Europe. "He couldn't shake the dust of Dutton off his feet fast enough," said his son, also named John. "He was never a person who liked small towns."
His early travels in Europe included touring Ireland on foot and staying at boarding houses along the way. He eventually returned home to attend university, hoping to study biology, but was persuaded instead to study commerce at the University of Western Ontario. While at university, he joined the cadet corps. During his second year, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Artillery.
When Mr. HOCKIN informed his stern English grandfather that he was leaving for Europe, the old man demonstrated little emotion. "Well, good-bye," he said, barely looking up from his newspaper.
After training in Petawawa, Ontario, Mr. HOCKIN set off from Halifax for Europe in December, 1940. According to a family story, they missed connecting up with their convoy and had to travel via Iceland to miss enemy U-boats. Caught in rough, winter storms, one night Mr. HOCKIN and the captain were the only ones on board who made it to the mess at mealtime.
Although he returned home from the war without any major wounds, Mr. HOCKIN suffered hearing loss due to his close proximity to the guns. While in England, he was blown off a motorcycle and had to spend a week in hospital; in Belgium, he was hospitalized for jaundice.
In 1945, he retuned to Canada and went into the investment business with his uncle. Two years later, on a blind date in Toronto, he met a young woman named Jean. It was love at first sight, and the couple married in Toronto the following year.
"Before we married, he said, 'I want six children with red hair," said Ms. HOCKIN, adding that the reference was to her reddish hair.
In fact, the couple eventually had seven children. "He loved kids," Ms. HOCKIN said. "He would always stop in the street no matter what was happening when little people were coming by."
With nine people around the dining room table, meal times were always chaotic, as was travelling anywhere. Mr. HOCKIN refused to buy a station wagon - instead, he drove a Mercedes-Benz. Before the days of strict seatbelt laws, all seven kids would pile into the luxury car's back seat.
"He had an endless appetite for fine things," said his son.
After spending a few years living in Ontario, where Mr. HOCKIN worked in sales for the Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co., the family moved to the East Coast in the mid-1960s. In Nova Scotia, Mr. HOCKIN worked as a senior manager in a number of companies specializing in building products, then as a consultant, before retiring in Described by his family as intensely curious and a true romantic, he loved to travel and had a large library filled with books on everything from military history to religion to cooking and wine. "With recipes, he used to say, 'You never try the same thing twice.' You always had to try new things with him," his son said.
Despite being a decorated veteran, Mr. HOCKIN chose not to join the Royal Canadian Legion or to take part in Remembrance Day ceremonies. He almost never spoke of his wartime experiences, but near the end of his life, the memories flooded back. During his last five years, as he struggled with Alzheimer's disease, he spoke more openly about the war; he was often haunted by his experiences.
John HOCKIN was born in Dutton, Ontario, on July 29, 1916. He died at the Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre in Halifax on January 22, 2007. He lived in his Halifax home until three days before his death. He was 90. He is survived by his wife of 59 years, Jean. He also leaves children John, Anne, Sheila, Harold, Andrew and Gerald; sister Margaret; six grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his daughter Nora, who died in 2001 of pancreatic cancer.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-18 published
The last survivor of Canada's camps for First World War 'alien enemies'
As a girl, she was one of 5,000 Ukrainian Canadians and about 3,500 Eastern Europeans who were interned under the War Measures Act and held prisoner behind barbed wire
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail; Globe and Mail archives, Page S8
Halifax -- After years of trying to convince her children that she had been imprisoned as a little girl in an internment camp in Spirit Lake, Quebec, Mary Manko HASKETT fought to ensure that all Canadians, would remember what had happened to her and thousands of others during the First World War.
At first, her children were unable to find the place on a map and assumed their mother was confused and had referred instead to something that happened in Ukraine. But in 1986, after reading a newspaper article, they finally understood the truth of her tragic story of being forced to live in a bush camp in rural Quebec in 1915.
She was one of 5,000 Ukrainian Canadians and about 3,500 Eastern Europeans who were interned under the War Measures Act and accommodated at 24 camps across the country until 1920. Another 80,000 people, the majority Ukrainian, were forced to register as "enemy aliens" and required to report to local authorities on a regular basis. Most had come to Canada at the turn of the century, when the government encouraged Ukrainian immigration with promises of freedom and free land.
