GROBSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-07 published
GROBSTEIN, Harry
Peacefully at home, as was his fervent wish, in West Palm Beach, on Wednesday, December 5, 2007, in his 98th year. Beloved and loving husband of Ruth Elkman GROBSTEIN since 1986. He guaranteed her 15 years, but in typical fashion exceeded his commitment by giving her almost 22. Predeceased by his cherished first wife, Mildred Wagner GROBSTEIN, who passed away on December 7th, 1984. Deeply loved and respected by his children, Barbara, Debra and John, who will sorely miss him. Harry was a wonderful father-in-law to Michael LEFCOE and Barry CAMPBELL, and step-father to Richard and Cindy ELKMAN, and Ron ELKMAN, all of whom loved him like a father. Beloved grandfather of Yaacov and Batsheva LEFCOE, Kris LEFCOE and Rob JERESKI; Matthew and Jeremy CAMPBELL; Marissa and Justin SCHMIDT, David, Molly and Laura ELKMAN; Mark ELKMAN. Great-grandfather of 10 great-grandchildren in Israel and Florida. Sadly, Harry will not be with us to welcome his 11th and 12th great-grandchildren, expected soon in Israel and New York. Harry was also a much loved uncle. He led a full, productive and happy life, and was admired by all who had the privilege of knowing him. Predeceased by his brothers David GROBSTEIN and Nick PROCTOR, and by his sisters Rae FAERMAN and Gerry BIRNBAUM. Funeral service from Paperman and Sons, Montreal on Friday, December 7 at 2: 00 p.m. Shiva in Montreal through Monday evening continuing in Toronto at 20 Highland Avenue, Tuesday and Wednesday. Contributions in his memory may be made to the "Harry Grobstein Fund" c/o Temple Emanu-El Beth Sholom Congregation, (514) 937-3575.

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GRODZINSKI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-09-03 published
Ontario crashes claim 12
The driver in a Highway 402 crash that killed two and injured six faces careless driving count.
By Jane SIMS, Sun Media, Mon., September 3, 2007
Only part way through the last long weekend of summer, at least 12 people have died -- two in the London area -- in crashes on Ontario highways.
Yesterday, police identified two people from Illinois killed when their minivan rolled Saturday on Highway 402, west of London, a crash that also injured six members of their extended family in the van.
Poonambehi PATEL, 65, died at the scene, while Pushpaben AMIN, 69, was declared dead at the hospital, Middlesex Ontario Provincial Police said.
From McHenry, Illinois, in suburban Chicago, the Toronto-bound family had been travelling east on the 402, east of Longwoods Road, when the crash occurred.
Police said the van struck the shoulder, went out of control and rolled after the driver tried to pass a vehicle.
The family relationships of the victims weren't immediately clear, but Ontario Provincial Police said the two weren't a married couple.
The driver, Roopal AMIN, 35, was charged with careless driving. She was treated at hospital and released.
Four males who were in the van and one woman remained in a London hospital yesterday with the 49-year-old woman and one man, 54, in critical condition.
The other males included an eight-year-old and an 18-year-old, both stable in hospital with non-life-threatening injuries, and a 44-year-old whose condition police said was upgraded from critical.
The van had eight occupants but only seven seatbelts. Only the driver and front passenger were buckled in, the Ontario Provincial Police said.
Six occupants, including the two who died, were thrown from the van.
Elsewhere, a man, 53, died as he tried to help a 19-year-old who'd crashed his car on a rural road near Kitchener.
The older man was killed when a volunteer firefighter en route to the accident also lost control and crashed. The firefighter was unhurt, while the teen was taken to hospital with serious injuries.
Saturday, a head-on collision in Muskoka left two people dead and a third seriously hurt. The crash took place on Highway 169 near Bala in Muskoka, Ontario Provincial Police said.
The injured person was flown to a Toronto hospital. No names were released.
"It is shaping up to be a tough long weekend," Ontario Provincial Police Chief Supt. Bill GRODZINSKI said yesterday.
With 12 road deaths this long weekend, the Ontario Provincial Police was bracing for today, the last day of the Labour Day weekend.

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GRODZINSKI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-11-06 published
All-terrain vehicle deaths have doubled across region
Police say the increase in this type of fatality is totally preventable.
By Joe BELANGER, Sun Media, Tues., November 6, 2007
Alcohol, helmets and speed are key factors in six deaths this year of people riding all-terrain vehicles in Southwestern Ontario.
And a disturbing trend that has seen double the number of all-terrain vehicle fatalities across the province continued last weekend when a 28-year-old Howick man was killed after losing control of the vehicle.
"They're not handling the vehicles properly," said Ontario Provincial Police Sgt. Dave Rector, media officer for the Southwest Region.
"It's a powerful machine. They're not wearing helmets, they're mixing alcohol and that's just a recipe for disaster."
At about midnight Sunday, police said, an all-terrain vehicle driven by James SCHUMACHER, 28, of Howick, went out of control on Gorrie Line in Howick Township.
SCHUMACHER was pronounced dead at the scene and a passenger suffered minor injuries. The cause of the crash is still being investigated.
It was the second all-terrain vehicle-related death in less than a week.
Jerome Leonard AQUASH, 24, of Walpole Island was killed and three others injured early last Thursday when an all-terrain vehicle crashed into a telephone pole and a tree on Chiefs Road near Dan Shab Road. Among those injured was a 15-year-old girl who was airlifted to London Health Sciences Centre in serious condition.
To the end of October, 23 people died in 22 all-terrain vehicle accidents in Ontario, up 91.7 per cent over 2006 when 12 people died in 12 all-terrain vehicle incidents over the same period.
There has been a 350 per cent increase in the number of people killed in Ontario while not wearing a helmet -- nine this year versus two last year.
Meanwhile, alcohol has been a factor in 13 deaths in 2007, up 225 per cent from four last year.
"In reviewing reports of all-terrain vehicle fatal incidents, in a majority of cases the driver was going too fast, lost control and either hit something or the driver was thrown off the vehicle and it landed on him," said Chief Superintendent Bill GRODZINSKI, commander of the Ontario Provincial Police Highway Safety Division.
"All-terrain vehicles can be very dangerous if not driven responsibly," he said. "Drinking and driving or not wearing a helmet increases an operator's chance of having a serious crash considerably."
In one incident, an all-terrain vehicle driver was going too fast on a private road and lost control on a curve. The driver was ejected from the vehicle and was hit by a pickup truck.
In another, an inexperienced driver tried to jump a ditch but hit the edge of it instead and launched the vehicle 29 metres before it landed on the driver, who had been drinking.
"The increase in this type of fatality is totally preventable," GRODZINSKI said. "The Ontario Provincial Police will continue to maintain a zero tolerance approach to charging all-terrain vehicle operators who are caught drinking and driving or not wearing approved helmets."
Aside from fatalities, all-terrain vehicle injuries are also causing concern. A recent Canadian Institute for Health Information study concluded the number of hospitalizations related to all-terrain vehicle accidents increased 25 per cent from 1996-1997 to 2004-2005.
That means, on average, 19 people a day went to emergency departments in Ontario, a toll that has climbed dramatically in less than a decade.

