GOOCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-06 published
'Brilliant teacher' and professor explained politics to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation viewers
Political scientist triumphed not only as a scholar but also as a commentator. He could explain even the most erudite concepts succinctly and without condescension, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
In the great triumvirate of scholarship, administration and teaching, by which academics tend to be graded, political scientist Paul FOX's contribution lay in all three areas - but above all in the classroom.
"He was the most popular teacher in a very big department, one that prided itself on teaching," said his former colleague, the political scientist J.T. McLeod (who writes fiction under the name Jack MacLeod). "He had a wonderful ironic wit and he could make the study of politics very lively, and about people, not just about laws and constitutions. He was a brilliant teacher." Beginning in 1962, Prof. FOX was the lead editor of Politics: Canada, a collection of readings that went through eight editions and which for many years was the most widely used undergraduate textbook in the subject.
Prof. FOX "was one of those remarkable academic administrators who's a true gentleman," said philosopher Paul GOOCH, president of Victoria College in the University of Toronto. "He was a man of unfailing courtesy. That was my initial and lasting impression," he said of the man who served two terms as principal of Erindale College (from 1976-1986) on the Mississauga Campus of the University of Toronto and then sat on the Board of Regents at Victoria, after he retired from teaching.
The opposite of an ivory tower academic, Prof. FOX gave his discipline a public face through his accessibility to journalists - eager for sound bites and pithy comments - and his many appearances as a political commentator on radio and television and in print, especially during political campaigns and election-night coverage. Rail thin, with a glint of humour in his eyes, he could explain even the most erudite concepts succinctly and without condescension.
"He was humane, and he brought the world of politics to you in a way which made you feel that you could not only understand it, but participate in it," former governor-general Adrienne Clarkson said. The two met in 1965 when Ms. Clarkson was co-host of Take Thirty on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television. Prof. FOX, who shared in the "entertain-and-learn-along-the-way philosophy" of the program was a regular guest on Take Thirty for a decade. "I have not high enough words of praise for this man," Ms. Clarkson said.
Paul Wesley FOX was born in 1921, the younger of two sons of Paul Hazelton and Ida (née MEREDITH) FOX. On his father's side, his family pre-dated the United Empire Loyalists, having emigrated from the American Colonies to what is now Nova Scotia in the early 1760s. His mother's family heritage was English and Welsh. His father worked for the Canadian National Railway as an assistant superintendent of operations for several branch lines in eastern Ontario, and his mother was a homemaker.
Paul and his older brother Arthur were born in Orillia, Ontario, their mother's home town, probably because his father was at that time posted in northern Ontario. The family moved to Ottawa when Mr. FOX was transferred there by the Canadian National Railway. Paul went to First Avenue School, then Glebe Collegiate and finished high school in Barrie, after his father was transferred there.
He went to Victoria College in the University of Toronto in 1940 and volunteered in the Canadian officers Training Corps. An excellent student, Mr. FOX graduated in 1944 with the Ames gold medal in political economy and the Men's Senior Stick (an award given by the student body to the student they feel has made the greatest contribution) at Victoria College. He immediately was posted for officer training at an army camp in Brockville, Ontario, and then, with the rank of lieutenant, to what was then called Camp Utopia, near Gagetown, New Brunswick The war ended before he could be shipped overseas.
He went back to the University of Toronto in the fall of 1945 to undertake studies for a masters degree in political science, which he completed in 1947, while working in the department as a research associate. He won a British Council Scholarship and probably completed the residency requirements for his doctorate at the London School of Economics the following year, before interrupting his education to teach at what was then called Carleton College in Ottawa from 1948 to 1954. That's where he met Joan GLADWIN. They were married on June 20, 1951, and eventually had three sons, Rowley, Bruce and Nicholas.
The family moved to Toronto in 1954 after Mr. FOX accepted an appointment as an assistant professor at the University of Toronto in what was then called the Department of Economics and Political Economy. At the same time, he continued work on his doctoral thesis and received his doctorate from the University of London in 1959.
Prof. McLeod arrived at the University of Toronto from Saskatchewan in October, 1955 to begin his doctorate in political science and almost immediately met Prof. FOX. "He and his wife had me to dinner, the day we met, and I thought 'isn't Toronto such a friendly place,' and I never got invited any place else for about five years," Prof. McLeod said with a chuckle.
"He was a pleasure to work with and a privilege to know. Thoughtful, helpful co-operative and always ready to give sensible advice&hellip and a good man. I never heard anybody say anything critical of him."
Political scientist David COOK, now the principal of Victoria College, still remembers being in Prof. FOX's Politics 100 class when he was an undergraduate in the mid-sixties. The textbook was the second edition of Politics: Canada, edited by Prof. FOX. "He was a tremendous teacher with a wonderful sense of humour who knew many stories about political figures and could weave them into his teaching of the elementary aspects of Canadian government," according to Prof. COOK.
"He was able to establish an intimacy with the class" even in a large lecture hall. "You liked the man immediately."
Besides Politics: Canada, Prof. FOX was also the senior Canadian editor of The World Almanac from 1972-78, the general editor of the 24-book series, Politics, co-editor of the Canadian Journal of Political Science from 1974-77 and president of the Canadian Political Science Association from 1979-80. He also served on the Advisory Committee on Research for the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism 1964-68, the Ontario Advisory Committee on Confederation from 1965-71, and as chair of the Ontario Council on University Affairs from 1987-88.
He was a mentor to younger academic colleagues and a very successful principal of Erindale College, according to Prof. COOK, who spent many years in the central administration of the university and had many opportunities to observe Prof. FOX in action. "He had an amazing ability to make relationships work and he transformed Erindale's relationship with the community in Mississauga," Prof. COOK said. "He delegated well and he gave the college a sense of itself."
After teaching at the University of Toronto for more than 30 years, Prof. FOX officially retired in 1987 and was named an emeritus professor. He returned to the college where he had spent his undergraduate years and served as Senior Research Associate from 1988-2004 and on the board of Regents, including a term as chair.
About three years ago, Prof. FOX developed pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive disease in which the air sacs of the lungs become replaced by fibrotic tissue, making it very difficult for the lungs to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream. He managed with supplementary oxygen but declined in the last year and went into palliative care at Grace Hospital in Toronto just after Thanksgiving.
Paul Wesley FOX, O.C., was born in Orillia, Ont, on September 22, 1921 and died in Toronto on October 18, 2007, of complications from pulmonary fibrosis. He was 86. He is survived by his wife Joan, his three sons, two grand_sons, his older brother Arthur and his extended family.

