HAW o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-11-21 published
CLARK, " Beth" Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren Clark (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton. For funeral service information please call 924-2810. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.
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HAW o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-20 published
CLARK, “Beth” Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren Clark (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton. For funeral service information please call 924-2810. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

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HAW o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-21 published
CLARK, “Beth” Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren CLARK (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton on Friday, November 23, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held at Gentle Shepherd Community Church on Saturday, November 24 at 11 a.m. Interment Salem Cemetery, Eugenia. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

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HAW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-13 published
MacDONALD, Donald Clifford "D.C."
Born April 23, 1922 in Cobalt, Ontario. Died peacefully September 1, 2007 at Sunrise Senior Living in Unionville after a lengthy period of declining health. Predeceased by his wife, Valerie, in 1997, his granddaughter Kylie Mae ROOKE in 1993 and by all four of his dearly beloved siblings, most recently his sister Florence SIMONE of Royal Oak, Michigan on August 11th 2007. Passionate bridge player and ballroom dancer he is survived by his daughters Pamela MacDONALD (Tony ROCKINGHAM), Willow (Eric AAGAARD), and Marthe-Monique (Michael HOOK) and by his grandchildren Jamie ROCKINGHAM, Thomas and Sally AAGAARD and Tyler ROOKE. Thank you to Doctors VIVONA and HAW at Markham-Stouffville Hospital for their wise and compassionate care. Special thanks to Shauna CLAXTON and to the staff of the Reminiscence Floor at Sunrise, particularly Dennis DESOUZA. No service by request, private cremation has taken place.

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HAWCO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-09 published
ACOMBA, Margaret Elizabeth (née EATON)
Giver of Life
Passed away peacefully on June 6, 2007 in Ajax, Ontario in her 92nd year. Gloriously came into this world on April 23, 1916. First child of George and Mary EATON of Montreal, Quebec. Devoted wife of 62 years to the late Sydney ACOMBA. Sister of dear Marie MARSH of Notre-Dame de Grace, Montreal and sister to dearly departed James EATON and Daphne FOLEY. Beloved, respected and treasured Mother to Catherine ACOMBA (Graham DARLINGTON), Jean GROULX (Gerald GROULX), David ACOMBA (Sharon KEOGH), Richard ACOMBA (Peggy ACOMBA) and honourary son David HAWCO. Adored Grandmother to Pamela, Rob, Catherine, Leigh, Craig, Jordan, Scott. Loving Great-Grandmother to Matthew, Natalie, D.J., Jack, Eva, and Oliver. Margaret's compassion for others was demonstrated through her care-giving and tireless work as a foster mother to 105 children over the years during the 1950's while in Montreal. Her passion for playing the piano and her gifted vocals will forever remain with us. All who would like to celebrate the remarkable life of this determined, loving woman, please join us Wednesday, June 13th, 10: 30 at St. Bernadette's Roman Catholic Church, 21 Bayly St. E. (Bayly and Harwood), Ajax, Ontario, followed by a reception in the Hall. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Hospital for Sick Children (416-813-5320) would be appreciated by the family. She will be sadly missed.

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HAWKE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-30 published
ROBINS, Mildred Alice Jean (née SEABROOKE)
Peacefully, at Lee Manor, with her family by her side, on Wednesday, August 29th, 2007. Mildred Alice Jean ROBINS (née SEABROOKE) of Owen Sound, in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Lewis ROBINS. Loving mother of Paul (Pat) ROBINS, of Balmy Beach, Muriel (Avery) DANARD, of Owen Sound, Martin (Norah) ROBINS, of Belleville and Bob ROBINS, of Owen Sound. Proud grandmother of 12 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren and 1 great great-grandchild. Survived by her sister Alice CLOSE, of Owen Sound. Predeceased by her parents Thomas and Jeannie SEABROOKE, and her sister Muriel HAWKE. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (519-376-7492) on Thursday from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A funeral service for Mildred ROBINS will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Friday, August 31st, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. with Rev. Kristal McGEE officiating. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Canadian Cancer Society as your expression of sympathy.

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HAWKE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-04 published
HAWKE, Alberta Maude (BURLEY)
Peacefully at the Dearness Nursing Home, on Tuesday, January 2nd, 2007, Alberta Maude HAWKE (BURLEY) in her 86th year. Predeceased by beloved husband Lount (1967) and two daughters Judy DANN (1984) and Susan ROGERS (1980.) Dear mother of Larry (Beverley,) Sharon (Ron) McLAY, Peter (Johanna) and Tim HAWKE. Survived by many grandchildren, great-grandchildren and great-great-grandchildren. Friends will be received at the Evans Funeral Home, 648 Hamilton Rd. (1 block east of Egerton) on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Evans Chapel on Friday, January 5th, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. with Rev. Victor BROWN officiating. Interment in Stoke's Bay. Donations to London Health Sciences Centre, Cancer Program or Alzheimer's Society would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences can be expressed at www.evansfh.ca. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Alberta Hawke.

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HAWKEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-13 published
RODA, Lillian " Lulu" (formerly LANDELL, née VALACHOS)
(April 24, 1922-June 11, 2007)
Passed away peacefully, at the Toronto General Hospital, in her 86th year. Lillian was one of the three beautiful daughters of the late James and Mary VALACHOS, well-respected owners of the original Olympia Candy Store and Restaurant in Brantford, Ontario. She is also predeceased by her brothers George, Peter, William VALACHOS, sister Kathleen HAWKEN and husbands Gordon RODA and Stanley LANDELL. She will be sadly missed by her sister Evelyn COULOS, all her loving nieces and nephews, extended family and special Friends. Lillian's long career spanned several decades with Seagram's Distillers in Toronto and throughout her life she continued an active role in the modeling profession. Lillian lived her life with grace, dignity, elegance, unconditional love and a contagious zest for life and laughter, qualities we will carry proudly with us and forever make us smile. We extend our heartfelt thanks to Doctor SCULLY, the excellent staff at Toronto General Hospital and the caring nurses in Cardiovascular Intensive Care Unit. A celebration of Lillian's life will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), at 1 p.m. on Saturday, June 16th, with a reception to follow in the Leaside Room. If desired, donations to the Salvation Army or the Red Cross would be greatly appreciated. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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HAWKEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-27 published
HAWKEN, Frances Marion (née ROCHESTER)
On Friday, August 24, 2007 in Toronto. Formerly of Ottawa. Beloved wife of the late H. Cameron HAWKEN. Loving Mother of Ted (Susan) and Mary (Gene SCHOONEN.) The family would like to sincerely thank the staff at both Christie Gardens and Smart Staffing Solutions, as well, Doctor Elena SOMSKA for their kind and compassionate care. Friends are invited to visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa on Tuesday August 28 from 12: 30 p.m. until time of Funeral Service in our Chapel at 1 p.m. Interment Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. Condolences / donations at www.mcgarryfamily.ca

