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"SNA" 2006 Obituary


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SNAITH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-21 published
Bruce DUNCAN, Conservationist (1946-2006)
General manager of the Hamilton Conservation Authority haunted Ontario's Niagara escarpment and was a prolific contributor to books and articles on hawks and eagles
By Ron CSILLAG,
Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Not even his own wedding could interfere with Bruce Duncan's love of birds and nature. His 1992 marriage to fellow hawk bander Janet SNAITH took place at Hawk Cliff, a prime hawk-watching bluff overlooking Lake Erie, near Port Stanley, Ontario As Peter WHELAN, the Globe's late birder columnist duly noted at the time, the bride and groom wore binoculars. So did the guests and minister, who had been forewarned the ceremony might be interrupted to observe any interesting birds of prey.
Fifteen minutes before the nuptials, a peregrine falcon portentously circled overhead, but no hawk of note interrupted the "I do's." The next morning, Mr. DUNCAN's new wife helped him capture the first peregrine falcon in his 16 years of banding.
Among Canada's leading naturalists and experts on raptors, or birds of prey, Mr. DUNCAN was a passionate conservationist and outdoorsman who loved to teach schoolchildren in and around Hamilton about the plant and animal life in their surroundings. He was a prolific contributor to books and scholarly articles on eagles, hawks and natural history in Ontario.
Mr. DUNCAN was general manager and chief administrative officer of the Hamilton Conservation Authority. "Bruce was in charge of a $15-million organization and would not carry a cell phone," noted Chris FIRTH- EAGLAND, chairman of the authority. "He so trusted and respected his staff that he wanted them to deal with the issues. He was very hardworking and dedicated and was always pursuing better environmental approaches to doing business, remediating properties and acquiring new lands to protect them."
Normally a quiet, self-effacing man, Mr. DUNCAN had recently been flying high. On October 23, Ontario gifted to the conservation authority a 180-acre parcel of land in upper Stoney Creek, west of Hamilton, called the Eramosa Karst (a geological formation where surface water erodes soft limestone and creates underground streams and caverns). It is considered an environmentally significant property; the provincial Ministry of Natural Resources designated the lands an area of natural and scientific interest in 2003.
Two weeks later, a beaming Mr. DUNCAN emceed the ceremony at which Heritage Green Community Trust announced a $1.5-million donation, which he had negotiated, to the Hamilton Conservation Foundation for the development of the karst lands as the city's newest conservation area.
"Elation couldn't describe how he had been feeling in the last couple of weeks for bringing those two things together," Mr. FIRTH- EAGLAND said. "There's no higher end for us than to acquire new land and open it up for recreation, education and different functions."
Mr. DUNCAN joined the authority in 1988 to run its outdoor education program. He would take schoolchildren on nature hikes through the Dundas Valley. In 1992, he became the Hamilton Conservation Authority's staff ecologist, and a decade later, was named director of watershed planning and engineering, a post in which he was responsible for the flood warning and response system. He became the authority's general manager in January of 2004, and embarked on an ambitious five-year strategic plan.
The authority will mark its 50th anniversary in 2008, and the karst acquisition and donation were fine advance centrepieces. "You can image the satisfaction that our organization felt -- that he felt -- [at] already having this 50th anniversary birthday present all wrapped up, all secured, all ready," Mr. FIRTH- EAGLAND said.
Born in post-war England to a British mother and Scottish-born member of the Canadian army's medical corps, Mr. DUNCAN grew up in Orillia, Ontario He graduated with a psychology degree from Wilfred Laurier University and spent the next three years as a guide at the Quetico Provincial Park west of Thunder Bay, providing instruction in canoeing, trekking and wilderness lore.
The experience was life-changing. He returned to the University of Waterloo to study biology and then worked for 11 years for the Grand River Conservation Authority as a resource interpreter at the Taquanyah Nature Centre near Cayuga, where he established himself as a raptor expert. He supervised the introduction of bald eagles to southern Ontario, and helped introduce peregrine falcons in the Hamilton area.
But it was on hawks Mr. DUNCAN was considered an expert. "He was a self-confessed hawk nut," said Debbie DUNCAN, his sister-in-law. "He had a life-long passion for sharing knowledge and enthusiasm for nature. He was always leading hikes and workshops."
