BROAD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-11 published
DEGUERRE, Edward Ross Belfry
In his 83rd year, died peacefully surrounded by his family at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre - K Wing after a long illness on Thursday, August 9, 2007. Born in Newmarket, the second youngest of the late Ross and Frances DEGUERRE. Predeceased by his first wife Virginia REID. He will be remembered with great love by his children Peter (Julia) DEGUERRE, Vicki (Keith) CARRUTHERS, Christopher (Julie) DEGUERRE and very special grandfather to Zachary, Oliver, Madelaine, Lindsay, Carlyn, Deanna, Olivia and Charlotte. He will be missed by his brothers and sisters, Frederick (Betty) DEGUERRE, Frances YATES and Diana McVITTY and predeceased by his brother Daniel DEGUERRE. He was the fond uncle of Carol (Leon) BROAD, Douglas (Erika) DEGUERRE, Dianne (Alan) WOODS, Gregory (Sharon) YATES, Suzanne (Rodney) DARWIN, Brian (Diane) McVITTY, Patricia (Reinhard) GRICHTING, Susan (John) VINCENT and Catherine McVITTY (Regan TAKENAKA) and many cousins, great nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his second wife Mary Ursula CRAFT and sadly missed by her children Michael (Jackie) CRAFT, Elizabeth (Wayne ALLSIP), Paul (Giselle) CRAFT and Steven CRAFT, their children, and a very special friend Jane Morris. The family wishes to thank all of the marvellous caring staff/good Friends of Sunnybrook Hospital K2 Centre. A funeral service will be held to celebrate Edwards's life at Eglinton St. George United Church, 35 Lytton Boulevard (at Duplex Avenue), on Thursday, August 16 at 1: 00 p.m. Reception to follow at The Granite Club, 2350 Bayview Avenue. As an expression of sympathy, a charitable donation to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family. 'Ed will always be remembered by his love, kindness and generous spirit.'

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROAD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-03 published
MARENTETTE, Alan
Surrounded by his family, at his home in Burlington, on Saturday, December1, 2007, in his 70th year. Beloved husband of Donna (nee SMITH.) Loved father of Paula MARENTETTE and her husband Rev. Craig WENTLAND of Camrose, Alberta, Stephanie MARENTETTE of Toronto and Sarah MARENTETTE- BROWN and her husband Jamie BROWN of Burlington. Cherished grandfather of Emma, Maeve, Elizabeth, Kyle and Isobel. Dear brother of Janine SALKOWSKI (Ted) of Michigan, Marvin (Veronica) of Windsor, Beverly McCUTCHEON of Windsor, Gayle BROAD (Ted) of Windsor and Michael (Hilary) of Halifax. He will be greatly missed by many nieces, nephews, Friends and especially Mike LANGDON. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 1167 Guelph Line (one stoplight north of Queen Elizabeth Way) Burlington (905-632-3333) on Tuesday from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Prayer Vigil Tuesday at 8: 30 p.m. at the Funeral Home. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Paul the Apostle Roman Catholic Church, 2265 Headon Road, Burlington on Wednesday, December 5, 2007, at 10 a.m. Private interment Gate of Heaven Cemetery, Burlington. If desired, memorial contributions to the McMaster University Blood Disorders Clinic or the charity of your choice would be sincerely appreciated by the family. www.smithsfh.com

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROAD - All Categories in OGSPI

BROADBENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-27 published
BROADBENT, Ronald
(Insurance Broker for 47 years)
peacefully on Tuesday, September 25th, 2007 in his 88th year. Beloved husband of Bessie for 63 years. Loving father of the late Valerie, Pauline (Doug LANGLEY) and Cathy (Bob ALGAR.) Friends may call at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd (North of Lawrence Ave) Weston on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A service will be held on Saturday at 1 p.m. from Saint_John's Anglican Church, 2125 Weston Rd. Cremation. If desired a donation to either Saint_John's Anglican Church or the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be sent to ronald.broadbent@wardfh.com

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROADBENT - All Categories in OGSPI

BROADFOOT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-24 published
HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, William " Bill"
Soldier, athlete, writer. Born August 11, 1930, in Toronto. Died February 21, in Langley, British Columbia, after a series of strokes, aged 76.
By Lyndon GROVE, Page L8
At Central Collegiate Institute in Moose Jaw, he wore jeans with "Jeanius" stencilled across the bottom. Later, he wore the dress uniform of an officer in Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, and strode confidently into Toronto night clubs, regimental sword swinging at his side.
Hutch - which is what almost everyone called him - had come to Saskatchewan from Saint_John's College in Winnipeg. Bill's father had died in Europe in the First World War and his chic mother, Vera, had married big-hearted Art BROADFOOT, a prosperous owner of a Moose Jaw funeral home and ambulance service.
In high school, he was the BMOC (big man on campus) - coaching football, playing basketball, writing Teen Scene for the Times-Herald, and performing at school concerts.
Bill's goal was to be a college football coach, teaching history on the side. Ultimately, he achieved both in a roundabout way: He became a leader in British Columbia amateur football (he wore a Canadian Football League Builder's ring), and he taught history - military history - at the Canadian Land Force Command and Staff College in Kingston.
His military career came as a surprise to his Friends and, possibly, to him. At the University of British Columbia in the 1950s, he studied physical education and history.
To finance his tuition, he enrolled in the Regular Officers Training Plan. Then, after he completed his courses (including a catch-up in square dancing) he found the army was his true vocation. He went on to serve as platoon, company and battalion commander, with tours of duty across Canada, in Germany, at the Pentagon, and in Cyprus, where he commanded the Canadian contingent for the United Nations.
Bill also worked on state visits and military tattoos. He also found time for rugby as a player, referee and administrator.
His companion through most of this was Kay HUNTER, a spunky, athletic Doris Day look-alike he married in Moose Jaw. They had three children: Susan (an Anglican priest); Bill Jr. (an investment consultant), and Barbara Allyn (a children's songwriter).
Every marriage has peaks and valleys, and the Hutchinsons' was no exception. After some years apart, they reunited on the West Coast. Bill Jr. delighted in telling people, with feigned shock, "My mother and father are living together!" (Kay died of leukemia in 1986, a week after her 53rd birthday.)
Late in 2006, Bill suffered a stroke. And then another. And another. He gave away most of his 4,000 books and moved to a medium-care centre.
In praise of rugby, he wrote that it is "a game that teaches the values of dedication, perseverance, teamwork, initiative and respect for rules." So did he.
Lyndon GROVE is Bill's friend. He wrote this with help from the Rev. Susan HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROADFOOT - All Categories in OGSPI

BROADLEY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-17 published
MacDONNELL, Donald Joseph
On Monday October 15th, 2007 at Grey Bruce Regional Health Services Owen Sound. Don MacDONNELL of Owen Sound in his 62nd year. Loving husband to Joan (née BROADLEY.) Dear father to Jon (Leanna) of Barrie, Meri and her husband Brian DOCHERTY of Orillia, and Jeff of Barrie. Dear grandfather to Kentin, Aislynn, and Keegan. Predeceased by his parents Donald Sr. and Dorothy MacDONNELL, and his brother Derek. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home for visiting Thursday evening from 7-9 p.m. and Friday from 12: 30-1:30 p.m. A Legion Service will be held Thursday evening at 6: 45 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Saint Mary's Church Friday, October 19th, at 2 o'clock. Cremation to follow. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROADLEY - All Categories in OGSPI