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HAWKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-25 published
GRAHAM, Allen Frederic, M.D., F.R.C.P. (Can,) M.C.
Peacefully, at Toronto General Hospital on Wednesday, October 24, 2007. Darling husband of Helen Clare (HAWKER.) Beloved father of Shari Graham FELL (Tony) and Annabel Lucille GRAHAM. Greatly loved 'grand-dad' of Annabelle FELL, Graham FELL, Geoffrey FELL (Martha,) and Caitlin FORRESAINT_Great-granddad to Jacqueline and Sophie FELL. Brother-in-law to Joy and Clive FOSTER. Fun-loving brother of the late James GRAHAM (Aileen,) Elizabeth ANDRAS (Ken,) and Lucille BARTON (Ted.) Greatly loved 'Uncle Afie' to many nieces and nephews. Born in Toronto on October 2, 1915. son of Dr. Joseph S. GRAHAM and Eleanor Boyd GRAHAM. Grandson of Sir John Alexander BOYD, last Chancellor of Ontario, and Lady Boyd. Educated at St. Andrew's College, Aurora and the University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine. In 1939 he joined the British Medical Corps as Captain and was posted to North Africa. Captured at Tobruk in 1941, he became a prisoner of war in Italy and Germany until 1945. He was later awarded the Military Cross for extreme bravery under fire throughout the Battle Tobruk. Returning to Canada in 1945, he met Helen, the love of his life in August on V.J. day. They were married January 28th 1946 in New York City and enjoyed 62 years of love, fun, and great happiness together. Beloved physician, he practiced medicine at the Medical Arts Building and Toronto General Hospital for over fifty years. He loved nature and treasured his summers at Goodcheer Island in Georgian Bay and winters and weekends at 'Hawksprings' in the Hockley Valley. He will be remembered for his great sense of humour and love of life, his compassion, kindness, and humility. The family wishes to thank Ioanna JUNEJA and Zodie GHEBRHEWATE for their wonderful care over the last few years. A funeral service will be held in Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge Street, Toronto, on Monday, October 29th at 3: 30 p.m. Reception to follow at The York Club. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Toronto General and Western Hospital Foundation or The Toronto Humane Society would be greatly appreciated.

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HAWKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
GRAHAM, Allen Frederic, M.D., F.R.C.P. (Can,) M.C.
Peacefully, at Toronto General Hospital on Wednesday, October 24, 2007. Darling husband of Helen Clare (HAWKER.) Beloved father of Shari Graham FELL (Tony) and Annabel Lucille GRAHAM. Greatly loved 'granddad' of Annabelle FELL, Graham FELL, Geoffrey FELL (Martha,) and Caitlin FORRESAINT_Great-granddad to Jacqueline and Sophie FELL. Brother-in-law to Joy and Clive FOSTER. Fun-loving brother of the late James GRAHAM (Aileen,) Elizabeth ANDRAS (Ken,) and Lucille BARTON (Ted.) Greatly loved 'Uncle Afie' to many nieces and nephews. Born in Toronto on October 2, 1915. son of Dr. Joseph S. GRAHAM and Eleanor Boyd GRAHAM. Grandson of Sir John Alexander BOYD, last Chancellor of Ontario, and Lady Boyd. Educated at St. Andrew's College, Aurora and the University of Toronto, Faculty of Medicine. In 1939 he joined the British Medical Corps as Captain and was posted to North Africa. Captured at Tobruk in 1941, he became a prisoner of war in Italy and Germany until 1945. He was later awarded the Military Cross for extreme bravery under fire throughout the Battle of Tobruk. Returning to Canada in 1945, he met Helen, the love of his life in August on V.J. day. They were married January 28th 1946 in New York City and enjoyed 62 years of love, fun, and great happiness together. Beloved physician, he practiced medicine at the Medical Arts Building and Toronto General Hospital for over fifty years. He loved nature and treasured his summers at Goodcheer Island in Georgian Bay and winters and weekends at 'Hawksprings' in the Hockley Valley. He will be remembered for his great sense of humour and love of life, his compassion, kindness, and humility. The family wishes to thank Ioanna Juneja and Zodie Ghebrhewate for their wonderful care over the last few years. A funeral service will be held in Christ Church Deer Park, 1570 Yonge Street, Toronto, on Monday, October 29th at 3: 30 p.m. Reception to follow at The York Club. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Toronto General and Western Hospital Foundation or The Toronto Humane Society would be greatly appreciated.

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HAWKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-10 published
Doctor won Military Cross for bravery in a raging tank battle in North Africa
Trained in Toronto, he was seconded to the British Army to become a battalion medical officer at Tobruk, writes Sandra MARTIN. He was captured and spent the rest of the war treating PoWs
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
Shy, smart and athletic, Allen GRAHAM graduated from medical school a few months before Canada entered the Second World War. Less than two years later he had exchanged his intern's whites for a khaki uniform. As a member of the medical corps, Lieutenant GRAHAM was not supposed to be directly involved in fighting the enemy. Instead, he was expected to provide medical services when soldiers fell ill, and to care for the wounded. Instead, he was decorated for bravery in North Africa, captured by the Germans and spent most of the war behind enemy lines treating the sick and dying in prisoner of war Camps.
Allen Frederic GRAHAM was born in the middle of the First World War, the third of four children of Doctor Joseph and Eleanor (née BOYD) GRAHAM. On his mother's side he was the grand_son of Sir John Alexander BOYD, a very prominent lawyer and judge in the late 19th century. After Allen's father died when he was 11, the bereaved boy's godfather, J.P. BICKELL, the millionaire mining executive and part-owner of the Toronto Maple Leafs, provided the funds to send him to St. Andrew's College in 1927.
Boxing Champion
In his six years at the boarding school for boys located in Aurora, Ontario, Allen excelled both academically and athletically. He played cricket and was on both the first rugby and hockey teams and was the boxing champion in June, 1932, according to the school's records. He was also a prefect and won the Old Boy's Medal in math when he graduated in 1933.
After St. Andrew's, he went to the University of Toronto, graduating in medicine in 1939. He had served in the General Reserve of Officers Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps (R.F.) while he was at university, and was an intern at the Toronto General Hospital when the Second World War broke out. On July 1, 1941, he enlisted as a lieutenant in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps. He was quickly seconded to the Royal Army Medical Corps and shipped to England for training and then to Cairo. The British got a bonus in Lt. GRAHAM, according to his family, because he introduced his cricket-playing colleagues to the North American game of baseball.
He probably first saw action with British Forces at Tobruk, the heavily fortified and strategically located fortress in Libya that was hotly contested by Axis and Allied powers. But it was his courageous actions at the Gulf of Sidra, a body of water on the northern coast of Libya, that earned him promotion to the rank of captain and the Military Cross "in recognition of gallant and distinguished service in the Middle East."
The citation, which was published in the Canada Gazette on November 5, 1942, stated: "During the attack on El Sidra on 5 June 1942, this officer [Capt. Allen Frederic GRAHAM] was the battalion medical officer. He followed closely behind the attacking tanks, but realizing that a smokescreen put down by the enemy obscured his view, he brought his un-armoured vehicle to the forefront of the tank battle. There, in his truck or on foot, despite the battle raging around him, and the intense artillery and machine-gun fire of the enemy, he calmly proceeded from one damaged tank to another, evacuating the casualties and rendering first aid. He showed complete disregard for his own personal safety in the execution of his duty and his bravery was responsible for saving many lives."
Capt. GRAHAM was captured during the offensive led by The Desert Fox, German Field Marshal Erwin Rommel, and his Afrika Korps Panzer tanks on Tobruk in May and June of 1942. (Tobruk remained under Axis control until the Allies re-took it after the Second Battle of El Alamein in November, 1942). After his capture, he continued working as a doctor, but tended to Allied prisoners of war from all over the world.
He was sent first to Italy "in such a dilapidated aircraft that he doubted they would reach their destination," according to an account written by W.G. Cosbie in his book, The Toronto General Hospital 1819-1965: A Chronicle, and then to Lamsdorf in Poland, the notorious Stalag VIII-B (later renumbered Stalag-344) that had been the site of PoW camps since the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71. It was there that the Germans had incarcerated Polish PoWs after invading Poland in 1939. Approximately 100,000 Allied PoWs eventually spent time in this over-crowded camp.
After having been incarcerated in Lamsdorf for nine months, Captain GRAHAM was moved to Stalag Luft III, a primary PoW camp for Allied officers in Sagan, about 170 kilometres southeast of Berlin. This camp was famous for the number of times PoWs attempted to flee their captors, including the major break from the British compound on March 24, 1944 that was the basis for the book and the movie entitled The Great Escape. Of the almost 80 prisoners who crawled out of camp through a tunnel 102 metres feet in length, dug nine metres below ground level, only three made it to neutral territory. The rest were recaptured, and 50 of them were executed.
Death March
Capt. GRAHAM's main job, according to an interview that he gave to The Globe and Mail on his return to Canada in June, 1945, was taking care of prisoners "who were unable to march." As the balance of power shifted after the D-Day invasion of Normandy in June, 1944, and Allied forces moved eastward through France and westward from Russia hoping to join up west of Berlin, the Germans began evacuating some of their PoW camps by forcing their prisoners on "death marches," or by cramming them into box cars on railway lines. Capt. GRAHAM's patients were the PoWs who were too weak or sickly to be transported.
Like many veterans, Capt. GRAHAM didn't like to discuss the horrors he had seen and experienced, but he did tell his daughters how frustrating it had been to try to treat PoWs when he had virtually no medical supplies. He was always performing triage and making horrific decisions about who was likely to die and who might survive with a dose of his paltry drugs. When the first Red Cross parcels, containing the miracle drug penicillin, arrived late in the war, he was jubilant.
The Russians liberated Capt. GRAHAM's camp in March, 1945, and he finally began his long trek home. He told his family later that the Russians separated the officers from the enlisted ranks and fed them a meal of pigs' feet slathered with sour cream, washed down with vodka. It was far too rich for men accustomed to nothing more nutritious than black bread and water. Capt. GRAHAM was so nauseated that he went outside to be sick and fell head first into an open grave.
Many of the troops and the other PoWs began looting German houses, but all that Capt. GRAHAM wanted was a knife and a fork and a napkin ring - symbols of the civilized life he had left behind three years earlier. The GRAHAMs still have that "liberated" napkin ring, dated 1576.
Along with other Canadian PoWs, representing 48 different ranks, he travelled with Russian troops by box car, bicycle and on foot through war-devastated Poland and Ukraine. The Canadian PoWs embarked by ship from Odessa on the Black Sea. Capt. GRAHAM arrived at Union Station in Toronto on June 12, 1945, where he was greeted by his widowed mother and by a reporter and a photographer from The Globe and Mail.
Two months later, on Victory over Japan day in mid-August, 1945, he met Helen HAWKER at a celebratory party at his mother's big house on St. Clair Avenue in Toronto. Ms. HAWKER, who had arrived with another man, noticed tall, skinny Capt. GRAHAM sitting alone on a sofa under the stairs. Wondering who he was, she asked her friend, James GRAHAM, the veteran's name. "Oh, that's my brother, Allen," he replied, according to a well-told family story. "He's just back from the war. Don't pay any attention to him. He's boring." Ignoring this caution, Ms. HAWKER introduced herself and spent the rest of the evening by Capt. GRAHAM's side - while her date finally went home alone.
Elopement
Five months later, they eloped to New York, where they were married on January 28, 1946. This past January they celebrated their 61st wedding anniversary. Together, they raised two daughters, Shari Graham FELL and Annabel GRAHAM.
After Capt. GRAHAM was demobilized, he returned to his medical studies, qualified as a specialist in internal medicine and became a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians (Canada) in the late 1940s. Doctor GRAHAM had privileges at Toronto General Hospital for many years, and saw patients at his offices in the Medical Arts Building at St. George and Bloor Streets in midtown Toronto for more than 50 years.
The GRAHAMs summered at Goodcheer Island in Georgian Bay and spent winters and weekends at "Hawksprings," their home in the Hockley Valley. Doctor GRAHAM finally retired when he was 80. After a long, healthy life, he fell ill last month with interstitial pneumonitis, a disease that is not usually responsive to antibiotics and causes a progressive shortness of breath.
Allen Frederic GRAHAM, M. C, was born in Toronto on October 2, 1915. He died in Toronto General Hospital on Wed., October 24, 2007. He was 92. Predeceased by his three siblings, he is survived by his wife Helen, his daughters Shari and Annabel, four grandchildren, two great-grandchildren and his extended family.

