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"SMY" 2006 Obituary


SMY  SMYTH  SMYTHE 

SMY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-02-27 published
BROWN, Thomas S.
On February 23, 2006 at Douglas Fir Hospice. Predeceased by his beloved wife Beverley in 1995. Survived and much loved by daughters Dorothy POLUKOSHKO of Vancouver, Peg (Barry SMITHSON) of Genelle, British Columbia; sons Bill (Linda RIZZATO) of Port Alberni, Bob (Linda BROWN) of Kelowna and grand_sons Thor POLUKOSHKO (Chelsea CROOKS) of Vancouver, Karl POLUKOSHKO (Chelsea SHIMELL) of Penticton, William Rizzato BROWN of Port Alberni. Also, step-grandchildren Shawn ESKITT (Courtney and their daughter Hunter) and Terry SMY (Jim and their sons Austin and Dorian). Also, sisters Muriel (George GROOME) of Montreal, Effie KIMMERLY of Oshawa, Grace HARRIS of London, Ontario, Leslie McNUTT of Banff, brother John (Shirley SAMPSON/SAMSON) of Coles Island, New Brunswick and brother-in-law Walter LOGAN of Regina plus many nieces and nephews. Born in Toronto July 5, 1925 Tom's journey through life was rich and varied rising out of his passion and commitment to the United Church and his vision of hope using his skills of sharing and teaching. He was an agriculturist, journalist, facilitator and adult educator. Tom was most in his element when he was surrounded by people working towards a common goal. Along his life's road, Tom formed countless deep and lasting relationships and touched the lives of people all over the world. A memorial service will be held at First United Church 721 Bernard Ave. in Kelowna on Thursday March 2nd at 1: 00 p.m. with Reverend Helen Hobbs and Rev. Walter Logan officiating. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to First United Church or the British Columbia Cancer Agency. The funeral arrangements have been entrusted with care to Westwood Funeral Chapel. The family would like to express their sincere thanks to Dr. M. Shepard and the entire staff at Douglas Fir Hospice for their compassionate care.

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SMYTH o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-03-18 published
McGILL, Ruth Lydia (LORENTZ)
Of R.R.#2 Wiarton passed away at Victoria Hospital, London on Friday, March 10th, 2006 in her 64th year. Beloved wife of John A. McGILL and awesome Mom of JoAnne McGill-Anderson SMYTH and her husband Robert of Barrie, Jim and his wife Sally of Owen Sound and Ted and his wife Carolyn of Waterloo. Very best Nana of Chuck and Laura ANDERSON, Shannon and Michelle McGILL and Joe, Scott, Jake and Luke McGILL. Ruth leaves behind her siblings Arnold, Robert, Harold, Mildred and Joyce. Her numerous Friends will miss her generous hospitality and excellent cooking. She was an active member of the Bruce Peninsula Sportsman's Club. Cremation has taken place. Friends may call at the George Funeral Home, Wiarton on Saturday, March 25th from 12: 00 to 2:00, where the memorial service will be held at 2: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or Grey-Bruce Health Services, Wiarton would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com
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SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-23 published
SMYTH, Charles Ivan (June 10, 1946-January 23, 2005)
We thought of you with love today
But that is nothing new
We thought about you yesterday
And days before that too
We think of you in silence
We often speak your name
Now all we have is memories
And your picture in a frame
Your memory is our keepsake
With which we will never part
God has you in his keeping
We have you in our hearts
With love from your loving wife Sandra, four children and eleven grandchildren.

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SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-04-10 published
McMARTIN, Wilma Pearl (PAYNE)
Peacefully at London Health Science Centre, University Hospital, London on Saturday, April 8th, 2006 after a brief illness, Wilma Pearl (PAYNE) McMARTIN of London and formerly of R.R.#2 Thorndale in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Edwin A. McMARTIN (1979) and dear mother of Roy and Sue of Callander, John of London, Lois and Hans JASTRAU of London, Mary McMARTIN and Ernie McFARLAND of Guelph, and Elinor McMARTIN and Paul SMYTH of London. Dear grandmother of the late Shannon (1991). Also loved and sadly missed by 4 grandchildren: Grant, Amanda, Daniel and Lianna. Dear sister of Elsie DUNCANSON of London and the late A.D., and Ken and Marion PAYNE of Thamesford. Friends may call at the Harland B. Betzner Funeral Home, 177 Dundas Street, Thamesford on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday, April 12, 2006 at 11 a.m. Rev. Lewis SNOW officiating. Interment Clipperton Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be given to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the London Regional Cancer Centre.