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GROEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-10-03 published
BROWN, Melvina Ethel (formerly RIDDELL, née TALBOT)
Suddenly at her residence on Saturday, September 29, 2007. Melvina (née TALBOT) of Durham in her 87th year. Wife of the late Clifford RIDDELL and the late James A. BROWN. Loving friend of Thys GROEN. Loved mother of Carolyn (Douglas) LEITH of R.R.#1 Priceville, Lorne (Carol) Riddell of R.R.#1 Dundalk, Barbara Gordon (Denis MOORE) of R.R.#1 Maxwell and Gwen (Brian) MULLIN of R.R.#1 Feversham. Dear sister of Mervyn (Marie) TALBOT of Creemore, Marjorie BLAKEY of Orangeville and Morris (Shirley) TALBOT of Desboro. Sadly missed by sister-in-law Velma TALBOT of Collingwood, 17 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by one granddaughter and 2 brothers. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Durham on Tuesday. Funeral Service will be held at the Durham Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 3, 2007. Interment in Dundalk Cemetery at 3 p.m. Wednesday. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Durham Presbyterian Church, Durham Seniors' Silver Threads or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
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GROEN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-10-17 published
BROWN, Melvina
The family of Melvina BROWN would like to thank family, Friends and neighbours for your kindness and thoughtfulness. We are grateful for the support you have given us and the Friendship you have shared with mom. Thank you to Rev. John JOHNSON, the Durham Presbyterian Church, the Silver Threads Choir and Annabelle NEUMAN, pianist. Thank you to Ian LEITH for playing your Grandma's favourite music. Your thoughtfulness will not be forgotten. - Douglas and Carolyn LEITH and family, Lorne and Carol RIDDELL and family, Dennis MOORE and Barb GORDON and family, Brian and Gwen MULLIN and family, the Talbot family, and Thys GROEN.
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GROEN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-01 published
BROWN, Melvina Ethel (formerly RIDDELL, née TALBOT)
Suddenly at her residence on Saturday, September 29, 2007. Melvina (née TALBOT) of Durham in her 87th year. Wife of the late Clifford RIDDELL and the late James A. BROWN. Loving friend of Thys GROEN. Loved mother of Carolyn (Douglas) LEITH of R.R.#1, Priceville, Lorne (Carol) RIDDELL of R.R. #1, Dundalk, Barbara GORDON (Denis MOORE) of R.R.#1, Maxwell and Gwen (Brian) MULLIN of R.R.#1, Feversham. Dear sister of Mervyn (Marie) TALBOT of Creemore, Marjorie BLAKEY of Orangeville and Morris (Shirley) TALBOT of Desboro. Sadly missed by sister-in-law Velma TALBOT of Collingwood, 17 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by 1 granddaughter and 2 brothers. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Durham on Tuesday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at the Durham Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 3, 2007. Interment in Dundalk Cemetery at 3 p.m. Wednesday. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Durham Presbyterian Church, Durham Seniors' Silver Threads or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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GROGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-24 published
PAGE, Doctor John, M.D., C.M., M.Sc. (Med,) (F.R.C.P.C,) F.A.C.P.
Peacefully with his family by his side at the Brockville General Hospital Charles Street Site, on Monday September 17, 2007. Doctor John PAGE of Brockville, aged 82 years. Beloved husband of the former Frances Pearl McGILL. Dear father of Tom PAGE and his wife Lynn of Bedford, Nova Scotia, Nancy GORDON and her husband Kevin, Jim PAGE and his wife Jackie and Jane PAGE and her fiancé Andrew BROWN all of Brockville. Loving grandfather of Max, Tess and Austin PAGE, Elizabeth FREAMO and her friend Rob and Lindsay FREAMO, and Jackson and John PAGE. Also survived by a great-grand_son Devon RUTHERFORD. Predeceased by his parents Rev. Arthur PAGE and his wife Eva GROGAN and a sister Ruth in infancy.
A private family service at John's request will be held at his residence. Interment will be held at Roselawn Memorial Garden's Maitland. In memoriams to the Charity of Your Choice would be gratefully acknowledged by the family. Barclay Funeral Home 137 Pearl St. East, Brockville entrusted with the arrangements. Messages of condolence may be sent online at: www.barclayfuneralhome.com

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GROLL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-15 published
GROLL, Sidney " Sam"
Passed away peacefully on Friday, December 14, 2007 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, after a hard-fought three year battle with cancer. Sidney GROLL, beloved husband of Alfreda Joy GROLL. Loving father and father-in-law of David and Aviva, Debra and Ian GOLDBERG, and Adrienne and Ari GABRIEL. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Aubrey and Lucille, and Gill and the late Cyril GROLL. Devoted grandfather of Amy, Sophie, Talia, Danielle, Jamie, Keren, Alon, and Yonatan. Special thanks to Dr.'s Hanna ZUCKERMAN and Harvey BLANKENSTEIN and caregivers Patricia and Rena. At Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Temple Emanu El section for a graveside service on Sunday, December 16, 2007 at 12: 30 p.m. Shiva: 4 Cedar Forest Court. Memorial donations may be made to the North York General Hospital Foundation, 416-756-6944.