BROBYN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-05-31 published
BROBYN, Frank, M.B.E.
Peacefully with family by his side on May 29th, 2007 at Etobicoke General Hospital. Predeceased by his cherished wife Amie. Forever loved and remembered by his children Bob and his wife Arlette and Anne and her husband Kirk. Special Grampie to Melanie, Allison and Michael. Predeceased by brother Cyril and lovingly remembered by sister Nora, both of England. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home 2035 Weston Rd (North of Lawrence Ave) Weston on Fri. June 1, 2007 from 10 a.m. until time of service at 12 p.m. in the chapel. Cremation. In lieu of flowers donations in Frank's memory can be made to the Alzheimer's Society or the Princess Margaret Research Foundation. Condolences may be sent to frank.brobyn@wardfh.com
"Frank and Amie together forever"

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROBYN - All Categories in OGSPI

BROCK o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2007-12-14 published
BROCK, Isabel (née BUSH)
(January 25, 1929-December 9, 2007)
Peacefully, with her family at her side, Isabel BROCK (née BUSH) of Collingwood passed away at 1: 30 a.m. Wife of the late Fred BROCK, mother of Michael, Pat and Janice. She will be missed by her sister Pauline and her grandchildren. She is pre-deceased by her siblings Eddie, twin-brother Gordon, William, Howard, Norma, Robert and Gladys. Visitation will be at 1 p.m. and service at 2 p.m. on Saturday at Fawcett Funeral Homes Collingwood Chapel, 82 Pine Street. In lieu of flowers, a donation can be made to the Lung Association or the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital Foundation. Friends are invited to view Mrs. BROCK's on-line Book of Memories by visiting: www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com
Page 32

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-04 published
BROWN, Eileen (née BROCK)
Peacefully in Halifax on 02 January, 2007. A long time resident of Bedford, Nova Scotia, Eileen was born at Rothesay, New Brunswick 14 May 1921, the daughter of C. Harold BROCK and Muriel GILLIS) BROCK. Predeceased by her husband George Albert (Capt. Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve) she is survived by sons Derek (Margaret Ann) Toronto and Brock (Donna LANDRY) Dartmouth, Nova Scotia, daughter Ann Louise (Stephen) ONYETT Lewiston, New York and son Mark (Martha) Bedford; as well as grandchildren George William BROWN, Charles Lee ONYETT, Jake Stephen ONYETT, Laura Eileen BROWN and Logan George BROWN and many nephews and nieces. She was predeceased by a sister, Susan and her two brothers Frederick (DSC, Lt. Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve) and John (DSC, Lt. Cdr. Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve). She is also survived by her sisters Nora LEE- WHITE/WHYTE of Rothesay, New Brunswick and Bettina DODDS- HEBRON of Toronto. Eileen was a graduate of Netherwood School for Girls, Rothesay, New Brunswick As well as a positive attitude, a sunny disposition and a great sense of humour, she loved the fellowship and companionship of Friends of all ages. A lifelong enthusiast of sports and politics, she adored life in Nova Scotia yet remained fiercely loyal to the Province of her birth. She was an early champion of the rights and duties of Canadian women, being of the inaugural class of volunteers into the Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service (Wrens) in World War 2, subsequently attaining the rank of Lieutenant Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service. A private family funeral has been held, her ashes to be spread by her beloved Navy on the cold grey waters of the North Atlantic Ocean. A memorial service will be held, notice to follow.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-03 published
BROCK, Aaron Robin (November 18, 1974-August 3, 2006)
A love for life
life of Humour and Warmth
life of Goodness and Honour
life of Gentleness and Generosity
A life of Passion and Courage
A life of Music and Love
Snatched away by Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy
As long as we live Aaron too shall live
For he is part of us
Deeply missed and forever loved by wife Josephine, Mom, Dad, Jason, Karen, Griffin, Turner, Nathan, and Ursula.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROCK - All Categories in OGSPI

BROCKELBANK o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-12-19 published
BROCKELBANK, Beatrice Syrenia (JULIAN)
At the Meaford Long Term Care Centre on Monday, December 17, 2007 of Eugenia in her 86th year. Beatrice JULIAN was the wife of the late Russell BROCKELBANK. Loving mother of Clinton (Cathy TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Eugenia, Julia BLACKBURN (Bruno) of Brampton and Charlie (Shirley) of Eugenia. She will be loved and remembered by her eight grandchildren and eleven great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Ora (Nelson) MERRIFIELD of Markdale and the late Willard, Mel and Jack. Survived by her sisters-in-law Louise and Edna. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton. For funeral service information, please call 519-924-2810. Interment Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the charity of your choice would be gratefully appreciated.
Page 3

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROCKELBANK o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-18 published
BROCKELBANK, Beatrice Syrenia (JULIAN)
At the Meaford Long Term Care Centre on Monday, December 17, 2007 of Eugenia in her 86th year. Beatrice JULIAN was the wife of the late Russell BROCKELBANK. Loving mother of Clinton (Cathy TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Eugenia, Julia BLACKBURN (Bruno) of Brampton and Charlie (Shirley) of Eugenia. She will be loved and remembered by her 8 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Ora (Nelson) MERRIFIELD of Markdale and the late Willard, Mel and Jack. Survived by her sisters-in-law Louise and Edna. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton. For funeral service information please call 924-2810. Interment Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the charity of your choice would be gratefully appreciated.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROCKELBANK o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-19 published
BROCKELBANK, Beatrice Syrenia (JULIAN)
At the Meaford Long Term Care Centre on Monday, December 17, 2007 of Eugenia in her 86th year. Beatrice JULIAN was the wife of the late Russell BROCKELBANK. Loving mother of Clinton (Cathy TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Eugenia, Julia BLACKBURN (Bruno) of Brampton and Charlie (Shirley) of Eugenia. She will be loved and remembered by her 8 grandchildren and 11 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Ora (Nelson) MERRIFIELD of Markdale and the late Willard, Mel and Jack. Survived by her sisters-in-law Louise and Edna. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton on Wednesday, December 19, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held from Eugenia United Church on Thursday, December 20 at 11 a.m. Interment Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROCKELBANK - All Categories in OGSPI

BROCKETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-14 published
MONTGOMERY, Florence Isabel "Iya" (née BROWN)
Died July 11, 2007 in her 84th year at Gravenhurst, Ontario after a long illness. She is survived by her sisters Ann LOCKE (Bracebridge, Ontario,) Evelyn BROCKETT (Canandaigua, New York,) six nieces and nephews, and seventeen grand-nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her husband Irving. Private family interment. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Alzheimer's Society. "When I come to the end of the day and the sun has set for me, bury your sorrows in doing good-deeds - miss me, but let me go"

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROCKETT - All Categories in OGSPI

BROCKWELL o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-08-01 published
McGUIRE, John
The family of the late John McGUIRE wish to convey our sincere gratitude to Doctor WATKIN, Doctor KITAI and to the nurses at Collingwood General and Marine Hospital who cared for John. Special thanks to the nurses and P.S.W. workers from Community Care Access Centre who came to our home. Sincere and heartfelt thanks to our Friends, neighbours and relatives who visited and supported us during John's illness and at the time of his passing. Thanks also to Pastors, Merv BROCKWELL, Tony DEN BOK and Dale SHAW who conducted the service. Our appreciation to Clearview Community Church, to all who prepared and served lunch and to Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home for your professional assistance. Pat, Jeff, Shaun, Kelly and Michele McGUIRE and Family.
Page 12

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BROCKWELL - All Categories in OGSPI

BRODDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-14 published
CLARKE, Alan Martin (August 1, 1929-June 12, 2007)
After a full and wonderful life, and a long struggle with Parkinson's Disease, Alan died in Toronto on June 12, 2007 at the age of 77. Alan cherished his family, and will be forever missed by his beloved children Andrew (Lucy VAN OLDENBARNEVELD,) Beth (Laura CABOTT,) Jeffrey (Jane RUPERT,) and Matthew Devlin (Alexandra KIRBY,) his granddaughters, Ella and Grace, and Margot, his wife of 40 years. He leaves behind his brother Edgar (Betty), his sisters, Mary (Haruo KAWAI,) Harriet (Jacob ENNS) and Margaret (Sidney TJEPKEMA, his sister-in-law, Vicki BRODDY, and many nieces, nephews and life-long Friends. The son of Emily (EDGAR) and Lorne CLARKE, Alan was born in Stratford, spent his early years in Sudbury and his childhood and teenage years in Ottawa South. He graduated from Glebe Collegiate Institute and Victoria College, University of Toronto with a bachelor's degree in philosophy and ethics. Alan dedicated his life to social change through adult education, and community development. He was also a committed advocate for human rights. In the 1950s he spent several summers as a labourer/teacher and then supervisor for Frontier College beginning a lifelong interest in fostering adult literacy. He worked for ten years with the Young Men's Christian Association at various branches in Toronto. In 1958 he was the founder and first director of The Centre for Adult Education at the North Toronto branch which led to the founding of York University in 1959. From 1960 to 1966 he was Executive Director of the Canadian Citizenship Council and concurrently, for three years, of the Canadian Centenary Council. His next challenge was as the first Executive Director of the Company of Young Canadians, 1966 to 1968. He began a fifteen year tenure at Algonquin College in 1970 as the Director of the Demonstration Project in Community Development and then as the Director of Continuing Education. In 1985-86 he was Advisor to the Canadian Emergency Coordinator for the African Famine. The last ten years of his formal working career were as Communications Advisor for the International Joint Commission. Throughout his working life and as a volunteer in retirement, Alan worked with many local, national and international organizations, contributing, among others, to Project 4000, the Movement for Canadian Literacy, and the United Nations Association in Canada. He was a contributing author to 'Strong and Free: a Response to the War Measures Act', in 1970. Alan's family would like to express a great debt of thanks to the 3rd and 4th floor staff at the North York Seniors Health Centre, especially Lidia and Mary-Helene. The family would also like to thank Estelle REED for the love and care she provided in Alan's last years. A memorial service celebrating Alan's life and legacy will be held in Ottawa at the First Unitarian Congregation, 30 Cleary Avenue, on Sunday June 17, at 3: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Alan's memory to the Parkinson Society of Ottawa, 1053 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, K1Y 4E9.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODDY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-16 published
He steered Canada's answer to the Peace Corps through rough waters
As executive director of the Company of Young Canadians in the idealistic Sixties, he fended off critics who said it was infiltrated by Communists
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
Toronto -- As a toddler during the Depression, Alan Martin CLARKE helped his mother hand out food to men riding the rails in search of work. As a university student he spent summer months with the adult-literacy organization Frontier College, toiling on a railway gang during the day and teaching his co-workers to read in the evening.
Those early acts kicked off a lifelong commitment to adult education, social action and human rights, in which he played key roles with Frontier College, the Young Men's Christian Association, Algonquin College, the International Joint Commission and the United Nations Association in Canada.
But no job brought him more publicity, good and bad, than his stint from 1966 to 1968 as executive director of the fledgling Company of Young Canadians. He headed the government-financed agency at a time when the press and many politicians were charging it was controlled by Communists, radicals and Québécois separatists.
"Alan's life touched a lot of people," says David MacDonald, a former Conservative cabinet minister who hired Mr. CLARKE for projects several times. "He was a community educator par excellence. He had an intense interest in citizen empowerment."
Over the years, Mr. CLARKE fought for many causes, both as an employee and as a citizen volunteer. Early in his career, he played a key role in the establishment of Toronto's York University. He worked in Ottawa to help settle Vietnamese "boat people" fleeing Communism in 1979, to raise funds for African famine relief in 1985 and 1986, to help Canadians increase their reading skills through the Movement for Canadian Literacy and to turn an old Ottawa courthouse into a centre for the arts.
He first came to national prominence in the 1960s as head of the beleaguered Company of Young Canadians. The group, modelled roughly on the U.S. Peace Corps, was created by prime minister Lester Pearson's Liberals during a turbulent era when baby boomers were coming of age and questioning traditional values. The Company of Young Canadians's mandate was to deploy young Canadians in impoverished communities across the country where they would help people better their lives.
In 1967, opposition members demanded the government put the Company of Young Canadians on a short leash after two volunteers, David DePoe and Lynn Curtis, took part in a rally against the U.S. war in Vietnam.
Mr. CLARKE insisted the volunteers had acted strictly as individuals, and threatened to resign if the prime minister didn't defend the agency's independence in Parliament. Eventually, Mr. Pearson did just that, thanks to the intercession of Marc Lalonde, then a member of the Company of Young Canadians council and an adviser to the Prime Minister's Office. Mr. Lalonde would later become a cabinet minister under Pierre Trudeau.
Mr. CLARKE's victory was short-lived, however, as new charges of radicalism and overspending continued to dog the organization. In 1968, Mr. CLARKE was ordered by the office of Gérard Pelletier, then secretary of state, to fire Martin Beliveau, a Quebec employee accused of separatist leanings. Despite his misgivings, Mr. CLARKE asked Mr. Beliveau to resign, then he handed in his own resignation.
Mr. CLARKE quit on a matter of principle, says Stewart Goodings, who replaced him as executive director, and was to quit himself within a matter of months.
"No one man could have solved the dilemmas that CLARKE faced daily," wrote Ian Hamilton in his 1970 book, The Children's Crusade: The Story of the Company of Young Canadians. He praises Mr. CLARKE for fighting for the group's independence and involving the volunteers in decision making, but faults him for not hiring people capable of keeping the Company of Young Canadians on an even keel. The group was brought under government control in 1969 and finally disbanded in 1976.
Co-workers remember Mr. CLARKE as a serious man who worked long hours. But his family saw his fun-loving nature.
"Every so often he would come into our bedrooms, stark naked and carrying just a briefcase," recalls his oldest son, Andrew. "He'd say, 'Okay, I'm off to work.' The children, fearing he was so distracted he had forgotten to dress, would rush downstairs to head him off. They would find him hiding in the closet.
The son of Emily (EDGAR) and Lorne CLARKE, both teachers, he grew up in a strict Baptist home in Sudbury. The family later moved to Ottawa where he was graduated from Glebe Collegiate Institute.
While earning a degree in philosophy and ethics at the University of Toronto, he spent his summers as a labourer-teacher and later as a supervisor with Frontier College. He went on to become first a member, then chairman of the college board. He was employed during his university years, and immediately after, by the Young Men's Christian Association. In 1958, while serving as founder and first director of the Centre for Adult Education at the Young Men's Christian Association's North Toronto branch, he was a member of the group that set up York University. York recognized his contribution in 1992 by awarding him an honorary degree.
In 1958, he married Margo BRODDY, a teacher, and lived with her for more than 40 years. They separated in 1998 and were divorced in 2003. They had three children together: Andrew, Beth and Jeffrey. He had another son, Matthew DEVLIN, through a separate relationship.
Alan CLARKE never paid attention to the speed limit when driving, says his son Andrew. "The only times my dad stepped on the brakes were for stop signs, red lights and to check out pretty girls."
At the family dinner table, Mr. CLARKE challenged his children by leading discussions about current events. "He wanted us kids to learn to think things out for ourselves," says his daughter Beth.
Prior to Mr. CLARKE's appointment with the Company of Young Canadians, he served six years as executive director of the Canadian Citizenship Council and concurrently, for three years, as director of the Canadian Centenary Council. For 15 years, starting in 1970, he worked at Ottawa's Algonquin College as director of a community development project and later as director of continuing education.
In 1985, he was hired as an adviser to David MacDonald, who had been named Canadian emergency co-ordinator for the African famine. Mr. MacDonald says he was initially reluctant to hire Mr. CLARKE because he had employed him in the past, and because they were close Friends. He feared the appointment would look like nepotism.
But he went ahead when Joe Clark, then prime minister, insisted Mr. CLARKE was the only person capable of motivating Canadians to contribute. A Decima poll later showed that two out of every three Canadians made a donation.
For the next 10 years, Mr. CLARKE served as communications officer with the International Joint Commission, a Canadian-U.S. body that deals with issues concerning shared boundary waters. Mr. CLARKE joined the board of the United Nations Association in Canada in 1989, and worked there on a contract basis after his retirement from the International Joint Commission in 1996. He continued to come into the office after he was diagnosed with Parkinson's disease but realized that his memory was starting to fail.
"He was remarkably calm as he faced that challenge, recalls Joan Broughton, the group's public information officer. "It was tough to watch and wonderful to watch at the same time."
In 2000, he moved in with Estelle REED, a civil servant and long-time friend. They lived together first in Ottawa and later in Toronto. She continued to care for him after he was admitted to North York Seniors Health Centre in Toronto, where he was to live for 2½ years.
Alan Martin CLARKE was born on August 1, 1929, in Stratford, Ontario He died in Toronto on June 12, 2007, of complications from Parkinson's disease. He was 77. He leaves his wife of 40 years, Margo (née BRODDY;) children Andrew, Beth and Jeffrey CLARKE and Matthew DEVLIN; two granddaughters, Ella and Grace CLARKE a brother Edgar; three sisters, Mary, Harriet and Margaret; and his common-law partner, Estelle REED, . A memorial service will be held tomorrow at the First Unitarian Congregation, 30 Cleary Avenue, Ottawa at 3: 30 p.m.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODDY - All Categories in OGSPI