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-28 published
FALLIS, " Skippy" Lucienne
Peacefully on Tuesday, June 26th, 2007 in her 86th year with her family by her side. Skippy, beloved wife of the late Howard. Loving mother of Lorraine and her husband John MADILL and Richard FALLIS (of Montreal.) Dear Step Grandmother of Kim, and Mike and his wife Jenn. Dear aunt of Raymond FALLIS (of Montreal) and Eileen and her husband Bob GOOD (of New Brunswick.) Friends may visit at Oshawa Funeral Home, 847 King St. West (905-721-1234) on Wednesday, July 4th from 7-9 p.m. A Private Family Interment has taken place at Thornton Cemetery, Oshawa. In lieu of flowers, donations to Skippy's favourite pastime, The Whitby Senior's Activity Centre, 801 Brock St. South, Whitby L1N 1L4 would be appreciated by the family.

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GOODAIRE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-04 published
GOODAIRE, Edgar George (1911-2007)
Peacefully at Lakeridge Health Whitby on July 2, 2007, in his 97th year. Only son of Mary (née WATSON) and George GOODAIRE. Leaving to mourn are his dear wife of 65 years, Winnifred (nee SPRINGETT,) two sons Edgar and David (Pamela,) two grand_sons, Timothy (Sarah) and Mark (Annie) and one dearly loved great-granddaughter Sydney Christina GOODAIRE. Observing their small child play the piano by the hour on a dressing table, Edgar's parents spent a large part of their savings on a piano. That, and the organ were Edgar's life for the next 90 years entertaining countless people as a concert pianist, Church organist at St. Andrew's United Church, Bloor Street for 50 years, pianist for service clubs and Masonic lodges including West Toronto Kiwanis and Downtown Toronto Rotary Club for 60 years (a Paul Harris fellow) and the University Skating Club for many years. His ability to sit down at a piano and play for hours without a note of music amazed everyone who knew him. He was a humble, sensitive, loving man with an infectious laugh, who never raised his voice or was ever seen angry. The perfect father he was genuinely loved by all who knew him, he will be greatly missed. A special thanks to the caring supportive staff at Lakeridge Health Whitby. A Memorial Service will be held at 1 p.m. on Thursday, July 5 at the Anglican Church of St. Clement's, Eglinton (Duplex Avenue at Briar Hill). Reception in the church to follow. Arrangements in the care of the Trull Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, (416) 488-1101.

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GOODALE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-30 published
AVERY, Dora Emily " Doris"
Peacefully, with family by her side, on Wednesday June 27, 2007, in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late Alec. Doris is survived by her daughter-in-law Cathy AVERY, her sister-in-law Margaret GOODALE and many nieces and nephews. Dennis and Rosalie GOODALE would like to thank the nursing staff at the Trillium Health Centre and Cawthra Gardens, for their wonderful care. A private family service has been held. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Trillium Health Centre Foundation. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Turner and Porter Peel Chapel, 905-279-7663.

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GOODALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-13 published
HALL, Keith William
Passed away peacefully at Woods Park Care Centre in Barrie, on January 10, 2007. Born in Toronto on November 8th of 1919. Survived by his sister, Gwendolyn GOODALL of Toronto. Married Kathleen (WALLWIN) in Barrie on August 13th, 1949. Settled in Thornhill in 1951, retiring back to Barrie in 1987. Loving father of three children; Heather (Daniel), Douglas, and Catherine (Joseph), and he will be dearly missed by them. Loved by six grandchildren Jeffery, Robert, Rebecca, Caitlin, Jennifer and Bradley. Served in the Royal Canadian Air Force overseas during World War 2 and discharged, at the rank of Sergeant, in June of 1945. Former Board member of Thornhill Country Club. Cremation has taken place, and in accordance with Keith's wishes, there will be no visitation or funeral service. A special thank you is extended to all the staff at Woods Park Care Centre (Barrie) for their compassion and care. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be greatly appreciated by the family. Condolences may be forwarded through www.steckleygooderham.com

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GOODALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-16 published
GOODALL, Doctor Robert Graydon
Dearest Pap, adoring and missing you especially this Father's Day. Lovingly remembered by Jamie, Katherine, Tia and James.

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GOODBURN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-10 published
BREYER, Alice (MENIST)
Gone to be with her Lord on Tuesday, January 9, 2007 at Trillium Villa Nursing Home, Sarnia, Alice (MENIST) BREYER, age 84 of Sarnia. Devoted member of First Christian Reformed Church. Beloved wife for 60 years to the late Samuel BREYER (2005.) Loving mother of Ann Catharine (Henry) SLOTEGRAAF of Clinton, Samuel BREYER of Sarnia and Grace CARVER (Eric FOWLER) of Sarnia. Cherished grandmother of Lisa and Ron SUZOR, Nancy FIELD, Patricia and Ken GOODBURN, Steven SLOTEGRAAF, Shawn SLOTEGRAAF, Roy and Kelly BREYER, Shawn BREYER, Shona and Dan TRUCHON, Davina and Darin McKELLAR, Tanya CARVER, Darryl and Tara CARVER, Kim CALLAGHAN. Great-grandmother of Sheena and Tara SUZOR, Kelsey CAMERON, Eli and Olivia GOODBURN, Seleena SLOTEGRAAF, Jacob and Joshua BREYER, Cassandra, Everett and Gabrielle TRUCHON, Nichole, Rachel and Ryan McKELLAR, Brody CALLAGHAN and the late Nathaniel TRUCHON. Loved sister-in-law of Dina and the late Eise WEIMA of London, Dick and Florence BREYER of Wyoming, John and the late Hilda BREYER of Thedford, Ger BREYER of the Netherlands, Ann and the late Harry BREYER of Manitoulin Island and the late Peter and Janny BREYER of the Netherlands. The funeral service will be held at First Christian Reformed Church, 1105 Exmouth St. (at Murphy), Sarnia on Thursday, January 11, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment to follow in Resurrection Cemetery. Family and Friends will be received at the Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia on Wednesday evening from 6 to 9 p.m. Sympathy through donations to World Vision would be appreciated by the family. Memories and condolences may be sent online at

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GOODCHILD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-23 published
ADAM/ADAMS, Gwendoline " Gwen" F. (née GOODCHILD)
Peacefully at Lee Manor on Monday, October 22nd, 2007. Gwen F. ADAM/ADAMS (née GOODCHILD) formerly of Walkerton in her 79th year. Beloved wife of the late Ronald ADAM/ADAMS. Loving mother of Geraldine (Gerald) BRILL of Annan, Glynis (Hank) BONNEVELD of Walkerton and Paul (Jan) ADAM/ADAMS of Windsor. Also survived by eight grandchildrfen, six great-grandchildren and her brother Alan of London, England. Predeceased by a great-grand_son. At Gwen's request, cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at the Walkerton Cemetery on Saturday, October 27th at 10; 30 a.m. Memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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GOODE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-17 published
ROSENTHAL, Joan (née SKINNER)
On September 13th, 2007 at home. Joan, beloved wife of the late Gordon ROSENTHAL. Dear mother and mother-in-law of Janet and Paul HENNICK, Lynda and Joe LOMBARDO, and the late Harlan ROSENTHAL and Rise GOODE. Proud Nanny to Jennifer, Kimberley, Alexander, Joey, Lawrence, Lesley, Stacey, and Sean. Great-grandmother to Halle and Mackenzie. A graveside service was held at the Holy Blossom Memorial Park on Sunday, September 16th, 2007.