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HAWKEY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-13 published
HAWKEY, Edward Trewinard " Ed"
(Veteran of World War 2)
Peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound on Sunday, August 12th, 2007. Edward Trewinard (Ed) HAWKEY, of Owen Sound, formerly of Sudbury, in his 95th year. Dearly beloved husband of the late Russ HAWKEY (née WILSON.) Loving father of Donald HAWKEY and his wife Janette, of Wasaga Beach, Eleanor FARBIN and her husband Robert, of Wyevale, Barbara HOWSON and her husband, Brent, of Owen Sound. Dear grandfather of seven grandchildren and thirteen great-grandchildren. Survived by his sister Dorothy HAWKEY, and sister-in-law, Janet HAWKEY, both of Toronto. Predeceased by his brother, William HAWKEY, and his parents, William and Alice HAWKEY. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250-14th Street West, Owen Sound (519-376-7492) on Monday evening from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A funeral service for Ed HAWKEY will be held at Evangelical Baptist Church, 895-7th…Street East, Owen Sound, on Tuesday, August 14th, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Bruce LAIDLAW officiating. Interment in Grandview Cemetery in Massey, Ontario on Wednesday, August 15th, at 2: 00 p.m. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Canadian Cancer Society as your expression of sympathy.

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HAWKINS o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-11-21 published
CLARK, " Beth" Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren Clark (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton. For funeral service information please call 924-2810. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.
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HAWKINS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-20 published
CLARK, “Beth” Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren Clark (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton. For funeral service information please call 924-2810. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

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HAWKINS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-21 published
CLARK, “Beth” Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren CLARK (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton on Friday, November 23, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held at Gentle Shepherd Community Church on Saturday, November 24 at 11 a.m. Interment Salem Cemetery, Eugenia. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

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HAWKINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-05-30 published
EVERSOLE, Margaret Sophia (formerly PLEWES, née HARDY)
Born January 20, 1913 to Eunice Olivetta MUNRO and Charles Ernest HARDY, Margaret died peacefully on April 20, 2007 at the Village of Tansley Woods, Burlington, with her family close by. Affectionately known as "Dee", she is survived by her daughters-in-law Cathy PLEWES of Oakville, Ontario, and Donna PLEWES of Edmond, Oklahoma step-daughters Marilyn HOLMSTROM, Nancy WARD, and Joanne MYERS grandchildren John, Kimberley, Amanda and Derek; nephews John PLEWES of Naples, Florida, and Don PLEWES of Toronto, Ontario niece Pam SCHMIDT of Napanee, Ontario. She was predeceased by her husbands Doctor Campbell PLEWES and Doctor James EVERSOLE; her sons James PLEWES and Doctor John PLEWES, and her daughter Mary PLEWES; her sister Doris HARDY and her brother James HAWKINS. Her courage in the face of so many losses and declining health, her sense of humour and love for her family will be treasured by all who knew her. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, June 9, 2007 at 11 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street, Oakville. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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HAWKINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-05 published
EVERSOLE, Margaret Sophia (formerly PLEWES, née HARDY)
Born January 20, 1913 to Eunice Olivetta MUNRO and Charles Ernest HARDY, Margaret died peacefully on April 20, 2007 at the Village of Tansley Woods, Burlington, with her family close by. Affectionately known as "Dee", she is survived by her daughters-in-law Cathy PLEWES of Oakville, Ontario, and Donna PLEWES of Edmond, Oklahoma step-daughters Marilyn HOLMSTROM, Nancy WARD, and Joanne MYERS grandchildren John, Kimberley, Amanda and Derek; nephews John PLEWES of Naples, Florida, and Don PLEWES of Toronto, Ontario niece Pam SCHMIDT of Napanee, Ontario. She was predeceased by her husbands Doctor Campbell PLEWES and Doctor James EVERSOLE; her sons James PLEWES and Doctor John PLEWES, and her daughter Mary PLEWES; her sister Doris HARDY and her brother James HAWKINS. Her courage in the face of so many losses and declining health, her sense of humour and love for her family will be treasured by all who knew her. A Memorial Service will be held on Saturday, June 9, 2007 at 11 a.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 89 Dunn Street, Oakville. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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HAWKINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-07 published
KOTSCHOREK, Ted
Passed away peacefully after a courageous battle with cancer on Tuesday, July 3, 2007. Loving husband of Debbie PEARL- KOTSCHOREK and the 'World's Best Dance Dad' to his daughters Nicky and Alex. Predeceased by his parents, Frank and Theresa KOTSCHOREK. Remembered by his mother-in-law Charlene PEARL, his brothers-in-law Derek PEARL (Debbie) and Brent PEARL (Pamela,) sister-in-law Susan PEARL and best Friends Lise and Ted HAWKINS. Visitation will be held at the Oakview Funeral Home, 56 Lakeshore Rd. West, Oakville (905-842-2252), on Wednesday, July 11, 2007 from 6-8 p.m. and Thursday, July 12th from 6-8 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held at the Church of the Good Shepherd, 21 Simonston Blvd. Thornhill (905-881-1534) on Friday, July 13, 2007 at 10: 30 a.m. Burial to follow at Glen Oaks Memorial Gardens, 3164 Ninth Line, Oakville. Reception to follow at Glen Oaks Chapel and Reception Centre, at 1: 30 p.m. (corner of Hwy 5 and Ninth Line 905-257-8822) Donations to the Terry Fox Foundation or Halton Big Brothers and Big Sisters would be appreciated by the family. Special thanks to our CDC family whose love and support go beyond words.