BRODERICK o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-09-12 published
BRODERICK, Marcelle Jeanette - Estate of
Notice To Creditors and Others
In the Estate of Marcelle Jeanette BRODERICK
All persons having claims against or claiming an interest in the Estate of Marcelle Jeanette BRODERICK, late of the Town of Wasaga Beach, County of Simcoe, who died on or about the 28th day of August, 2007, are hereby notified to send particulars of same to the undersigned on or before October 17th, 2007 after which date the Estate will be distributed with regard only to the claims of which the undersigned shall then have notice and neither the Estate nor the undersigned will be liable to any person whose notice of claim has not been so given.
Dated at Wasaga Beach. September 12, 2007.
Maurice A. LOTON
Solicitor for the Estate
802 Mosley Street, Wasaga Beach, Ontario L9Z 2H4
Page 14

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODERICK o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-09-19 published
BRODERICK, Marcelle Jeanette - Estate of
Notice To Creditors and Others
In the Estate of Marcelle Jeanette BRODERICK
All persons having claims against or claiming an interest in the Estate of Marcelle Jeanette BRODERICK, late of the Town of Wasaga Beach, County of Simcoe, who died on or about the 28th day of August, 2007, are hereby notified to send particulars of same to the undersigned on or before October 17th, 2007 after which date the Estate will be distributed with regard only to the claims of which the undersigned shall then have notice and neither the Estate nor the undersigned will be liable to any person whose notice of claim has not been so given.
Dated at Wasaga Beach. September 12, 2007.
Maurice A. LOTON
Solicitor for the Estate
802 Mosley Street, Wasaga Beach, Ontario L9Z 2H4
Page 18

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODERICK o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-09-26 published
BRODERICK, Marcelle Jeanette - Estate of
Notice To Creditors and Others
In the Estate of Marcelle Jeanette BRODERICK
All persons having claims against or claiming an interest in the Estate of Marcelle Jeanette BRODERICK, late of the Town of Wasaga Beach, County of Simcoe, who died on or about the 28th day of August, 2007, are hereby notified to send particulars of same to the undersigned on or before October 17th, 2007 after which date the Estate will be distributed with regard only to the claims of which the undersigned shall then have notice and neither the Estate nor the undersigned will be liable to any person whose notice of claim has not been so given.
Dated at Wasaga Beach. September 12, 2007.
Maurice A. LOTON
Solicitor for the Estate
802 Mosley Street, Wasaga Beach, Ontario L9Z 2H4
Page 12

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODERICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-11 published
McCLINTOCK, Rev. Dr. George Bernard
(April 3, 1924-July 9, 2007)
A shining example of faith, hope, courage, and love to all whose lives he touched, George McCLINTOCK died on the morning of July 9 at the Toronto General Hospital, aged 83. George was the beloved husband for the past 25 years of Catharine Ann MONTGOMERY. He was also the beloved husband of Elizabeth Louise (LONG) McCLINTOCK, who predeceased him in 1969. He was the son of Wesley Bernard and Floretta Louise Randolph BUSSWELL and the brother of Lois (deceased), Carol, Donald, John, and Hugh. George was the loving, inspirational, and quite simply wonderful father and grandfather of Elizabeth Irene and her daughter Ujarak of Arviat, Nunavut Margaret Louise (James MacCAMMON) and their son James Thomas (Tom) of Toronto; George Bernard Jr. of Halifax and his daughters Alice Aurora and Laura Arden of Cobourg; and John David (Vina BRODERICK) and their daughter Victoria Louise of Saint_John's. He was the loving stepfather of Charles Francis MINOR (Adele) and grandfather of their daughters Abigail Frances and Hannah Catharine of Aurora. George was a dedicated United Church minister cherished by his congregations in Kenogami, Quebec; Halkirk and Three Hills, Alberta; and St. George's, Birchcliffe, West Humber, Woodbine, and Saint_James-Bond United Churches in Toronto. He was also a teacher at Heydon Park Vocational, Jarvis C.I., and Harbord C.I. in Toronto. A child of the Depression, George was a high school principal at the age of 19 and a brilliant mathematician at university who followed his faith into the ministry and returned to university to earn his doctorate of ministry at the age of 69. A tireless worker for social justice, he served as a volunteer on many boards and committees throughout his life. His unflagging spirit, keen intelligence and wit, wisdom, humility, and compassion will be deeply missed by us all. The funeral service will be held at Thornhill United Church on Thursday, July 12, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Memorial donations may be made to the Toronto Public Library or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODERICK - All Categories in OGSPI

BRODEUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-19 published
HEARD, Helen (née BRODEUR)
Passed away in Welland, Ontario June 8th 2007 in her 96th year. Dear mother of Robert (Louise) HEARD of Port Colborne, Ontario and Laurie (Steve) MINOR of Ridgeville, Ontario. Beloved grandmother of Trevor, Ryan, Sherril, Deborah, and Martyn. Loving great-grandmother of Lindsay, Matthew, Zachary, Victoria, Candyce, Bailey, Casey and Jaime. Dear aunt of several nephews and nieces. Helen was predeceased by her husband Frank (2001), and siblings Gerald, Gordon, Laurie and John, Ardie, Jean and Cecil. Helen was a Reg. N. and graduate of Saint_Joseph's Hospital School of Nursing, Toronto, Ontario. She was employed for many years at Hotel Dieu Hospital, St. Catharines, Ontario until her retirement. Cremation has taken place. Funeral services were held at Saint_John's Roman Catholic Church, Waubaushene, Ontario with interment at Saint_John's Cemetery, Waubaushene, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to a favourite charity of your choice in memory of Helen.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODEUR - All Categories in OGSPI

