BARGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-08-03 published
York officer dies attempting arrest
Const. Rob PLUNKETT, 43, was dragged by a car, pinned to a tree, then thrown from the vehicle.
By Steve RENNIE, Canadian Press, Fri., August 3, 2007
Markham -- A pre-dawn police probe into air bag thefts turned tragic yesterday when a veteran York Region officer died after being dragged by a car, pinned to a tree and then thrown from the vehicle while attempting an arrest, police said.
Const. Rob PLUNKETT, hailed as "true hero" by his police chief, was the force's first officer to die in the line of duty since 1984 and only the third in the department's history.
A 19-year-old man faces a manslaughter charge in the death of the 43-year-old Markham married father of three and police said additional charges are pending.
PLUNKETT's death came as a heavy blow to a force not accustomed to loss, said Deputy Chief Bruce HERRIDGE.
"It's an organization where we've not lost many officers, but even one is one too many," said HERRIDGE, adding that PLUNKETT was well-known within the force.
The tragic confluence of events that sent PLUNKETT to hospital with fatal injuries were outlined yesterday by York police Chief Armand LA BARGE.
During a joint investigation between 5 District criminal investigation bureau and the York police special services unit into airbag thefts, police surveillance officers spotted two Hondas -- one white and one gold -- leaving a Toronto address.
Police said there have been a rash of airbag thefts since last September and 43 thefts since January of this year. Stolen airbags can net between $1,500 and $2,000, LA BARGE said.
Officers believed at the time the gold Honda was stolen, LA BARGE said. He confirmed at the afternoon news conference the car was indeed reported stolen.
The two Hondas were driven to a crescent in Markham, just north of Toronto, where plainclothes officers saw the drivers park their cars. The driver of the gold Honda opened his door and police allege he took out a stolen air bag.
Just after 5 a.m., PLUNKETT moved toward the open driver's side door of the gold Honda intending to make an arrest, said LA BARGE.
"As Const. PLUNKETT attempted to arrest the suspect, the suspect put the vehicle into reverse and accelerated over a curb, across a lawn and over several shrubs," he said.
PLUNKETT was then pinned between the open door and a tree as the suspect kept trying to drive away, LA BARGE said. The officer was then dragged onto a nearby lawn and thrown from the car.
"The suspect continued to reverse across the lawn at which time assisting officers rammed the vehicle to stop its progress," said LA BARGE.
A local resident, who didn't want to be named, said he heard two loud bangs outside his window and looked out to see a man lying on a lawn across the street.
The neighbour said he heard cries of, "He's bleeding, he's bleeding," shortly before an ambulance arrived.
PLUNKETT was taken to a hospital in east Toronto, where he died of his injuries.
Nadeem JIWAH, 19, has been charged with manslaughter and police say more charges are pending.
A second suspect, 23-year-old Baseer YOUSAFZAI, was also arrested and is facing charges of theft, mischief and bail violation.

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BARGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-08 published
Officer, two teens die in crash
By Greg McARTHUR, Page A9
Toronto -- A 28-year-old off-duty police officer was among three people killed in a fiery car crash Saturday morning in the Toronto suburb of Vaughn.
Constable Davis AHLOWALIA, who had been with York Regional Police for 2½ years, was killed when a westbound minivan occupied by three people swerved into oncoming traffic at 3: 30 a.m., colliding with his eastbound Honda Civic.
Two occupants of the minivan, both teenagers, were killed in the accident on Major Mackenzie Drive. The third occupant, who was severely burned, is in critical condition at the hospital, York Regional Police said late last night.
During his short time with the force, Constable AHLOWALIA launched a fundraising drive for a Jamaican orphanage. He spent many of his vacations in India and Jamaica, working with the poor and Human Immunodeficiency Virus patients. He was stationed out of the force's headquarters in Newmarket.
"This is truly a tragedy that someone so young, with so much to give is gone. Policing is a family and Davis's loss will be felt by every member of York Regional Police," Chief Armand LA BARGE said.
"We extend our deepest sympathy to Davis's many Friends and family and we will be supporting them in their time of grief."
Investigators are still trying to determine what caused the minivan to swerve. The force's traffic bureau asks anyone with any information to call 1-866-876-5423 ext. 7703, or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-222-8477.

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BARGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-03 published
'True hero' killed in the line of duty
Two men face charges after 22-year veteran is slammed into a tree while attempting to arrest suspected airbag thief
By Timothy APPLEBY and Geoff NIXON with a report by Alan CAIRNS, special to The Globe and Mail, Page A1
Markham, Ontario -- An undercover York Regional Police officer, dragged to his death yesterday by an alleged car thief on a sleepy residential street, is "a true hero" who paid the ultimate price for his "selfless sacrifice," Police Chief Armand LA BARGE said.
A charge of manslaughter has been laid against a 19-year-old Toronto man, with further charges pending. A second suspect in custody also faces an array of criminal charges.
Constable Robert PLUNKETT was a 22-year veteran of York Regional Police and 43-year-old father of three. He died after an abortive 5 a.m. operation when he approached the driver's side of a car to arrest a man suspected of trying to steal airbags - a profitable mini-industry in the auto-theft world.
The suspect threw the Honda into reverse and Constable PLUNKETT was trapped by the open driver's-side door. The vehicle drove over a curb, across a lawn and slammed into a tree, fatally injuring the officer, Chief LA BARGE said.
Backup police then rammed the vehicle and arrested the driver as he attempted to escape. The other suspect, nearby in a second car, was also quickly apprehended.
Rushed to Scarborough Grace Hospital, Constable PLUNKETT died soon afterward - the first York Regional Police officer killed in the line of duty in more than 20 years.
The slain officer once won a bravery reward for rescuing an elderly woman from a frozen lake and was renowned for his work on behalf of the Special Olympics, a forum for disabled athletes.
"Rob and police officers like him are true pillars of the community that we serve, and their selfless sacrifice and their hard work ensures that the communities that we call home are safe places in which to live and to raise a family," Chief LA BARGE said.
Asked if Constable PLUNKETT's approach of the suspect was in line with normal procedure, Chief LA BARGE replied, "Surveillance officers, when they undertake these types of details, formulate a plan as to how they would effect the arrests where arrests need to be made."
As upwards of 30 officers descended on the crime scene early yesterday, residents of Ascot Crescent described the chaos.
Startled awake by the ruckus, one resident described seeing Constable PLUNKETT lying on the street.
"I heard a very loud noise and somebody yelling," said a woman who asked that her name not be published. "He was lying on the ground and they were trying to get him to breathe."
She said she took a blanket outside to an emergency worker in hopes that it would be passed on to Constable PLUNKETT, but it was too dark for her to tell if it was eventually placed upon him.
A few doors away, at a home directly across the street from where he was killed, another homeowner recounted hearing officers yelling, "Breathing! Breathing!"
Police had followed two cars - both Hondas - from an address in Toronto to Ascot Crescent, in the Birchmount Road and Steeles Avenue area. At least one of the vehicles was stolen and police believe it had been taken to a quiet location to remove its airbag.
The driver was trying to do just that when Constable PLUNKETT moved in for the arrest, Chief LA BARGE said.
The death is the first killing of a police officer in York Region since 1984, when two officers died in the line of duty within weeks, and sent shock waves across the force, formed in 1971 and now serving more than 900,000 people.
"It's an organization where we've not lost many officers, but even one is one too many," Deputy Chief Bruce HERRIDGE said.
The theft of airbags and other auto accessories is a long-established business, said Detective Staff Sergeant Scott MILLS, who heads the Ontario Provincial Police auto-theft unit.
"There is a very large grey market for replacement auto components, airbags being one, along with Global Position System, stereos, body components - things that can easily be put into high-end vehicles," he said.
"Body shops buy them. There's a very low profit margin in auto body repair, so if the owner can buy, say, airbags for a Cadillac Escalade for $100 on the grey market, then he doesn't have to go to General Motors and buy them for $400."
As for the thieves, police say they range from drug-hungry addicts needing a fix, to slick, well-organized criminal gangs.
"And some shops buy them up like candy," another police source said.
In this instance, detectives believe the suspects specialized in the theft of airbags, which also get shipped abroad to developing countries.
Chief LA BARGE suggested Constable PLUNKETT had no choice but to act as he did.
"Surveillance officers work in a team environment, but the situations that they encounter can happen so quickly that there is absolutely no alternative but for the surveillance officers to make those arrests," he said.
"And this is the particular situation that we are dealing with here."
Chief LA BARGE indicated that 43 airbags had been stolen in Markham since January of this year - most from Honda and Acura model vehicles - and that this particular investigation had been under way for two or three weeks.
Nadeem JIWA, 19, has been charged with manslaughter, which usually describes an act of unintentional homicide. Baseer YOUSAFZAI, 23, faces charges of breach of bail and possession of stolen property.
Both men are from Toronto and likely face additional charges, police said.

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BARGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-09 published
Officer remembered as friend, athlete
'Affable manner and his Huron County charm made him a very easy person to get to know,' Chief says
By Sean Patrick SULLIVAN, Canadian Press, Page A10
Newmarket -- Thousands of police officers from across Canada paid tribute yesterday to slain Detective Constable Robert PLUNKETT, who was remembered at his funeral service as a dedicated family man with a personal motto of: "Go big or go home."
Det. Constable PLUNKETT, 43, a 22-year veteran of York Regional Police, was killed last week when he was struck by a car while attempting to make an arrest.
Officers in dress uniform were marshalled on a grass-covered slope before marching into the complex in this city north of Toronto, followed by a solemn stream of mourners.
The complex's 3,500 seats were filled, as was an overflow room. Some 1,500 other mourners - many of them uniformed police officers - listened to the ceremony from the parking lot in 30-degree temperatures.
York Regional Police Chief Armand LA BARGE praised Det. Constable PLUNKETT's athleticism and superb physical conditioning, which he said set the officer apart from others in his rookie year.
"Rob's affable manner and his Huron County charm made him a very easy person to get to know, and as a member of our police service, Rob distinguished himself as a very determined and a very gifted athlete," Chief LA BARGE said.
York Inspector Tom CARRIQUE said Det. Constable PLUNKETT's colleagues valued his ability to bring levity to a situation with a practical joke, often at the expense of an unsuspecting supervisor.
He recalled how "Plunk" and a few accomplices were once caught carrying a colleague's Austin Mini Cooper across a parking lot on their way to hiding it in a corn field.
Glenn MacDONNELL, president of Special Olympics Ontario, said Det. Constable PLUNKETT's love of sport - and his belief that policing is more than just law and order - prompted the enthusiastic officer to throw himself into organizing events for the group, including acting as chair for the Special Olympic Spring Games in 2000.
Det. Constable PLUNKETT received a number of accolades throughout his career, including one in February, 1998, when he was recognized for bravery in assisting in rescuing an elderly woman from the freezing waters of Swan Lake in nearby Markham.
He is survived by his wife Sonja and three children, Amanda, Matthew and Jeffrey.
The funeral comes one day after a charge against a suspect in Det. Constable PLUNKETT's death, Nadeem JIWA, 19, was upgraded from manslaughter to first-degree murder. Baseer YOUSAFZAI, 23, faces at least four lesser charges. Both suspects appeared in a Newmarket courtroom yesterday and will return to court later this month.

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BARGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-10 published
Detective with a steel-trap memory excelled at undercover surveillance
He did everything from wire tapping to following vehicles, even though weaving in and out of traffic while remaining undetected by a suspect is not for everyone
By Alwynne GWILT, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
John (Freebie) FREEMAN was a York Regional detective in Ontario who never gave up a case until all the parts of the puzzle were perfectly in place. For much of his career, he was a surveillance expert with a steel-trap memory who knew the name, address and activities of every bad guy in his bailiwick.
The son of a dentist father and a homemaker mother, he grew up in a two-storey brick home on Chine Drive in Scarborough, now part of Toronto. As a boy, he was surrounded by a large extended family. In 1964, his father and uncle bought an outdoor skating rink that they called Little Switzerland; it was the job of the family men to keep it up, packing snow down and flooding it on cold winter nights. He spent a couple of winters with his cousin, Greg, working at the rink, before both families decided to go rural and move to the village of Zephyr, just north of Uxbridge, Ontario, where home became about 80 hectares of blissful farmland. Along with his cousins, he bused 15 kilometres every day to attend secondary school in Uxbridge.
But country life was not for him. As soon as he turned 19, he joined the Toronto Metro Police. For a young man who loved almost any kind of motor vehicle, the highlight of joining so young was to be assigned the use of a Harley Davidson police motorcycle. They were fast times: From his motor bikes to his new job and a marriage at 21 to Ellen Dianne HENDERSON, Mr. FREEMAN left city life nearly as quickly as he entered it. After only four years in Toronto, he moved north to York Regional Police, where he would spend the rest of his career. In 1975, he began work as a uniformed officer in Newmarket, Ontario
Five years later, he was selected to be part of York Region's first surveillance unit. He had a near-photographic memory that was perfect for the job, and there was rarely a criminal whose name, address and activities he did not know by heart or could not recount easily to colleagues. Friends considered him a walking computer and liked to ask random questions simply to see whether he knew the answer.
As part of the Special Sections Unit, his work entailed everything from wire tapping to following vehicles. It was his love of driving that really cut him out as the person to tail cars. Weaving in and out of traffic while remaining undetected by the suspect is not a job for every police officer, but it was a skill that Mr. FREEMAN mastered, according to York Regional Police Chief Armand LA BARGE.
"If you're careless, you'd never survive," Mr. LA BARGE said. "But he had abilities beyond the norm, and there was a passion in Craig."
But Mr. FREEMAN possessed more than just memory skills and excelled at connecting with people through his quiet wit and friendly manner. Known as Freebie, he possessed a relaxed demeanour that came in handy when a situation needed to be defused. Answering a complaint about a noisy bar in nearby Vaughan, he convinced the owner that, rather than trying to lower the decibels, maybe the party should be fully shut down. Where most police officers would get an angry response, Mr. FREEMAN found respect.
Colleagues said you could also never tell whether he was serious or joking. Wes BONNER, his former partner, liked to recount the story of a female officer from outside the district who arrived dressed in a leather outfit.
"I just love a woman when she dresses in leather," remarked Mr. FREEMAN.
"What do you mean by that?" she asked.
"Well, you smell like a new car."
During the early years in surveillance, Mr. FREEMAN became especially close to his team, since the unit's six or seven members worked the same hours. They spent off-time together, sometimes becoming close enough to share Christmas holidays or vacation trips. It wasn't easy work and could be dangerous, investigating organized crime, auto theft and motorcycle gangs. After only a couple of years, Mr. FREEMAN was promoted to detective and took over running his team.
Everyone in the unit knew they had to pull their weight to meet his expectations. Mr. FREEMAN saw hard work as simply keeping up the standards he felt every officer should share - in the work, the uniform or even the vehicle they drove. As detective, most of his work should have been focused behind the desk or in administrative duties, but he could often be seen hopping in a car with colleagues and chasing after criminals.
During this time, he separated from and then divorced his wife. Later, he met Daneen RAE, a fellow police officer. The two became close and moved in together. In the mid-1980s, Ms. RAE was diagnosed with leukemia and given just three months to live. He stuck with her and she fought on for more than three years before dying in 1988. Not long afterward, Mr. FREEMAN transferred out of the special sections unit.
In April of 1994, he unexpectedly experienced a change in his social life that would set the course for years to come. At 42, he met the love of his life on a blind date set up by one of her Friends. Craig FREEMAN and Doctor Carol ROLHEISER made an unusual couple: She was an associated dean at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education, while he was deep in the subculture of law enforcement.
In 1997, they married. But while honeymooning in San Francisco, Mr. FREEMAN began having problems with pain in his feet. When he returned to work, he began a quest to find out what on earth was troubling him. Over the next couple of years, he tried to figure out the cause, but he and his doctors remained puzzled. When he was finally hospitalized because of a blood clot, doctors suggested amputating his legs. That struck him as a ridiculous notion.
Dr. ROLHEISER called in some favours through her university network and the couple found a doctor who finally solved the mystery. Three years in, Mr. FREEMAN found out he was suffering from POEMS syndrome, a very rare blood disorder with no real explanation that doctors believe may involve an overgrowth of bone-marrow cells. Its unusual acronym is made up from elements of its most common symptoms: Polyneuropathy (peripheral nerve damage); organomegaly (abnormal enlargement of organs); endocrinopathy (damage to hormone-producing glands)/Edema; M protein (an abnormal antibody); and skin abnormalities.
In the end, doctors had to amputate one leg below the knee. For the next seven years, Mr. FREEMAN maintained a positive attitude and acquired all the gadgets necessary to outfit a van in a way that would allow him to motor on. Although he technically semi-retired in 1999, he remained a member of the police force and delighted in finding his Friends gifts on the Internet. Sometimes, colleagues would open the door to discover a new kitchen gadget or even, since he was the "world's biggest Jimmy Buffet fan," the latest margarita machine.
This year, with his health deteriorating, Mr. FREEMAN drove himself to his official retirement ceremony, but fell very ill in August. In hospital, he charmed the staff with his attitude. Even in his last days, his humour was not to be messed with.
"Do you know you are in Toronto General Hospital?" asked Doctor ROLHEISER, testing his cognition.
"Well, I'm not in Kansas City," he replied.
John Craig FREEMAN was born in Toronto on July 6, 1952. He died at Toronto General Hospital on August 19, 2007. He was 55. He is survived by his wife, Carol ROLHEISER, and his brother, Mark FREEMAN. He also leaves many others in his extended family.

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BARGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2007-01-07 published
Head-on collision kills 2 teens, police officer
Van carrying teens crossed into oncoming lane on Major Mackenzie Drive, crashing into off-duty York Region police officer's car early yesterday
By Thulasi SRIKANTHAN, Staff Reporter with files from Meghan WATERS and Nick KYONKA
Every Christmas, York Region police officer Davis AHLOWALIA would buy and gift-wrap hundreds of boxes of chocolates, then drive to Nathan Phillips Square to hand them out to the homeless.
It was typical behaviour for the 28-year-old police officer, who helped raise funds for an orphanage in Jamaica and worked to feed the poor in Calcutta.
But yesterday, the man who worked hard to build a better life for others was killed in a head-on collision after a van travelling in the opposite direction crossed into his lane.
Two teenage boys from the van were also killed in the accident, near Major Mackenzie and Pine Valley Drives in Vaughan. A third passenger in the van is in critical condition at Sunnybrook Hospital. Police yesterday tentatively identified AHLOWALIA. One of the vehicles was registered in his name.
"It hasn't really sunk in yet because he is just so full of life and I can't imagine that would be taken away so quickly," said his sister-in-law Alisia D'SILVA. "He is one of the pillars of this family. It's going to be so quiet in this house. He has always been so full of life, he walks into the door and you know he's there 'cause he is always laughing."
Police remembered AHLOWALIA as a humanitarian with a warm heart. "This is truly a tragedy that someone so young with so much to give is gone," said York Police Chief Armand LA BARGE.
In the last few hours of his life, D'SILVA says AHLOWALIA was with her and one of his older brothers. They spent the evening having dinner and joking around.
"We were reminiscing about our childhoods and growing up in Indian families and joking about pranks we used to get into and the trouble we used to get into with our parents," she said.
AHLOWALIA's final stop before he left to drive home was the house of his sister-in-law's parents in York Region.
"I hugged him goodnight and went inside and he talked to his brother for a bit and got back in the car and that was it and then a couple of hours later, we got a call that he was gone," she said.
The youngest of three brothers, he grew up in a devout Catholic family. He planned to become a priest but left after a year to pursue a career in the force.
"Any sort of injustice he just couldn't stand for it, he wouldn't just sit back there and think about it, he'd get out there and do something about it."
Last October, he flew to India to work with Mother Teresa's charity, where he bought food for the homeless and cared for the mentally handicapped. His vacations were spent volunteering. "He's done more in his 28 years than most people would have in 90 years," D'SILVA said. "He has lived his life and he has touched so many people in that short time."

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BARGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2007-01-09 published
Crash claims 'a true hero'
York officer's beat reached from orphans in Jamaica to the poor in Calcutta slums
By Jim WILKES, Staff Reporter
Davis AHLOWALIA's family has locked hearts with kin of a teenager who drove the van that crashed into the 28-year-old off-duty York Region police officer's car and killed him Saturday.
AHLOWALIA, Waleed SHAUKAT, 17, and his friend Sulman YUSAF, 19, all died in the inferno that engulfed the vehicles on Major Mackenzie Dr. in Vaughan. A third van occupant, Mohammed MATTU, 19, is in a coma in hospital.
"When two families get together to mourn the loss of two young children, there's not many words that can be said, but tears," Anil AHLOWALIA, Davis's older brother, told reporters crammed into the family room of his parents' home in Richmond Hill yesterday.
"As our family grieves the loss of a true Canadian hero, our condolences go out to the SHAUKAT and YUSAF families, who have also lost part of their families. We are keeping the MATTU family in our prayers during this time."
AHLOWALIA's family had gathered, not to dwell on his death, but to tell the community of his great charitable work that took him around the world.
Anil spoke of the Jamaican orphanage his brother had championed, even winning support of the police force for his efforts, and of his deeds for the poor in Calcutta last year.
"With the help of God we are trying to come to terms with the loss of a great man," he said.
"We mourn his sudden death, but more importantly, we celebrate the life of a man who gave of himself unconditionally, to his family, his Friends and everyone he met.
"(Davis's) love for family and Friends was only contested by his love for serving the poor and the unfortunate. Among his role models were Mother Teresa, John Paul II and our mother."
His parents, Anna and Rishi, wiped away tears as York police Chief Armand LA BARGE said the force would do everything it can to grow AHLOWALIA's efforts in Jamaica and help "those in their most desperate hour of need."
AHLOWALIA had been a constable 2½ years, but LA BARGE said he'd had an effect on "the entire global community.
"Davis had a sense of humanity and compassion that exceeded most people's in this world," the chief said. "Davis was always looking for somebody that needed a helping hand."
LA BARGE pointed to AHLOWALIA's work in Jamaica and Calcutta, "helping young people, helping children that are stricken with poverty and disease, suffering with Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, helping seniors that had basically, as he put it, been discarded by society.
"To me it's like losing a son. Davis was more than just a police officer, to me Davis was a friend. He inspired all of us to do more from a Christian perspective."
Anil said his brother touched many lives.
"We are proud of our brother for fulfilling his dreams and helping so many people in so little time," he said. "As a family, we pray that Davis's senseless death will not be meaningless, that this young man's life of charity and generosity will inspire all of us to love unconditionally, to give generously and to live life to the fullest."
He read from a letter family members had found after AHLOWALIA died, a letter he had been too modest to share.
In it, the mother of a 23-year-old woman told how compassionate AHLOWALIA had been when he went to her home after her daughter had attempted suicide.
It was, Anil said, just the kind of thing their mother -- "the pillar of our family" -- had taught her sons, to "give 'til it hurts, to practise your faith.
"She's an exceptional lady, she's unbelievable and Davis took everything she said and lived it."
Visitation for AHLOWALIA will be at Chapel Ridge Funeral Home on Woodbine Ave. in Markham on Thursday from 1-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.
The funeral will be at Saint Mary Immaculate Church in Richmond Hill at 11 a.m. Friday.

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BARGE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2007-01-13 published
Bidding farewell to a kind soul
Family chose simple, unadorned casket, befitting the humble nature of officer who helped so many
By Christian COTRONEO, staff reporter with files from Joanna SMITH, Page B3
The casket Anil AHLOWALIA chose for his younger brother Davis was oak, without stain or ornament.
It was much like one the brothers had seen on television more than a year ago for the burial of Pope John Paul II.
"We saw this simple casket and we said, 'That's the way people should be buried -- humbleness, right to the hour of death and beyond,'" Anil recalled.
So when the AHLOWALIA family had to choose a casket for Davis, they looked past the ornate, expensive models.
"We saw one that was just oak," Anil said. "No stain. No glamour. It was made for Davis."
Only it was made too early.
Davis AHLOWALIA was killed on January 6, 2007, when an oncoming van unaccountably swerved into his lane on Major Mackenzie Doctor in Vaughan. The 28-year-old York Regional Police officer was off duty at the time.
In all, the fiery crash claimed four victims. The driver of the van, Waleed SHAUKAT, 17, and 19-year-old passenger Sulman YUSAF died on the scene.
The driver's mother, Mansoora SHAUKAT, said yesterday in a telephone interview that she was sorry to learn her son's other close friend, Muhammed MATTU, had succumbed to his injuries Thursday night after spending the week in hospital in critical condition.
"A very cute boy, Muhammed," she said.
She remembers the 17-year-old, whose family she said lives in the Peace Village neighbourhood of Maple, Ontario, often coming home with her son to watch movies or eat pizza in the basement.
"They were very close Friends, all three -- Muhammed, Sulman and Waleed."
Yesterday 1,000 mourners -- more than the church could bear -- attended the funeral for the fallen officer.
For a few frozen moments, traffic along a bustling four-block stretch of Yonge St. in Richmond Hill was hushed. Police officers held cars at bay. The soft strains of a devotional hymn floated outside Saint Mary Immaculate Roman Catholic Church.
Scores more officers -- Royal Canadian Mounted Police in scarlet and polished leather riding boots, York Regional Police in red-brimmed caps and Ontario Provincial Police officers in full regalia -- lined the church steps outside. When the oak casket emerged, they held a long salute, bidding a final farewell to one of their own.
"Although he only served for a short time, he made an incredible impact on our community," said York Regional Police Chief Armand LA BARGE after the service. "Every human contact, every radio call, every interaction that he had, he brought his Christian values to the forefront and helped people."
A fervent Christian, AHLOWALIA travelled to impoverished regions of the world whenever he could, persuading his fellow officers to lend a hand to an orphanage in Jamaica, and helping the poor in Calcutta, India.
Parents and older brothers joined a grim procession of family, following the casket down the church steps. "Today, I had the difficult task of burying my brother," said Anil AHLOWALIA, his voice breaking, as he spoke after the funeral. "It's one of the hardest things I've ever had to do in my life."
Chris GRANT, who attended Saint Michael's College School with AHLOWALIA, joined about 100 former schoolmates and teachers at the service, many wearing their school ties in memory of the departed.
"I mostly remember him walking around on game days, wearing his football jersey," GRANT said. "He was very proud to be on the team."
GRANT recalled his schoolmate wanted to be a priest -- "but decided to serve his community in a different way."
That desire led AHLOWALIA to police college, where he met Ryan STEVENSON, also training to be an officer.
"He would always take time out of his day to stop and say hello, ask how you are and how your family is," said STEVENSON, now a special constable with York Regional Police.
Even then, it was obvious that AHLOWALIA's ambitions went beyond the badge. "He used policing as a springboard into what he did in the community," said STEVENSON.
Indeed, during the hiring process, AHLOWALIA was asked why he wanted to become a police officer -- and, according to Chief LA BARGE, he answered, "to help people in the most need."

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BARGE - All Categories in OGSPI

BARGMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-08 published
PRICE, Harry
After a long life filled with much love, on Thursday, September 6, 2007 at Kensington Gardens. Harry PRICE, beloved husband of the late Minnie PRICE. Loving father and father-in-law of Sharryn Price KELMAN and Harold KELMAN, Gayle and Gary MITCHELL, Marla PRICE, Cindy Price EISNER and Murray EISNER, and Matthew PRICE and the late Michelle Goodman PRICE. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Rose and Ed ORZY, and the late Joseph, Sam, and Max. Devoted grandfather of Todd BARGMAN, Sari and Philip SHAW, Carrie and Nick MAZZEI, Beth and Zale APPLEBY, Michael SINGER, Mitchell, and Jessica EISNER. Great-grandfather of Sierra, Jakob, Ethan, Casey, and Sydney. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue W., (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, September 9th at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Adath Israel Synagogue section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva 68 Babcombe Drive, Thornhill, daily from 2: 00 p.m. Donations may be made to The Harry Price Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324 or at www.benjamins.ca.

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BARHAM o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-17 published
RYDALL, Joan Adeline (née FERGUSON)
Peacefully at her son's home at R.R.#2, Durham on Saturday, September 15, 2007. Joan (née FERGUSON) of Orangeville in her 62nd year. Loved mother of Sherry OUTHWAITE and Alan LEIBTOG of Hamilton and Calvin (Maureen) of R.R.#2, Durham. Loving sister of Jack (Hazel) of R.R.#2, Hanover, Jessie PITTMAN of Scarborough, Ella (Roy) WHITE/WHYTE of Midland, Norman (Derlene) of Port Elgin, Mike of Alma, Joyce (Bob) BARHAM of Walkerton, Jean (Keith) HASTIE of R.R.#2, Priceville and Nancy (Robert) TALBOT of Walkerton. Sadly missed by her grandchildren Erin, Katey, Becky and Amy. Predeceased by her parents Irwin and Janet and her sister Gladys HELM. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Durham on Monday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at the Royal Canadian Legion, Durham at 1 p.m. on Tuesday, September 18, 2007. Interment Amos Cemetery, Dromore.

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BARK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-25 published
QUESNELLE, Amy Catherine (née TEMPLIN)
Passed away peacefully, surrounded by the love of her family on Tuesday, October 23, 2007 at Lisaard House, Cambridge at the age of 41.
Beloved wife of John QUESNELLE; loving mother of Matthew, Scott and Sydney. Dear daughter of Elizabeth (née MORRISON) TEMPLIN of Kitchener and her late husband Peter and daughter-in-law of Bernard and Helen QUESNELLE of Sudbury. Dear sister of John Templin of Whitby, Martha and her husband Stephen WENN of Waterloo, Sarah and her husband Stephen QUANZ, of Kitchener, Jane and her husband David ALBERS of Calgary, brother-in-law, Peter QUESNELLE and wife Linda of Waterloo, sisters-in-law Rita WILSON and Susan QUESNELLE of Calgary and Cathy QUESNELLE of Halifax. Amy will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews.
Predeceased by her brother Timothy (1956), sister-in-law Mary BARK- TEMPLIN (1991,) brother-in-law Doug WILSON (2006,) and sister-in-law Lee TEMPLIN (2007.)
Amy was employed by Bell Canada for many years but still had plenty of time for her real passion which was her children. She also found time to tend to her gardens, work on her scrapbooks, and play the occasional round of golf.
Amy's family will receive relatives and Friends on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener, 519-749-8467 and on Saturday from 10-10: 45 a.m. at Parkminster United Church, 275 Erb St. E., Waterloo. A celebration of Amy's life will take place at 11 a.m. on Saturday, October 27, 2007 at Parkminster United Church, Rev. Keith HAGERMAN officiating.
Cremation has taken place. Internment will take place in the family plot at Belsyde Cemetery, Fergus.
In Amy's memory, donations may be made to the family trust fund or Lisaard House. Please call the funeral home for details.
The family would like to express their gratitude for the overwhelming support and assistance from family, Friends, relatives, and strangers over the past three years. Special thanks to the Dr.'s and staff at the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Community Care Access Centre in-home care staff, and the staff at Lisaard House.
Visit www.henrywalser.com for Amy's memorial.

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BARKER o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-10-03 published
DYCE, Bertha Pauline
Passed away at the Huronia District Hospital, Midland on Saturday, September 29, 2007. Pauline DYCE of Wasaga Beach, in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Norman Edward DYCE. Dear mother of Wendy (Jim) ROBERTS, James DYCE and Barbara (Robert) HENDERSON all of Wasaga Beach. Loved grandmother of David, Paul, Stephen, Brian, Wayne, Casie, Alycia and Cody and lovingly remembered by her great-grandchildren Emily, Alyson, Samantha, Ben and Jacob. Sister of Howard BARKER, Evelyn FERRY and the late Robert, Lucille, Lynes and Nathan. Cremation with interment at Elmvale Cemetery. A Celebration of Pauline's Life will be held at the Wasaga Beach Lions Den, 1724 Mosley Street, Wasaga Beach on Saturday, October 6 at 1 p.m. Memorial Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated. Book of condolence may be signed at www.lynnstonefuneralhome.com
Page 17

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BARKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-16 published
HASEN, Jack Austin (1942-2007)
Passed away peacefully, at home with his family by his side, on Thursday, June 14th, 2007. Jack will be forever missed by his loving wife Christina and sons Tyler and Adam. Jack wrote: 'Since I fell in love with Christina, she has been my rock, friend and companion. I will love her forever and will always be a part of her. I have been blessed with 2 wonderful sons, Tyler and Adam, whom I will cherish forever, and blessed with their wonderful mother, Patty HASEN, who lovingly brought them into this world for us.' Jack will be deeply missed by his sister Mussette BARKER, his brother Ken and their families, Christina's family and his many Friends. Jack was a member of the 1968 Canadian Olympic Team (yachting). He was also a long time member of Royal Canadian Yacht Club and Ashbridges Bay Yacht Club. He graduated with his Civil Engineering degree from the University of Waterloo (1967), and finished his M.B.A. at Western (1974). He was a real estate development executive with Hudson's Bay Co., and later with Slough Estates Canada Ltd. as Executive Vice President. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Sunday, June 17th. A graveside service will be held at Mount Pleasant Cemetery with the procession from the funeral home beginning at 11 a.m. on Monday, June 18th. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com. 'Life has been good and rewarding'

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BARKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-23 published
BARKER PAULSON, Marilyn (née STEVENS)
Marilyn left hand-in-hand with the angels on Tuesday, June 19, 2007 at the Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto after a short but courageous and well fought battle with brain cancer.
Marilyn is the beloved daughter of the late Fred and Reta STEVENS. She leaves her loving daughter Heather McGORAN and son-in-law Peter, as well as three grandchildren to whom she was devoted and immensely proud, Lindsay, Kaitlin, and Matthew, who all travelled to amazing destinations with their 'Grandy'. Marilyn was the much loved sister and great friend to Fred STEVENS and his wife Laura, and special aunt to Leah and her husband Erik.
The family would like to thank the doctors and staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, in particular Doctor Normand LAPERRIERE as well as Marilyn's caregiver Carolina RAZON who was an angel for Marilyn in her last weeks.
In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Marilyn Barker Paulson Brain Cancer Fund for Children

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BARKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-25 published
Prince Edward Island plant pathologist led the world in potato research and breeding
Although unable to stomach spuds himself, he believed that with some laboratory tinkering the humble tuber could be the answer to beating famine in developing countries
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
As a boy, Orville PAGE had a bad experience with a potato. He either choked on one or had an allergic reaction. In any case, he never knowingly ate one again.
Yet he was to become one of the world's leading potato researchers and a strong believer in the introduction and expansion of potato production in developing countries as a means of alleviating hunger. The Ontario-born scientist worked in Peru from 1973 to 1985 as the first director of research and deputy director at the International Potato Center. The centre is a multinational institution devoted to reducing poverty through sustainable development of the potato, sweet potato and other root and tuber crops.
Dr. PAGE, known to Friends and co-workers as Ory, had earlier spent 12 years researching potatoes in Fredericton with Agriculture Canada and the University of New Brunswick. And he continued his potato work after his retirement through assignments with a number of development agencies.
As a young man, he was based in Prince Edward Island, Canada's potato capital, where he served as a pilot with the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. He went on to obtain a doctorate in plant pathology, to teach at the Ontario Agriculture College in Guelph and to spend a number of years researching banana diseases for the United Fruit Co. in both Honduras and the United States.
Colleagues at International Potato Center say Doctor PAGE set the centre's overall research policy while letting his staff get on with their individual projects without interference. They remember him as a charming but tough boss, and as a dedicated scientist with a commitment to feeding the world's burgeoning population and a reputation for looking immaculate -- even when inspecting agriculture projects in remote areas of the Third World. In his spare time, he had a passion for sailing and dabbled in studying sparrows, saying he was intrigued by the small birds' ability to adapt to local conditions anywhere in the world.
"Ory laid the groundwork for a highly recognized international potato research program," says Hubert Zandstra, a fellow Canadian who was International Potato Center's director general from 1991 to 2005. One of Doctor PAGE's major contributions, he says, was the development of sanitary measures that allow genetic material from potatoes to be exchanged among researchers around the world and to be made available for breeding in developing countries. Without those procedures, most countries would refuse entry to specimens taken from live potato plants.
Peter VanderZaag, a Canadian potato breeder, says Doctor PAGE's initial priority at the centre was to collect and classify wild and cultivated species of potato and study their properties. His team then had to find ways to transfer disease-resistant genes from plants that grow wild in the Andes to domesticated varieties, a complicated process because of the genetic makeup of potatoes.
Dr. PAGE also helped further the growing of potatoes from the plants' seeds, rather than from pieces of the tuber as had been the normal practice. This is important in Third World countries because it means all the tubers could be used for food, says Dr. VanderZaag, who was once Southeast Asian regional director with the Consultative Group on International Agricultural Research, of which International Potato Center is a member.
Dr. PAGE had a special interest in late blight, the fungal disease that led to one million deaths during the great Irish famine in the mid-1800s, says George Tai, a retired New Brunswick potato researcher. Late blight continues to ravage crops today, and Dr. PAGE worked to find a way to prevent it by building up resistance. Under his guidance, researchers and breeders developed many new potato varieties and introduced them to suitable locations around the world. "To a large extent," says William George BARKER, a retired potato researcher and long-time friend, "the potato presence in the world is largely his doing."
In a 1994 paper published in the Canadian Journal of Plant Pathology, Dr. PAGE explained that potatoes yield more food energy per hectare than cereals and are especially valuable in developing countries that can grow more than one crop a year. The most critical problem in developing countries is the population explosion, he wrote. But potato production in the Third World is limited by the lack of disease and pest controls and the limited availability of chemical fertilizers.
Orville Thomas PAGE grew up in Burlington, Ontario, and learned carpentry skills from his father, English-born Thomas William PAGE, and used them later in life to design and finish a 12-metre wooden sailboat he called Caesar's Ghost. He passed his woodworking skills on to his son, William, a professional carver who lives in New Brunswick.
Orville's mother, Eunice Grace (née BUSCOMBE,) died when the boy was 3. He and a younger sister Grace (now BRIDLE) were raised by their father's second wife, Scottish-born Isobel REID.
The future scientist was not a stellar student at high school and was happy to sign up with the Royal Canadian Air Force when war broke out, says his daughter, Karen MARANTZ. He joined as a mechanic, but soon quit and re-enlisted to be trained as a pilot. He should have been turned down because he was colour-blind, she says. But he avoided detection by memorizing the correct responses to eye tests. Based at No. 1 General Reconnaissance School in Summerside, he flew low flights over coastal waters looking for enemy submarines. He was also the base's chief test pilot. Wartime flying in Prince Edward Island was so dangerous that 98 young airmen died there, mostly as the result of air crashes. While in the service he courted Norma Isobel ELLIS of Summerside and married her in 1944.
After the war he went to Guelph to earn a bachelor of science at the Ontario Agricultural College (then affiliated with the University of Toronto), followed by a masters and PhD from Iowa State College. From 1954 to 1957, he was an associate professor at Ontario Agricultural College. It was there he met Doctor BARKER, then a fellow member of the botany faculty. The pair went on to work together in both Honduras and Fredericton.
While in Guelph, Doctor BARKER, who had also served in the Canadian military, extolled the virtues of "army underwear" and convinced his friend to buy some with him at a surplus store. The pairs they purchased were too constrictive to wear, but became the basis of a long-running joke.
Once while Doctor PAGE was giving a scientific lecture in the United States, his friend dangled a set of army underwear from the balcony on a string. Doctor PAGE retaliated by having a pilot friend drop a package containing army underwear to Doctor BARKER using a parachute. The underwear passed back and forth on special occasions for half a century. At Doctor PAGE's 50th anniversary party, Doctor BARKER had a pair piped in on a silver tray.
From 1957 to 1959, Doctor PAGE worked in La Lima, Honduras, where he conducted research into banana diseases for the United Fruit Co. He brought along his wife and two young children. Mrs. MARANTZ says her parents flipped a coin to decide whether to go or not. At that time, United Fruit, which operated banana plantations, had near-total control of most Central American economies. He continued as a research officer with the United Fruit Co. in Norwood, Massachusetts., from 1959 until 1961.
The family then moved to Fredericton where Doctor PAGE was a research officer with Agriculture Canada's national potato program until 1964 and then a professor and associate dean of science at the University of New Brunswick until 1973. His work at the potato centre in Lima started as a one-year sabbatical from the university, but he ended up staying until his retirement in 1985. He hired staff and directed the work of some 50 PhD-level scientists and their research students. During his career he published 33 scientific papers and served as president of the Canadian Phytopathological Society.
On his retirement, he moved with his wife to a Summerside house that had been built for her parents. But he continued to work as a consultant with International Potato Center and such agencies as Canadian International Development Agency and the U.S. Agency for International Development. Over the years his work took him to more than 25 countries including China, India, Tanzania and Papua New Guinea.
In Summerside he put his knowledge of sustainable development to use as a volunteer board member with the Bedeque Bay Environmental Management Association, a non-profit group that focuses on local ecosystem issues. He helped with the establishment of the Prince Edward Island Potato Museum at O'Leary and worked on setting up a local library in a former train station. He also laid out a heritage tree walking tour that highlighted species imported from Europe by pioneers or from points abroad by early seafarers. That project won him the nickname Tree Man of Summerside.
In recent years, he began writing poetry, with environmental issues as one of his most common themes. He continued to keep up with developments in science until he was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease.
Orville Thomas PAGE was born in Burlington, Ontario, on February 13, 1921. He died of pulmonary arrest on August 4, 2007, in Summerside. He was 86. His wife, Norma Isobel (née Ellis), died in 2006. He leaves his daughter, Karen Marantz, his son, William PAGE, and his sister, Grace Bridle.

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BARKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
FUCHS, Doctor Helmuth (1929-2007)
It is with great sadness that the family of Helmuth FUCHS announces his passing on August 27, 2007 after a long illness. Helmuth died peacefully in Wiarton, Ontario with his wife Mercedes Chacin de FUCHS at his side. He will be sorely missed by his sons Christian and Mathias, his adopted sons and daughters Mariano CONSENS, Chris PRODANOS, Veronica TRUJILLO and Flavia CONSENS, his grandchildren Marie-Andrea, Sebastien, Alex, Clemmy, Nicole, Micaela, Marina and Nicolas, his sister Gerda (Bauer) and brother Hans Peter and also by his innumerable Friends and colleagues in every corner of the world. Helmuth is predeceased by his parents Margerette (POSS) and Johann and his siter Rose-Marie. Helmuth was born in Vienna, Austria on February 6, 1929. A man of many talents, he became a renowned and distinguished ethnologist, museum professional and educator. In 1956 he received his PhD in Ethnology and Archaeology from the University of Vienna, with a focus on indigenous cultures of Latin America. One year later, in 1957, the President of Austria presented him with that country's most prestigious scholarly award, the Theodor Korner Prize. Soon after, he became Curator of Ethnology in the Museum of Natural Science in Caracus, Venezuela and served as that institution's Chief of the Ethnology and Archaeology Departments from 1962 to 1967. During his last three years in Caracus, he dedicated half of his time to serving as visiting professor at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. In 1967 Helmuth was asked to join the staff of the Royal Ontario Museum as Curator in the Ethnology Department. Here he continued his valuable field research on Indian tribes of northern South America, contributing greatly to the collection of artifacts and publications of the Royal Ontario Museum. From 1975 to 1980 he served as Curator-in-Charge of the Ethnology Department with tremendous energy and dedication. In the period that followed, up to his retirement from the museum in 1994, Helmuth FUCHS acted as a guest professor in some ten universities in Mexico, Peru, Germany, Austria, Canada and U.S.A. He served on important committees, including two terms on the Executive Board of the United Nations (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) International Committee on Ethnology Museums. After his retirement he continued his museum work with Canadian Executive Service Overseas donating his considerable skills, experience and knowledge to various institutions and agencies throughout the world. Helmuth passed his last years at his beloved retreat at Colpoy's Bay. He took great pleasure tending his garden and feeding the birds that found their way to his sanctuary; he found peace in listening to their songs and to the sounds of the water nearby. He loved to behold the fabulous view from his special lookout spot at the kitchen table. And, perhaps most of all, he treasured the time he was able to spend with all of his grandchildren - just as they delighted in their time with him. In addition to his prodigious professional achievements, Helmuth was also a man of rare musical sensitivity and talent; had he not chosen the career that he did, he might well have become an accomplished concert pianist. He always shared his love of music with those around him and entertained and delighted us all with his magnificent performances and shared with us his collection of musical instruments and music from all over the world. The family wishes to express special thanks to Doctor Jean MARMOREO and Doctor Maia NOSENKIS and to the staff of the Wiarton Hospital, as well as the staff at CarePartners and Community Care Access Centre. The family also expresses their special gratitude to Doctor Eric BARKER who attended Helmuth with utmost compassion and dedication not only during the last eight months but during the last moments of his life. We owe you all a debt of gratitude for the care and comfort you gave to him. In accordance with Helmuth's wishes, cremation has taken place. There will be no funeral home visitation or service. There will be a memorial gathering at a later date. Arrangements entrusted to the George Funeral Home, Wiarton, Ontario. Donations made to the Wiarton Hospital or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com or Friends_Of_Helmuth_Fuchs@comcast.net

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BARKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-23 published
HICKMAN, Maude Mary
It is with great sadness the family announces the peaceful passing of our darling Mum and Nana at Castleview-Wychwood Towers on Thursday, October 18, 2007 at age 89. Predeceased by her beloved husband Sennen and eldest son Dan. She will be forever missed by her sons, daughter, daughters-in-law, son-in-law, grandchildren, great-grandchildren: Rudy and Ann; Clary and Rilla; Alan and Pat; Marietta and A.J.; Judith; Karen and Melody; John, Maria and Grace; Marika, Rick, Micaela Maude, Arik and Caiden; Michelle, Adam, Stewart and Alyssa. Mum will be lovingly remembered by all her nieces, nephews, relatives and Friends in Canada, United Kingdom India, Australia and other parts of the world. She will be missed by all who knew her, especially Hazel FREDERICK who was her close companion and caregiver for many years. Maude was born in Kolar Gold fields, India. She loved to cook and showed her love for all of us through her cooking. She was a talented seamstress, and she loved to travel with her beloved partner of 62 years, making many Friends around the world. Most of all she was passionate, loving and caring about her family. Maude sacrificed to give her children the very best she could and did just that. Rest in peace darling Mum/Nana - you are forever in our hearts. Our grateful thanks to Laurie BARKER at Community Care Access Centre, Hazel FREDERICK, Remy NAVIDAD, Lethi QUIBRANT and all the 6th floor east staff at Castleview-Wychwood Towers for their unfailing support and compassionate love and care. Our thanks to Doctor Gwen JANSZ and Jennifer for the wonderful care they extended to Mum. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 10: 30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. followed by a Funeral Mass in St. Basil's Church, 50 Saint_Joseph Street, Toronto at 12: 30 p.m. Interment at Resthaven Memorial Gardens, 2700 Kingston Road, Scarborough. A small reception at the funeral home following interment. If desired, remembrances to the charity of your choice. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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BARKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
THORSEN, Jan (October 18, 1932-October 26, 2007)
Jan passed away peacefully at his home in Victoria after fighting lung cancer for more than eight years. He died only because he had to. After graduating from the Ontario Veterinary College in 1955, Jan worked in Nigeria for Her Majesty's Overseas Service, then in a mixed practice out of Edmonton. Realizing his interests lay more in research and teaching, he earned a PhD in Medical Virology at the University of Toronto, and joined the faculty at Ontario Veterinary College as a professor of veterinary medicine. Jan is survived and adored by his wife, Ruth SLAVIN, his daughters, Lisa and her partner, Tom BARKER, of Hobart, Tasmania, and Michèle, of San Francisco; his brother, John, of Toronto and wife Beth and stepdaughters Christina McKIBBON, her husband, John and son, Nicholas, and Jennifer LAING and sons, James and Robin, all of Windsor, Ontario. He will be greatly missed by his large extended family and many Friends, including the members of the Vancouver Island Scottish Country Dance Society.
A memorial service will be held at Saint Martins In-the-Field church hall, 550 Obed Street, Victoria at 2: 00, Wednesday, October 31. In the near future, Jan's ashes will be interred in the Anderson/Thorsen plot in Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough Ontario, and a memorial gathering will be held in Guelph, Ontario. Flowers are gratefully declined, but Jan's favourite charity is Doctors without Borders. Messages may be sent to ruthandjan@shaw.ca.
You must habit yourself to the dazzle of the light and of every moment of your life
Walt Whitman

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BARKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-15 published
OWEN, Lucille Yvonne Fortier
Volunteer, activist, fighter, role model, friend, wife, lover of the theatre, night owl, member of the Book Babes Book Club. Born April 23, 1944, in Favourable Lake, Ontario Died July 28 in Toronto of cancer, aged 63.
By Maggi REDMONDS, Audrey KING and Diane Murray BARKER, Page L8
For many years, Lucille and a friend celebrated August 10, 1952, as the marker of their shared destiny - their contact with polio.
A happy childhood with her loving family was punctuated with numerous medical interventions. Since life in a wheelchair made the local secondary school inaccessible, Lucille completed high school in the United States. Although unable to continue her formal education, she was extremely well-read, curious and astute.
In 1973, Lucille married activist and Ryerson English professor Bill OWEN. She greatly enjoyed the years they spent at the University of Kentucky, where Bill earned a PhD.
During that time she renewed her Friendship with Margaret STATON, whom she had met as a teenager at Toronto's Lyndhurst Lodge rehabilitation centre.
In 1994, Margaret named Lucille to the initial board of her Ethel Louise Armstrong Foundation (named after Margaret's grandmother), created to "promote… the inclusion of people with disabilities."
Overcoming a fear of flying, Lucille made numerous trips to California for board meetings. In 2004, the foundation honoured her with the Lucille Fortier Owen Scholarship.
In Chicago in 1981, Lucille and a friend attended a conference at which post-polio issues came to the fore. Together they nudged the Ontario March of Dimes to re-establish a post-polio program.
Lucille championed accessible health care for women with disabilities and always provided excellent analyses of the politics of disability and other social change campaigns.
When diagnosed with terminal cancer in 2001, Lucille became an informed decision maker in her own care. She astonished her palliative care team by long outlasting her initial prognosis. Lucille personally organized a note and a gift to be given to each member of her support circle after her death.
When Bill died in 2005, Lucille established the Bill and Lucille Owen scholarship at Ryerson University. Advisers had persuaded her to add her name, to provide a role model for female students and to underline her part in "their lifetime work to secure social justice through public policy."
Lucille's legacy is vastly greater than our loving memories and scholarships. By her persistence, through her actions and in her treatment of others, Lucille Owen lived her conviction that everyone must be treated equitably.
Maggi REDMONDS, Audrey KING and Diane Murray BARKER are Lucille's Friends.

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