Mr. DUNCAN served as president of both the 500-member Hamilton Naturalist Club and the Ontario Bird Banding Association. He personally banded the legs of thousands of predatory birds to track their migration habits, enduring little more than the usual talon stabs and scratches. He named one of "his" bald eagles Gustav Mahler, for his favourite composer. His friend and co-birder of 30 years, Bob CURRY, recalls that Mr. DUNCAN came close to tears when he discovered that Gustav had been shot and killed over Lac-Saint-Jean, Quebec
"He was a gentleman and a gentle man," Mr. CURRY recalled. "He never raised his voice, but managed to influence people."
In 1991, Mr. DUNCAN founded the Niagara Peninsula Hawk Watch program, which monitors the migration of hawks, eagles, falcons and vultures over the Niagara Escarpment.
Nicknamed "the Fox" for his red hair, Mr. DUNCAN was a First World War buff who read avidly. "He consumed everything," said his wife, Janet. "If something caught his interest, he wasn't satisfied until he'd read a dozen books on the subject."
He indulged his Scottish heritage once a year when the family hosted a Robbie Burns night at their house (once the home of Alexander Graham Bell.) Mr. DUNCAN would don a kilt and dress a mean haggis. In the warm weather, when not out trekking and communing, he would sit in a lawn chair, imported beer in one hand and requisite binoculars in the other. In the winter, he delighted neighbours by building snowmen and snowdogs.
There were frequent family outings with Janet and two young children. "We were always going somewhere," Janet said, "somewhere different, and experiencing new things."
Mr. DUNCAN received many honours for his work, including Hamilton's Environmentalist of the Year Award in 1992, the Canada 125 Award for Environmental Service to the Community, and a 1997 accolade from the Hawk Migration Association of North America.
As for the stereotypical image of Hamilton as a gritty steel town with little regard for conservation or the environment, Mr. DUNCAN extolled the region as having more waterfalls than any community in North America, and more escarpment lands and green space per capita than any other Canadian city -- and he wanted to keep it that way, said Mr. FIRTH- EAGLAND. " Bruce had a different feeling about Hamilton. He felt that Hamilton was blessed."
And as the Hamilton Spectator noted last week, the community has lost not only a friend, but a teacher whose name is "memorialized in millions of tonnes of uncarved stone -- and grass, woods, streams and caves."
Bruce William DUNCAN was born on January 13, 1946, in Woking, Surrey, England. He died in hospital in Brantford on November 11, 2006, after suffering injuries in a car accident near his home in Paris, Ontario The vehicle he was driving had been struck head-on by a car that had crossed the centre line. The other diver was declared dead at the scene. He was 60. He leaves his wife, Janet; two children, Katie, 10 and James, 13; one brother, Jim, and a sister, Margaret DEMUNNIK. A public celebration of his life will be held at Bay Gardens Funeral and Memorial Centre, 1010 Botanical Dr., Burlington, Ontario on Saturday, November 25, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.

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SNAJDR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-18 published
Tom HODGSON, Artist And Athlete: (1924-2006)
The last surviving member of the Painters Eleven group that introduced abstract art to Toronto was an anti-academic who favoured spontaneity over skill. He was also a champion canoeist
By John CHAPUT, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Tom HODGSON grew up on Toronto's Centre Island near Hanlon's Point, a locale named after the legendary 19th-century rower Ned HANLON, but chose canoeing as his water sport. That proved wise as he became a Canadian Olympian on the water and even symbolic in his lifelong occupation as an artist. Whereas a rower gazes back on the water he has spanned, the paddler always looks ahead.
Technically a master of representational fundamentals, Mr. HODGSON enjoyed a long career in advertising, could paint striking realistic portraits, and picked up extra money doing courtroom sketches. His quest as an artist, however, was to find new means to express creativity, even if it meant suppressing skill and rebelling against an establishment he regarded as stifling.
"He thought the most creative people were the young who weren't influenced by anything," says daughter Lise SNAJDR. "My father was a skilled draftsman, but, in a way, he was against skill because it was all stuff you picked up from life experience. He was left-handed, but he went through a period of drawing only with his right hand in an attempt not to be too skillful. As it turned out, he developed an ambidexterity that proved to be another skill.
"His painting was spontaneous -- everything he did was -- but he wanted it to look that way. He could be free and liberal with paint, and put his feelings into a work."