BRODHURST o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-19 published
BRODHURST, Karen Flannigan (née O'BRECHT) (1940~2007)
After a long, mightily courageous battle with breast cancer, Karen Flannigan BRODHURST née O'BRECHT died peacefully at her home in Town of the Blue Mountains on December 14, 2007. She left us the way she lived with us, with dignity, style and attitude. Karen leaves behind a loving family, her sister Heather O'Brecht SINNOTT, her adoring husband Rick BRODHURST and her step-daughters Krista, Erica and Lori who will miss her sorely. Her passing will leave an empty space in their lives and in the lives of a multitude of Friends and acquaintances from many locations and walks of life. Karen's family would like to invite her Friends to join them on Saturday December 22 at Weider Room 1, Blue Mountain Inn between two and five p.m. to remember the richness of her life. Please do not send flowers. Donations may be made in Karen's name to Front Line Collingwood Foundation, a charity active in the fight against breast cancer. Friend may leave on-line condolences by visiting www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODHURST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-19 published
FLANNIGAN, Karen Brodhurst (née O'BRECHT) (1940-2007)
After a long, mightily courageous battle with breast cancer, Karen Flannigan BRODHURST née O'BRECHT died peacefully at her home in Town of the Blue Mountains on December 14, 2007. She left us the way she lived with us, with dignity, style and attitude.
Karen leaves behind a loving family, her sister Heather O'Brecht SINNOTT, her adoring husband Rick BRODHURST and her step-daughters Krista, Erica and Lori who will miss her sorely. Her passing will leave an empty space in their lives and in the lives of a multitude of Friends and acquaintances from many locations and walks of life.
Karen's family would like to invite her Friends to join them on Saturday December 22 at Weider Room 1, Blue Mountain Inn between two to five pm to remember the richness of her life.
Please do not send flowers. Donations may be made in Karen's name to Front Line Collingwood Foundation, a charity active in the fight against breast cancer.
Friend may leave on-line condolences by visiting www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODHURST - All Categories in OGSPI

BRODIE o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-08-01 published
Former Resident in "Lives Lived"
It was interesting to read in last Thursday's (July 26) Globe and Mail an article on the life of Joan Marguerite BURRELL which had been submitted by her daughter, Anne SCANLAN. Joan BURRELL was the wife of Doctor Archie BURRELL, who doctored in Dundalk in the late 1950's and early 60's.
It was a coincidence that she met her husband through a date set up by her sister, Carol, who was dating and later married Dr. Douglas BRODIE. Doctor BURRELL originally came from the Hanover area.
The BURRELLs moved from Dundalk to North York in 1962. Then in 1982 they went to Saudi Arabia where Doctor BURRELL worked in a hospital clinic. After returning to Canada Mrs. BURRELL followed her husband to the north where he filled in for doctors on vacation.
Dr. and Mrs. BURRELL had six children, four girls and two boys, and ten grandchildren.
Music was a big part of her live as she sang in the choir of the Forest Grove United Church, and would often have a grandchild seated beside her on the piano bench in her home.
Mrs. BURRELL died on April 28, 2007 from leukemia at the age of 76.
Page 3