"I have lived with memories of that injustice all my life," she once said. "I can never forget what was done to my family and me. We were innocent and yet we were treated as enemy aliens."
After the war ended, the matter was forgotten by the rest of Canada, said Ms. HASKETT, who was the last known survivor of the camps. "For many years, it was almost as if it was all a bad dream, a nightmare it would be best if we forgot, certainly not something other Canadians wanted to talk about with us, the victims."
For years, Ms. HASKETT served as the honorary chairperson of the National Redress Council of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association. "I don't want an apology. How can anyone today apologize for something that happened 80 years ago?" she once told Lubomyr Luciuk of the Ukrainian Canadian Civil Liberties Association. "I want people to remember."
Ms. HASKETT's parents, Andrew and Katherine MANKO, arrived in Canada from an area of Ukraine that belonged to Poland, then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, in the early 1900s. When war broke out against Germany, Austria, Hungary and other parts of Eastern Europe, her family and thousands of others like them were regarded as enemy aliens. Depending on where they lived, some were forced to turn over money and property - which, according to McGill University historian J.H. Thompson, the government later auctioned for 10 cents on the dollar or kept. Some of that wealth is still in federal coffers.
Starting in 1914, camps and work sites were set up in British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia. Those of German heritage were sent to the more comfortable camps -- even though Imperial Germany was the wartime enemy -- while racist attitudes of the day pushed most of the Ukrainian detainees to the wilds of northern Quebec and the backcountry of British Columbia and Alberta.
In April, 1915, it was the Mankos' turn. The federal government rounded them up with several other Ukrainian families from a parish in Montreal's Point St. Charles area and put them on a train. They were taken hundreds of kilometres away to an internment camp behind barbed wire at Spirit Lake, known today as Lac Beauchamp, in Quebec's Abitibi region. It didn't matter that Mary, then 6, and two of her siblings were born in Canada.
"It wasn't fair they were taken out there. They had done no wrong," said her daughter, Fran HASKETT. "It was very sad."
At Spirit Lake, Mary and her brother, John, sisters Annie and Carolka, and her parents, all lived in a bunkhouse in the woods. Because she had been so young, Ms. HASKETT remembered very little of her time at the camp except for mental images of soldiers with bayonets standing guard, and of her father returning, half-frozen, after spending the day cutting firewood and clearing forests. The children were not allowed to attend school and the family was issued only two pairs of stockings. To make matters worse, Carolka died at the camp before she had reached her third birthday. The family was never able to locate her grave.
Hers was one of many deaths. Some internees were killed trying to scale the barbed-wire fence; others simply gave up and committed suicide. Overall, 107 detainees died in the camps.
Most internees were forced to do heavy labour and had their belongings confiscated, Doctor Luciuk said. At the Spirit Lake camp, the first internees had to clear the bush to create farm land. "It was an experimental farm carved out of the woods," he said.
On June 14, 1916, the Mankos were released. But it wasn't until 1920 that the last of the camps were closed.
"After a while, it became obvious that they posed no threat," said Doctor Luciuk, who teaches political geography at the Royal Military College in Kingston. For 20 years, he has scoured federal documents, interviewed survivors and written books about the events.
Why Ms. HASKETT and all the others were interned remains open to debate. Some historians point to xenophobia; others suggest wartime fervour. Canada was aligned with Britain against Austria-Hungary and was facing a labour shortage. The internment camps provided cheap or free labour to build the country's infrastructure and economy.
After the Manko family was released from the Spirit Lake camp, they made their way to Toronto and opened a grocery store in the Cabbagetown neighbourhood. They later moved to Mississauga, where Ms. HASKETT spent the majority of her life. "They never had much money," Fran HASKETT said. "They could stretch it."
Ms. HASKETT worked at a Goodyear Tire and Rubber Co. plant for a time. In 1930, she married Frank HASKETT, a factory worker and union man. They had five children, losing one boy to a heart defect when he was less than a year old.