Described by some as "anti-intellectual," Mr. HODGSON was, in fact, a deep thinker who would be better described as anti-academic. "He had his own ideas," says artist Gary MILLER of Peterborough, Ontario "He had great admiration for Willem de Kooning, but he didn't want to just cater to someone's opinion. He was stubborn and, because he was anti-academic, there was a movement to squelch Tom."
In his book Creativity Is Change, Mr. HODGSON declared skill to be "in some ways the antithesis of creativity, a sort of disrespect for man's time, and certainly for his individualism&hellip
"Creativity is curiosity, concern, trial and error, invention, not knowing, discovery. Skill is knowing how to do something…. The essence of creativity is uniqueness."
Mr. HODGSON was sometimes dismissed as a "jock painter" because many couldn't see athleticism and aesthetics harmonized in one personality. He won more than a dozen national titles at the juvenile and junior levels, and then nine more as an adult. In 1952, he took eighth place at the 1952 Helsinki Games in the 1,000-metre tandem with Art Johnson. At the Melbourne Games in 1956, he placed ninth in the 10,000-metre tandem with Bill Stevenson.
Standing just under six feet tall and weighing about 140 pounds, Mr. HODGSON was a whirlwind in the studio, his frenetic energy bustling as if his body was struggling to keep up with his train of thought. Although articulate, he could lapse into a stutter that affected his speech in childhood but was brought under control through therapy he took early in his professional life.
Mr. HODGSON's first serious painting was done from 1943 to 1945 while he was training as a pilot and gunner in the Royal Canadian Air Force. The Second World War ended and he was discharged before he could be assigned to combat, but he made numerous renderings of military life and later donated them to the War Art Museum. He first achieved artistic prominence a decade later as one of the Painters Eleven, the association of Toronto avant-garde painters who challenged artistic conservatism and gave the city its first healthy dose of abstract modernism. With Jack BUSH, Oscar CAHEN, Hortense GORDON, Alexandra LUKE, Jock MacDONALD, Ray MEAD, Kazuo NAKAMURA, William RONALD, Harold TOWN and Walter YARWOOD, they broadened the scope of Canadian art through mutual support and group exhibitions from their 1953 formation through their gradual fragmentation and dissolution from 1956 to 1960. Their affiliation was more professional than theoretical; they used disparate approaches and had no aesthetic commonalities.
Works of the Painters Eleven grew in demand and value in the '60s, but just a little too late for Mr. HODGSON to take full advantage of it. Short of materials at the time, he painted over some of the canvasses that could have brought in good money. Bad luck also struck in 1993 when a fire at his cottage destroyed many of the works he had stored there.
As a senior instructor at the Ontario College of Art, he was in the forefront of outrage at the upheaval of the school brought about by the policies of new president Roy ASCOTT in 1971-72. As a tenured professor, Mr. HODGSON was able to keep his job while many of his colleagues were fired, only to quit himself within a few months. Ironically, he was one of only two people on staff who had opposed the institution of tenure at the Ontario College of Art in the 1960s.
"Tom believed in the process of creativity as one of constant change and in the freedom of artists," says Mr. MILLER, then a student at the Ontario College of Art. " ASCOTT and later Royden RABINOVITCH were from the New York school, very radical and modern, and they were telling students their work was garbage. So Tom broke away, formed the Z School, and took half the student body with him."
As protests go, it was symbolically powerful and a practical failure.
"The Z School lasted about six months," recalls Don MORRISON, an artist and illustrator who was Mr. HODGSON's long-time friend and business partner. "You can't very well have a school without a structure or bureaucracy."
Mr. MORRISON and Mr. HODGSON shared studio space, first on Church Street across from St. James Cathedral, then in a warehouse on the corner of Dufferin and Bloor. Those were also venues for Drawing Night in Canada figure classes held every Thursday. The classes were conducted as the antithesis of the typically sombre gathering of sketchers and painters around a nude model.
"Usually at classes like that, it's like listening for a pin to drop," Mr. MORRISON says. Drawing Night in Canada was different. "These were noisy, vocal, 10 to 18 artists talking and joking. Anyone could grab a cold beer for 50 cents. The model would talk back and tell stories, too."
Inevitably, Mr. MORRISON wearied of the back-lane access to the warehouse and told his partner he'd prefer a storefront studio.