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-03 published
BROWN, Ivan Ross
At Rockwood Terrace, Durham on Sunday July 1, 2007, Ivan Ross BROWN of Guelph, formerly of Markdale in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Joan BROWN (PARKER) of Guelph. Loving father of Peter BROWN of Carleton Place, Terry BRODIE (Ray LEWIS) of Markdale, Becky BROWN of Guelph and Virginia STEFFLER (Glenn) of Markham. Grandfather of Matthew, Heather and Evan BRODIE; Madeleine and Abraham THEODORE; Isobel BAKER- BROWN; and Emerson STEFFLER. A funeral service will be held at Annesley United Church, Markdale, Friday July 6th at 2: 00 p.m., followed by cremation. Arrangements entrusted to May Funeral Home, Markdale. If desired, donations to the New Democratic Party, Lung Association or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-28 published
WOODS, Ella Irene (COLLINGWOOD)
Passed away surrounded by the love of her family at Country Lane nursing home in Chatsworth on Friday, December 21st, 2007 in her 93rd year. The former Irene COLLINGWOOD was the beloved wife of the late Lloyd WOODS. She is the loving mother of Pamela (Les) MCINNES/MCINNIS, Linda (Clayton) MADILL, Bill (Valerie) and Tom (Lynda.) Her memory will be cherished in the hearts of her 11 grandchildren: Anthony, Deborah (Randy), Todd (Cathy), Lezlie (Bob), Michael (Rhonda), Bruce, Murray (Leanne), Sharon (Shawn), Trevor (Elaine), Adam and Courtney as well by her 9 great-grandchildren: Alicia, Brittany, Jayla, Kyle, Katie, Colton, Kennady, Cory (Natasha) and Kiera. Predeceased by her sisters: Mildred BRODIE and Jean BRODIE. A private family service was conducted at the Currie Funeral Home in Chatsworth. Mr. Wesley FRIZZEL officiated. Spring interment: Walters Falls cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, if so desired to a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-05 published
BRODIE, Isabel (May 31, 1920-June 1, 2007)
Servicewoman, healer, sportswoman, world traveller, passed away peacefully on Friday, June 1, 2007 at the Kings Nursing Home in Bolton, Ontario. She is preceded in death by her parents, Robert and Ann BRODIE, brothers Robert and Ian, and dear friend Mable STUBBS. She is survived by her nephew Michael BRODIE and his wife Marilyn, nieces Ann INGRAM and husband Alan, Robin CLEMAS, Heather HEAPS and husband Len, Lee MEGSON and husband John, Cathy MOLINERO, numerous great and great-great-nieces and nephews, and life-long friend Marion LINDNER. Isabel, born in Oakville, Ontario and later residing in Clarkson, Ontario, enjoyed a rich, colourful life. She served in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War 2, stationed 'overseas' in Newfoundland. She achieved a degree in Physical Therapy after the war and worked at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children where she attained the position of head Physical Therapist. Isabel retired from the hospital after 25 years of service. Isabel was an adventurer enjoying globetrotting, camping, canoeing, cross-country skiing, birding, photography, and golf. She was a skilled wood carver, dressmaker, gardener, organist, folk dancer, and bridge player. She enjoyed entertaining Friends, family, colleagues, and patients often at her home and helping families who could not afford lodging during their child's treatment at Sick Kid's. Over the years she sponsored children through Christian Children's Fund visiting some of her sponsored children in India and other countries. She will be greatly missed by those who knew and loved her. She touched so many lives. She will be held in our hearts always with great affection for her character and love of life. A funeral service will be held on Saturday, June 9, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, South of Steeles). She will be laid to rest in the Veteran's section of York Cemetery (160 Beecroft Rd.) following the service. Donations in lieu of flowers can be made to Christian Children's Fund of Canada 1200 Denison Street Markham, Ontario L3R 8G6 Canada Voice: (905) 754-1001 Toll free: 1-800-2635437 for on-line donations: sponsors@ccfcanada.ca Condolences www.rskane.ca R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-27 published
Hospital physiotherapy pioneer was a 'tough but sympathetic' taskmaster
For more than 25 years, she was a force to be reckoned with at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, where she helped polio victims and treated Canada's first separated conjoined twins
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Isabel BRODIE was a pioneer physiotherapist who played a key role in rehabilitating children crippled by a polio epidemic that swept across North America, and treated the first set of Canadian conjoined twins to be successfully separated. For more than 25 years, she headed the physiotherapy division at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, where she was a force to be reckoned with.
She was variously described by Friends as outspoken, feisty, loud, compassionate and caring. Doctor Barry SHANDLING, the former pediatric surgeon at Sick Kids, called her "tough but sympathetic" - exactly the qualities needed for treating infants whose heads were bent to one side because of wry neck.
The condition, which is caused by a shortened muscle, can be corrected in small babies provided someone has the skill and tenacity to twist the head to its proper position. Most parents and physiotherapists do a "wishy-washy" job of this because they are too concerned about being gentle, he says. Not so Ms. BRODIE.
In 1972, she performed physiotherapy on Heather and Kristen, the first set of Canadian conjoined twins to be successfully separated. Doctor SHANDLING performed the surgery and she helped to keep them active and to mobilize their joints.
Early in her career, she had treated scores of children who had been crippled by polio. Successive epidemics had affected thousands of children across the continent until Doctor Jonas Salk of the University of Pittsburgh developed a vaccine in 1955.
"Ms. BRODIE was a very dedicated, compassionate physiotherapist who was very effective in treating of children with paralysis, particularly those who suffered from poliomyelitis in the years before the vaccine was developed," said Doctor Robert SALTER, a professor emeritus of surgery at Sick Kids.
But her contributions at the children's hospital went beyond simply treating young people. She also became involved in their lives. She invited numerous children and their families to live at her home while the youngsters were undergoing treatment.
As director of physiotherapy, however, she was a strict taskmaster who asked her staff to address her as Ms. BRODIE, recalled Anne-Marie HAMILTON, a former co-worker. Later, after stepping down for health reasons and rejoining the front-line therapy team, she asked them to call her by her nickname, Skip. "Then we got to see her soft side," Ms. HAMILTON said. "We saw she had a sense of humour."
Isabel BRODIE grew up in Oakville, Ontario Her Scottish-born father, Robert BRODIE, had travelled around the world as a ship's carpenter before building the family home. Her mother, also from Scotland, was a homemaker who often returned to the old country to visit relatives.
Ruth MacDONALD, who also grew up in Oakville, remembers bicycling along the shore of Lake Ontario with Ms. BRODIE to visit Friends in the nearby village of Clarkson when both were girls. After the outbreak of the Second World War, Ms. BRODIE joined the Royal Canadian Air Force and convinced Ms. MacDONALD to do the same.
They were among 17,000 Canadians who enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force to serve in the Women's Division, which trained those who joined in more than 40 trades. Ms. BRODIE, who enlisted in 1942, worked as an equipment assistant and achieved the rank of leading air woman. She was posted to a number of places in Canada, as well as Torbay, Newfoundland., which at the time was considered to be "overseas."
She used to talk about the snow in Newfoundland being so high that she had to go in and out through an upstairs window to get to the mess hall, said Marion LEAVITT, a close friend and frequent travel companion over the years years. She also told about talking an air force chef into cooking up some steaks so she could organize a party. After the war, but while still in uniform, she was sent to England and posted to an Royal Canadian Air Force airbase in Topcliffe, Yorkhire.
After returning to civilian life, Ms. BRODIE used her military allowance to take a three-year physical therapy course at the University of Toronto. She graduated in 1950 and practised for about four years at Toronto's Saint Michael's Hospital before moving to Sick Kids, where she worked for more than a quarter of a century.
Mary SAURIOL, who worked with her at Saint Michael's, said: "She was wonderful with children. If they wanted to run around, she ran around with them." She often took outpatients on excursions to the Canadian National Exhibition or on day camping trips.
Next to her work, Ms. BRODIE's greatest love was travelling, both within North America by camper van, and abroad, including Russia, China and several times to India. She sponsored a number of children through the Christian Children's Fund and visited some of them overseas.
Her most constant companion for travel, sports and pastimes was Mable STUBBS, a Revenue Canada employee who had also served in the air force. After the war, the two women shared an apartment and later bought a house in Clarkson. In 1988, when Ms. STUBBS was quite ill with cancer, they took their final trip together, a Mediterranean cruise. Ms. STUBBS died shortly after their return. Friends said Ms. BRODIE took a long time to recover her bounce after the loss.