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GROOM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
DUBAS, Stanley Paul
After a brief battle with cancer Stan passed away peacefully in Victoria, British Columbia on December 14, 2006. He will be dearly missed by his loving wife of 45 years, Helen, his daughters Deborah GROOM (Rob), Heidi (David BRITNELL), and Krista WANSBROUGH (Sean,) and grand_sons Joshua GROOM and John Connor WANSBROUGH. In Toronto he leaves his brother Harry (Georgie), sisters Alys and Ann (Ted), and nephew Ralph (Cathy). He is predeceased by his mother Stella and father Paul. Stan's strength came from his faith, family and Friends. He embraced all of life's challenges in both work and leisure with passion, and his joy of life inspired those who knew him. Stan was born in Smooth Rock Falls, Ontario, February 13, 1936. He attended Royal Military College (CMR) in Saint_Jean, Quebec, received his B.A. Political Science and Economics from the University of Toronto, his Masters in Public Administration from Carleton University and was completing his Ph.D. thesis. His career path included, in Ottawa, Director General, National Health and Welfare; Deputy Director, Treasury Board Secretariat in British Columbia, Director, Management Operations, Ministry of Consumer and Corporate Affairs; Deputy Minister, Ministry of Economic Development and Ministry of Health and Emergency Health Services, Chairman. He will be greatly missed as the Executive Director, James Bay Care Center in Victoria. There will be a Celebration of Stan's Life held on Sat. January 13, 2007 at 2 p.m. at Saanich Baptist Church, 4347 Wilkinson Rd. Victoria. A reception will follow the service. In lieu of flowers donations in Stan's memory to the Saanich Baptist Church Building Fund or the Make-A-Wish Foundation of British Columbia and Yukon would be appreciated.

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GROOM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-06 published
HEROLD, Mary Elizabeth, R.N. (née GROOM) (8 April 1926-4 June 2007)
Loved and loving wife of William Albin (Olly) HEROLD for 59 years. Proud mother of Robert and Jeffery and daughter-in-law Beth. Grandmother of Rachel, Caitlin, Owen, Anna and Ian. Mary passed away quietly after a long illness and will be greatly missed by all who knew and loved her. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (between Islington and Kipling Aves.), on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at All Saints Kingsway Anglican Church, 2850 Bloor Street West, on Friday, June 8, 2007 at 11 a.m.

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GROOME o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-13 published
SWENSON, Bernard " Ben"
Veteran World War 2. Retired Businessman
Passed away at Good Samaritan Seniors Complex, Alliston, Ontario on Monday, June 11, 2007, in his 92nd year. Beloved husband of Lois PINGLE of Alliston, Ontario Loved father of Larry SWENSON and his wife Barbara Jane of New Glasgow, Nova Scotia, Sharon SWENSON of Toronto, Ontario, Debbie and her husband Tom HOGARTH of Windsor, Ontario Loving grandpa of Stephanie and her husband Andrew JONES, Samantha SWENSON, Alex and her husband Gord HARTLEY, Ainsley and Madison HOGARTH. Dear brother of Mary and her husband George HAIG and predeceased by Oscar SWENSON, John SWENSON, Sophie ERICKSON, Carrie PEARSON and Ingla GROOME. Dear brother-in-law of Edith BURR, Phyllis McROBBIE, Ann SPICER, Bruce and Donna PINGLE. Ben will be fondly remembered by his nieces, nephews and Friends. Resting at W. John Thomas Funeral Home, 244 Victoria Street, E., Alliston on Wednesday, June 13, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, June 14, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. If so desired, memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated.