While raising her children and taking care of the family home, she formed a club with some women in the neighbourhood. They would regularly meet, away from their families, to talk, play cards or go to see a show. She always loved singing Ukrainian and other folk songs. "She was vivacious and had a wild sense of humour," Fran HASKETT said. "She was such a people person."
In 1986, Ms. HASKETT read a Globe and Mail article about the internment camps. The story had been written by Doctor Luciuk, and she tracked him down. "She was in no way bitter," he said. "She didn't see herself as a victim."
Ms. HASKETT wasn't interested in an apology or compensation for herself or any of the descendents of internees - she simply wanted the government to acknowledge that the internment had occurred, and that the value of the internees' confiscated wealth and forced labour to be put into an endowment fund to be used for educational purposes so that no other Canadians would ever again suffer in the same way.
On November 25, 2005, royal assent was given to Bill C 331, The Internment of Persons of Ukrainian Origin Recognition Act. The act acknowledges that persons of Ukrainian origin were interned in Canada during the First World War and legally obliges the government to negotiate "an agreement concerning measures that may be taken to recognize the internment" for educational and commemorative projects. So far, the latter mandate has not been fulfilled.
"We always hoped we would secure a timely and honourable redress settlement that Mary could bear witness to as the last known survivor of Canada's first national internment operations," Doctor Luciuk said. "I hope that when we secure our settlement, and we will, Mary will be there in spirit."
Mary Manko HASKETT was born in Montreal on August 10, 1908. She died of pneumonia at a long-term care facility in Mississauga on July 14, 2007. She was 98. She is survived by her son John and by daughters Fran and Dianne. She was predeceased by her husband, Frank, and by sons Ronald and Paul. A funeral mass will be held at St. Christopher's Catholic Church in Mississauga today at 10 a.m.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-18 published
Nature-loving steel worker inspired the creation of Ontario's Bruce Trail
Self-taught naturalist who grew up on the Saskatchewan Prairie moved to Hamilton and fell in love with the Niagara Escarpment. 'Without him, it would not have started.'
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
For a man with an insatiable curiosity about the natural world, the thought of losing the rugged beauty of Ontario's Niagara Escarpment to development was unthinkable. "Not all of us can study ecology, but we should all have the opportunity to walk under ancient trees on a forest floor that is rich with the things that sustain life," said Ray LOWES, who is credited for inspiring the creation of the Bruce Trail.
In 1968, the self-taught naturalist appealed to the Niagara Escarpment Conference to consider preserving the route, a marked hiking trail on a rocky ridge that stretches more than 800 kilometres across Ontario, for posterity. "It is this right of access to places of natural beauty that I plead for," he said in a speech. "The simplicity of our request is astounding."
The trail had opened the year before as part of Canada's centennial celebrations, but nothing had ever been said of its future. For his part, he knew exactly what was required: "We just want a strip of land that will be left alone - not manicured, not landscaped, not serviced by multilane highways or 'parkways' - and not through new subdivisions. It's not much to ask. A later generation will demand it."
It all started after Mr. Lowe hiked portions of the 3,501-kilometre Appalachian Trail, a route from Maine to Georgia that is maintained by a loose association of about 30 U.S. hiking clubs. "If they could do it," he asked himself, "why couldn't we?"
At a meeting of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club in 1959, he turned to wildlife artist Robert Bateman, who was also a member of the club, and wondered aloud, "What would you think of a hiking trail winding up the Niagara Escarpment from one end to the other?"
Mr. Bateman liked the idea and, with the support of the Hamilton Naturalists' Club, Mr. LOWES approached the Federation of Ontario Naturalists. Before long, a four-man committee was struck, with Mr. LOWES as secretary along with nature lovers Philip GOSLING, Robert MacLAREN and Norman PEARSON. For the next two years, they pored over maps and plotted a route from Queenston, near Niagara Falls, to Tobermory, on the tip of the Bruce Peninsula.
"He had the dream and he got it going," said Mr. GOSLING, a Guelph, Ontario, businessman. "Without him, it would not have started."