Their relationship was one of Friendship and convenience, but nothing more, said her niece, Heather HEAPS. Ms. BRODIE was engaged to a man who was killed during the Second World War, and later to a second man, but she broke that relationship off when she realized she still loved the first.
A woman of eclectic interests and athletic prowess, she filled her leisure time with camping, canoeing, cross-country skiing, bird-watching, photography, wood-carving, dressmaking, gardening, playing the organ, folk dancing, and playing bridge. She took up golf in her early 70s, and went on to win three hole-in-one trophies.
Isabel BRODIE loved entertaining, said Marilyn BRODIE, a niece by marriage. "The first time I met her was at a corn roast in her backyard. She had a giant pot like a witch's cauldron."
In her early 80s, she began to develop Alzheimer's disease and could no longer drive. But that didn't ground her. She would jump on her bicycle and ride to a favourite restaurant for ribs and a rum and Coke, Ms. HEAPS said.
As her health deteriorated, she began using a cane. "Unfortunately, the cane became a lethal weapon," Ms. HEAPS added. "When dining in a restaurant, she thought nothing of smacking the waitress with the cane to get her attention."
Isabel BRODIE was born in Oakville, Ontario, on May 31, 1920. She died of complications of Alzheimer's disease at the King Nursing Home in Bolton, Ontario, on June 1, 2007, one day after her 87th birthday. She is survived by a nephew and five nieces. She was predeceased by her older brothers John, a former Mountie, and Robert, who died in Walkerton, Ontario, in 2000 when the municipal water supply there became contaminated with E. coli bacteria.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-25 published
CLUTE, Kenneth Fleury, B.A., M.D., (F.R.C.P.C)
Passed away peacefully at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto on Sunday, July 22nd, 2007 following a brief illness. Predeceased by his loving wife Roberta (née BRODIE.) Sadly missed by his beloved sons Alec (Joanne), Thomas (Fiona) and Geoff (Anned), his cherished grandchildren Sam, Owen, Neve, Nicole and Erik and by several nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his sister Evalyn and his brothers Roger and Deryck. He was born on December 19th, 1918 in Toronto to Arthur Roger CLUTE, Q.C. and Laurine Adele FLEURY. He was educated at the University of Toronto Schools. He then attended the University of Toronto where he received a B.A. in Classics in 1940 and an M.D. in 1945 and was awarded the gold medal in each. For the next twenty years, he was involved in paediatric research and practice in Canada and the U.S. (including Johns Hopkins University and Hospital in Baltimore and the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto) and published his book 'The General Practitioner'. From 1966 to 1984, he was a professor at the University of Toronto where he taught health law in the Faculty of Medicine. On retirement, he was named Professor Emeritus. He enjoyed many happy summer holidays at Idyl-Wild on Lake Rosseau, travelling in Canada and abroad, music, reading, astronomy and the company of his family and Friends. A private service will be held. The family wishes to thank the staff at Mount Sinai Hospital (17th Floor N) for their care and compassion during the last two months. If desired, donations may be made to Mount Sinai Hospital Foundation, 600 University Avenue, Suite 210, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X5.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-26 published
BURRELL, Joan Marguerite (née HASSELL)
By Anne SCANLAN, Page L8
Mother, "Nana," wife, sister, friend. Born September 11, 1930, in Toronto. Died April 28 in Toronto of leukemia, aged 76.
Joan was a woman of style and class, best known in her later years as the matriarch of the family home in North York. The role of doctor's wife fit her like a slipper, although it was hardly as glamorous as she might have first imagined.
The third daughter of Beth and Jack HASSELL, Joan was a city girl. It was in the city that she met medical student Archie BURRELL, on a date arranged by Joan's sister, Carol, who was dating Archie's University of Toronto med student pal, Douglas BRODIE. Doctors BURRELL and BRODIE were destined to be brothers-in-law.
The bride soon followed the groom back to the countryside from which he hailed, specifically as the town doctor in Dundalk north of Orangeville, Ontario (Archie was from nearby Hanover.) Dundalk's claim to fame is that it's Ontario's highest point (526 metres) it's unlikely that the high point of Joan's career as a doctor's wife was the day a patient came by the house with four recently slaughtered chickens as payment for Doctor BURRELL's services.
More to her liking was the response at the local general store when Joan first arrived: "You just leave the bags here and we'll deliver them to you. You're the new doctor's wife."
Joan and Archie had six children: four girls and two boys. (Two of the girls were delivered by Archie himself because he beat the scheduled doctor to the delivery room.) Joan and her young family learned quickly that a country doctor was on permanent call.
She became the wife of a city doctor in 1962, when the family moved to North York. Life with Joan was always an adventure. No matter where the out-of-town destination, the car wouldn't get far before Joan would find a lake suitable for a spontaneous swim.
In the fall of 1982, Joan and Archie ventured to Saudi Arabia, where Archie worked in a hospital clinic. They used Jetta as a jetting-off point to travel in Europe and Asia. After returning to Canada, Joan followed her husband to the north, where Archie filled in for doctors on vacation.
In her later years, Joan loved nothing more than being surrounded by her six children and 10 grandchildren. Her laughter could fill a room. Music was also close to her heart. Joan sang in the choir of the Forest Grove United Church, and would often have a grandchild seated next to her on the piano bench at home.
On the night of Joan's final family Christmas gathering, her family surrounded her as she played Christmas carols deep into the evening. She never looked more content.
Anne SCANLAN, Joan's daughter, submitted this on behalf of siblings John, Sylvia, Elaine, Ruth and Andrew.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-19 published
BRODIE, Barbara Hermione (née GIBSONE) (1918-2007)
Barbara died peacefully at Peace Arch Hospital on Sunday, October 14, 2007. She was predeceased by her loving husband, John Malcolm, and is survived by her three children and their families; Derek John Robert, his wife Ruth, and their three children Elizabeth, Anne, her husband David FISCHER, and Margaret, Heather Joanne, her husband Jim MELIDONES, and Barbara Elizabeth, her husband, Patrick WELLINGTON. Barbara was predeceased by her sister Elizabeth (Bebes) JESSOP in December 2006 and her brother Derek, who was killed in Action at Cassino, Italy in 1944. Barbara was born in Quebec City and resided during her adult life in Regina, Brandon, Winnipeg and West Vancouver. She graduated from McGill University with a Bachelor of Arts and Chamberlane College of Boston, Massachusetts. with a degree in Marketing and Design. Barbara was devoted to her family and a gracious hostess to her Friends and her community. She was a delightful and special Granny who approached life with warmth and curiosity. Her volunteer involvement included the Peace Arch Hospital Auxiliary, VanDusen Gardens and a lifetime supporter of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. She had been an active member of the University Women's Club for the past 50 years. Barbara was also a great supporter of the Canadian figure skating and ski teams. A Celebration of her Life will be held at the Church of the Holy Trinity, 15115 Roper Avenue, White Rock, British Columbia on Tuesday October 30, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. Flowers are gratefully declined. Donations in Barbara's memory may be made to the Peace Arch Hospital Foundation, 15521 Russell Avenue, White Rock, British Columbia V4B 2R4. The family would like to thank the staff of the Peace Arch Hospital and Doctor Martin Lebl for their compassion and assistance.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-20 published
BRODIE, Paul
Officer of the Order of Canada and Ambassador of the Saxophone passed away in Toronto at Sunnybrook Hospital, on Monday, November 19th, 2007. He was 73 years old. Cremation will take place. No formal funeral arrangements are being planned. His loving wife Rima and darling daughter Claire, would like to invite family and Friends to attend an Open House at the Brodie home at 573 Roselawn Avenue (at Latimer) from l: 00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. on Tuesday, November 20th to Thursday, November 22nd (416-440-2124). In lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of your own choice would greatly appreciated.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-20 published
Paul BRODIE: 73
Canada's 'Ambassador Of The Saxophone'
By Staff, Page S8
Toronto -- Paul BRODIE, a classical musician who became known as the "ambassador of the saxophone," died yesterday while undergoing heart surgery at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto. He was 73.
Raised in Regina, he played the clarinet as a boy and then studied saxophone at the University of Michigan. He graduated in 1958, and three years later made his first solo appearance with the Toronto Symphony. With 50 albums to his credit, he came to be considered the most recorded concert saxophonist in the history of the instrument.
Over the years, he taught woodwinds at Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto, the University of Toronto and then York University. A full obituary is forthcoming