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GROPIUS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-23 published
Dreams of Toronto city planner turned into a nightmare of red tape
Visionary and prophetic British-trained surveyor and urban developer battled bureaucracy to make an important contribution to the development of the city in the Sixties
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
As Toronto's first Commissioner of Development, Walter MANTHORPE had a hand in a stunning new city hall complex, envisioned a metropolitan skyline dominated by soaring towers, understood the value of downtown residential neighbourhoods and was among the first to have notions of a domed stadium.
Yet, as a guiding light, he was also an engineer whose vision was infused with controversy. He rode fluctuating waves of public opinion, fashioned creative solutions but still managed to gain the respect of his political opponents. "He and I tangled greatly in the late sixties and early 1970s," said former Toronto mayor, John Sewell. "He believed very strongly, as many people did, in the idea that modernist approaches to the city were a really good idea - high-rise apartments, towers in parks, getting rid of streets. Those kinds of things.
"We were on the cusp of the big change that was happening in Toronto, that gave Toronto the central area plan," Mr. Sewell added.
Walter MANTHORPE cut his teeth on controversy. He was one of two sons born into a family with strong Quaker connections in Norwich, England, during the First World War. His grocer father was a conscientious objector who was sentenced to several years' hard labour in Dartmoor Prison. Meanwhile, his mother ran the family business, which was an early health-food store, and raised her sons as vegetarians during a time when such a path was strongly criticized.
After articling with a firm in Norwich, Mr. MANTHORPE qualified as a surveyor in 1936. But instead of immediately picking up a pencil, he joined Maddermarket Theatre, a local venue that in 1921 had become the first permanent recreation of an Elizabethan Theatre. Under the founder and director, Nugent Monck, Mr. MANTHORPE also acted in early productions of plays by George Bernard Shaw.
Shortly afterward, he found a job in London at the Office of Works, which looked after government property and, in particular, public parks. He then took another surprising turn and moved into a place called the Youth House, a residence established by a group of theosophists who valued the principles of internationalism. While living here, Mr. MANTHORPE helped provide accommodation and find jobs for German and Austrian students who were fleeing the Nazi regime of Adolf Hitler. He met his future wife, Anne PARKER, at Youth House.
When the Second World War started Mr. MANTHORPE, like his father, chose to be a conscientious objector, and the ramifications of this decision were significant. Questions were asked in the House of Commons as to the validity of his case, since he was one of the first people in Britain to argue conscientious objector status on philosophical rather than religious grounds. He had to appear before a tribunal as well as resign from his government job. Instead, he did first aid work and become an air raid warden. Meanwhile, his brother Jack enlisted in the Royal Air Force and was later killed.
In 1951, Mr. MANTHORPE joined the Central Office of Information in London and became involved in designing the Festival of Britain. This festival, popularly referred to as "a tonic for the nation," was an attempt to boost the morale of bombed-out Londoners. An elaborate exhibition was developed on the south bank of the River Thames. Controversy plagued the festival. Irate tenants who were being evicted from their homes to make way for the highly publicized development took their fight to the streets, and many believed the millions budgeted for the event would have been better spent on new housing. In the process, Mr. MANTHORPE had caught sight of his future; he attended London University at night and qualified as a town planner. One of his early jobs was to design the dry dock at Greenwich for the Cutty Sark, the last of the three-masted tea clippers. Perhaps it was on the deck of this ship that he first considered crossing oceans and taking his city-planning skills to Canada.
In 1955, he landed a job as Toronto's deputy planning commissioner. He and Anne, along with their daughter Vicky and son Jonathan, who later became a reporter at the Globe and Mail, emigrated to Toronto just as the city was staging an international competition for the design of the new city hall. His career took off and in 1962 he was appointed Toronto's first Commissioner of Development.
"He was at the centre of a community of planners and architects who paved the way for Toronto's progress toward becoming one of the most cosmopolitan and attractive cities in North America," said Vicky. "It was a period of ferment, creativity and excitement."
Mr. MANTHORPE developed a passion for functional architecture in the style of modernist architect Walter GROPIUS, with whom he worked on a Toronto waterfront development later in his career. He viewed the development of high-rise apartments as a necessary component. "His outlook was very cosmopolitan. He was keen on people being able to flow around the world," said Vicky. "In Toronto, he foresaw that there would be great immigration… and that lots of apartments would be required."
He also was one of the first to come up with the idea of a domed sports stadium in downtown Toronto, and believed that derelict railway yards that lay between Front Street and the lake shore was just the place to put it. The idea, however, was years ahead of its time and decades elapsed before the SkyDome took shape.
Fed up with bureaucratic limitations and what he considered to be backward thinking, Mr. MANTHORPE resigned his post as commissioner in 1967. Mr. MANTHORPE was fond of an editorial cartoon that appeared in The Globe and Mail. It shows him slipping out of a meeting of the board of control whose members are all asleep. "Great things are going to happen in this city and I want to be part of them," he whispers.
An editorial published in The Globe and Mail at that time said Mr. MANTHORPE had been hired to attract developers to Toronto and "clear the track ahead of them," but instead of being free to get on with his job, he found himself mired in red tape. So he tiptoed out of city hall and into the offices of Meridian Property Management Ltd. to become a consultant.
Controversy continued to dog him. For instance, a high-rise building development planned for Toronto's South Saint_James Town neighbourhood quickly developed into a highly publicized fracas. In 1970, more than 100 tenants living in low-rise buildings in this downtown neighbourhood were given eviction notices by their landlord, the Meridian Group, to make way for the construction project. They formed a tenants' union and John Sewell - who at that time was a Toronto city alderman - spearheaded their fight against the developer. Mr. Sewell and Mr. MANTHORPE devised an experimental program whereupon Mr. Sewell became the middleman between the company and the tenants. Rents were paid to Mr. Sewell and then passed on to the Meridian Group. While zoning decisions were being made at city hall concerning low-rise or high-rise developments, tenants were protected from immediate eviction. Meanwhile, planning went ahead.
Where Mr. Sewell and Mr. MANTHORPE differed was not that new zoning laws had to be established, but rather what kind of development would fill the space and whether residents would have a say in the planning. "[Meridian] want high density. We say fine. There's no problem with high density at all as long as that doesn't mean high rise," Mr. Sewell said at that time.
Mr. MANTHORPE's position at Meridian gave him a platform upon which to try and shame the city into looking to the future and accepting that higher was better. "It's understandable that people in downtown residential areas are frightened," he said. "Practically every other city has a downtown core that is rotting away, a battlefield that no one dares cross. But Toronto is on the right track and if you're winning, it's the wrong time to turn tail and run away."
His approach did not always win Friends but it did gain him respect. "He was actually a nice man; I liked him," said Mr. Sewell earlier this month. "I got along with him in a personal way, but we believed in fundamentally different directions."
While critics point to Saint_James Town as a failure, the low-cost housing development may also be seen as another example of Mr. MANTHORPE's prescience. Many years later, residential downtown towers are now flourishing in the form of expensive condominiums.
After the debate surrounding Saint_James Town died down, Mr. MANTHORPE continued working as a town planning consultant on various projects, both in Toronto and in Great Britain. He was an authority on planning law and was much in demand as an expert witness at hearings and tribunals. In the mid-1980s, he managed the redevelopment of the Hudson's Bay headquarters in London and in the early 1990s, he returned to Southern Ontario to work on development planning with the Anglican Church.
At 80, he finally retired and spent his final years back home in Norwich.
Walter MANTHORPE was born in Norwich, England, on November 15, 1916. He died in Norwich on June 13, 2007. He was 90. He is survived by his wife, Anne, his son, Jonathan, and daughter Vicky.

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GROSBECK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-05 published
Crash victims cling to life
Five people die in crashes in a devastating weekend on Southwestern Ontario roads.
By Kelly PEDRO, Sun Media, Tues., June 5, 2007
Two people were clinging to life in a London hospital yesterday after a deadly weekend on Southwestern Ontario roads claimed five lives.
The weekend deaths were among 11 lives lost on area roads in the past 17 days.
"It's been a very devastating weekend for the officers investigating the crashes, as well as the families left behind to deal with the tragedies," said Western Region Ontario Provincial Police Sgt. Dave Rektor.
"The worst part is, it's all preventable."
In the most recent death, a 44-year-old London man was killed when the motorcycle he was driving collided with a pickup truck near Saint Marys.
The pickup was travelling south on the 15th Line when it collided in the intersection with the motorcycle travelling west on Zorra Road 92 about 6 p.m. Sunday, said Oxford Ontario Provincial Police.
The intersection is controlled by stop signs on the 15th Line, police said. Roads were dry and clear at the time.
Other weekend deaths:
- Joel SCHILLER, 55, of Tecumseh died after the all-terrain vehicle dune buggy he was driving on Northville Road south of Port Franks, rolled into a ditch Sunday afternoon. SCHILLER suffered fatal head injuries. Ontario Provincial Police are investigating.
- April JILLSON, 22, of Corunna and Jennifer SEABROOK, 33, of London, were killed after the car they were in collided with another vehicle at Littlewood Drive and Carriage Road Friday afternoon. JILLSON and SEABROOK were travelling west on Littlewood, south of London at the time. The intersection is controlled by stop signs on Littlewood, Ontario Provincial Police said.
- Three hours later, Judy Mae ABRAM, 51, of Muncey died after the car she was driving failed to stop for a stop sign on Jubilee Drive and Muncey Road and collided with an embankment. Two passengers, Marie GROSBECK, 47, and Morgan WILLIAMS, 23, also of Muncey, were in critical condition in a London hospital yesterday.
Though the Ontario Provincial Police have increased visibility and public education efforts, the safe-driving message seems to be falling on deaf ears, Rektor said.
"Unless the public buys into this message that they need to change their driving, then they could be next," he said.
"If people felt that way, they might reconsider the way they're driving every day."