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GOODENOUGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-15 published
STANLEY, Eileen Elizabeth (DUFFY) (1916-2007)
The family announces with sorrow her death at North York General Hospital on Sunday August 12, 2007, at the age of 91 years. Much loved wife of the late Jack STANLEY. Loving mother of Jane STANLEY of Toronto, Lois FILION (Jean-Marc) of North Bay, and Tim STANLEY (Jan) of Vancouver, British Columbia. Sadly missed, well-remembered and loved grandmaman of Stefáne FILION (Amanda,) Renée NORTHRUP (Scott,) Marc-André FILION (Lisa,) Jean-Michel FILION, and David STANLEY. Special great-grandma of Sophie FILION. Eileen is survived by her sister Frances GOODENOUGH (Art) of Consecon, and her brother Howard DUFFY of Grand Valley. The family would like to express their heartfelt appreciation to all those very special Friends who made Mom's last years and months and days more comfortable and enjoyable, especially Ruth, Amy, Donna and Stella. A memorial service will be held in the Chapel at York Visitation Chapel and Reception Centre, 160 Beecroft Road, North York, Ontario (north of Sheppard Ave. 1st street west of Yonge St.) 416-221-3404 on Thursday, August 16, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. For those who wish, a donation in memory of Eileen may to made to North York General Hospital, 4001 Leslie Street, Toronto, Ontario M2K 1E1.

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GOODERHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-30 published
GOODERHAM, James Buchanan
Born April 26, 1917, James passed away peacefully at Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital in Burlington on August 28, 2007 at the age of 90. Beloved husband of Angelene (née BASILII) GOODERHAM and former husband of Margaret GOODERHAM. Loving father of Ann Elizabeth GOODERHAM- SAMAKESE (Joseph SAMAKESE) of Burlington, David Leys GOODERHAM (Kathryn) of Oakville and Sandra Gooderham TERRY (Stephen TERRY) of Whitby. Cherished grandfather of Holly-Ann and Joseph James GOODERHAM- SAMAKESE, Christopher and Mark GOODERHAM, Stuart Gooderham SMITH (Alexandra), Jennifer Smith SILLS (Chad SILLS) and great-grandfather of Ethan SMITH and Morgan, Braiden, Victoria, Brooklyn and Owen SILLS. son of the late John Leys GOODERHAM and Beryl Olive BUCHANAN, Jim is also predeceased by his brother Peter Buchanan GOODERHAM and his wife Mary, all of Toronto. He is also survived by his brothers- and sisters-in-law; Olvido BASILII (Lou), the late Lena BASILII, Domenic "Nick" BASILII (Verda), Rinaldo "Ron" BASILII (Jacqui), Jose DUMONT (Claude), Ida FITZPATRICK (the late John,) Gina SECA (Johnny) and Deno BASILLII. Jim also leaves behind many nieces, nephews and cousins. Cremation has taken place. Visitation will be held at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street (one block north of City Hall), Burlington (905-632-3333) on Saturday, September 29, 2007 from 12 noon until time of the Service of Remembrance in the Chapel at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the charity of your choice. www.smithsfh.com

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GOODFELLOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-08 published
GOODFELLOW, James Bruce Haggert "Jim"
At the Kingston General Hospital in Kingston, Ontario on Friday, January 5, 2007 at the age of 69 years. Beloved husband of Constance and much loved father of James Robert and his wife Shannyn. Proud grandfather of Molly, Spencer and Dylan. Predeceased by his parents Bruce Cowper GOODFELLOW and Eleanor Jane HAGGERT and by his son Ian Bruce. In keeping with the family's wishes, services will be private. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations made to the Wolfe Island Branch of the Kingston Public Library would be appreciated by the family. (Donations by cheque only please). James Reid Cataraqui Chapel Kingston (613) 544-3411 www.jamesreidfuneralhome.com

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GOODINE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-11-30 published
A lifetime of writing from a difficult existence
By Ian GILLESPIE, Free Press Columnist, Fri., November 30, 2007
For years he shuffled along London's streets, clutching tightly to his notebooks, propelled by an urgent need to blacken the pages with the words streaming through his head.
Maybe you saw him. And if you did, maybe you steered a wide path. Because it was clear that something was amiss with Terence (Terry) QUINLAN.
"I called him the Van Gogh of the neighbourhood," says Steve GOODINE, a London police officer who lived near QUINLAN. " You knew he knew about life. You knew he had a lot to offer. But he struggled, because society didn't see him in that light."
QUINLAN's struggles are over now -- he died of kidney failure on December 4, 2006, at the age of 66 in hospital in Exeter.
But the man who will be familiar to many Londoners -- particularly those who frequent the downtown library and coffee shops -- has found some permanence, as his Goderich-based sister Pat MARTIN has now self-published a hardbound copy of his writings.
Although MARTIN had only 52 copies printed and the book isn't available to the public, she sent copies to the London Public Library, several local churches and to the national archives in Ottawa -- acts that ensure her brother's lifelong work will not soon vanish.
"He was always hungry and broke," says MARTIN. "It was hard for all of us to understand Terry. But the people of London and that neighbourhood kept him alive."
Born in Hamilton and raised in Brantford, QUINLAN was the second eldest in a family of 10 children. MARTIN recalls him as a generous boy known as the family's "scholar" for his bookish ways.
But after enrolling in a Guelph seminary at age 20 to become a priest, something happened.
Although MARTIN is unsure if he was ever formally diagnosed, she assumes it was the onset of schizophrenia that dislodged her brother from the "normal" world for the rest of his life.
There were brief stints, she recalls, when QUINLAN held regular employment. But the jobs didn't last.
"He could sometimes be a bit belligerent," MARTIN recalls. "He wanted people to understand him. He needed a lot of attention."
After drifting through Port Bruce, Aylmer and Saint Thomas, QUINLAN eventually landed in London, where he rented a single, windowless room in a house on Colborne Street for nearly 20 years.
"As long as you let him be and let him write, he was a generally happy fellow," says MARTIN. "He spent all his time writing. Besides eating and sleeping, he didn't do anything else."
Although most of his nearly illegible writings ended up in boxes, some of his poems were published in newspapers, including the Toronto Sun, and others were reprinted in church newsletters.
He wrote about a variety of topics.
He wrote about everything from coping with cold and hunger, to tributes to farmers, Terry Fox and Rose Kennedy. For the most part, the poems are laced with gentle humanity. In Kindness, for example, he wrote: "The greatest poem/ Is kindness/ The hand that turns/ A day into a smile/ A fellow into a friend/ A door into a welcome/ And a quarrel into peace."
But what emerges most from talking to MARTIN and GOODINE is not only a portrait of a poet struggling with mental illness, but a picture of a community that cared for him.
MARTIN says QUINLAN's landlords, the Skinners, showed a "gentle tough love" to her brother, while others supplied him with the gloves and shoes that he invariably seemed to lose.
"Terry would drop off his letters and poetry to people," recalls GOODINE, who typed some of QUINLAN's work. "And everyone did what they could to look out for him."
Of course, even simple gestures could go awry. GOODINE recalls giving QUINLAN a handful of winning roll-up-the-rim stubs from Tim Hortons. Later, he learned QUINLAN had redeemed the coupons all at once, consuming six coffees and five doughnuts in a single sitting.
But in the end, GOODINE says QUINLAN's difficult life reminds him to look beyond a person's outward appearance and behaviour.
"I think that's the lesson," he says. "Everyone adds something. Everyone has a gift, or something to share… And we need to be there for them. That's what works."