They started knocking on doors in towns and villages along the escarpment to negotiate access, and soon established trail organizations in several communities. The also reached access agreements with landowners on the planned route. The Bruce Trail Association was formed, and by 1967, the trail was open. The association slowly grew in size; by the late 1970s, it was able to start purchasing land to build a permanent, protected route.
While Mr. LOWES spent time getting his hands dirty building sections of the trail, his main role was that of promoter and office co-ordinator. An impassioned speaker, he gave speeches to raise support and awareness, and used his gift for promotion to attract volunteers and media attention. In the early 1960s, The Toronto Telegram was reporting on hikes held along the trail.
For 20 years, Mr. LOWES served as a director and secretary of the Bruce Trail Association. In 1983, he was made the association's honorary president, which today has the support of more than 8,000 members and 1,000 volunteers. "He was really like a father figure to the whole thing," said Bill CANNON, president of the Bruce Trail Association in the late 1960s.
Mr. LOWES was a child of nature. Raised in rural south-central Saskatchewan, his love of the outdoors developed during the countless hours he spent as a child exploring the countryside near his home. His family ran a general store in the community of Willows, not far from the town of Assiniboia, and he was outside observing birdlife, catching gophers and adopting coyotes at every opportunity.
"He always had that spirit of getting out in nature," said his long-time friend Alan ERNEST, the land trust co-ordinator at the Hamilton Naturalists' Club.
Mr. LOWES left home as a teenager and set out across the country to find work. To eke out a living, he sold everything from brushes and men's wear to advertising space in a Catholic publication. Along the way, he met Jane CHAMBERLAIN; the two married in 1933. Three years later, they moved to Hamilton.
The LOWES home, which was within walking distance of the Bruce Trail, soon became a playground and nature classroom for neighbourhood children. They joined Mr. LOWES for Sunday hikes, which usually ended with ice cream cones.
Although Mr. LOWES had none of his own, "he loved getting children, in particular, interested in nature," Mr. ERNEST said.
In 1938, Mr. LOWES joined Stelco, the steel manufacturer. He stayed for the next 38 years, eventually becoming chief open-hearth metallurgist.
Away from the foundry, he loved to walk the gentle valleys and rocky cliffs of the Bruce Trail and would average about 20 kilometres a week along its length. One of his favourite pastimes was to take a morning in Niagara's Short Hills area, followed by a slice of pie at his favourite restaurant.
"He was a delightful person to go on a walk with," Mr. CANNON said. "He was full of stories about the natural world."
Mr. LOWES never attended university, but was intensely curious about nature and taught himself all he could about birds, insects and plants. When something caught his interest, he sought to know everything he could about it, Mr. ERNEST said. About 12 years ago, he visited a friend in Arkansas and, while there, toured a plant that processed black walnuts. He was hooked. After learning all he could about the nuts, he returned to Ontario, contacted the local nut-growers association and proceeded to plant thousands of black walnuts. To his delight, they bore fruit.
Believing that we are all interrelated in the cycle of nature, Mr. LOWES was passionate about protecting the Niagara Escarpment from development. Through his work on the Bruce Trail, he helped spur the Ontario government to establish the Niagara Escarpment Commission in 1973. Mr. LOWES was appointed a founding member of the commission, which was formed to regulate development on the escarpment. After serving for about a decade, he resigned in 1984, saying he felt the body was more concerned with local political interests than conservation.
"I'm kind of sorry to be off the commission," he told The Globe and Mail at the time. "But I think it was the only protest I could make. Maybe now they'll pull up their socks and fly right."
Despite the designation of the Niagara Escarpment as a World Biosphere Reserve in 1990, just under half of the Bruce Trail and its 300 kilometres of associated side trails are currently on protected land. The remaining 53 per cent is on private land, although the Bruce Trail Association continues to buy up parcels each year. Last year, more than $1.3-million was spent securing land on the escarpment; the association now manages 2,178 hectares of land. To buy the remaining trail, the association estimates it needs more than $60-million.
After retiring from Stelco in the early 1970s, Mr. LOWES travelled to more than 40 countries and continued to spend as much time as he could hiking and exploring. Seeing himself as a rugged individualist, he was proud of his physical stamina, Mr. CANNON said. He remembers the delight Mr. LOWES took when one May they swam together in Georgian Bay while ice floes floated nearby. Just this summer, he talked to a friend about mathematical patterns found in the natural world. "That brain of his was always working," Mr. ERNEST said.