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GROSBECK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-06 published
Two hurt in fatal crash cling to life
By Free Press Staff, Wed., June 6, 2007
Two people were still clinging to life yesterday after a Friday night crash in Strathroy-Caradoc.
Marie GROSBECK, 47, and Morgan WILLIAMS, 23, of Muncey were in critical condition in a London hospital. The two were passengers in a car being driven by Judy Mae ABRAM, 51, of Muncey. ABRAM died after the car she was driving failed to stop at a stop sign at Jubilee Drive and Muncey Road and collided with an embankment.

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GROSS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-18 published
CONDY, Wayne
Of Hanover, passed away at Hanover and District Hospital surrounded by his loving wife and daughter on Saturday, December 15, 2007. He was 67. Survived by his loving wife Carol (née MONK) CONDY, cherished daughter Gail (Glen) BUMSTEAD and the apple of grandpa's eye Meggy all of Hanover, daughter Shelley RAMAGE of Keswick, grandchildren Cassandra, Logan and Jillian. Also survived by brother Gary McCURDY of Alberta and mother-in-law Marina ZETTLER of Hanover. Very sadly missed by his family of fur faces. Predeceased by his brother Bradley CONDY, sisters Sharon ERNEWEIN and Nora GROSS and father-in-law Elmer MONK. Visitation at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover on Tuesday 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Mass will be held on Wednesday, December 19, 2007 at 10: 30 a.m., at Holy Family Church, Hanover. Memorial donations to the Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or Hanover Hospital Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Further information and register book available at www.mightonfuneralhome.ca