"A storefront?" Mr. HODGSON retorted. "I need a storefront like I need a hole in the head." In a matter of weeks, they had two storefront studios, one of them facing the historically infamous but architecturally engaging Mental Health Centre at 999 Queen Street West.
"Tom was impulsive, just like his painting. He would do exactly what he wanted," Mr. MORRISON says. "He built a swimming pool in the backyard of every house he owned. He would attempt to do almost anything. One day, he had a plumber come to his home on MacPherson Avenue because of a leak and the plumber said a lot of digging was necessary to get at the incoming line in front of the house. When he told Tom what it would cost, Tom said: 'I'll tell you what, I'll dig it myself.' After he had dug this enormous hole, I told Tom: 'Well, it may have been a lot of work to dig, but it'll be easy to fill in.' 'I don't want to fill it in,' he told me. 'I'm going to build a ramp so I can drive my bike right under the front porch and into the basement.' He had three motorcycles -- a BMW, a Husqvarna, and a Can-Am. So he built the ramp.
"It didn't occur to me that if he took the ramp to come in the basement, he'd use it to get out, too. I was renting on the second floor, and the first time he revved up one his bikes -- VRRRROOOOM! I jumped right out of bed."
Mr. HODGSON's energetic and impulsive nature, bohemian cultural surroundings and enjoyment of good times were an ideal formula for trouble in a man ripe for midlife crisis. He had a number of lovers and ended his first marriage to Wilma HODGSON before settling into a peaceful lifestyle with his second wife, Catherine GOOD. They moved to Peterborough in 1990. A few years later, he began to display the first signs of Alzheimer's. He was the last surviving member of the Painters Eleven.
Thomas Sherlock HODGSON was born on June 5, 1924, in Toronto. He died on February 27, 2006, near Peterborough, Ontario, of Alzheimer's disease. He is survived by his sons Mark, Rand and Timothy, daughters Lise Snajdr and Kara Warburton, and sister Jane HODGSON. He was predeceased by his wife, Catherine.

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SNAJDR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-03 published
Tom HODGSON, 81: Passion for art, life
Abstract painter helped revitalize Canadian art
Kid from islands paddled a canoe like few others
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
People always talk about the parties. That's what they remember about Tom HODGSON's life. They happened wherever he lived or in whatever studio he worked -- be it the Pit, as it was called, at King and Church Sts., the house on Shaw Street, where he built a swimming pool in the kitchen, or the storefront on Queen St. W. opposite the mental hospital.
Cold cuts infamously served on the reclining body of a nude woman adorning the buffet table, body-painting women's bare breasts, art student orgies, rich and powerful art patrons swinging on the rope from his studio ceiling.
HODGSON's sons used to drop by to meet girls because there were always women around their dad -- if not the models he hired to pose nude for life drawing classes, then the dewy-eyed students he taught at the Ontario College of Art during the '70s, when mores were exploding in the name of creativity, the muse and the worship of the artist.
You can get away with it when you're also one of Canada's greatest painters, a founder of the audacious Painters Eleven -- the gang of abstract artists who broke the stranglehold of the Group of Seven and revolutionized the Canadian art world, at the same time as you're an Olympic athlete, marathoner, dirt-bike champ and master paddler winning dozens of national championships.
"Tom was a gifted person. Some people are just touched a certain way, but he was very easy about it, not full of himself," said Christopher CUTTS, HODGSON's art dealer.
In 1987, when CUTTS was an upstart on the art scene, a friend arranged a meeting with the artist known as a superb colourist, as well as for his style of action painting -- arm's-length hurling, scraping, pouring oil paints on horizontal canvases on a table surface held in place by an elaborate system of blocks and tackle.
"He had a natural way of dancing on the canvas. He could make it work," CUTTS said.
HODGSON's last solo show was at Cutts's gallery in 1992, the year the artist was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. This year, five days after HODGSON died from the disease -- at 81 on February 27 CUTTS opened a major group show of abstract painters. HODGSON's piece in the show was priced at $30,000.
HODGSON and his kid sister grew up in a 35-room house on Centre Island that their family rented out to tenants. Their father was an insurance broker, a convivial alcoholic who threw parties at their home, known throughout the island as the Hodgson House of Nonsense, according to Jane HODGSON.
"The kids all hung out at the clubhouse on the lagoon," she recalled. "All of us paddled."