Although he took to calling himself a "curmudgeon" late in life and "didn't suffer fools lightly," Mr. LOWES received honorary degrees from Brock and McMaster universities for his work on the Bruce Trail. In 2005, The Bruce Trail Association created the Ray Lowes Side Trail in Hamilton in his honour.
Until he turned 90, the year he broke his hip, he had walked five kilometres of the Bruce Trail three or four times a week.
Ray LOWES was born in Saskatchewan on March 23, 1911. He died August 29, 2007, at Saint Peter's Residence at Chedoke in Hamilton after briefly slipping into a coma. He was 96. He was predeceased by his wife Jane, who died in 1986, and by his brothers Warren and Gerald.

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LAWLOR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-04 published
Inspired to overcome racism, he became Canada's first black high commissioner
In Nova Scotia, he started an influential newspaper. In Ottawa, he became an important player in the civil service
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Halifax -- A career public servant who broke race barriers on his way to becoming Canada's first black high commissioner, James Calbert BEST didn't see himself as an activist.
The only son of a spirited human-rights defender and a quiet railway porter, Mr. BEST, who was best known as Cal, entered the civil service as a young man in the late 1940s after he and his mother started Nova Scotia's first black newspaper.
In 1946, while still a university student in Halifax, he and his mother Carrie BEST, began publishing The Clarion. Aside from covering local news, sports and social happenings, the paper took on deeper racial issues facing black people in Nova Scotia and across North America.
"The town [New Glasgow] has a daily and weekly newspaper, but the publication that creates the most talk on the street is The Clarion, that has grown from a church bulletin to the most powerful Negro newspaper in Canada today," Will R. Bird wrote in his 1950 book, This is Nova Scotia.
Mr. BEST and his mother used their newspaper to publicize the case of a black Nova Scotian named Viola Desmond. In 1946, Ms. Desmond, who has been referred to as a Canadian Rosa Parks, was arrested and fined for sitting in the "whites only" section of the Roseland Theatre in New Glasgow.
"We do have many of the privileges which are denied our southern brothers, but we often wonder if the kind of segregation we receive here is not more cruel in the very subtlety of its nature. Nowhere do we encounter signs that read 'No Colored' or the more diplomatic little paste boards which say 'Select Clientele,' but at times it might be better. At least much consequent embarrassment might be saved for all concerned," Mr. BEST wrote after Ms. Desmond's arrest. The Clarion ceased publication in 1956.
Years before Ms. Desmond's case, Mr. BEST and his mother experienced a similar incident in a New Glasgow movie theatre. While sitting downstairs in the whites-only section, as they often did, management told them to go to the balcony. They were told that someone had complained. After refusing to move, they were evicted and the police were called. They were charged with disturbing the peace and eventually convicted and fined. They sued for loss of dignity, but lost.
"I wouldn't want this [experience] to be seen as colouring his life. I heard about this incident once in my life," said his daughter, Christene BEST. "It inspired him more than anything else. To get out of New Glasgow and to thumb his nose at anyone who thought he wasn't deserving of 'loss of dignity.' "
Born in 1926, Mr. BEST grew up on South Washington Street in what was considered an integrated part of New Glasgow. While the legal segregation of Nova Scotia's schools didn't end until 1954, long after he completed his education, Mr. BEST never spoke about the racism he must have faced growing up in a small, industrial town.
"My grandmother considered herself an activist; my father didn't," his daughter said.
While his mother was busy organizing protests or holding poetry readings to raise money to help pay a black family's taxes, Mr. BEST spent his time as a child playing baseball or hockey on the pond behind their house.
He identified more with his father Albert, a man he called "the kindest, gentlest man I've ever known." As a child, he loved to run down to the railway station when he knew his father was returning home after days away.