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HAWKSWORTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-11 published
HAWKSWORTH, William " Bill" " Skip"
Peacefully on July 9, 2007 after a short illness at the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga. Loving husband and best friend of Lynne. Loving father of Jason, Craig (Laura) and Kyla. Proud GrandDad of Alexa and Ethan, brother of Jo STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, dear brother-in-law and uncle. Former President of Freeway Washer Ltd. Special thanks to Friends and family, nurses and staff on 4D and Intensive Care Unit for all their support. A very special thanks to 'loved family son' Dan SHEEHAN. Bill is resting at the funeral home of Skinner and Middlebrook Ltd, 128 Lakeshore Road East (1 block west of Hurontario Street), Mississauga (parking off Ann Street), on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at First United Church, 151 Lakeshore Road West, Mississauga, on Saturday, July 14, 2007 at 12 noon. Cremation to follow.

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HAWKYARD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-31 published
NEWMAN, Freda Lucille (SEAFOOT) (1914-2007)
At the Humber Valley Regional Hospital in Toronto Thursday morning December 27, 2007. The former Freda SEAFOOT of Toronto in her 94th year. Beloved wife of the late Ross NEWMAN (1972.) Loving mother of Robert NEWMAN of Toronto. Dear sister of Durward SEAFOOT of Webb, Saskatchewan and Hazel MULHALL of Gull Lake, Saskatchewan. Lovingly remembered by her niece Mary HAWKYARD and her husband Harry of Leamington as well as several other nieces and nephews. Predeceased by one sister Phyllis SHELLEY and one brother Orval COVELL. Funeral Service will be conducted from the Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth Thursday morning January 3, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Robert GATES officiating. Visitation one hour prior to service. Spring interment Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Memorial contributions to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Freda by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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HAWLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-29 published
DANE, Jacquelyn Gladys Alexandra (née HAWLEY)
Born March 6, 1922, Toronto. Passed away peacefully, surrounded by her family, August 31, 2007, Vancouver. Daughter of Elsie (MARTIN) and John C. HAWLEY. Sister of the late Douglas (Mabel) and Wanda THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (d. Andrew.) Mother of Carol DANE and Leona OLSEN (Bob.) Loving grandmother to Meredith (Todd KEMP) and Laura ARMSTRONG, Ole and Kristen OLSEN. Proud great-grandmother of Zoe Olsen KELLY. Loving aunt to many nieces and nephews. In memory of Jackie donations can be made to the Arthritis Society of Canada.

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HAWLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-26 published
SOUTHAM, Jean (née MacMILLAN,) C.M.
(October 26, 1915-October 23, 2007)
Born in Victoria on October 26th, 1915 to H.R. and Edna MacMILLAN, Jeannie died just before sunrise on October 23rd at home surrounded by love, three days before her 92nd birthday. She was predeceased by her beloved husband Gordon, their sons Harvey and Gordon, two grandchildren, Joanna and Jason, and her sister Marion HAWLEY. She is survived by her five daughters Carol, Martha Lou, Stephanie, Lisa and Nancy (Gerald), thirteen grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and her devoted antique-chewing bulldog, Rosie. Jeannie will be remembered for her keen intelligence, her unbounded sense of fun, and her irrepressible love of life. Educated in Vancouver, she then graduated in 1938 from Stanford University. Amongst her directorships were MacMillan Bloedel, Vancouver Aquarium, York House School, Brentwood College, World Wildlife Fund, Holt Renfrew, and Pearson College of the Pacific. Additionally, Jeannie was a founding Canadian supporter of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award World Fellowship. Mum felt especially grateful for the loyalty and years of service from Jake, Brenda, Misa, Josie, Joy, Holly and Chris. The family is particularly thankful for the patient and tender attention given these past nine months to Mum by her nurses and caregivers. Jeannie leaves a longing and a smile in the hearts of all who knew her. Private cremation. A memorial service will be held at 3 o'clock on Thursday, November 1st, 2007 at Christ Church Cathedral, 690 Burrard Street, Vancouver, British Columbia. One of Mum's legacies was her extraordinary philanthropy to many causes. It is with this in mind that if you so wish, please make a donation to a charity of your choice in her memory. Walkey and Company Funeral Directors 604-738-0006

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HAWLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
SOUTHAM, Jean (née MacMILLAN) C.M.
(October 26, 1915-October 23, 2007)
Born in Victoria on October 26th, 1915 to H.R. and Edna MacMILLAN, Jeannie died just before sunrise on October 23rd at home surrounded by love, three days before her 92nd birthday. She was predeceased by her beloved husband Gordon, their sons Harvey and Gordon, two grandchildren, Joanna and Jason, and her sister Marion HAWLEY. She is survived by her five daughters Carol, Martha Lou, Stephanie, Lisa and Nancy (Gerald), thirteen grandchildren, nine great-grandchildren and her devoted antique-chewing bulldog, Rosie. Jeannie will be remembered for her keen intelligence, her unbounded sense of fun, and her irrepressible love of life. Educated in Vancouver, she then graduated in 1938 from Stanford University. Amongst her directorships were MacMillan Bloedel, Vancouver Aquarium, York House School, Brentwood College, World Wildlife Fund, Holt Renfrew, and Pearson College of the Pacific. Additionally, Jeannie was a founding Canadian supporter of the Duke of Edinburgh's Award World Fellowship. Mum felt especially grateful for the loyalty and years of service from Jake, Brenda, Misa, Josie, Joy, Holly and Chris. The family is particularly thankful for the patient and tender attention given these past nine months to Mum by her nurses and caregivers. Jeannie leaves a longing and a smile in the hearts of all who knew her. Private cremation. A memorial service will be held at 3 o'clock on Thursday, November 1st, 2007 at Christ Church Cathedral, 690 Burrard Street, Vancouver, British Columbia. One of Mum's legacies was her extraordinary philanthropy to many causes. It is with this in mind that if you so wish, please make a donation to a charity of your choice in her memory.
Walkey and Company Funeral Directors 604-738-0006