But HODGSON was just that much more intense about the sport and much more skilled. When he was 12, it also was clear he was also a talented artist. He began the balancing act between art and athletics that he would maintain for decades.
He trained hard, dodging the ice in Toronto's harbour, winning more than 20 Canadian solo championships. With another islander, Art JOHNSON, and later Bill STEPHENSON, he finished eighth in the tandem at the Helsinki Olympics in 1952 and in ninth place four years later in Melbourne, Australia.
HODGSON married Wilma STEIN, an island girl, and they moved into a house on Centre Island on a lot that extended to the lagoon, where he built a north-facing studio on stilts.
When the property of Centre Island's residents was expropriated in the late '50s, HODGSON moved to the city, becoming very successful in advertising at the same time as he was making a name for himself in the art world with Painters Eleven.
But he walked away from advertising after assessing that he had enough money either to buy a sports car or support himself as an artist for two years. When his marriage ended in 1968, his wife had to get a job to support their four kids. "His life was more important than anybody else and that was hard," said daughter Lise SNAJDR. "He wasn't a good father, but he was a good person in many ways."
"He was not the kind of dad who hugged or kissed you or told you he loved you," said Tim BROADWAY, HODGSON's fifth child, born to Jeannie BROADWAY, an artist. They never married.
Painters Eleven officially disbanded in 1959. By the 1960s and early '70s, HODGSON was a famous artist, as well as a popular teacher at the Ontario College of Art. A nudist, he hosted many parties around the indoor pool at his Shaw St. home. He never had more than three beers, but others did.
"They were orgies," said Neil COCHRANE, an assistant art director at the Toronto Star who was studying at the college then. "That's what happens when you get naked art students, water and drink."
HODGSON met his second wife, Cathy GOOD, when she was his student. She was 19, he 46. He and GOOD moved to a horse farm near Hastings, Ontario, where he built a pond and paddled until 1996, when he went over a dam on the Trent River. By then, Alzheimer's had robbed him of the ability to talk in full sentences or complete a painting.
HODGSON then moved into a care facility and Good to an apartment in Warkworth. He could neither walk nor talk. GOOD, who was devoted to him, visited him three times a day, until her unexpected death last year of an embolism.
HODGSON was saluted by Friends and family at the Balmy Beach Club last month. At one point, one of his Friends shouted, "Here's to Tom," then took off all his clothes (except for his socks) and ran around the whole assembly, past HODGSON's trophies and his art, before sitting down and putting on his clothes.
"Dad would have loved it," SNAJDR said. "But I think he would have preferred it have been a beautiful young woman."

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SNAKE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-17 published
HILLIKER, Clayton " Marvin"
Suddenly in London on Friday December 15th, 2006 Clayton "Marvin" HILLIKER of R.R.#1 Muncey in his 37th year. Beloved son of Karen ANTONE, Ray KECHEGO, Garry SNAKE and predeceased by Don DELEARY and survived by his children Hubert, Robin, and Tiffany DELEARY. Dear father of Kelie, and Justin HILLIKER and Warren STURGEON. Dear brother of Annette HILLIKER, Priscilla MARTELL, Angélique SNAKE and brothers Richard BOOKER, Edward HILLIKER, Floyd (Alecia) DELEARY, Garry SNAKE Jr., David SNAKE and Micheal and predeceased by brothers Mitchell and Ron MARTELL. Survived by grandma Aletha PRATT, uncle Goldwyn RILEY, great uncle Marvin HILLIKER, Lindsay ARMSTRONG, aunts Wilma and Cheryl SNAKE. Special nieces and nephews: Raquel and Jordan HILLIKER, James, Robert, Alia, Joshua, Autumn, Shana and great nieces Sumara and Aubree. Predeceased by grandma Elsie RILEY and grandpa Edward HILLIKER. Also predeceased by aunt Donna SNAKE. Friends may call at the home of Karen ANTONE (826 Switzer Drive Chippewa The Thames 1st Nation) on Sunday, December 17th. Funeral service to follow on Monday from the home commencing at 11 a.m. Cremation with interment at a later date. Donations to the Canadian Kidney Foundation would be appreciated. Elliott-Madill Funeral Home, Mount Brydges entrusted with arrangements.