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GROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-29 published
'Country gentleman' doubled as the gravel-voiced Nose of Algonquin
Disarmingly direct, he kept a close eye on his resort's decorum and his campers' secrets
By Charles OBERDORF, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
For 30 years, most people met Eugene KATES as the proprietor of Arowhon Pines, the luxury resort in Ontario's Algonquin Park. Although sometimes disarmingly direct, he had the manners and style of what an earlier generation called a "country gentleman." In charge but at ease, he made a very reassuring host.
Mr. KATES's gentlemanly side often came as a revelation to the two generations of summer campers, more than 5,000 children and adolescents, who knew him in the 30 years before 1975 as the fearsome, gravel-voiced autocrat who owned and ran Camp Arowhon, two lakes away from "the Pines."
Seth GODIN, a former Arowhon camper and counsellor who is now a widely read marketing guru, wrote recently that, "In an age of 'the customer is king,' Eugene was an anachronism. He never said things to make people happy, didn't sugarcoat his point of view and didn't compromise. He stood up to the government, to rangers, to staff and even to his customers, the parents. He wasn't afraid to tell you what he thought, and it didn't take long to guess what he expected."
Behind his back, campers called him The Nose. That hurt, but as his daughter Joanne, now Arowhon's camp director (and in winter, this newspaper's restaurant critic), tried to tell him, it was really a backhanded compliment. Although he rarely dealt with campers individually - that was the counsellors' job - he always seemed to know everything that went on, including each child's most embarrassing secrets. The full phrase was "The Nose knows."
And so he did. When two counsellors-in-training got caught smoking marijuana, Mr. KATES immediately began arranging to send them home. Not an easy decision; one of the two was very popular and also a close relative. Within hours, one senior counsellor had begun organizing a resistance: "If those two have to go home, we should all quit."
Mr. KATES called a staff meeting for 11 p.m. His decision was final, he said, adding that he had heard talk about quitting. "I'm going into my office now," he said. "If any of you want to leave, meet me there and we'll do the paperwork." No one took him up on it.
However, he was less hard-hearted than his young charges thought. His second wife, Helen, remembers a pale yellow bathrobe in which he would patrol the grounds when he thought some campers were staying up too late. Helen, new and conscientious, took a walk herself one night, caught a boy in one of the girls' cabins and marched the miscreants to the director's cabin. Later, he told her gently that the idea wasn't really to catch anyone. It was enough that campers saw the yellow bathrobe and got scared back to where they belonged.
Eugene KATES was born in Toronto, the elder child and only son of Max KATES, a dentist, and his wife, Lillian. He grew up on Edgar Avenue in Rosedale, attended St. Andrew's College, Elm House School and Upper Canada College until his final school year, 1932-33, when he transferred to the University of Toronto Schools. At the university itself, he studied math, physics and chemistry. He then went for a short time to Rochester, New York to learn film editing, hoping to work in the industry.
But the Depression was cutting deeply into his father's income, and to eke things out, Lillian KATES determined to open a children's camp in Algonquin Park. She took over the lease on a bankrupt family campground, renamed it Arowhon (from Samuel Butler's utopian novel Erewhon - and "arrow"), and in 1934, signed up her first 60 campers, recruiting them through the sisterhoods of Reform synagogues within one day's drive of Toronto. Mr. KATES, then 20, dealt with logistics.
"The cabins had no lights, no running water," he later recalled. "There was a smelly central toilet system and a kitchen with a couple of old wood-burning stoves. To keep food cold, we had to cut ice from the lake in wintertime, carry it to the icehouse and pack it in sawdust. I was as much trouble as I was a value, but I installed a small 32-volt generator, which allowed a 25-watt bulb in each of the camper cabins. Almost every time there was a play, we would overload the generator and there'd be a mad rush up the hill to restart it while the camp waited in the dark."
In 1940, he and friend Tommy Walker joined the armed forces. He trained at Camp Borden and in 1941 was commissioned a second lieutenant with the 10th Armoured Regiment. By mid-1942, in England, he had been seconded to the Royal Air Force, interpreting aerial photographs and, it seems, spending many evenings at London's Savoy Hotel.
He always spoke fondly of his time in England, but hardly at all about later tours in Europe and North Africa, except to imply that what he witnessed there turned him forever against the idea of war. His last long conversation with his daughter was about the folly, as he saw it, of Canada's involvement in Afghanistan.
At war's end, he had a job offer in the British film industry but decided to help out for one season at the camp. The war years had left it with a staff more interested in having fun than in their charges, and his mother was giving it only partial attention, having also built and opened Arowhon Pines, for visiting parents.
"That season was so unsuccessful and so unhappy" he wrote, "that I had to come back to prove that I could beat it. I certainly had no experience as an educator, but I had trained men in the army and had become used to having my directions unquestioned. That first postwar year at camp hooked me on the life."
He abhorred the thought of running a babysitting service, though. He cleared a baseball diamond and an archery range, built stables and a riding ring, expanded the docks for canoeing, sailing and swimming. They could choose what skills to master, but they were expected to set goals, state them and meet them. "His philosophy," his daughter says, "was that the drive toward excellence and the pursuit of learning forged lifelong character - for both the child attaining the skill and the staff member teaching it."
He was also passionate about the wilderness, even though, as his son, Robert, an expert outdoorsman, points out, he never hiked in the bush, never paddled a canoe and hardly ever sailed. "But he loved Algonquin Park, loved being in business in Algonquin Park."
From the start, Camp Arowhon had been co-ed - one of the first such camps in North America. After the war, Mr. KATES set about diversifying it in other ways, reaching outside the Jewish community to replicate the rich mix of cultures he had experienced in the army. Soon enough, Arowhon was mixing not only Jews and gentiles, Americans and Canadians, but also campers from Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America.
His off-season life in Toronto went less well for a while. In 1949, he had married Ruth GROSS, Joanne and Robert's mother, but the pair divorced in 1962. In 1968, he married Helen DAY, an English-born businesswoman. In 1971, the two took over Arowhon Pines, the resort hotel, which had been fading under Mr. KATES's mother's management.
The hotel's lease then had only six years to run, and government policy called for an end to all private leaseholds in the park. Mr. KATES brought his full-bore energy and single-mindedness to bear on Queen's Park. "A park the size of Algonquin can't be the exclusive preserve of canoeists and backpackers," he argued. "Three hotels in a 3,000-square-mile park exclude no one."
The minister he addressed was impressed, and even more that the Pines had stayed solvent for 30 years with no liquor licence (guests bring their own) and operating only 18 weeks a year. Its lease was renewed, and the government was soon promoting it in its tourism brochures.
The KATESes set about upgrading on all fronts. As Mr. KATES put it with typical directness in a 1976 interview, "We're in the business of selling three things: a bedroom, a dining room and a setting. The setting is superb, but it's beyond our control, so we have to do our best with the other two." In 1987, Arowhon Pines was invited to join Relais and Châteaux, the very selective luxury hotel association.
By that time, it was already attracting guests from Europe. It has since seen them arrive from as far as Peru, Vietnam and Senegal. Mr. KATES delighted over the foreign guests, but when his staff was abuzz over serving Goldie Hawn and Kurt Russell, William Hurt, Frances McDormand or Martin Short, he would ask, "Who?" And, while he fretted over decorum in the stately dining room, whenever hydro crews worked on lines to the camp or the hotel, they got invited to lunch, sweaty work clothes and all.
Until late in his 70s, he went skiing for three weeks each year in the Alps. In his 80s, he and Helen were beating couples 30 years his junior at doubles tennis. About five years ago, though, he was diagnosed with emphysema. Still, one afternoon in April, sitting in his Toronto garden with the management team, talking about reopening, he offhandedly said, "I don't know if 92 is the right time to retire."
He spent his final weeks in his cabin at the camp, amid the shouts and laughter of children. He died on the final day of camp, but not until after the last bus had left.
The Nose knew.
Eugene KATES was born in Toronto on October 14, 1914. He died at his cabin in Algonquin Park on August 21, 2007. He was 92. He is survived by wife Helen, children Joanne and Robert, and four grandchildren.

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GROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-01 published
GROSS, Kurt
Peacefully, although unexpectedly, while on a visit in Pfullendorf, Germany on Saturday October 6, 2007 at age 76. Beloved husband of the late Brigitte (1989). He will be greatly missed by his daughters Christina, Isabel, and Andrea, his son-in-law David SELKIRK, and his grandchildren Kathleen and Owen SELKIRK. Dear brother of Rolf and his wife Ingrid, and loving companion of Margot AMMANN- TREUBEL. Kurt fostered education and trades training in numerous parts of the world with Canadian International Development Agency and the United Nations International Labor Organization for many years, as well as a teacher in Scarborough. Kurt will be remembered as a devoted friend who enjoyed storytelling, good conversation, travel, and classical music. Memorial service to be held on Saturday, November 3 at 1 p.m. in the chapel of the St. James' Cemetery, 635 Parliament Street, Toronto, Ontario, M4X 1R1 (at Wellesley and Parliament). If desired, flowers sent to the Saint_James' Cemetery for Friday afternoon or preferably Saturday morning. A donation, in lieu of flowers, to United Nations Children's Fund to reflect Kurt's international service is also appreciated.