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GOODINGS o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-06 published
LOUCKS, John Edwin " Jack"
John Edwin " Jack" LOUCKS, born on the East Back Line in Artemesia Township, Ontario on July 7, 1922, a son of the late Edwin and Mildred (WHITE/WHYTE) LOUCKS, passed away peacefully at Markdale Hospital on Thursday, May 31, 2007 at the age of 84.
After leaving the Flesherton area in 1941, Jack went to Work on the Alaska Highway. He met Edna McARTHUR and the couple were married in 1946. Jack owned and operated JL Loucks Tire Service, a tire retail and repair business in Rocky Mountain House, Alberta for many years until his retirement in 1984, where he and his wife Edna lived and raised their family.
Jack was an avid outdoorsman who loved to hunt, fish and camp and who especially enjoyed touring about in his camper visiting family and Friends. He especially liked taking each of his family for a week during the summer months when they would share time together, usually on a fishing adventure. Jack also enjoyed getting away to the "acreage" where he would relax in his woodworking hobby and just enjoying the life which it provided. His family, and particularly his grandchildren, were his "pride and joy".
He was predeceased by his beloved Edna (née McARTHUR) and is lovingly remembered by his children Tom LOUCKS (Andrea) of Coronation, Jean (Bob) WALL of Calgary, Bob LOUCKS (Shar) also of Calgary, Janice (Gary) AUSTIN of Rocky Mountain House and Ronald, also of Rocky Mountain House. Jack was also predeceased by a son, Donald. He will be sadly missed by his 16 grandchildren and many great-grandchildren. Jack will also be remembered as a dear brother by George LOUCKS and his wife Dorothy of Chesley, Doris (late Archie) CUNNINGHAM of New Hamburg, Carmen LOUCKS and his wife Marie of Kitchener, Verna (late Raeburn) ALMOND of Meaford, Milford LOUCKS and his wife Geraldine of Owen Sound, Ronald LOUCKS and his wife Margaret of Markdale and Clifford LOUCKS and his wife Ineke of Flesherton. He was predeceased by brothers Norman LOUCKS of Markdale and Ross LOUCKS of New Brunswick and a sister Jean MERLA of Sudbury and will be remembered also by sisters-in-law Mary LOUCKS of Markdale and Sandra LOUCKS of New Brunswick and is also survived by many nieces and nephews.
Following cremation, a family service and celebration of Jack's life, officiated by Reverend Doctor Brian GOODINGS, was conducted at the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher St. E. in Meaford, Ontario on Saturday, June 2 at 11: 00 a.m.
Jack's cremated remains will be interred at Rocky Mountain House, Alberta. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Centre Grey Health Services Foundation would be appreciated.
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GOODINGS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-01-06 published
ARMSTRONG, Lorne Everett
At Meaford Long Term Care Centre on Thursday January 4, 2007 on his 89th birthday. Beloved husband of the former Marie HARBOTTLE of Meaford. Loving father of Thelma (Allan) FLIGG of Meaford, Karol BEASLEY of Sudbury, Michael ARMSTRONG of Meaford, Joan ARMSTRONG (late Norm PIKE) of Owen Sound, and Joyce (Brad) LONG also of Owen Sound. Predeceased by an infant son Clive in July 1953. Sadly missed Grandpa of Kim WALKER (Brian KIRK) of Bognor, Shawn VANSICKLER (Joyce) of London, Theressa BEASLEY (Kelly STRUTT) of Sudbury, Patrick PIKE of Owen Sound, Jeremy and Jesse LONG, attending school in London, and Great-Grandpa of Cassie WALKER of Owen Sound, Tyler VANSICKLER of London, Kyle VANSICKLER of British Columbia and Kayla BEASLEY of Sudbury. Dear brother of Grace STEPHENS of Guelph and brother-in-law of Verna SHERIDAN of Clarksburg, Elwood (Hazel) HARBOTTLE of Kimberley and Donna (Fred) LEKX of Durham. Predeceased by brothers Wilfred and Melville ARMSTRONG and sisters Laura DAWN and Muriel HARBOTTLE. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, in Thornbury on Sunday form 2 to 4 and from 7 to 8: 30 p.m. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend Doctor Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at the funeral home on Monday January 8, 2007 at 2 p.m. with committal and interment at Union Cemetery, Thornbury to follow. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Salvation Army or the the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated.

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GOODINGS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-11 published
MARTIN, Carole Ann (née IRELAND)
At Collingwood General and Marine Hospital on Friday August 10, 2007. Carole Ann Martin (née IRELAND) of Thornbury in her 74th year. Predeceased by her beloved husband of 50 years, Charles Chuck MARTIN, in 2003. Loving mother of Cheryl (Gerry) STONE of Collingwood; Christine (Lyndon) JOHNSTON of Walter's Falls Caron (Jim) ELLIS of Wasaga Beach, and Charlene (Paul) FOSTER also of Wasaga Beach. Sadly missed Grandma of Zachary, Calvin, Jordan and Lauren, Eric and Keegan. Dear sister of Joy COLLINSON and family. Carole will also be remembered by her sister-in-law Shirley WATSON and family. A funeral service, officiated by Reverend Dr. Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at Grace United Church in Thornbury on Tuesday August 14 at 1 o'clock. Committal and interment services will be conducted at Lakeview Cemetery in Meaford. As your expression of sympathy and in lieu of flowers, donations to Collingwood General and Marine Hospital would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, 20 Alice St. E., Box 556, Thornbury N0H 2P0 (519-599-2718) to whom arrangements have been entrusted.