After high school, Mr. BEST headed to the bustling wartime city of Halifax. Having a thyroid condition, he was unable to serve in the military. In 1948, he graduated with a degree in political science and a diploma in journalism from the University of King's College and went on to postgraduate work in public administration. He initially believed that the only careers open to a young black man in Nova Scotia were in teaching or on the railway, but his mind changed when he saw an advertisement for junior positions in the public service. In 1949, he boarded the train with his father and headed to Ottawa to begin what would become a 49-year career as a senior public servant and, eventually, high commissioner to Trinidad and Tobago.
"It was exceedingly difficult to get into the public service if you were a person of colour" in the 1940s, said Senator Don Oliver, a former Halifax lawyer. "At a time when racism was rampant in the public service, he was able to virtually move to the top. Soon, people forgot to look at his colour."
When Mr. BEST arrived in Ottawa, he found few people who looked like him. In the Department of Labour, he may have been the only black person. It wasn't much different on the street. While riding the bus, he was occasionally asked how the Ottawa Rough Riders were doing that season - the assumption being that because he was black, he played football.
Nevertheless, he found postwar Ottawa exciting. The civil service was growing rapidly and Mr. BEST quickly became an important player in its development.
The same year he arrived in Ottawa, Mr. BEST met his future wife at a party and declared that "she was the prettiest girl I've ever met." In 1957, he and Doreen PHILLS married in Montreal and later had four children.
At the Department of Labour, Mr. BEST co-founded the Civil Service Association of Canada, which evolved into the Public Service Alliance of Canada, and served as its first president, from 1957 to 1966. "He played a huge role in bringing collective bargaining to the public service," said Patty Ducharme, Public Service Alliance of Canada's national executive vice-president.
In creating the organization, Mr. BEST used his diplomacy and strong negotiating skills to bring together two existing associations representing civil servants and to defuse the power struggles that threatened the new organization.
"He was such a dynamic person; such an intellectual," said Daryl Bean, a former Public Service Alliance of Canada president. "His influence and calming approach allowed for good debate. He seemed to be three steps ahead of most people."
After leaving the labour department, Mr. BEST served as a director in both the Office of the Comptroller of Treasury and the Department of Supply and Services before becoming assistant deputy minister in the Department of Manpower and Immigration in 1970. In 1978, he became executive director of immigration and demographic policy, holding that position until 1985.
In late 1978, he worked closely with minister Bud Cullen to relax immigration laws to bring about 600 Vietnamese refugees, who were stranded in Malaysian water aboard the tiny freighter Hai Hong, to Canada. Mr. BEST travelled to Asia to help process the boat people. One of the refugees painted a picture of him arriving on a boat with a Canadian flag.
In 1985, Mr. BEST was appointed Canadian high commissioner to Trinidad and Tobago. He retired after returning to Canada in 1988, but his public service continued. "He was incredibly proud to serve. He would always say, 'The Canadian people pay my salary,' Ms. BEST said. He was such a scrupulous civil servant that his daughter never knew how her father voted politically until after he retired.
Mr. BEST was appointed chair of a federal task force to look into the future of sports in Canada after the Ben Johnson steroid scandal. In 1992, the three-person task force produced the report "Sport - the Way Ahead." The report, which cost a reported $1-million to produce, was intended to be a guideline for the future development of sport in Canada. Among the recommendations were that Ottawa fund fewer sport agencies.
"He was the tall, silent type," said Lyle Makosky, a former assistant deputy minister of fitness and amateur sport, who recruited Mr. BEST for the task force. "He was an imposing man but he had a quiet gentleness about him."
Mr. BEST later conducted an investigation into allegations of racism involving the Canadian men's national basketball team. head coach Ken Shields was alleged to have been prejudiced against black players. Mr. BEST's investigation absolved Mr. Shields. In 1999, he served on another task force, this one looking into the participation of visible minorities in the federal public service.
"When he talked, you always knew he had something important to say," Mr. Makosky said.
For his work, Mr. BEST was awarded an honorary law degree from the University of King's College, where he served on the board of governors.
James Calbert BEST was born July 12, 1926, in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia He died of cancer in Ottawa on July 30, 2007. He was 81. Predeceased by his wife Doreen, he leaves his children Christene, Jamie, Stephen and Kevin; five grandchildren, close friend Suzanne LOZANO and foster sisters Berma and Sharon MARSHALL.

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