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HAWLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-15 published
HENRY, Robert D. (1923-2007)
Bob died peacefully in his sleep at home in Waterloo on Tuesday, November 13, 2007. He was 84.
Beloved husband of Doreen (McKENZIE,) who predeceased him November 10, 2003. Loving father of three sons and their families; David and Marilyn, Paul (Gus) and Penny and Brian and Brenda, all of Kitchener.
He will be lovingly remembered by his grandchildren, Kim and her husband Ian DEWAR, Kris HENRY, Kaitlyn, Matthew and Stephen HENRY, Brianne and Andrew HENRY; great-grandchildren, Jackson, Nathan and Jared DEWAR and Madison DOYLE. Brother of Burleigh HENRY and his wife Talla of Brantford, Beth and her husband Frank RUTLEDGE of Ancaster and Ron HENRY of Arden.
Bob was born in Bracebridge, Ontario and moved to the east end of Toronto at age four. He attended Earl Haig Public School and Riverdale Secondary School. While at Riverdale he excelled in hockey, football and track. He spent three years serving as a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force and played hockey and football for the Royal Canadian Air Force Hurricanes. Bob attended the University of Toronto and graduated with a B.P.H.E. He excelled in hockey and football and was a recipient of a Bronze T and a Bronze Bar. He was inducted into the University of Toronto Sports Hall of Fame in 1998. In 1949 he moved to Kitchener and accepted a teaching job at Kitchener-Waterloo Collegiate. When Eastwood opened in 1956, he moved there as the head of Physical Education and then Director of Student Activities. He remained at Eastwood until 1965 when he was appointed vice-principal at Kitchener Waterloo Collegiate where he remained until his retirement in 1980. During his teaching career he coached football at both Kitchener Collegiate Institute and Eastwood and in a span of fifteen years his teams won nine championships, including six in a row from 1953-1958. While vice-principal at Kitchener Collegiate Institute the male staff always looked forward to the annual June weekend at his cottage in Muskoka. Shortly after moving to Waterloo he got involved in the community by coaching minor hockey. From there he moved on to the minor hockey executive, the Arena Commission and eventually became the chair of the newly formed Community Services Board.
In 1967, he successfully ran for council and remained as an alderman for 21 straight years. He liked to keep a low profile as an alderman and often said, "I'm here because I like to see things done."
After retiring as an alderman in 1988, he and his wife Doreen, spent their retirement years traveling and at their cottage in Muskoka. Bob also enjoyed woodworking and loved doing the Globe and Mail cryptic crossword. In recent years he enjoyed being surrounded by his family and Friends. He will be missed by all who knew him.
Friends are invited to share their memories of Bob with his family at the Erb and Good Family Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo on Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. and Friday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. The funeral service to celebrate Bob's life will be held on Saturday, November 17, 2007, at First United Church, 16 William Street West, Waterloo at 2: 30 p, m. with Rev. Rick HAWLEY officiating. Cremation has taken place.
Condolences for the family and donations to Saint Mary's Hospital Foundation for the Heart Function Clinic would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and may be arranged through the funeral home, 519.745.8445 or www.erbgood.com
In living memory of Bob, a tree will be planted through the Trees for Learning Program by the funeral home.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-06 published
HAWTHORN, Daniel Fleming " Dan"
Peacefully with all his family at his side at University Hospital, London on Friday June 1, 2007. Dan HAWTHORN of Markdale in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of 61 years to Doris (née PERRODON,) loving father of Judy SMITH (Rick) Sandra GIGNAC (John) and the late Danny, loved Poppa of Becky (Jeremy), Danny, Dana (Tim), Richard (Lindsay), Dawn (Kyle) and great-granddaughter Taylor, predeceased by brothers William and Frank. Cremation. A private family service was held. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to the Dennis Toll Funeral Home, 55 Charing Cross St. Brantford. www.dennistoll.ca "Was dearly loved and will be sadly missed"
Page 3