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-24 published
'Ambassador of the saxophone' was a champion of his own virtuosity
Musician who fell in love with the sax as a boy probably performed more music for the instrument than anyone in history, writes Sandra MARTIN. He was also a tireless and polished self-promoter who even invented a fictional front man to ensure concert bookings
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
The man and his instrument. During his 50-year career as a professional musician, Paul BRODIE, "the ambassador of the saxophone," probably played more concerts, recorded more albums, toured more countries and taught more private students than any classical saxophonist of his or any other day. He was the champion not only of his own virtuosity as a player, but of the saxophone as a musical instrument.
The saxophone, invented by Belgian Adolphe Sax in Paris in the 1840s, is a hybrid that combines the volume and carrying power of brass with the intricate key work and technical finesse of woodwinds. Although some modern classical composers have written for the saxophone, it is still mainly played in military and blues bands and jazz combos. Mr. BRODIE tried to change that.
"He was a master promoter and the saxophone needed someone like Paul, because as an instrument, it was invented late in the history of music, so it was shut out of orchestral circles," said his former student, concert saxophonist and composer Daniel Rubinoff "The great composers had already established the orchestra and composers in Europe didn't really want to take a chance on this latecomer.
Mr. BRODIE was the first person to teach saxophone at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. He was not himself a composer, but he persuaded composers such as Srul Irving Glick, John Weinzweig, Bruce Mather and Violet Archer to write daunting music for the saxophone. In his quest to promote the saxophone he co-founded the World Saxophone Congress with Eugene Rousseau in Chicago in 1969 to bring players, critics, composers and audiences together in a different city every four years.
"He built a career for himself. He was an incredible worker, he believed in himself totally and he never looked back," said Jean-Guy BRAULT, a flutist with the National Arts Centre Orchestra for more than 30 years. "He was an icon in the saxophone world - in the classical sense, but he also taught many jazz saxophonists," said Mr. BRAULT. "He changed my life. He opened my eyes to so many things - the realities of the professional music world," he said. "I owe a lot to him."
Paul (Zion) BRODIE was born in Montreal in the bitterest depths of the Depression, the younger son of Sam and Florence (née SCHILLER.) When Paul was 10 months old, his father, who ran a dry goods store, moved his family to the north end of Winnipeg, where he found work selling radios in an appliance store. The family moved again when Paul was 11, to Regina in neighbouring Saskatchewan.
He went to Strathcona School, sang in the junior choir at synagogue and played the clarinet in the Regina Lions Junior Band. In high school, the only subject that interested him was music. Sick in bed with a cold one day in Grade 10, he heard Freddie Gardner play I'm in the Mood for Love on the saxophone.
He was besotted with the sound and immediately decided to switch instruments. Goodbye clarinet. Hello saxophone.
He earned money to buy a saxophone working at a local deli, but he couldn't find a woodwind teacher and so transferred what he knew about playing the clarinet to the saxophone.
After graduating from high school in 1952, he packed his sax and his clarinet and headed to Winnipeg where he entered United College, but failed miserably in a pre-law program. With support from his high-school music teacher, he was accepted the following year at the University of Michigan, where Larry Teal taught the saxophone.
In one of his first classes in the history of music he heard a recording of French classical saxophone virtuoso Marcel Mule playing the alto sax. His ambitions changed; whereas he once hoped to be good enough to play in a band led by a musician of the calibre of Tommy Dorsey or Les Brown, he now considered the possibilities of becoming a classical saxophonist.
He joined the university band under conductor William Revelli and played the bass saxophone when they performed in Carnegie Hall in April, 1954. He also formed a dance combo called The Stardusters, which helped earn tuition money and taught him a great deal about the business of promoting and organizing a group.
After graduating with a bachelor's degree in music education and a master's degree in performance in December, 1957, he went to Paris to study with maestro Marcel Mule. Back in Canada, he moved to Toronto and looked for a job teaching saxophone.
"The Royal Conservatory of Music is now in its 72nd year and we have never allowed a saxophone in the building," protested Ettore MAZZOLINI, director of the Royal Conservatory of Music, but the ever-persuasive Mr. BRODIE succeeded in getting an audition and played so well he broke the embargo. He was a woodwinds instructor from 1959 to 1960. Soon, he was also playing on an occasional basis for the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and doing regional tours with Jeunesses Musicales du Canada, first with pianist George Brough and then with Colombe Pelletier as his accompanist.
Late in November, 1959, a musician friend introduced Mr. BRODIE to Rima GOODMAN, a modern dancer (and later a fibre artist) who worked in New York, but whose parents lived in Toronto. They were married on March 13, 1960. Their daughter, Claire, was born in October, 1964.
Mr. BRODIE made his debut as a soloist with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra at a Sunday afternoon concert on December 27, 1959, with Walter SUSKIND conducting and his New York debut at the Town Hall on November 18, 1960, with George Brough accompanying him on the piano and Mrs. BRODIE turning pages.
There were only about 45 people in the audience, but one of them was Raymond Erickson, the music critic for The New York Times. "Mr. BRODIE's skill made everything he played sound fluent and easy although the music was studded with technical difficulties&hellip producing a lovely soft tone when he wanted to… in his splendidly vital performance," he wrote. A jubilant Mr. BRODIE phoned the Canadian Wire Service and begged them to pick up Mr. Erickson's review, which they obligingly did, flashing the news about the Canadian native's success in the Big Apple. Mr. BRODIE carried that tattered clipping in his wallet for the rest of his life.
Because two performance careers in one family meant too much travelling for a couple that wanted to stay together, the BRODIEs decided to make their base in Toronto. There, they established the Brodie School of Music and Modern Dance early in 1961 in a former furniture store. The dance studio was on the ground floor, six music studios were in the basement and the second floor had two apartments. They lived in one and turned the other into an additional five music studios.
One of his first students was Jean-Guy BRAULT, who had played saxophone for fun while studying philosophy at university. He studied saxophone, clarinet and flute for about two years and then began teaching in the Brodie school before taking a master's degree at the University of Michigan with Mr. BRODIE's old teacher, Larry Teal. "He was a fantastic teacher," Mr. BRAULT said of his mentor, describing Mr. BRODIE as "encouraging and never flinching."
When the National Arts Centre was looking for players for its new orchestra in 1969, Mr. BRAULT auditioned and got a job as second flutist. He played with the orchestra for more than 30 years, retiring in 2002 after a concert with jazz singer Cleo Laine and her saxophonist husband, John Dankworth
The BRODIEs ran their school for nearly 20 years, employing about 20 music and dance teachers, and training about 650 students a season - among them Willem Moolenbeek, Lawrence Sereda, Robert Pusching, John Price and Robert Bauer. Mr. BRODIE also taught woodwinds at the University of Toronto from 1968 to 1973 and formed a quartet in 1972 to showcase his own playing and the work of a revolving group of three students. The Paul Brodie Saxophone Quartet played at the World Saxophone Congress in London in 1976 and in the 1981 film Circle of Two.
Never a slouch when it came to self-promotion, the canny Mr. BRODIE invented a fictitious character, Ronald Joy, to serve as his front man in booking concerts. After printing business cards and letterhead, the BRODIEs and some of their students stuffed envelopes and sent them to more than 5,000 concert sponsors throughout North America. When potential sponsors called the school asking for Mr. Joy, the call would be put through to Mr. BRODIE who would lower his voice by a couple of octaves and start bargaining performance fees, hotel rates and dates. Mr. Joy booked nearly 800 concerts for his "client" in the next two decades and also promoted Mrs. BRODIE's career as a sculptor and fibre artist.
Mr. BRODIE was playing his saxophone in his music studio one day in 1978, when the phone rang. The caller was actor Warren Beatty, casually inquiring if he could use a recording of Mr. BRODIE playing the saxophone in Heaven Can Wait, his movie about a football player who also plays the soprano sax. An amateur saxophonist, Mr. Beatty believed that Mr. BRODIE's recording of the fourth movement from Handel's Sonata No. 3 would be perfect background music for the scene in which Mr. Beatty's character plays football with his servants.
After agreeing on terms, Mr. BRODIE put his promotional skills to work. Before long "the Canadian media somehow got the idea that a Canadian saxophonist was being featured throughout the film," according to the account that Mr. BRODIE related in his autobiography, Ambassador of the Saxophone. When Heaven Can Wait was nominated for several academy awards, the BRODIEs and Claire (then 13) flew to Los Angeles, where Mr. BRODIE sent 250 postcards pumping his connection with the film To Canadian media and arranged to do a live telephone interview with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television the day after the ceremonies.
The following year, the BRODIEs closed down their school and the quartet. The lease was up, he was in "phone ringing-off-the-hook" demand after the release of Heaven Can Wait and she was "wildly busy" with commissions for her work as a fibre artist. He never stopped teaching, however, either privately in a smaller studio or at York University, where he taught from 1982 until the late 1990s.
Concert saxophonist and composer Daniel Rubinoff was one of his last students. "I needed a mentor and I found one," he said in a telephone interview. After studying in Europe, he worked with Mr. BRODIE for 18 months beginning in 1995 and won the gold medal at the Royal Conservatory for the ARCT exams in 1997.
"One of the things about Paul's legacy is that he realized that you had to practice the saxophone to become as good a performer as you could possibly be, but you also had to be a tireless promoter," Mr. Rubinoff said. "He was a wonderful business person and he passed that on to people like me." How to have a career as a concert saxophonist, how to talk to an audience, how to be tough about criticism, how to cold call a concert promoter and how to set up a teaching studio, were among the synergistic "life lessons" that Mr. Rubinoff learned from Mr. BRODIE.
About seven years ago, Mr. BRODIE, who was suffering from high blood pressure and diabetes, developed an aortic dissection - a tear in the walls of the aorta which is frequently fatal. "Miraculously" without surgery "his body glued itself back together," according to Mr. BRODIE's daughter, Claire. "The last seven years were a gift."
Earlier this fall, a Magnetic Resonance Image revealed an enormous aneurysm in Mr. BRODIE's aorta. Mr. BRODIE asked if he had time to make a CD of favourite pieces with harpist Erica GOODMAN before undergoing surgery. (The CD, which was recorded at Grace Church on the Hill in Toronto, will be released shortly.) On Monday morning Mr. BRODIE was wheeled into surgery, but three-quarters of the way through the long operation, his heart gave out.
Paul Zion BRODIE, O.C., was born in Montreal on April 10, 1934. He died during heart surgery at Sunnybrook Hospital on November 19, 2007. He was 73. Predeceased by his parents, he leaves his wife, Rima, his daughter Claire and an older brother.

  B... Names     BR... Names     BRO... Names     Welcome Home

BRODIE - All Categories in OGSPI

BRO surnames continued to 07bro002.htm