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SNAPE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-04 published
WYNNE, George John Alphonsus
(Born in Downpatrick, Northern Ireland)
Peacefully at home surrounded by his family on Wednesday, February 1, 2006. Loving husband to Sandra for 33 years. Proud dad to John (Linda), Martin (Ritu) and Paul (Miel). Cherished granddad to Natasha and Declan. Survived by his sister Ann (the late Colin MacALLISTER;) brothers Edward (Eileen,) and Michael (Breda) sisters-in-law Denise KNIGHT and Pat (Walter ELBE.) Sadly missed by nieces, nephews and Friends in Canada and Ireland. Special thank you to Dr. SEHDEV and the Oncology department at William Osler Health Centre-Brampton, Dr. SNAPE, Nurse Laura for all her help and compassion, Nurse Alcina, and Muriel from Hospice of Peel. Friends will be received at Andrews Community Funeral Centre, Bramalea Chapel, 8190 Dixie Rd., (north of Steeles Ave.) 905-456-8190 on Saturday and Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass on Monday at St. Anthony of Padua Roman Catholic Church, 940 North Park Drive. Interment to follow at Assumption Catholic Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, in memoriam donations to the Hospice of Peel or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. Condolences may be forwarded to www.mem.com

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SNARR o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2006-05-31 published
SCRIVER, Carl Norton
On Thursday May 25, 2006 at his home in Stayner at the age of 66. Carl, beloved husband of Sharon. Loving father of Andrew (Jolene), Katrina (Bill CRUICKSHANK) and Kendra (Ronald POLLEY) and step-father of Robert (Nicole) RACINE, Michelle RACINE and Dennis (Annette) RACINE. Dear grandfather of 13 grandchildren. Also survived by his siblings June HART, Ruby (Eric) SUMMERS, Elma BROWN, LaVella (Hilliard) BERRIDGE, Paul (Janet), Reed (Betty), Lois (Ross) STEED and Bruce (Jeanne.) Predeceased by his siblings Ruth BRYER, Aubrey, Lucy Mae SNARR, Andy and Ronald. Carl will be sadly missed by his many nieces, nephews and Friends. Friends were received at the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, 7313 Highway 26 (Main Street), Stayner (705-428-2637) on Saturday May 27, 2006 from 12 noon until the time of the Memorial Service in the Chapel at 1: 30 p.m.. If desired, remembrances to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. For more information or to sign the online guest book, log on to www.generations.on.ca.
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SNARY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-07 published
MacNALLY, Peter S.
Unexpectedly on Sunday, November 5th, 2006, Peter S. MacNALLY of London in his 41st year. Dear son of Henry and Georgena MacNALLY. Loving brother of Heather MacNALLY of London. Also loved by his aunts and uncles Robert HENDRY and his wife Linda of Kitchener, and Theresa SNARY of Wallaceburg, as well as by his cousins Jamie, Bobbi-Lyn and James. Special friend to Bernadette SIMPSON. A private memorial service will be held at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Peter are asked to consider the Youth Alpha Canada.

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SNAUWAERT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-02 published
JAECQUES, Maurice Charles " Moe"
At Bluewater Health -- Norman Site on Tuesday, October 31, 2006, Maurice Charles (Moe) JAECQUES, age 75, of Sarnia, beloved husband of Dorothy Helen (SHANNON) JAECQUES and dear father of Patrick and his wife Kathy of Brooklin, Ontario, Chuck of Alberta and Dale and his wife Joan of Brampton. Step-father of Bonnie and her husband Bill MORRIS of Port Dover, Patricia URRY, Robert URRY and his wife Leatha and Steven URRY and his wife Shirley all of Sarnia. Also survived by eighteen grandchildren and step-grandchildren. Brother of Margaret DEPOORTER and her husband Roger of London and Mary SNAUWAERT of Sarnia. Brother-in-law of Bertha JAECQUES and Mary JAECQUES of Sarnia. Predeceased by three brothers Marcel, Oscar and Albert. Mr. JAECQUES was a lifelong Sarnia area resident and had retired from Fiberglas with 42 years of service. He was a charter member of the Lady Luck Riders Motorcycle Club and a life member of H.O.G. Cremation has taken place. A celebration of Moe's life will take place at a later date. Sympathy may be expressed through memorial donations to the charity of choice. Arrangements entrusted to the D.J. Robb Funeral Home, Sarnia. Messages of condolence can be sent to djrobbfh@ebtech.net

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