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GOODINGS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-29 published
ALDERDICE, Eva Mary (née WILLIAMSON)
In Meaford on Sunday, August 26, 2007. The former Eva WILLIAMSON, daughter of the late Robert and Martha (née CASWELL) WILLIAMSON, in her 81st year. Loved mother of Mary Jane and her husband Pat MULLANEY of Oregon, and Darryl HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Barb of R.R.#4, Meaford. Remembered also by Ross ALDERDICE of R.R.#4, Meaford. Predeceased by a son Robert 'Bob' HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON in May 2006 and by William “Bing” HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON in March 2007. Loving grandmother of Erin and Blue of Collingwood, Keegan, Colleen and Mark MULLANEY, Amber, Jocelyn, Devin and Joel HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, and Jason and Ryan VAIL and great-grandmother of Haley. Dear sister of John WILLIAMSON and his wife Doreen of Burlington, Reg WILLIAMSON and his wife Marie of Hanover, Hilda THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Markdale and Irene MCINNES/MCINNIS, also of Markdale. Predeceased by a brother Ed WILLIAMSON of Berkeley and fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews and their families. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, Thornbury on Thursday 5 until 8 p.m. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend Doctor Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at Grace United Church in Thornbury on Friday August 31 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment and committal services will be conducted at 1: 30 p.m. at the Markdale Cemetery. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Beaver Valley Athletic Association or the Meaford Amateur Athletic Association would be appreciated.

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GOODINGS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-29 published
SATCHELLE, Annie (STRONG)
At Grey Bruce Health Services in Meaford on Thursday September 27, 2007. The former Annie STRONG of Thornbury, in her 89th year. Predeceased by her beloved husband Dennis Martin Harold “Dave&rdquo SATCHELLE in 1990. Dear mother of Barry and his wife Margaret of Lively, Clive and his wife Joan of Annan and Peter (Lynda CARROLL) of Clarksburg. Loving grandmother of Brooke SATCHELLE and fondly remembered by Sharon SATCHELLE, Sabrina GREGSON, Noah GREGSON and Elysia CARR. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, Thornbury on Sunday September 30 from 1 until 3 p.m. Funeral services, officiated by Rev. Dr. Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at Grace United Church in Thornbury on Monday October 1 at 11 a.m. with committal and interment to follow at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. As your expression of sympathy, donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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GOODINGS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-11 published
KNOTT, Orville Henry
Orville KNOTT, son of the late William H. and Mildred ABERCROMBIE) KNOTT of Euphrasia Township, passed away at Errinrung Residence in Thornbury on Wednesday October 10, 2007 at the age of 83. Dear brother of Maurice and Audrey KNOTT of Meaford. Predeceased by brothers Harvey in infancy, and Russell as a teen. Uncle of James KNOTT and his wife Patricia of Hickson, Wayne KNOTT and his wife Ruth of Meaford, Russell KNOTT and his wife Debbie of Clarksburg, Nancy and her husband Brian KANE of Thornbury, and Shelley and her husband Chris CORNFIELD of Rocklyn. Also remembered by 10 great-nieces and nephews, a great-great-niece, and three great-great-nephews. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend Dr. Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at the Grace United Church in Thornbury on Friday October 12 at 11 a.m. with interment and committal services to follow at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. Friends are invited to a time of fellowship and remembrances of Orville at the Grace United Church following interment. As your expression of sympathy, donations to Meaford General Hospital Foundation would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, in Thornbury to whom arrangements have been entrusted.

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GOODINGS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-16 published
CLARKE, Elmer Fredrick
Elmer CLARKE, a Veteran of World War 2 and member of Royal Canadian Legion Branch 220 Shelburne, passed away peacefully at Errinrung Residence in Thornbury on Wednesday November 14, 2007 at the age of 86. Predeceased by his beloved wife, the former Beth TURNER in 1987. Loved father of Shirley and her husband Harvey FULFORD of Meaford and predeceased by a son Fred “Butch” CLARKE in 2001. Loving Grandpa of Liz SMITH (Paul), Kathy CHAPPLE (Barry) and Chris CRAMP (Mike) all of Meaford, and Ray FULFORD (Aneitta) of Thornbury and by Terry CLARKE of Winnipeg and Rick CLARKE and Wanda CLARKE of British Columbia. Sadly missed by thirteen great-grandchildren and three great-great-grandchildren. Predeceased also by his twin sister, Velma ELFORD. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, in Thornbury on Sunday from 2 until 4 and from 7 until 9 p.m. where funeral services, officiated by Rev. Dr. Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted on Monday November 19 at 11 o'clock with interment to follow at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Diabetes Association or Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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GOODINGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-19 published
McIVOR, Frances Elaine (née KOCH)
'Fran' was born December 5, 1940 in Flin Flon, Manitoba, a daughter to Ruth (née ERICKSON) and Alfred KOCH and sister to Elfreyda and her husband Alex MORRICE of Brooks, Alberta.
Fran passed away peacefully and in the company of her family on Friday, June 15, 2007, in Meaford, Ontario in her 67th year.
She was the dear and beloved mother of David and his wife Deneen of Loretto, Ontario, Erin and her husband Darrell DENNIS of Clarksburg, Ontario, Paige of Christie Beach, Ontario and Drew and his wife Megan of Guelph, Ontario.
She will be the fondly missed Nana of her grandchildren Maxwell, Madelaine, Benjamin, Ava, Cole and Naomi.
A private family service, officiated by Reverend Doctor Brian GOODINGS, was conducted on Monday, June 18, 2007 at the Ferguson Funeral Home in Meaford with cremation following.
Deepest appreciation for donations to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-02 published
PETERSON, Marjorie (née GOODMAN)
It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden passing of Marjorie PETERSON, of Riverside Retirement Residence, on December 31, 2006 at University Hospital. Marjorie, at the age of 89 years, passed away peacefully with her family at her side. She was predeceased by her loving husband George PETERSON and is survived by her loving children, Barbara HURT and her husband David, and Bonnie McCABE and her husband Kenneth, her grandchildren Steven (Josée,) Jeffrey, Ryan (Christine), Aaron and Meagan, her great-grandchildren Shannon, Cassidy, Rochelle, Gavyn, Alexandre, and her loving sister, Helen ALLEN. The family would like to extend thanks to the doctors and staff of the University Hospital Intensive Care Unit for the tender care given to Marjorie during her brief stay with them. Visitation has been arranged for Wednesday, January 3, 2007 from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at Needham Funeral Chapel, 520 Dundas Street, London (519-434-9141) and a funeral service will take place at 1: 00 p.m. on Thursday, January 4, 2007 at Needham Funeral Home. Memorial donations made to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. Tributes may be left at www.mem.com

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-11 published
GOODMAN, Mary
In memory of a loving Mother and Grandmother, Mary, who passed away 20 years ago today. In our hearts your memory lingers, Sweetly tender, fond and true, There is not a day, Dear Mother, That we do not think of you. Sadly missed and ever remembered by son John and families.