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-20 published
Red Wings coach won Stanley Cup without ever playing in the National Hockey League
As Detroit's coach, he acquired many more penalties than during his days with the Flin Flon Bombers. He traded blows with players, refs and ushers, and once even ended up in court
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Victoria -- Jimmy SKINNER won the Stanley Cup in his rookie season as coach of the Detroit Red Wings. The triumph was the more remarkable for his having done so without benefit of National Hockey League experience as a player.
The 1955 victory - delivered in storybook fashion, at home in the seventh and deciding game - brought with it the promise of many more to come. However, the team would not win another championship for 42 years, by which time the old coach had retired, after more than three decades with the club.
Early in his tenure, Mr. SKINNER earned the approval of Red Wing players, although he had a reputation in the minors as a harsh taskmaster. "He has the drive and knows how to handle the fellows," said team captain Ted Lindsay.
The desire to win sometimes led the coach to display his considerable temper. He once exchanged punches with a rival player during a game, while his vocabulary included words better suited to the locker room than to a players bench within earshot of paying customers.
He quit in his fourth season, blaming migraine headaches, but continued his association with the club in the front office and as a scout.
A rotund man with a face as round as a hockey puck, Mr. SKINNER seemed less obsessed with keeping his job than others in the tiny National Hockey League coaching fraternity. It was always his option to return to the family restaurant in Manitoba, where he was regarded as the Hot Dog King of Lockport.
Although he placed his name on the Stanley Cup but once, he is credited with giving the storied trophy its first kiss, a tradition that continues to this day.
Jimmy SKINNER carried a hefty 184 pounds on his 5-foot-9 frame, making him something of a bowling ball in bodychecking opposing forwards during his playing days.
He patrolled the blueline for the junior Winnipeg Rangers as a teenager during the Depression. In 1936, he played on the New York Rovers amateur team against what was billed as the Canada All-Stars in a series of exhibitions staged in Winnipeg. The grand-sounding showdown was a means for Lester Patrick and the New York Rangers brain trust to evaluate young players at their preseason hockey school. One of his teammates was his year-older brother Morden, who carried the unlikely hockey nickname of Ducky. The Rangers eventually passed on the two, who were signed to the Red Wings organization.
The battling SKINNER brothers played for the Flin Flon (Man.) Bombers in 1938-39. At the end of the season, Jimmy SKINNER went to work in the copper mine for 56 cents an hour.
His dreams of an National Hockey League career were denied - these were the days when the premier circuit had just six teams with only about 25 jobs for defencemen. Although he was the last player cut at the Red Wings training camp in 1944, Detroit boss Jack Adams told him he would never be good enough. He signed a contract to play for the Indianapolis Capitals farm team, where he was reunited with Ducky.
The next season found Mr. SKINNER on the roster of the Omaha Knights, joining a 17-year-old rookie from Floral, Saskatchewan., who was making his pro debut. The great Gordie Howe would later help his teammate win the Stanley Cup as coach of the Red Wings. He was a kid with a chippiness about him," Mr. SKINNER told the Windsor Star last year. "We had to teach Gordie not to take silly penalties… but I think he turned out pretty good, didn't he?"
By the end of the decade, both SKINNERs were working behind the bench: Ducky as a playing coach in San Diego and Jimmy as head coach of the junior Windsor Spitfires and the Windsor Ryancretes of the International Hockey League.
Although not notorious for violating hockey's rules as a player, Jimmy chafed behind the bench. He was bounced from the arena by referees many times. The poor play of the Ryancretes did not help matters, as the team failed to win a single game during the 1948-49 season, with 25 losses and six ties.
The junior Spitfires were more satisfying to guide, as Mr. SKINNER gave instruction to such future stars as goaltender Glenn Hall.
Yet it was with the Spitfires that Mr. SKINNER found himself in court facing a criminal charge after a game in Barrie, Ontario In the second period, the referee called consecutive penalties against Mr. SKINNER's team in a span of three seconds. The incensed coach screamed invective at the ref.
At this point, an usher approached Mr. SKINNER to demand he tone down his language. The usher, a staff sergeant at nearby Camp Borden, got a single punch for his troubles, suffering a broken nose and a cut that require five stitches. A Barrie fan who tried to join the melee was similarly dispatched by the coach.
Players from both teams then fought a battle at the Windsor bench. The referee ordered Mr. SKINNER from the arena. He was taken to the police station, where bail was set at $500. A Barrie court later found him guilty of assault, levying a fine of $50. The Ontario Hockey Association also suspended him for a month.
In 1954, Mr. SKINNER was coaching the junior Hamilton Cubs when a game in the Montreal suburb of Verdun ended in chaos at 5: 44 of the second period. The coach accused the referee of favouring the home side. The referee insisted the coach take back the insult.
"I said I would never take it back, and then we started arguing nose to nose," Mr. SKINNER said afterward.
The game ended with the referee sprawled on the ice -- he claimed to have been headbutted by the coach before being knocked flat by a Hamilton player. Mr. SKINNER, escorted from the rink by police, denied striking the official.
In the end, both men were suspended by the league.
Not all of his adventures behind the bench involved cursing and brawling. A hypnotist was once engaged to put his players into a pregame trance, a move that successfully ended a losing streak. He also raised funds for Gordie Petrie, a Winnipeg-born former teammate at Omaha who became dependent on an iron lung after contracting polio in the 1950s.
For his part, Mr. SKINNER let it be known that perhaps coaching was not to be his life's calling. "Maybe I'll stick to selling hot dogs," he said. "You don't get ulcers that way."
The SKINNER family had run an eponymous restaurant in Lockport since 1929, famous to this day for selling foot-longs.
A few months after suggesting he might become a full-time frankfurter vendor, Mr. SKINNER was promoted to head coach of the Red Wings, the defending Stanley Cup champions. His predecessor, Tommy Ivan, had been lured away to be general manager of the Chicago Black Hawks.
The ascension to the highest ranks of hockey did not make Mr. SKINNER a more gentlemanly presence behind the bench. On December 2, 1954, a scuffle between players of the Canadiens and Red Wings in front of the Detroit bench at the Olympia became a free-for-all. At one point, Mr. SKINNER exchanged punches with a much bigger Butch Bouchard.
A month later, on New Year's Day at the Montreal Forum, some loud, off-colour criticisms of the officiating led one patron to approach the Detroit bench to instruct the coach to watch his players' language. Mr. SKINNER told league president Clarence Campbell to mind his own business.
Mr. Campbell and Mr. SKINNER also found themselves at the Forum on the night of what would become known as the Richard Riot. The league president had suspended Canadiens star Rocket Richard for the remainder of the season. The crowd was in an angry mood, which did not improve as Detroit took the lead. Somewhere, a tear-gas canister was ignited. The building was evacuated, the game was suspended in Detroit's favour and the crowd spilled onto downtown streets, where disorder lasted for several hours.
In the playoffs, the Red Wings knocked off the Toronto Maple Leafs before meeting the Canadiens in the final series. Mr. SKINNER received a good-luck telegram signed by 500 residents of his hometown of Selkirk, Manitoba Both teams won their home games to tie the series 3-3 before Detroit claimed its second consecutive Cup with a 3-1 victory at home.
The cup was placed on a table on the ice. Clutching his fedora in his left hand, Mr. SKINNER leaned forward to peck the bowl of the silver trophy. "It scares me to think of all the mistakes I made, right up to the end," the winning coach said. "I've been plain lucky."
The Canadiens, smarting from the Richard suspension, took revenge by winning the next five championships.
Early in 1958, Mr. SKINNER surprised the hockey world by resigning. He blamed persistent migraine headaches on a concussion suffered while playing for Flin Flon. He was named Detroit's chief scout later in the year.
Part of his duties for the organization saw him become general manager of the Red Wings' junior team in Hamilton, which won the Memorial Cup in 1962.
Mr. SKINNER stayed with the Red Wings through the darkest seasons in the franchise's history, including a long playoff drought. He served a two-year stint as general manager beginning in 1980.
The Red Wings did not repeat Mr. SKINNER's Stanley Cup triumph until 1997, by which time he had been long retired.
He had a brief, almost comical, return to coaching during a game in 1963. When Hamilton coach Ed Bush was ousted from the game, Mr. SKINNER took over his duties, only to be banished himself four minutes later for throwing the scorekeeper's papers onto the ice in protest at a call.
James Donald SKINNER was born January 12, 1917, at Selkirk, Manitoba He died in Windsor, Ontario, on July 11. He was 90. He leaves a son and three daughters. He was predeceased by his wife, the former Vivian Anna REYNOLDS, who died at home on January 11. He was also predeceased by his brothers, Gordon, who died in 1991, and Morden (Ducky), who died in 1993.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-23 published
She was a Toronto softball slugger who starred in a league of her own
Gifted infielder, endowed with glamour and a smattering of experience on stage, became a key player for the Chicago Chicks of the National Girls Baseball League
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Victoria -- Peggy WILSON's hitting prowess made her a terror on Toronto's softball sandlots. At age 16, the slugging infielder helped lead her team to the finals of the 1945 world softball championships and went on to play professionally in the United States.
At a time when women had few opportunities to earn pay for their athletic skills, she won a roster spot as two competing leagues battled for supremacy in the American Midwest. As it turned out, television killed attendance at minor-league sporting events and those few jobs for professional female athletes all but disappeared.
The infielder brought an athletic grace and a certain glamour to the diamond. Her flowing hair, full lips and deep-set eyes could just as easily have won her a spot on a Hollywood backlot as on a softball sandlot.
Though fortunate to be an athletic pioneer, she would suffer more than her share of heartbreak and tragedy.
Margaret Merla Eleanor WILSON was born in Toronto to a father who was an engineer and a sergeant in the Grenadier Guards. Francis Cyril (Frank) WILSON married Dorothy (Dolly) Catherine WATSON five days before Valentine's Day in 1928. Their daughter arrived 11 months later. Mr. WILSON led an apparent life of propriety for many years before suddenly abandoning the family. In seeking financial support, his wife took him to court, where, to her surprise, he was exposed as a bigamist. Their marriage licence was entered into proceedings under the tag "Exhibit A."
Dolly WILSON was the oldest of 10 children. The boys worked for the family business, Watson Movers, out of the family home at 281 Rhodes Ave., while the girls worked on stage, though the traditional theatre was not their milieu. The Watson Sisters crisscrossed the continent in the 1920s with such travelling revues as Plunkett Productions. Dolly was also an acclaimed snake dancer. By age 10, Peggy WILSON was accompanying her mother onstage as a bongo player.
The public performances perhaps made it easier for her to handle the pressure of playing softball as a young girl. Her photograph appeared in a Toronto newspaper in 1941, when the 12-year-old led her team to a championship in a league for under-18 girls. She played for Areadians of the Danforth league and Malverns of the Beaches league, often at the old Sunnyside stadium near Broadview Avenue and Queen Street. She was a star by age 14 playing against older women as a second baseman for the Staffords.
While mature on the diamond, she possessed an innocence away from it. Globe sports columnist Bobbie ROSENFELD recounted an incident when riding a bus back from a game at Malton, Ontario, when young Peggy engaged a gentleman beside her in conversation.
"Are you interested in softball?" the girl asked.
"Oh, yes, quite a bit," he replied.
"Do you go to Sunnyside often?"
"Yes, every night."
"Why? Are you connected with any team?"
"Yes, in a way," Ed BEWLEY said. "I happen to be the league president."
In the spring of 1945, she joined the Crofton Athletic Club. The powerhouse team boasted Alma WILSON (no relation) as an ace pitcher known as the Crofton Comet. The team dominated all comers in the Olympic girls' softball league, an amateur circuit based in Toronto.
In one game at Sunnyside, the Croftons embarrassed the Fuels 22-5, with Alma WILSON getting the win and Peggy WILSON banging a double and a home run.
After disposing of local challengers, the Croftons travelled to Cleveland for a world championship tournament. They downed the dogged Utah Lassies 5-2, slipped past the Gastonia (N.C.) Rex Hanovers 1-0 and then shut out a team from Stamford, Connecticut., 2-0. The victories earned a berth in the finals against a favoured New Orleans team.
The Jax Maids were led by Nina (Tiger) Korgan, a Nebraskan known as the Babe Didrikson of softball. She surrendered just two singles to the Toronto batters, as the Maids won 5-0 to claim their third world title in four years.
The Croftons' exposure in the United States caught the attention of scouts from competing leagues of women baseball players. A bird dog from the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League - a circuit portrayed in the 1992 Hollywood movie A League of Their Own - came to Toronto armed with professional contracts. Instead, Peggy WILSON and the pitcher Alma WILSON ended up signing with the Chicago Chicks of the rival National Girls Baseball League.
The Chicago-based loop maintained softball's shorter base paths and underhanded pitching, even while playing with a smaller ball than a regulation softball. (The All-American league adopted baseball rules for a circuit based in mid-sized Midwestern cities.)
The novelty of pro female athletes attracted good crowds in the years following the end of the Second World War. A photo of Peggy WILSON appeared in one publication with the headline: "Snappy flysnatchers and shapely eye-catchers, gal softballers draw fans."
The infielder returned to Toronto at the end of the season, later playing for the Sherrins of the East Toronto league. After marrying a tool-and-dye man named George JOHNSTONE, the local daily newspapers began carrying accounts of a now-veteran player named Peggy JOHNSTONE.
In 1952, she moved to Bayview, New York outside Rochester, where she earned $125 a week to play for a team called Van's TNT Girls. The coach was Roy Van Graflan, a former umpire who was behind the plate when Babe Ruth made his famous "called shot" gesture in the 1932 World Series.
The coach was an expert at spotting female sporting talent. His own baseball career began as a pitcher on a team known as the Van Graflans, which featured his seven brothers and father. In the baseball off-season, the moonlighting umpire coached women's basketball teams, with his barnstorming Filaret side winning 553 games of 565 played from 1933 through 1949.
In July, 1953, the TNT Girls came to Toronto to play a televised exhibition against Mrs. JOHNSTONE's old rivals, the Gartens of the East Toronto league. On his way to the ball park, the car in which the coach was a passenger rear-ended a truck on Gerrard Street. The coach's head cracked the windshield, yet he refused to be taken to hospital. He managed just two innings at the game before calling it a night. He was driven home to Rochester and died some weeks later. He was 59.
Sadly, the unexpected death of a beloved coach in an automobile accident was but one of several tragedies to be endured by Peggy WILSON. Her aunt, Eleanor (WATSON) HENDERSON, a circus trouper, was killed with four others in a fiery collision on the Trans-Canada Highway outside Hearst, Ontario A son, aged 16, was killed by a drunk driver. She would also outlive two husbands, including one who died of a brain tumour only a few years after they married.
After hanging up her glove and cleats, she lived in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, spending more than 30 years aiding the ladies auxiliary of a fraternal organization. She rarely spoke of her time on the diamond, although her obvious talent at the plate - on display during pickup games at family picnics - never failed to surprise male observers.
Margaret DOUCETTE (née WILSON, formerly JOHNSTONE and CAESAR) was born on January 10, 1929, in Toronto. She died of lung cancer on May 17 in Palm Bay, Florida She was 78. She leaves a daughter, three grandchildren and two great-granddaughters. She was predeceased by two husbands and two sons. A first marriage ended in divorce.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-09 published
Smooth defenceman got high by winning
Denied National Hockey League stardom, he won Olympic silver and studied on the side
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Darryl SLY never won a Stanley Cup and never held a permanent job in the National Hockey League. His career statistics were uninspiring - 79 games played, one goal, two assists.
A versatile player known as Slippery Sly for his smooth skating, he played professionally for 22 seasons and worked behind the bench as a coach for several more. Over those years, he wore sweaters for towns that no longer exist (Galt, Ontario, now Cambridge) and for teams long defunct (the original Iowa Stars).
Mr. SLY was a valuable asset on any hockey roster. As an amateur, he skated for Canada at the 1960 Winter Olympics (winning a silver medal), and he represented his country at the 1961 world championships (winning gold). As a professional, he helped a powerhouse Rochester Americans squad win three consecutive Calder Cup titles in the mid-1960s.
Originally a forward with a good touch around the net, he was converted into a defenceman whose tenacious play made him a favourite of goaltenders.
With Rochester, he was paired on the ice and in road hotel rooms with a pugnacious defenceman of equal heart but lesser skill: "Darryl SLY carried me for six years, his skating was that good," said Don Cherry, who went on to greater success as a hockey commentator. "Whenever the puck was dumped into our end, I'd say, 'Go get it, Darryl.' "
But success eluded Mr. SLY in hockey's premier league. He played only two games in the pre-expansion National Hockey League and, after the league doubled in teams, he dressed for only 77 games with Toronto, Minnesota and Vancouver.
Darryl Hayward SLY learned his hockey in his hometown, a popular Ontario resort on Georgian Bay. He led the Collingwood Cubs to the Ontario juvenile-A title shortly before his 17th birthday. It would be the first championship of many.
He spent the following three seasons in Toronto at Saint Michael's College School, the Catholic institution that graduated more hockey players than priests. His teammates included Dave Keon and Frank Mahovlich. Coached by Rev. David Bauer, the boys were tutored to combine academic achievement with athletic endeavour. Mr. SLY attended teachers college in his final season with the St. Mike's Majors, during which he served as team captain. St. Mike's lost to Peterborough in the junior-A finals.
The National Hockey League's Toronto Maple Leafs offered Mr. SLY a $3,500 salary with a $1,500 signing bonus, an attractive sum on its own, all the more so for a graduating student contemplating a career as a teacher. Instead, he accepted Father Bauer's advice to remain an amateur, playing for the Kitchener-Waterloo (Ont.) Dutchmen, a senior team.
The Dutchies were coached by Bill Durnan, the former Montreal Canadiens goaltender, but he quit after a losing streak. Bobby Bauer, an National Hockey League star and the brother of Father Bauer, was reluctantly pressed into service.
The Dutchmen were chosen to represent Canada at the Olympics after the Allan Cup-winning Whitby (Ont.) Dunlops declined. The Dunlops bolstered the Dutchies' lineup by contributing a forward line and defenceman Harry Sinden, who would be named captain of the Olympic squad.
The team travelled by bus for two weeks, playing exhibitions across Western Canada before arriving at Squaw Valley, California.
His lone goal in the Olympic tournament came when he opened the scoring against Czechoslovakia, a tally that would be the game-winner as Canada posted a 4-0 victory. He also earned an assist.
The team's hopes for a gold medal diminished when the U.S. team, cheered on by 8,000 partisans, scored a 2-1 upset. The decisive goal was scored by Paul Johnson, who was being covered on the play by Mr. SLY.
The Americans went on to strike gold and the Canadians had to make do with silver.
Mr. SLY played for the Galt Terriers the following season, a team formed from the remnants of the Dutchmen. The team nearly folded at Christmas, struggling in last place. Midway through the season, Mr. SLY was invited to temporarily join the Trail (B.C.) Smoke Eaters. The club had been chosen to represent Canada at the world championships in Switzerland.
Granted a three-month leave from his job as a teacher in Elmira, Ontario, Mr. SLY began an odyssey that saw him travel to British Columbia for a few games before flying back through Toronto on his way to Europe.
The Smoke Eaters went undefeated in the tournament at Geneva, the only blemish a 1-1 tie with the Czechs. The Canadians clinched the championship with a 5-1 victory over the Soviets. Afterward, a reporter found an exhausted Mr. SLY slumped on a bench in the dressing room. He said he was "bushed, but I am about the happiest guy in the world."
After his 10-week hiatus with the Trail team, the world-beating defenceman returned to the Galt blueline. His return was a happy one - he had four goals and six assists in 12 Allan Cup playoff games, helping his team claim the national senior title. An ecstatic home crowd prevented the victors from reaching their dressing room for 20 minutes after the game. The championship came just six weeks after his return from overseas.
Mr. SLY then turned professional with the Rochester Americans, an American Hockey League team that was home for seven seasons. Although playing in a minor league, the Amerks, as they were known, were widely regarded as being strong enough to compete in the six-team National Hockey League.
Rochester won three consecutive Calder Cups as league champs with a roster packed with high-calibre talent, from National Hockey League players winding up their careers to young stars with promising futures. The team also produced future National Hockey League coaches in Mr. Cherry and fellow defenceman Al Arbour.
A Maple Leafs' call-up in December of 1965 lasted just two games, with Mr. SLY assigned penalty-killing duties. It was not an auspicious debut.
Despite his many road trips, Mr. SLY completed English studies at Saint_John Fisher College in Rochester in 1966. Newspapers carried stories on his achievement, so rare was an educated skater. "Darryl Sly," The Globe and Mail noted, "is one hockey player who is improving by degrees."
The doubling of the National Hockey League before the 1967-68 season gave Mr. SLY hope he would be drafted by one of the six new American teams. Instead, he was passed over.
"My chances of making the National Hockey League would have been a lot better. My pay, too," he said while at Toronto's training camp, which, as usual, boasted a surfeit of quality defencemen. He saw limited action in 17 games with the Leafs that season, recording no points.
His rights were transferred to the Vancouver Canucks of the Western Hockey League after the club purchased the Syracuse franchise.
He took on the role of assistant coach even as he maintained a regular spot on the ice. The Canucks won eight consecutive playoff games to claim the Lester Patrick Cup as league champion.
The National Hockey League's Minnesota North Stars spent $30,000 to pluck Mr. SLY from the Canucks in the 1969 inter-league draft. He scored his lone National Hockey League goal while wearing Minnesota's sweater for 29 games.
He returned to Vancouver the following season, as the new Canucks National Hockey League franchise grabbed him in the expansion draft. He was Vancouver's sixth pick and third defenceman, after Gary Doak and Pat Quinn.
By 1971, he was again playing senior hockey in Ontario as the playing coach of the Barrie Flyers. He led them to four Allan Cup finals in five seasons - losing to Spokane in 1972 and 1976, and to Thunder Bay, Ontario, in 1975. The Flyers took the senior championship by knocking off the Cranbrook (B.C.) Royals in 1974.
In 1973, his old team, the Rochester Americans, asked him to return for a single game to fill a hole on defence. Mr. SLY responded by playing perhaps the greatest game of his career, scoring a goal and adding two assists in a 3-3 tie.
After hanging up his skates at 39, Mr. SLY took up the coaching reins of the amateur Collingwood Shipbuilders, winning an intermediate-A title in 1983 and a senior-A title in 1987.
Mr. SLY was prominent in his hometown as a real-estate developer and owner of the Blue Mountain Chrysler automobile dealership. He was inducted into the Collingwood Sports Hall of Fame in 1980 and was an inaugural member of the Amerks Hall of Fame in 1986.
Mr. SLY once told The Globe's Nora McCabe that he enjoyed coaching unpaid players who, like him, simply loved hockey. "Some guys drink and some guys take dope to get high," he said. "Amateur hockey players get high by winning."
Darryl SLY was born April 3, 1939, in Collingwood, Ontario He died of cancer August 28, 2007, in Collingwood. He was 68. He leaves his wife, Sylvia (McCLURE,) a daughter, two sons, five grandchildren and two brothers. He was predeceased by two brothers.