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SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-05-09 published
KEELEY, Doctor Charles Douglas, M.D., (F.R.C.S.C,) F.A.C.S.
Died Sunday, May 7, 2006 in his 91st year at his home. He was predeceased by his wife, Betty and his son-in-law Rick BROWN. He is survived by his two daughters, son-in-law Pearce BUNTING, two granddaughters, two grand_sons, and sisters-in-law Marge KEELEY and Joan PATTERSON. He was loved and admired by them all. One of his great Friends said of Doug, "He served his country, his community, his school. What more can any man do." He was honoured in his lifetime by the Chatham Kent Community Foundation, the University of Western Ontario Medical School, the Chatham Maroons, and Maple City Country Club. Cremation has taken place. Donations may be made to the Chatham Kent Community Foundation (C. Douglas and Betty Keeley Fund.) Special Thanks to Helen and Ken SMYTH, their children, and their grandchildren. Arrangements entrusted to the McKinlay Funeral Home, Chatham, Ontario. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-07-07 published
MATTSON, Donald
At Woodstock General Hospital on Wednesday July 5, 2006. Donald MATTSON of Canterbury Street, Woodstock in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Pauline MATTSON (née ROWE.) Dear father of Mary Jane IUTZI and her husband Edward of Strathroy, Dave and his wife Judy of Oxford Centre, Wendy SMYTH and her husband David of Windsor, Sue SIM and her husband Clark of Woodstock, Margaret BLAKE and her husband Matthew of Guelph. Loved grandfather of Alayna IUTZI, Adrian IUTZI, Andrew MATTSON, Brooke MATTSON, Derek SMYTH (Kelly), Kevin SMYTH, Sophie ROE, Danielle ROE, Trent ROE and three great-grandchildren, Ian MATTSON, Chloe SMYTH and Ethan SMYTH. Dear brother of Jean FOSTER of Thamesford and brother-in-law of Hilda MATTSON of British Columbia. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his grand_son Jason SIM, brothers Fred, Bill and sisters Margaret CAVANAGH, Sadie ELMS and Florence McKAY. Don served overseas in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War 2. Friends may call at the R.D. Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Avenue, Woodstock (519-539-0004) Friday 2: 30-4:30 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held in the chapel Saturday at 2: 00 p.m. with Pastor Doug BOTT officiating. Interment Innerkip Cemetery. Contributions to Christian Horizons or Woodstock General Hospital Foundation would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com

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SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-03 published
SCOBIE, Frances Louise (formerly THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON)
Frances Louise SCOBIE, age 88, of Cedarcroft Place, Stratford passed away peacefully at her residence on Thursday, November 2, 2006. Frances was predeceased by her 1st husband Doctor Hugh THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (1988,) by her 2nd husband Kenneth SCOBIE (2000,) by a daughter F. Jane THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (2003,) by a sister Mollie STRUTHERS and a brother Bill SMYTH. She is the loving mother of Ian THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and his wife Susan, Stratford. She will be sadly missed by her grandchildren Jason, Scott and Mark THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. A family service will be held on Monday, November 6, 2006. at the W.G. Young Funeral Home, 430 Huron Street, Stratford. Cremation with interment in Avondale Cemetery, Stratford. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Stratford General Hospital or to the charity of one's choice through the funeral home.

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SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-20 published
McINTYRE, Michael Wayne
Suddenly at his residence on Sunday December 17, 2006 Michael Wayne McINTYRE of Brucefield in his 52nd year. Beloved husband of Sheri (SMYTH) McINTYRE and loving father of Jesse, Cody, Hailey and Maicy McINTYRE. Dear son and son-in-law of Gerald "Skip" and Yvonne McINTYRE of Saint Thomas; Marian McINTYRE of London George and Barbara SMYTH of Dungannon and Judy and Harold COOK of Lucknow. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Rick McINTYRE and Edna LARAWAY and Terry McINTYRE and Pam VECCHIO all of London Barry and Janine SMYTH of Dungannon and Carol and David HARVEY of Zambia. Dear uncle of Ryan, Brayden and Carmen SMYTH and Sophie and Sebastian HARVEY. Friends will be received at the Falconer Funeral Homes Ltd., - Clinton Chapel, 153 High Street, Clinton on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at the Brucefield United Church on Friday December 22, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Baird's Cemetery, Stanley Township. Donations to a trust fund for Michael's children payable to Sheri McINTYRE-in Trust or to London Health Sciences Foundation -- for Cochlear Implants c/o Dr. Lorne PARNES would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. (Donations by cheque only please.)