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GROSS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-27 published
CONNOLLY, Edwin C.
On Christmas Eve, December 24, 2007 in Ottawa, at the age of 95. Born February 2, 1912 in Ottawa, Ed was a man who lived for his family, his Friends and his faith. He will be remembered and sadly missed by his loving wife of 64 years, Nora (MURPHY.) Very proud father of Joan (late Gerard) MacGILLIVRAY, Michael, (Madelyn BERRY), Mary (Michael) Byrne, David (Nancy DEVINE) and Nora (Andrew) GROSS; cherished grandfather of Martha, David, Jennifer, Patrick, Michael James, Kate, Erin, John, David, Lindsay, and Busman to Geoffrey and Sarah; and great-grandfather of Matthew, Elizabeth, Julia, Isaac and Ethan. Predeceased by his parents, Patrick and Josephine (MacDONALD) CONNOLLY and his brothers, John of Ottawa and Charles of Toronto.
As a young man, in 1930, he was the Eastern Canadian Junior Single Tennis Champion. In 1932, he won the International Intercollegiate Downhill Ski Race and in 1934 the Canadian Intercollegiate Downhill and Slalom Ski Races for Queens University. He played competitive tennis out of the Ottawa Lawn and Tennis Club. Upon graduating from the University of Ottawa, he went on to Queens University and was president of the Commerce Club in 1934 and 1935. During the Second World War Ed served on the Quesnel, a corvette on convoy duty. While posted in Halifax, he met and married Nora MURPHY. His employment years were spent largely with the Department of National Revenue as a chartered accountant, retiring in 1977, as Director General of the Tax Appeals Branch. They lived in Halifax, Regina and Ottawa and spent summers in Nova Scotia at Hubbards.
Thank you to the nurses at the Civic Hospital and the staff at the New Edinburgh Square. Friends may visit at McEvoy-Shields Funeral Home, 1411 Hunt Club Road, at Albion, on Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral will be at Immaculate Heart of Mary Church on Saturday, December 29 at 9: 30 a.m. Interment to follow at Notre Dame Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his memory to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Canada. Good Saint Anne, pray for him. Condolences may be sent to www.mem.com.

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GROSSKURTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-10 published
GROSSKURTH, Robert Arthur, Commander (retired,) Canadian Navy
Passed away in Delhi, India on October 1, 2007 at the age of 85. Beloved husband of Maniza (Minnie) BOGA for nearly 38 years. Dearly loved father of Christopher (Fiona,) Brian (Ting CHANG,) and Anne (Julian SNOWDON.) Sadly missed by grand_sons Evan, Alan and Colin GROSSKURTH, and Joel and Robin SNOWDON. Also missed by niece Barbara BELLIS and her family, and numerous relatives and Friends. Bob grew up in Weston and graduated in Engineering from the University of Toronto, where he was assistant editor of the Varsity. He served in the Royal Canadian Navy in World War 2 and Korea. He retired from the Navy in 1973 and moved to India with Minnie to help her run her furniture business, TAARU, and farm. Bob had many interests and enjoyed life to the fullest. A celebration of his life will take place in Delhi on October 13.

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GROSSMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
UNGERMAN, Celia
Surrounded by her family, on Thursday, August 30, 2007 at Baycrest Hospital. Celia UNGERMAN, beloved wife of Jack. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Marvin and Sharon, Bernie and Monique, and Elayne and Irwin WORTSMAN. Dear sister of Harold GROSSMAN and the late Anne SINUKOFF. Devoted Bubby of Jordan and Veronica, Lezli and Massimo, Troy, Nicole and Ross, Jason, Stacey and Gil, Kimberley and Craig, Jillian and Jordy, Michael and Jessica. Devoted great-grandmother of 14. At Beth Sholom Synagogue, 1445 Eglinton Avenue W., (Eglinton and Allen Road) for service on Sunday, September 2nd at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Beth Sholom Synagogue section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 177 Dewbourne Avenue. Memorial donations may be made to the Jack and Celia Ungerman Endowment Fund, c/o The Baycrest Centre Foundation 416-785-2875.

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GROULX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-10 published
WADDELL, Gervais W.
"Laugh and the world laughs with you Cry and you cry alone"
"Count your age by Friends, not years
Count your life by smiles, not tears"
In loving memory of Gervis William WADDELL, 92 years, who passed away peacefully on Monday, January 8, 2007 at Saint_Joseph's Villa, Sudbury, Ontario. Grateful husband of Ellen Josephine Caswell McKESSOCK (predeceased 1985.) Proud father of Donald (partner Cathy FERGUSON,) Robert (partner Bonnie GROULX,) Richard (wife Diane,) Judy (husband Gordan ANGELOFF) and James. Fortunate Grandfather of Jody, Damien, Dean, Daniel, Kyle, David, Caitlin, Brendan, Samantha, Kristi, Aiden and Connor. son of William Henry WADDELL and Maria Kairns GERVIS (both deceased.) Stepson of Hazel Jackson WADDELL, a wonderful step-mother (deceased.) Fortunate brother of Hopewell HEWSON (husband Conrad,) Margaret SMITH (husband Myles,) all deceased. Fortunate step-brother of Gwen BRUNATTI (husband Joe,) Jackson WADDELL (deceased 1999,) Keith WADDELL (wife Ida,) Murray WADDELL (wife Joyce,) all of Parry Sound, and Wesley WADDELL of Toronto. His love and support will be sadly missed by numerous nieces and nephews on both sides of the family. Gerv enjoyed a long teaching career which began at Richmond School, a one room school house in Carling Township, Ontario - September 1934-June 1936. This was followed by Victory School in Parry Sound, Ontario - September 1936-June 1939. Opportunities abounded in Sudbury so Gerv moved north to teach at Alexander Public School - September 1939-June 1941. He spoke fondly of summers spent at Camp Falcona as Co-Director with good friend Bill Edgar. He left Sudbury late in 1941 to fight in World War 2 as an Aircrew Navigator with the Royal Canadian Air Force. He was on loan to 279 Squadron of the Royal Air Force flying Lougheed Hudsons from the North Sea to the French, Dutch and Danish coasts (Air Sea Resuce, Coastal Command, Bircham Newton, Norfolk, 1943-1944). He was then transferred to 161 Squadron of the Royal Air Force navigating Lougheed Hudsons and Stirling aircraft as Special Duties Support dropping agents and supplies behind enemy lines for the Resistance Movement in France, Holland, Denmark, Northern Germany and Norway, (3 Group-Bomber Command, Tempsford, Bedfordshire, 1944-1945). Crewmates "Nick" Nicholson, Sam Cullen and Bud Schroeder). Gerv finished up the War with 426 Squadron of the Royal Canadian Air Force on long range Military Personnel Transport from Tempsford, Bedfordshire to Karachi, India flying Liberator aircrart. (July 1945-November 19, 1945). He returned to Sudbury to become a Principal of Queen Elizabeth Public School, Wembley Public School, College Street Public School, and Princess Anne Public School with the Sudbury board of Education. Gerv spent "two of the best years of he and wife Ellen's married life" as a Principal on loan to the Canadian Armed Forces at Three Wing in Zweibrucken, Germany (1963-1965). The whole family benefited immensely as a result of this wonderful opportunity. Upon his return to Sudbury, Gerv was the Principal of Adamsdale Public School where he retired in June 1977. Gerv served his community for a decade as an honest and straight forward City Councillor for both the Ryan Ward and Ward Four. He also acted as Deputy Mayor during this time. It must also be mentioned that Gerv was one of the four founding builders/owners of the Caswell Motor Hotel. Gerv was born and raised in Parry Sound, Ontario. He was always proud of his roots and often took fellow "Parry Sounders" under his wing when they made their way to Sudbury to work. Always the gentleman, he will truly be missed by many. Visitation Friday, January 12, 2007 at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home. Friends may call 2-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service Saturday, January 13, 2007, 11: 00 a.m. Saint Peter's United Church, York Street. Interment in the family plot at Park Lawn Cemetery. In honour of Ellen, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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GROULX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-09 published
ACOMBA, Margaret Elizabeth (née EATON)
Giver of Life
Passed away peacefully on June 6, 2007 in Ajax, Ontario in her 92nd year. Gloriously came into this world on April 23, 1916. First child of George and Mary EATON of Montreal, Quebec. Devoted wife of 62 years to the late Sydney ACOMBA. Sister of dear Marie MARSH of Notre-Dame de Grace, Montreal and sister to dearly departed James EATON and Daphne FOLEY. Beloved, respected and treasured Mother to Catherine ACOMBA (Graham DARLINGTON), Jean GROULX (Gerald GROULX), David ACOMBA (Sharon KEOGH), Richard ACOMBA (Peggy ACOMBA) and honourary son David HAWCO. Adored Grandmother to Pamela, Rob, Catherine, Leigh, Craig, Jordan, Scott. Loving Great-Grandmother to Matthew, Natalie, D.J., Jack, Eva, and Oliver. Margaret's compassion for others was demonstrated through her care-giving and tireless work as a foster mother to 105 children over the years during the 1950's while in Montreal. Her passion for playing the piano and her gifted vocals will forever remain with us. All who would like to celebrate the remarkable life of this determined, loving woman, please join us Wednesday, June 13th, 10: 30 at St. Bernadette's Roman Catholic Church, 21 Bayly St. E. (Bayly and Harwood), Ajax, Ontario, followed by a reception in the Hall. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Hospital for Sick Children (416-813-5320) would be appreciated by the family. She will be sadly missed.