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HAWTHORN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-22 published
Baron CHATFIELD, 90
He Was Aide-De-Camp To The Governor General
By Tom HAWTHORN, Page S10
Victoria -- Baron CHATFIELD of Ditching, who served as aide-de-camp to a governor general during the Second World War, has died at his Oak Bay home. He was 90.
As a young lieutenant in the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve, he was at Pier 61 in Halifax in 1940 to greet the Earl of Athlone on his arrival to take up the post of Governor General. He served the earl throughout the war, attending him at such events as the 1943 New Year's levee at the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa. The soldier also was feted in his own honour, as a former Ontario cabinet minister and wife hosted a tea at the Toronto Hunt Club in 1941.
Ernle David Lewis CHATFIELD was born on January 2, 1917, at Edinburgh, Scotland. He was educated at the Royal Naval College at Dartmouth and at Trinity College at Cambridge, England.
His father, Alfred Ernle Montacute CHATFIELD, served as captain of the H.M.S. Medina during a tour of India by George V in 1911-12. He was decorated for his actions at the Battle of Jutland in the Great War, and was serving as First Sea Lord of the Admiralty when raised to the peerage as Baron CHATFIELD in 1937. Two years later, he was briefly in the war cabinet as the minister for co-ordination of defence.
The first Lord CHATFIELD died in 1967, his son succeeding to the title.
The 2nd Lord CHATFIELD died on September 30. He leaves his wife of 38 years, the former Elizabeth BULMAN, and a sister, Katharine DUCKWORTH, an officer of the Order of the British Empire. He was predeceased by a sister who died in 1943.