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-09 published
KEELEY, Doctor Charles Douglas, M.D., (F.R.C.S.C,) F.A.C.S.
Died Sunday May 7, 2006 in his 91st year at his home. He was predeceased by his wife, Betty and his son in-law Rick BROWN. He is survived by his two daughters, son-in-law Pearce BUNTING, two granddaughters, two grand_sons, and sisters-in-law Marge KEELEY and Joan PATTERSON. He was loved and admired by them all. One of his great Friends said of Doug, "He served his country, his community, his school. What more can any man do." He was honoured in his lifetime by the Chatham Kent Community Foundation, the University of Western Ontario Medical School, the Chatham Maroons, and Maple City Country Club. Cremation has taken place. Donations may be made to the Chatham Kent Community Foundation (C. Douglas and Betty Keeley Fund.) Special Thanks to Helen and Ken SMYTH, their children, and their grandchildren. Arrangements entrusted the McKinlay Funeral Home, Chatham, Ontario. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-03 published
O'NEILL, Mary (née McARTHUR)
On September 21, 2006 after a long well lived life in her 95th year. Predeceased by her beloved husband Jim. Left to cherish countless memories are daughters Sharon O'NEILL and Kathleen (Mark LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY.) Devoted grandchildren Shannon BISSET (Anthony CAVALLIN,) Megan McLENAGHAN (Luke McLENAGHAN,) McArthur and Julie LOWERY/LOWREY/LOWRIE/LOWRY, and great-grandchildren Cael and Ella BISSET- CAVALLIN. One of four sisters, Mary is survived by Margaret CAMPBELL and Helen KURTZ and predeceased by Kay SMYTH. As the wife of an exploration geologist, Mary raised her daughters in Copper Cliff where she was active in the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire, United Church Women's Assoc., the School Board and her many bridge groups. During their retirement Mary and Jim enjoyed travelling and especially their cottage at the French River. As a Mother, Grandmother and Great-Grandmother she provided a wonderful example of a positive outlook with love and laughter. We will miss your sense of humour and smile. As Mom wished, cremation has taken place and her life celebrated by her immediate family. A memorial service will be held on Tuesday, October 10, 2006 -- 4: 00 p.m. at the Copper Cliff United Church. In Mom's memory, family and Friends may make a donation to a charity of their choice.

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-03 published
SCOBIE, Frances Louise (THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON)
Frances Louise SCOBIE, age 88, of Cedarcroft Place, Stratford passed away peacefully at her residence on Thursday, November 2, 2006. Frances was predeceased by her 1st husband Doctor Hugh THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (1988,) by her 2nd husband Kenneth SCOBIE (2000,) by a daughter F. Jane THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (2003,) by a sister Mollie STRUTHERS and a brother Bill SMYTH. She is the loving mother of Ian THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and his wife Susan, Stratford. She will be sadly missed by her grandchildren Jason, Scott and Mark THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. A family service will be held on Monday, November 6, 2006. at the W.G. Young Funeral Home, 430 Huron Street, Stratford. Cremation with interment in Avondale Cemetery, Stratford. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Stratford General Hospital or to the charity of one's choice through the funeral home.

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-24 published
ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Hazel Mary
Died peacefully at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, surrounded by her family, on Sunday, January 22, 2006, in her 93rd year. Hazel, loving wife of the late John ELLIOT/ELLIOTT. Dear mother of Jacqueline and her husband Art DALEY, Barbara and her husband Neil MacDONALD, Billy and his wife Judy, John and his wife Kathy, and Margaret and her husband Ken SMYTH. Cherished Gramma of Wayne, Sue, Kimberley, Jenny, Cathy, Neil, Michael, Robin, Karen, Kenny, Shelly, John and Billy. Predeceased by her grand_son Lenny. Great-grandmother of 27 and great-great-grandmother of 3. Loving sister of Pearl, Ken and Doreen. Predeceased by her dear sister Val and by her brothers Gordon, Reggie, and Ed. Will sadly be missed by many nieces, nephews and Friends. Friends may visit at the Jerrett Funeral Home, 660 Kennedy Road, Scarborough (between Eglinton and St. Clair Aves. E.) on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service in the chapel on Thursday at 1 p.m. Interment Pine Hills Cemetery.

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-04 published
SMYTH, Veronica
At Norview Lodge Nursing Home on Sunday, January 29, 2006, in her 89th year. Will be lovingly remembered by her nieces and nephews Veronica MARTIN (SMYTH,) Shannon COPPERTHWAITE, Bubsie PINTER, Linda ANGLE, Bill WILSON, Tom WILSON, Pat REID, Michael SMYTH, Heather SMYTH, Veronica LUSKUS and their families. Cherished great-aunt to her great-nephews Nicholas MARTIN, Stephen COPPERTHWAITE, Brad WILSON and great-niece Debbie JONES. Predeceased by her brothers William, James, Charles and Michael and sisters Mary, Annie, