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"WYM" 2006 Obituary


WYMAN  WYMENGA  WYMENT 

WYMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-04-20 published
ROSENBLATH, George Louis John
at Grey Bruce Health Services, Southampton on Tuesday April 18, 2006. George ROSENBLATH of Southampton in his 73rd year. Beloved husband of Lucielle (née NEWMAN) of Southampton. Loving father of Debbie and her husband Chris WYMAN of Kitchener, Arlene FLEET of Kitchener, James FLEET of Winnipeg, Lorrie and her husband Bobby MASTERSON of Southampton, Lisa ST CLAIRE of Unionville and Vicki VERHUEL of Cambridge. Also survived by his sister Evelyn and her husband Fred CRABBE of New Dundee. Sadly missed and fondly remembered by 10 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by his mother Dora BINGEMAN, by his sisters Shirley and Doris and by his great grand_son, Nicholas. Cremation. Visitation from the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton on Sunday April 23, 2006 from 2-4 p.m. Expressions of Remembrance to the Canadian Cancer Society or to the Saugeen Memorial Hospital Foundation. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com

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WYMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-16 published
LIVINGSTONE, Jean (née McKEOWN) Reg. N.
Of Saint Thomas, beloved wife of the late Dr. J.A.F. "Frank" LIVINGSTONE (1971), passed away peacefully at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Friday, January 13, 2006, in her 88th year. Dearly loved mother of Robert B. LIVINGSTONE, Q.C. and his wife Lynne, Mary K. LIVINGSTONE, all of London, Frances A. LIVINGSTONE of Hamilton, and Richard G. LIVINGSTONE and his wife Susan of Kitchener. Cherished grandmother of Jason LIVINGSTONE and his wife Stephanie of London, Jeffrey LIVINGSTONE of Toronto, Ryan LIVINGSTONE of Dwight, Michael LIVINGSTONE and John LIVINGSTONE, both of Kitchener. Dear sister of Kathleen WYMAN of Nanaimo, British Columbia, Marion HARDY and her husband Ernie of Petrolia, Jack McKEOWN and his wife Maureen of Toronto, and Ken McKEOWN and his wife Donna of Sarnia. Also fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews. Born in Saint Thomas, August 7, 1918, the daughter of the late Samuel and Bella (ARMSTRONG) McKEOWN, Jean was a Registered Nurse, having been a graduate and a former staff member of the Memorial Hospital, Saint Thomas. She was a member of Knox Presbyterian Church, Saint Thomas, a charter member of the Saint Thomas Curling Club, a member of the Twilite Cloggers and the Memorial Hospital Nurses Alumnae. Jean was a former member of the Kannata Chapter, Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire and the Board of Directors of the Saint Thomas Seniors Centre. She was a 1997 recipient of the City of Saint Thomas Senior Volunteer Award and in 2001 received the Ontario Volunteer Award. Friends will be received at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Tuesday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Elmdale Memorial Park, Saint Thomas. Memorial donations to the Saint Thomas Seniors Centre, the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario gratefully acknowledged.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-07-05 published
McKEOWN, Kenneth Douglas
Of Sarnia passed away July 3, 2006, age 78. Ken was born and raised in Saint Thomas, relocating to Sarnia in 1953 and retiring from Dow Chemical in 1986. Beloved husband of Donna McKEOWN (HOWARD.) Loved father of Kathryn (Jim PTASZYNSKI), Sarnia; Brian (Lisa), Bon Accord, Alberta. Dear grandfather of Thomas and Kerri PTASZYNSKI and Chelsey and Christopher McKEOWN. Survived by his sisters Marion HARDY (Ernest), Kathleen WYMAN, brother Jack (Sam) McKEOWN (Maureen,) and brother-in-law Bev HOWARD (Helen.) Predeceased by his parents Samuel and Bella McKEOWN and his sister Jean LIVINGSTONE. A memorial service will be held at the D.J. Robb Funeral Chapel (102 North Victoria Street, Sarnia) on Friday, July 7th, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. with visitation one hour prior to service. Cremation has taken place followed by interment at Lakeview Cemetery at a later time. Donations to The War Amps Ontario, Sarnia Lambton Victorian Order of Nurses Visiting Nurse Program, or the charity of your choice would be appreciated and can be made by cheque at D.J. Robb Funeral Home. Messages of condolence can be sent to djrobbfh@ebtech.net.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-02-17 published
DONALDSON, Kathryn Elizabeth (née GOODERHAM)
Peacefully at Bay Village, Sarasota, Florida on February 2, 2006. Loving wife of John Norman DONALDSON (Lt. Cmdr Royal Canadian Navy Ret'd). Mother of Judith (David) RUBIN, Charleston, South Carolina and Richard (Daphne Gaby) DONALDSON, Mississauga. Gragrum to Kathryn (V. Joseph) WORD, Charleston, South Carolina. Kami to Leslie, Fraser and Whitney DONALDSON. Greatmother to Samantha and Joseph WORD. Sister of Joan WYMAN, Toronto, and Mary MATHES, Manchester, New Hampshire. Joined over Rainbow Bridge three days later by her loved canine friend, Morgan DONALDSON. A Celebration of Kathryn's life will be held on Saturday, March 4, 2006 at 1: 30 p.m at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, 20 Victoria Street, 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5C 2N8 or a charity of your choice.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-02-28 published
DONALDSON, Kathryn Elizabeth (née GOODERHAM)
Peacefully at Bay Village, Sarasota, Florida on February 2, 2006. Loving wife of John Norman DONALDSON (Lt. Cmdr Royal Canadian Navy Ret'd). Mother of Judith (David) RUBIN, Charleston, South Carolina and Richard (Daphne GABY) DONALDSON, Mississauga. Gragrum to Kathryn (V. Joseph) WORD, Charleston, South Carolina. Kami to Leslie, Fraser and Whitney DONALDSON. Greatmother to Samantha and Joseph WORD. Sister of Joan WYMAN, Toronto, and Mary MATHES, Manchester, New Hampshire. Joined over Rainbow Bridge three days later by her loved canine friend, Morgan DONALDSON. A Celebration of Kathryn's life will be held on Saturday, March 4, 2006 at 1: 30 p.m at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, 20 Victoria Street, 6th Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5C 2N8 or a charity of your choice.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-04 published
BELGRAVE, Mervyn Emile McCreath
Resting peacefully in the hearts of many, Mervyn Emile McCreath BELGRAVE, P.Eng., February 16, 1923-February 22, 2006. Devoted husband of Yvonne BELGRAVE (née DA SILVA.) Loving father of Catherine and Suzanne. Proud grandfather of Oriana, Justine and Kharis EVOY, Chloe and Reed WYMAN. Brother of Arthur (deceased,) Desmond and Kharis PRYJMA. The family is extremely grateful to Cummer Lodge for the excellent care given by the staff of 4 North. Memorial service to be held at 2: 00 p.m. on Saturday, March 18, 2006 at Bloor Street United Church (Bloor St. and Huron St.) Memorial gifts, in lieu of flowers, can be given to Guyana Christian and/or Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre Foundation c/o Dr. Black's Alzheimer's Research.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-06 published
Floyd CURRY, Athlete And Hockey Coach (1925-2006)
Famous for frustrating the opposition when Rocket Richard was off the ice, the right winger won four Stanley Cups
By Mike WYMAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Montreal -- Like many kids before him, Floyd CURRY's best shot at avoiding a lifetime working in the mines, wrestling minerals from the Canadian Shield, lay on the ice. At 16, he skated away from the family home in Kirkland Lake to join the Ontario Hockey Association's powerhouse Oshawa Generals.
A team with deep pockets thanks to the corporate largesse of the town's main employer, General Motors, which also provided employment for the many players who chose not to finish high school, the Generals had finished ahead of the pack every year from 1937-38 through 1943-44. The year that Mr. CURRY was first on the roster, the Generals made it to the Memorial Cup finals but lost to the Portage La Prairie Terriers. In 1942-43, Mr. CURRY doubled his scoring output to 22 goals as Oshawa, once again representing the hopes of Eastern Canada, lost to the Winnipeg Rangers.
While in Oshawa, Mr. CURRY was billeted in the home of the BATTEN family, whose son, Don, was also a General. A quiet, personable sort who was far more easygoing off the ice than on it, Mr. CURRY wasn't one to break training. "He and I got along just fine." Mr. BATTEN recalled. "We took a beer once in a while. We played a lot of pool, much to the chagrin of our trainer, who didn't want us standing all day before a game."
Entering the Canadian navy after finally winning the Memorial Cup in 1944, Mr. CURRY was stationed in Toronto where he contrived to suit up for teams in both military and industrial leagues. In the fall of 1945, newly married, he signed with the Canadiens organization, beginning his 55-year association with the club as a member of the Quebec Senior Hockey League's Montreal Royals. Mr. CURRY scored 23 goals in his first professional season and 22 in the next. He was ready for bigger things.
Playing their home games at the Montreal Forum on Sunday afternoons, the Royals exciting brand of hockey attracted as many, or more, spectators as did the building's marquee tenant. With a line-up featuring such can't-miss prospects as Gerry McNeil in nets, defenceman Doug Harvey and a sprinkling of future Canadien forwards, the Royals won the Allan Cup, Canada's Senior hockey championship trophy in 1947.
Cracking the Canadiens line-up was one thing, but sticking with the team was quite another. Playing 81 regular season games and seven more playoff matches with the big club between 1947 and 1950, Mr. CURRY spent the remainder of his time in Buffalo, playing for the American Hockey League Bisons as he waited for one of less than 100 National Hockey League jobs to open up. Held back by numbers, not by a lack of talent, he continued to show an impressive scoring touch.
The fall of 1950 saw the 25-year-old, by then nicknamed "Busher," make the team out of training camp. He would be a fixture for the next eight seasons, playing an essential but unsung role as the team made it to the finals every spring.
On Dick Irvin's teams everybody had a distinct role to play. With scoring from the right side taken care of by Maurice Richard, Mr. CURRY was not on the ice for his offensive skills. His assignment was to stop the opposition from scoring while the Rocket took a breather or served one of his many penalties.
"He wasn't confused about what his role was," said Dick Duff, who faced off against Mr. CURRY while wearing Toronto Maple Leaf colours. "The way teams were set up, they had three lines and two extra guys. The extra guys got a bit of time on the third line and they were the ones who killed the first half of the penalties. They were all invaluable, and just to make the team was a big deal. They worked twice as hard as anybody else to stay there."
Countering the top left wingers around the league, Mr. CURRY was almost invisible and only drew attention to his efforts when a mistake resulted in a red light flashing behind his goaltender. In an era when referees were more likely to overlook fouls than they are today, he played a tough but clean brand of hockey and rarely resorted to the illegal tactics preferred by some of his more underhanded contemporaries.
"Busher was always highly thought of by the Montreal guys," said Mr. Duff. "There are always guys on teams that fit in good with everybody. They're good players and they don't bother anybody."
With Mr. Richard missing 22 games to injury in 1951-52, Mr. CURRY stepped up and netted 20 goals for the only time in his National Hockey League career. While other, more celebrated teammates often enjoyed multiple goal evenings, Mr. CURRY recorded just one hat trick in his 692 games with the Habs, but he picked the right game for it.
On October 29, 1951, then-Princess Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh, later to become Prince Philip, watched the Canadians defeat the New York Rangers at the Forum. The score was a decisive 6-1, with Mr. CURRY lighting the lamp three times.
Back in the long shadows cast by his more flamboyant teammates, Mr. CURRY returned to his familiar role of shutting down the opposition with skill and effectiveness. In 1953, the Canadiens won the Stanley Cup, making him one of the few players to have collected all three major North American hockey championships. It was the first stirrings of something unprecedented in hockey history. For the next two seasons, the Canadiens narrowly lost the cup to the arch-rival Detroit Red Wings and then, with coach Toe Blake having taken over from Mr. Irvin, the Habs capitalized on their momentum and racked up a run of five consecutive championships. Mr. CURRY played on the first three winning teams in 1956, 1957 and 1958 before the wear and tear of high-level hockey took their toll and he left the National Hockey League. He played a final season with the Royals before hanging up his skates.
Leaving the ice didn't mean leaving the game. Mr. CURRY continued with the Montreal organization for more than 40 years. In the days when a handful of men ran entire hockey organizations, managers and coaches often wore more than one hat. Mr. CURRY coached farm clubs in Quebec, Cleveland and Halifax. He also worked in the Canadiens' sales and marketing office and spent several years as the club's travelling secretary, enjoying every minute of his time on the job.
"He made sure there were no problems on the road," said Mr. Duff, who joined the Canadiens in 1964. "We'd get off the train or the plane and he'd take care of everything. He'd hand out the hotel keys, tell us who we were rooming with and distribute the meal money. It was something he enjoyed because it kept him close to the team."
Mr. CURRY kept an eye older Habs, too. After Alzheimer's disease robbed Mr. Blake of his autonomy, he faithfully and regularly paid visits. He took Mr. Blake to lunch when his old coach was still able to go out and, as the disease progressed to its final, inevitable conclusion, spent long hours at his side. Mr. Blake died in 1995 and a few years later Mr. CURRY, too, was diagnosed with the same disease. He was placed in a specialized treatment centre where he spent his last years.
Floyd CURRY was born in Chapleau, Ontario, on August 11, 1925. He died at Maimonides Geriatric Centre in Montreal on September 16, 2006. He is survived by June, his wife of 61 years, daughters Dawn and Candace, four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-19 published
André VIGER, Athlete: (1952-2006)
A fiercely determined competitor who many times took first place in the Boston Marathon retired only after winning a gruelling 600-kilometre event in Alaska
By Mike WYMAN, Special to The Globe and Mail; with a file from Associated Press, Page S9
Montreal -- On June 3, 1973, at an age when most youngsters think they're still bulletproof, André VIGER had his outlook abruptly reversed when the car in which he was riding missed a curve and left the road.
At first, the 20-year-old Quebec steel-mill worker thought he had just broken both legs. That paled to insignificance when he was told that the damage to his spinal cord was permanent: He would never again be able to use his lower limbs. It was a diagnosis he initially refused to accept. Learning that a small percentage of people who suffered the same injury had managed to use crutches and leg braces instead of a wheelchair, Mr. VIGER resolved to be among the fortunate few.
As weeks stretched into months, Mr. VIGER learned to walk for the second time in his life. He worked relentlessly, slowly mastering the use of his orthopedic aids and, when he finally left for home, he departed on foot.
Life at home proved to be a series of challenges for which rehab hadn't prepared him. He lost his balance and fell a number of times. Reluctantly, he began to use a wheelchair. But he was determined to adapt to society rather than retreat from it.
A friend convinced him that paraplegia did not prevent him from playing sports. He tried swimming, the shot put, the discus and weightlifting before settling on wheelchair racing, a sport that promised lots of competition.
Establishing himself at the University of Sherbrooke, Mr. VIGER trained with the intensity and dedication that would be a trademark of all his endeavours. When winter put an end to his outdoor training, he rolled endless laps in tunnels that he discovered under the campus rather than mount his wheelchair on stationary rollers.
In 1979, he felt ready to compete and won a local event. Two years later, he entered the Montreal Marathon and finished third in his category. Mr. VIGER maintained his steady climb until 1984, when he went to the Olympics.
As it happened, the Los Angeles Games that year featured a number of demonstration sports, including the first 1,500-metre wheelchair event. Mr. VIGER finished third, becoming a celebrity at home and a standard-bearer for disabled athletes.
He then scored four consecutive victories. First, he won the Oita Marathon in Japan and then the 1984 Boston Marathon. He won at Boston again in 1986, setting a new record for the event, and rolled to victory the following despite being involved in a crash at the start.
At home, he was flooded with requests for public appearances. Accepting as many as possible, he spoke to everyone from children to heads of corporations. He presented a simple message, that disabled people could play a role in society.
Along the way, Mr. VIGER had trained as a jeweller, and he decided to open his own business. La Bijouterie André VIGER grew to half a dozen outlets, financed his athletic career and employed more than 30 people.
"He couldn't sit still," said Canadian Paralympic coach Jean Laroche. "There was no way he could just sit home and watch television. When he finished one thing, he had to start another. He'd leave the store, come train and go right back afterward."
Mr. VIGER continued to accumulate victories and overcome challenges. He won the Montreal Marathon a total of five times and took part in the Seoul, Barcelona and Atlanta Paralympics, bringing home two gold medals, a pair of silvers and a bronze.
In 1993, a year after winning the 10,000-metre wheelchair race in Barcelona, Mr. VIGER decided he was ready for much bigger things and entered the 600-kilometre Midnight Sun Wheelchair Marathon in Alaska.
It was his greatest challenge. The Fairbanks-to-Anchorage race which organizers say is the longest event of its kind in the world -- attracted 13 very serious athletes from as far away as New Zealand. They rode three-wheeled, all-aluminum aerodynamic race chairs, a far cry from the conventional wheelchairs used by the two co-founders (and only entrants) of the race 10 years before.
At that time, strength and concentration were about the only things to keep them from wobbling off the highway. In contrast, Mr. VIGER and the others completed the event in a hunched position with their legs tucked underneath or secured in front. At night, competitors and their support teams camped in a fleet of borrowed motor homes.
The gruelling course is never the same from one day to the next. In 1993, the first day was a 35-kilometre grind that climbed into the Alaska Range foothills, followed by 100 kilometres of headwinds. Another day is spent racing across flatlands that offered no chance of coasting, and the last stretch was an 18-kilometre downward sprint.
"It was downhill and very fast," said Mr. VIGER. " Today was like the cherry on the cake."
The cake proved to be first place and a prize of $5,000 (U.S.) for finishing with an elapsed time of 23 hours 50 minutes. He also bettered a course record set two years earlier by Canadian Ron Scanlon, a martial arts expert who moved to Los Angeles to teach kung fu from a wheelchair.
"It was an ultra-marathon with competitors covering from 20 to 75 kilometres every day for nine days over a very tough course with a lot of steep hills," said Mr. Laroche, who first began working with Mr. VIGER in 1981. "He was very happy with that win because it was an exceptional event."
Mr. VIGER never admitted defeat, said Mr. Laroche. "When he'd lose a competition, he put it behind him and concentrate his efforts on winning the next event. That's something I learned from him. He and the other athletes I coach are athletes first and foremost. We treat them like athletes and they respond as athletes."
In 1996, Mr. VIGER retired to concentrate on a new business venture, La Maison André VIGER, that supplied wheelchairs and other adapted equipment for the physically disabled. He still found time to make personal appearances.
Over the years, many honours came his way. In 1985, he was voted Quebec's athlete of the year, the same year that Jaycees International listed him among the seven outstanding young persons of the world. In 1987, he was appointed to the Order of Quebec and, two years later, he received the Order of Canada. In 2003, he was awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Ottawa. In November, he was inducted into the Paralympic Hall of Fame.
While his athletic achievements are in the record books, and others have followed the path he paved, most notably Rick Hansen and Chantal Petitclerc, Mr. VIGER's greatest legacy may be that society has come around to his way of thinking.
"He was aware of his limitations, but they didn't stop him from doing what he wanted to do," said Mr. Laroche. "He didn't define himself in terms of his handicap. He proved that life doesn't stop just because someone is confined to a wheelchair."
André VIGER was born in Windsor, Ontario, on September 27, 1952. He died of cancer at St-Luc Hospital in Montreal on October 1, 2006. He was 54.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-12-15 published
McKEOWN, " Sam" Jack Armstrong
Took his last solo flight on Wednesday December 13, 2006. His journey at sunrise was peaceful, at home surrounded by love. Sam enjoyed a long and successful career in Education and administration, but his greatest joy was the sound of a Merlin engine. A loving gentle spirit he will be missed by his wife Maureen his daughter Maggie and husband John, son Steven and wife Jane. Many wonderful memories will be held in the hearts of his grandchildren John Fredrick, Thomas, Kailey and Chad. Stepsons Adrian and Sean and fiance Melanie will miss his presence. Survived by his sisters Katie WYMAN of Nanaimo and Marion HARDY of Petrolia. He will be missed by all those whose lives he touched. A celebration of Sam's life will be held at The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre, 275 Lesmil Rd (Leslie and 401) 416-441-1580 Gathering and service from noon till 4: 00 p.m. Sunday Dec 17, 2006 In lieu of flowers donations in memory of the life of Sam may be made to Renascent House, Doctors Without Borders or St. Christopher's House Toronto.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-04 published
BELGRAVE, Mervyn Emile McCreath
(February 16, 1923-February 22, 2006)
Resting peacefully in the hearts of many, Mervyn Emile McCreath BELGRAVE, P.Eng., Devoted husband of Yvonne BELGRAVE (née DASILVA.) Loving father of Catherine and Suzanne. Proud grandfather of Oriana, Justine and Kharis EVOY, Chloe and Reed WYMAN. Brother of Arthur (deceased,) Desmond and Kharis PRYJMA. The family is extremely grateful to Cummer Lodge for the excellent care given by the staff of 4 North. Memorial service to be held at 2: 00 p.m. on Saturday, March 18, 2006 at Bloor Street United Church (Bloor St. and Huron St.). Memorial gifts, in lieu of flowers, can be given to Guyana Christian Charities and/or Sunnybrook and Women's Health Sciences Centre Foundation c/o Dr. Black's Alzheimer's Research.

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WYMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-18 published
WYMAN, The Reverend Harold Carlyle
On Saturday, April 15, 2006 in his 89th year. Beloved husband for 56 years of Dorothy (née BEALES,) loving father of Ruth WYMAN (Jonathan,) Kathryn WYMAN (Tom) and Margaret GAHAGAN (Brian.) Dear grandfather of Matthew, Nathaniel and Timothy WYMAN- McCARTHY Judith and Summer WONG; Caroline and Jackson GAHAGAN. Brother of the late Russell WYMAN of Ottawa and Doctor Herbert WYMAN of Winnipeg. Mourned also by sisters-in-law Ethna TAILOR/TAYLOR (Winnipeg,) Shirley HOBSON (Winnipeg) and Muriel WYMAN (Ottawa.) Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10 N of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Friday. Funeral Service of Praise and Thanksgiving will take place at Erindale United Church, 1444 Dundas Crescent, Mississauga, on Saturday, April 22, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. A time of fellowship and refreshments will follow the service at the church. Gifts in his memory may be offered to The Student Christian Movement of Canada (310 Danforth Ave., Toronto, Ontario M4K 1N6) or The Mission and Services Fund c/o The United Church of Canada (3250 Bloor St. West, Suite 300, Toronto, Ontario M8X 2Y4). "Devoted husband and father, faithful pastor, generous companion and friend - a good and gentle man."

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WYMENGA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-02 published
DYKXHOORN, Lawrence
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on December 30, 2005. Lawrence DYKXHOORN of Saint Thomas in his 41st year. Beloved son of Lou DYKXHOORN and his wife Willy of R.R.#1 Springfield and the late Sadie (WYMENGA) DYKXHOORN (1986.) Dear brother of Charles DYKXHOORN and wife Irene of R.R.#1 Springfield, Marjorie and husband George STEENBERGEN of R.R.#7 Aylmer, and Roy DYKXHOORN and his friend Colleen of Calton Line. Also survived by numerous aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Lawrence was born in Saint Thomas, Ontario on September 28, 1965. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Sunday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at the Christian Reformed Church, 194 South St. W., Aylmer on January 02, 2006 at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Richard DE LANGE, officiating. Interment Aylmer Cemetery. Donations to the Elgin Association for Community Living would be appreciated.

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WYMENGA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-05-27 published
WYMENGA, Eeuwe " Joe"
Of Saint Thomas, on Wednesday, May 24, 2006, at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, in his 91st year. Beloved husband of Lucratia Adriane (NAGELKERKE) WYMENGA and the late Wietske (ELZINGA) WYMENGA. Dear father of George and his wife Tilly WYMENGA of Saint Thomas and Wilco and Betty WYMENGA of Strathroy and dear step-father of Angie (husband late Ray LEGROS) of Thunder Bay and Wilma and her husband Hank BEKKERING of British Columbia. Loved grandfather of Nathan and friend Crystal, Gregory, Tricia and fiancé Craig, Mark and his wife Melissa, Rebekah and partner John BROOKS, Joel and fiancée Jenn, Michael and his wife Cheryl, Kevin and his wife Jenny, Jane and her husband Mark, Eric and his wife Fabian and Ellen. Sadly missed by a number of great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Al, Roel, Op, Reen, Joukje, Meint and the late Ray, Jake and Sjouke. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews. Eeuwe "Joe" was born in Holland on August 21, 1915, the son of the late Gjalt and Grietje (RIEMERSMA) WYMENGA. He came to Canada in 1948 and worked at Merlin Motors, Iron Foundry and then farmed. He was an original member of the First Christian Reformed Church and was active throughout his life, sang in the choir, was on Church Counsel, was involved in the London Christian School, Redeemer College and the Saint Thomas Christian School. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas until Wednesday afternoon and then to the First Christian Reformed Church for funeral service at 1: 30 p.m. Interment to follow in Elmdale Cemetery. Visitation Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the charity of choice.

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WYMENGA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-06-05 published
BROOKS, Joanne (née WATSON)
Of Saint Thomas, on Saturday, June 3, 2006, at the Londod Health Sciences Centre (University Hospital), as the result of a motor vehicle accident, in her 64th year. Dearly loved wife and best friend of Stirling BROOKS and loved mother of Shelly and her husband Ted STURK of Saint Thomas, Sue and husband Neal MUSCHETT of Oakville and John BROOKS and his wife Rebekah WYMENGA of Saint Thomas and special friend and mentor of Michelle TERRY- NELSON of Saint Thomas. Dear sister of Linda WATSON- KAUFMAN and her husband Gregg of Georgia and Lois and her husband Ron HALL of Hamilton. Deeply loved grandmother of Clayton and Nicholas, Gregory, Katherine, Parker and Serenity. Sadly missed by 2 nephews and 1 niece. Joanne was born in Saint Thomas on August 13, 1942, the daughter of the late Earl and Faye (PRIDDLE) WATSON of Saint Thomas. She lived most of her life in Saint Thomas and was active in her community throughout her life. Joanne worked for Saint Thomas Ford and formerly owned and operated Joanne's Beauty Shop and the Bambi Shop. She was a former Mayor and Alderman for the City of Saint Thomas and sat on the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital Board, was a founder and President of Christmas Care, President of Beta Sigma Phi, Board member of the Trillium Foundation, a member of First United Church and numerous other community organizations. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas until Thursday afternoon and then to First United Church where a service to celebrate Joanne's life will be held at 1: 00 p.m. Cremation to follow. Visitation at the funeral home on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. and Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the Joanne Brooks Community Charity Foundation.

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WYMENT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-27 published
BINNEY, John Cadman, M.D., (F.R.C.P.C)
Very peacefully and with dignity on Thursday, September 21st, 2006, in the arms of his beloved wife Martha, at home in Toronto, in his 70th year, after a lengthy illness. Doctor BINNEY was born on January 1st, 1937 in Montreal. Cherished brother of Margaret (Bill) SANDERS and much loved uncle of his nieces and nephews. John is the dearly cherished and loved father of Lisa, Christopher (Natalie) and Paul (Kelly) BINNEY. Extremely proud 'Papa John' of Emma Alison WYMENT, Jude John Paul BINNEY and Olivia Grace BINNEY. Step-dad of John (Leah,) Sara (Dean) and Tom DUNCANSON. A private family service of joy and thanksgiving for John's life has been held, followed by cremation. In lieu of flowers, donations in John's memory to the Juvenile Diabetes Foundation of Canada, 7100 Woodbine Avenue, Suite #311, Markham, Ontario L3R 5J2, would be greatly appreciated. Messages of condolence to the family may be sent to 'marthaduncanson@hotmail.com'. 'Baby, we will sing and dance and go around, until the time comes for me to wrap my cloak around me and disappear into the night. Everything is okay. All the best'. J.C.B. (1937-2006)

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