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HAWTON o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-08-29 published
KOBEL, Kathleen Lillian
On Monday August 20, 2007 at the General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood in her 81st year. Kaye, formerly of Wasaga Beach, loving mother of Faye FERGUSON of Collingwood. Dear grandmother of Kandace (Dwayne) HAWTON and the late Kathleen Kelly FERGUSON. Great-grandmother of Blair and Alicia. Survived by brother John (Sally) COSSABOOM, step-sister Mary HUME and sister-in-law Muriel COSSABOOM. Predeceased by brothers Robert, James and Ralph and sister Estelle ORVIS. Kaye was predeceased by her former husband and dear friend Clarence Myers. Friends were received at the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, Stayner from 12 noon on Friday August 24th for the Funeral Service in the Chapel at 1 p.m. Interment Ebenezer Cemetery. Remembrances to The Kidney Foundation would be appreciated by Kaye's family. For further information or to sign the on-line guest book, log on to: www.carruthersdavidson.com
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HAWTON o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-11-14 published
VERNER, Adeline (formerly NORRIS, née HOOD)
Peacefully on Sunday November 11, 2007 at Vera Davis Centre, Bolton in her 97th year. Adeline, formerly of Stayner and Sunnidale, beloved wife of the late Leonard VERNER (1992) and the late Stanley NORRIS (1946.) Dear sister of the late Clara (Bill SPENCE) and Floreen (late Mervyn HAWTON.) Cherished aunt of Robert, Glenn, John, Lynda, Norman and their families. Step-mother of Donald VERNER, Jean VERNER, the late Ruth CRAIG and their families. Adeline was an active member of her church and community. She also held a special place in her heart for her students from the one room schoolhouses. Friends will be received at the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, 7313 Highway 26 (Main St.), Stayner (705-428-2637) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Thursday November 15, 2007. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Friday November 16, 2007 at 1 o'clock. Interment Creemore Union Cemetery. If desired, donations to the Alzheimer Society or Centennial United Church, Stayner would be appreciated by Adeline's family. For more information or to sign the online guest book, log on to www.carruthersdavidson.com
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