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GROULX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-19 published
FLETCHER, John Palmer (February 20 1911-June 15 2007)
Peacefully, At his home on June 15, 2007, surrounded by his family. John was the son of the late Caroline Anne and Howard Allan George FLETCHER. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 55 years, Jean. Trained as a physician at the University of Toronto, John graduated in 1936. In the early stages of his career John pursued a research career with Charles H. Best, co-discoverer of Insulin. When World War 2 began, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, where he served for five years with distinction, winning the Military Cross and the St. George Cross for his courage during t he Battle of Jelsi in 1943. On his return from Europe in 1945, John returned to medical research with a special interest in pediatric medicine. He felt ever more drawn to the practice of pediatric medicine and in the late 1940s left research to pursue this interest. The family moved to Ottawa in 1956, where, because of health problems, he became a corporate physician with Bell Canada. With his health restored and missing the experience of working with children, he returned to private practice in 1962. He retired in 1986 at the age of 75. He is survived by his three daughters: Mary, Susan and Frances; three sons in law, Robert HUDGINS, John FREEMAN and Edmund CLARK; eight grandchildren, John and Alan RAMUNAS, Delbert, Jean, Hugh and Caroline CLARK, and Lauren and Jessica HUDGINS; as well as five great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held on Thursday June 21, 2007, at the Unitarian Congregation of Ottawa, 30 Cleary Avenue at 2: 00 p.m. John's daughters would like to thank the Community Care Access Centre, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Comcare, especially Lois FRANCIS, Janet HINTON, and Mary Elizabeth GROULX, who cared for him in his final years. Doctor Julie JENNER of the Centretown Community Health Centre in Ottawa gave him the wise and compassionate care he had provided to his own patients. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario would be greatly appreciated.

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GROULX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-22 published
FLETCHER, John Palmer (February 20 1911-June 15 2007)
Peacefully, At his home on June 15, 2007, surrounded by his family. John was the son of the late Caroline Anne and Howard Allan George FLETCHER. He was preceded in death by his beloved wife of 55 years, Jean. Trained as a physician at the University of Toronto, John graduated in 1936. In the early stages of his career John pursued a research career with Charles H. Best, co-discoverer of Insulin. When World War 2 began, he enlisted in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps, where he served for five years with distinction, winning the Military Cross and the St. George Cross for his courage during the Battle of Jelsi in 1943. On his return from Europe in 1945, John returned to medical research with a special interest in pediatric medicine. He felt ever more drawn to the practice of pediatric medicine and in the late 1940s left research to pursue this interest. The family moved to Ottawa in 1956, where, because of health problems, he became a corporate physician with Bell Canada. With his health restored and missing the experience of working with children, he returned to private practice in 1962. He retired in 1986 at the age of 75. He is survived by his three daughters: Mary, Susan and Frances; three sons in law, Robert HUDGINS, John FREEMAN and Edmund CLARK; eight grandchildren, John and Alan RAMUNAS, Delbert, Jean, Hugh and Caroline CLARK, and Lauren and Jessica HUDGINS; as well as five great-grandchildren. A memorial service will be held on Thursday June 21, 2007, at the Unitarian Congregation of Ottawa, 30 Cleary Avenue at 2: 00 p.m. John's daughters would like to thank the Community Care Access Centre, Department of Veterans Affairs, and Comcare, especially Lois FRANCIS, Janet HINTON, and Mary Elizabeth GROULX, who cared for him in his final years. Doctor Julie JENNER of the Centretown Community Health Centre in Ottawa gave him the wise and compassionate care he had provided to his own patients. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario would be greatly appreciated.

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