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-09-25 published
DANBY kept art real
The renowned realist artist died Sunday at 67 while canoeing in Algonquin Park.
By Lee-Anne GOODMAN, Canadian Press, Tues., September 25, 2007
Toronto -- Ken DANBY, recognized as one of the world's foremost realist artists and best-known in Canada for his iconic hockey painting, At the Crease, has died at the age of 67 while canoeing in Algonquin Park.
Born in Sault Ste. Marie, DANBY's vast portfolio includes everything from portraits of famous Canadians to athletes in midplay to landscape paintings so crystalline that at first glance they resemble photographs.
"He aspired to be -- and in many ways achieved -- the status of Canada's storyteller," Matthew TEITELBAUM, director of the Art Gallery of Ontario, said yesterday.
"He wanted to be an artist who painted Canada in its heroic moments and in its everyday moments… he wanted to tell people through his art that you could paint realistically and capture great emotion and generate great feeling, and he did."
Ken McGEE, manager of the Danby Studio in Guelph, called his friend a Canadian treasure.
"He's been called a national icon and that's basically what he was," he said.
The prolific DANBY was said to have known from a young age that he wanted to paint and enrolled in the Ontario College of Art in 1958. His first one-man show in 1964 sold out, an occurrence that would become commonplace as his work proved popular with private, corporate and museum collectors.
When asked to identify his favourite work, he frequently replied: "My next one."
His 1972 painting of a masked hockey goalie hunched in the crease is considered by many to be a Canadian national symbol and is sometimes mistakenly thought to be a portrait of legendary netminder Ken Dryden. Lacing Up, another hockey painting of someone tying his skates in a locker room, is almost equally iconic.
On his website, DANBY recalled an encounter about At the Crease: "One day, a woman complimented me on my painting At the Crease, which she referred to as 'That painting you did of the goalie, Ken Dryden,' " he recalled.
"She said that she had long had a print of it in her home and really enjoyed it. I thanked her, but also explained that, 'It isn't an image of Ken Dryden.' Looking puzzled, she replied, 'Yes it is.' I responded, 'No it isn't.' After a long pause, she loudly exclaimed, 'Yes it is!' I quickly apologized, with the sudden realization that she was right. It's really whomever one wants it to be."
The goalie painting is DANBY's most successful but there's a lot more to his work, McGEE said.
"It's a worldwide image now. Over the years we have sold literally hundreds of thousands of those images -- anybody who knows hockey knows that image and therefore knows Ken DANBY," he said.
"But his reputation seemed to be, from the public point of view, that of a sports artist and he was certainly much, much, much more than that. His works ranged from sports images and panoramic landscapes to huge oils and figurative works and just some stunning works. Particularly in the last few years, his work has expanded both in size and imagery."
In the 1980s, DANBY prepared a series of watercolours on the Americas Cup and the Canadian athletes at the 1984 Winter Olympics in Sarajevo.
He also served on the governing board of the Canada Council and as a member of the Board of Trustees of the National Gallery of Canada. McGEE said DANBY, who continued to paint avidly, was on the lookout for new inspiration while canoeing with his wife, Gillian, in Ontario's pristine Algonquin Park on Sunday.
"He died gathering information for more paintings," said McGEE, who remembered his friend as "amenable, friendly, approachable, kind and generous."
DANBY was a big supporter of the arts, and frequently railed against the lack of arts education in the public school system.
"The arts are just as important as math and science in education, and just as important as any other endeavour in our lives," he said. "Art is a necessity. Art is an absolutely essential part of our enlightenment process. We cannot, as a species, as a civilized society, regard ourselves as being enlightened without the arts."
Ontario provincial police say DANBY collapsed while canoeing on North Tea Lake. He was transported by air ambulance to North Bay General Hospital where he was pronounced dead.
He's survived by his wife, Gillian and three sons.

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-06 published
GOODMAN, Marvin
It is with our heart felt loss, we announce the passing of Marvin on Thursday, July 5, 2007 at Saint Michael's Hospital. Marvin GOODMAN, beloved husband and best friend for 58 years of Evelyn LIPTON- GOODMAN. Loving father and father-in-law of Stephen GOODMAN and Barbara ROSENBERG- GOODMAN, and Doctor Barbara and Daniel BENOLIEL. Devoted son of the late Samuel and Tobe GOODMAN. Devoted grandfather of Jessica, Meghan, Vanessa, Talia and Seth, Atara, and Tamar, and great-grandfather of Noa. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Marilyn and Jack GOLDMAN, George and Iris GOODMAN, and the late Harry GOODMAN, and Irwin and Estelle GOODMAN. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, July 6, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Section of Dawes Road Cemetery. Shiva 57 Old Park Road through Monday evening. Memorial donations may be made to Aid for Disabled Veterans of Israel 905-695-0611.

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-10 published
KUSHNER, Gordon
On Saturday, September 8, 2007 in his 92nd year at The Oniel Centre. Gordon KUSHNER beloved husband and best friend of Thelma for over 60 years. Loving father and father-in-law of Naomi KUSHNER of Vancouver, British Columbia, and Laura and David WINMILL of Halifax, Nova Scotia. Dear brother of the late Chaim and Jack KUSHNER, Rose BROWNSTONE, and Sylvia GOODMAN. Devoted grandfather of Jessica, Jasmin, and Arin. Gordon was the Musical Director at Goel Tzedec Synagogue and Beth Tzedec Synagogue from 1948 for over 50 years and the Principal and Vice-Principal of the Royal Conservatory Of Music from 1978 to 1991. At Beth Tzedec Synagogue, 1700 Bathurst Street (south of Eglinton) on Monday, September 10th at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Memorial donations may be made to Gordon Kushner Memorial Fund c/o the Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, or www.benjamins.ca.

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-25 published
GOLDKIND, Sally (née FINKLE)
In her 90th year, peacefully on Sunday, September 23, 2007 at Baycrest Terrace. Sally GOLDKIND, beloved wife of the late Murray GOLDKIND. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Howard, Paul, and Louise and Shelly GOODMAN. Devoted daughter of the late Avrum and Brushka FINKLE. Dear sister of Gerry KARRY, and the late Eva and Jack BALTMAN. Devoted grandmother of Ari, Alex, Rebecca and Michael. At the Shaarei Tefillah Synagogue section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park for a graveside service on Tuesday, September 25, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Sally was the devoted care giver of Paul for many years. She will be sadly missed by her many cousins, nieces and nephews, her adoring grandchildren and life long friend Rose ROTH. Memorial donations may be made to Beit Halochem, 905-695-0611.

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-12 published
RICHMOND, Joy (née BREFF)
Peacefully, after months of a courageous fight against cancer, Joy, at the age of 76, passed away at home on Wednesday, October 10, 2007. She was predeceased by her parents, Joseph and Doris BREFF of New York. Joy was deeply adored by her husband Alec. She is survived by him and by two most loving daughters, Susan of London and Nina (Martin ROSS) of Toronto, as well as two granddaughters, Hannah and Isabel who truly loved their dear grandma. Also survived by sister, Gail, sister-in-law Judy, nieces Sharon ZANE, Caroline GOODMAN and Jill BRANDES and a special cousin, Marilyn RABIN and their families, and many other Friends who have been so kind always and particularly during her illness. Joy was born in New York and soon after graduating from University of Michigan, while on a holiday in the Adirondacks, met her husband to be and within 28 days of that meeting, they were married. Skeptical Friends were sure the match would not last. They were very wrong. It lasted over fifty two years. As soon as she was wed, Joy moved to London and spent the rest of her life enjoying that city. With her high spirits, sense of humanity and delightful sense of humor, she made many, many Friends. She did not sit still. Almost immediately after arriving in Canada, she became involved as an actress with the London Little Theatre and joined various clubs such as Hadassah of which she early became president. She was a devotee of theatre and musicals at London's Grand, and in Toronto, New York, Stratford, Niagara-on-the Lake and on. With Friends she loved playing bridge and Canasta. She also was most enthusiastic about travel and spent time in many countries of the world, both exotic and otherwise. Once her daughters had grown up and flown the coop, she went to work as a travel agent, one who insisted on getting the best for her loyal clients. On her behalf, her family wishes to express deep appreciation to all of the devoted and caring medical staff at Victoria Hospital on Commissioners. Sincere thanks as well to Medical Priorities, Victorian Order of Nurses and Community Care Access Centre. Donations, if any, would be much appreciated by the Canadian Cancer Society. Funeral Service will take place at Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas Street (between Waterloo and Colborne St.) on Sunday, October 14, 2007 at 3 p.m. and will be conducted by Rabbi Joel WITTSTEIN of Temple Israel. Interment Restmount Cemetery. Online condolences can be expressed at www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Joy RICHMOND.

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-12 published
GOODMAN, Harry Max

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GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-24 published
'Ambassador of the saxophone' was a champion of his own virtuosity
Musician who fell in love with the sax as a boy probably performed more music for the instrument than anyone in history, writes Sandra MARTIN. He was also a tireless and polished self-promoter who even invented a fictional front man to ensure concert bookings
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
The man and his instrument. During his 50-year career as a professional musician, Paul BRODIE, "the ambassador of the saxophone," probably played more concerts, recorded more albums, toured more countries and taught more private students than any classical saxophonist of his or any other day. He was the champion not only of his own virtuosity as a player, but of the saxophone as a musical instrument.
The saxophone, invented by Belgian Adolphe Sax in Paris in the 1840s, is a hybrid that combines the volume and carrying power of brass with the intricate key work and technical finesse of woodwinds. Although some modern classical composers have written for the saxophone, it is still mainly played in military and blues bands and jazz combos. Mr. BRODIE tried to change that.
"He was a master promoter and the saxophone needed someone like Paul, because as an instrument, it was invented late in the history of music, so it was shut out of orchestral circles," said his former student, concert saxophonist and composer Daniel Rubinoff "The great composers had already established the orchestra and composers in Europe didn't really want to take a chance on this latecomer.
Mr. BRODIE was the first person to teach saxophone at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He was not himself a composer, but he persuaded composers such as Srul Irving Glick, John Weinzweig, Bruce Mather and Violet Archer to write daunting music for the saxophone. In his quest to promote the saxophone he co-founded the World Saxophone Congress with Eugene Rousseau in Chicago in 1969 to bring players, critics, composers and audiences together in a different city every four years.
"He built a career for himself. He was an incredible worker, he believed in himself totally and he never looked back," said Jean-Guy BRAULT, a flutist with the National Arts Centre Orchestra for more than 30 years. "He was an icon in the saxophone world - in the classical sense, but he also taught many jazz saxophonists," said Mr. BRAULT. "He changed my life. He opened my eyes to so many things - the realities of the professional music world," he said. "I owe a lot to him."
Paul (Zion) BRODIE was born in Montreal in the bitterest depths of the Depression, the younger son of Sam and Florence (née SCHILLER.) When Paul was 10 months old, his father, who ran a dry goods store, moved his family to the north end of Winnipeg, where he found work selling radios in an appliance store. The family moved again when Paul was 11, to Regina in neighbouring Saskatchewan.
He went to Strathcona School, sang in the junior choir at synagogue and played the clarinet in the Regina Lions Junior Band. In high school, the only subject that interested him was music. Sick in bed with a cold one day in Grade 10, he heard Freddie Gardner play I'm in the Mood for Love on the saxophone.
He was besotted with the sound and immediately decided to switch instruments. Goodbye clarinet. Hello saxophone.
He earned money to buy a saxophone working at a local deli, but he couldn't find a woodwind teacher and so transferred what he knew about playing the clarinet to the saxophone.
After graduating from high school in 1952, he packed his sax and his clarinet and headed to Winnipeg where he entered United College, but failed miserably in a pre-law program. With support from his high-school music teacher, he was accepted the following year at the University of Michigan, where Larry Teal taught the saxophone.
In one of his first classes in the history of music he heard a recording of French classical saxophone virtuoso Marcel Mule playing the alto sax. His ambitions changed; whereas he once hoped to be good enough to play in a band led by a musician of the calibre of Tommy Dorsey or Les Brown, he now considered the possibilities of becoming a classical saxophonist.
He joined the university band under conductor William Revelli and played the bass saxophone when they performed in Carnegie Hall in April, 1954. He also formed a dance combo called The Stardusters, which helped earn tuition money and taught him a great deal about the business of promoting and organizing a group.
After graduating with a bachelor's degree in music education and a master's degree in performance in December, 1957, he went to Paris to study with maestro Marcel Mule. Back in Canada, he moved to Toronto and looked for a job teaching saxophone.
"The Royal Conservatory of Music is now in its 72nd year and we have never allowed a saxophone in the building," protested Ettore MAZZOLINI, director of the Royal Conservatory of Music, but the ever-persuasive Mr. BRODIE succeeded in getting an audition and played so well he broke the embargo. He was a woodwinds instructor from 1959 to 1960. Soon, he was also playing on an occasional basis for the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and doing regional tours with Jeunesses Musicales du Canada, first with pianist George Brough and then with Colombe Pelletier as his accompanist.
Late in November, 1959, a musician friend introduced Mr. BRODIE to Rima GOODMAN, a modern dancer (and later a fibre artist) who worked in New York, but whose parents lived in Toronto. They were married on March 13, 1960. Their daughter, Claire, was born in October, 1964.
Mr. BRODIE made his debut as a soloist with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra at a Sunday afternoon concert on December 27, 1959, with Walter SUSKIND conducting and his New York debut at the Town Hall on November 18, 1960, with George Brough accompanying him on the piano and Mrs. BRODIE turning pages.
There were only about 45 people in the audience, but one of them was Raymond Erickson, the music critic for The New York Times. "Mr. BRODIE's skill made everything he played sound fluent and easy although the music was studded with technical difficulties&hellip producing a lovely soft tone when he wanted to… in his splendidly vital performance," he wrote. A jubilant Mr. BRODIE phoned the Canadian Wire Service and begged them to pick up Mr. Erickson's review, which they obligingly did, flashing the news about the Canadian native's success in the Big Apple. Mr. BRODIE carried that tattered clipping in his wallet for the rest of his life.
Because two performance careers in one family meant too much travelling for a couple that wanted to stay together, the BRODIEs decided to make their base in Toronto. There, they established the Brodie School of Music and Modern Dance early in 1961 in a former furniture store. The dance studio was on the ground floor, six music studios were in the basement and the second floor had two apartments. They lived in one and turned the other into an additional five music studios.
One of his first students was Jean-Guy BRAULT, who had played saxophone for fun while studying philosophy at university. He studied saxophone, clarinet and flute for about two years and then began teaching in the Brodie school before taking a master's degree at the University of Michigan with Mr. BRODIE's old teacher, Larry Teal. "He was a fantastic teacher," Mr. BRAULT said of his mentor, describing Mr. BRODIE as "encouraging and never flinching."
When the National Arts Centre was looking for players for its new orchestra in 1969, Mr. BRAULT auditioned and got a job as second flutist. He played with the orchestra for more than 30 years, retiring in 2002 after a concert with jazz singer Cleo Laine and her saxophonist husband, John Dankworth
The BRODIEs ran their school for nearly 20 years, employing about 20 music and dance teachers, and training about 650 students a season - among them Willem Moolenbeek, Lawrence Sereda, Robert Pusching, John Price and Robert Bauer. Mr. BRODIE also taught woodwinds at the University of Toronto from 1968 to 1973 and formed a quartet in 1972 to showcase his own playing and the work of a revolving group of three students. The Paul Brodie Saxophone Quartet played at the World Saxophone Congress in London in 1976 and in the 1981 film Circle of Two.
Never a slouch when it came to self-promotion, the canny Mr. BRODIE invented a fictitious character, Ronald Joy, to serve as his front man in booking concerts. After printing business cards and letterhead, the BRODIEs and some of their students stuffed envelopes and sent them to more than 5,000 concert sponsors throughout North America. When potential sponsors called the school asking for Mr. Joy, the call would be put through to Mr. BRODIE who would lower his voice by a couple of octaves and start bargaining performance fees, hotel rates and dates. Mr. Joy booked nearly 800 concerts for his "client" in the next two decades and also promoted Mrs. BRODIE's career as a sculptor and fibre artist.
Mr. BRODIE was playing his saxophone in his music studio one day in 1978, when the phone rang. The caller was actor Warren Beatty, casually inquiring if he could use a recording of Mr. BRODIE playing the saxophone in Heaven Can Wait, his movie about a football player who also plays the soprano sax. An amateur saxophonist, Mr. Beatty believed that Mr. BRODIE's recording of the fourth movement from Handel's Sonata No. 3 would be perfect background music for the scene in which Mr. Beatty's character plays football with his servants.
After agreeing on terms, Mr. BRODIE put his promotional skills to work. Before long "the Canadian media somehow got the idea that a Canadian saxophonist was being featured throughout the film," according to the account that Mr. BRODIE related in his autobiography, Ambassador of the Saxophone. When Heaven Can Wait was nominated for several academy awards, the BRODIEs and Claire (then 13) flew to Los Angeles, where Mr. BRODIE sent 250 postcards pumping his connection with the film To Canadian media and arranged to do a live telephone interview with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television the day after the ceremonies.
The following year, the BRODIEs closed down their school and the quartet. The lease was up, he was in "phone ringing-off-the-hook" demand after the release of Heaven Can Wait and she was "wildly busy" with commissions for her work as a fibre artist. He never stopped teaching, however, either privately in a smaller studio or at York University, where he taught from 1982 until the late 1990s.
Concert saxophonist and composer Daniel Rubinoff was one of his last students. "I needed a mentor and I found one," he said in a telephone interview. After studying in Europe, he worked with Mr. BRODIE for 18 months beginning in 1995 and won the gold medal at the Royal Conservatory for the ARCT exams in 1997.
"One of the things about Paul's legacy is that he realized that you had to practice the saxophone to become as good a performer as you could possibly be, but you also had to be a tireless promoter," Mr. Rubinoff said. "He was a wonderful business person and he passed that on to people like me." How to have a career as a concert saxophonist, how to talk to an audience, how to be tough about criticism, how to cold call a concert promoter and how to set up a teaching studio, were among the synergistic "life lessons" that Mr. Rubinoff learned from Mr. BRODIE.
About seven years ago, Mr. BRODIE, who was suffering from high blood pressure and diabetes, developed an aortic dissection - a tear in the walls of the aorta which is frequently fatal. "Miraculously" without surgery "his body glued itself back together," according to Mr. BRODIE's daughter, Claire. "The last seven years were a gift."
Earlier this fall, a Magnetic Resonance Image revealed an enormous aneurysm in Mr. BRODIE's aorta. Mr. BRODIE asked if he had time to make a CD of favourite pieces with harpist Erica GOODMAN before undergoing surgery. (The CD, which was recorded at Grace Church on the Hill in Toronto, will be released shortly.) On Monday morning Mr. BRODIE was wheeled into surgery, but three-quarters of the way through the long operation, his heart gave out.
Paul Zion BRODIE, O.C., was born in Montreal on April 10, 1934. He died during heart surgery at Sunnybrook Hospital on November 19, 2007. He was 73. Predeceased by his parents, he leaves his wife, Rima, his daughter Claire and an older brother.

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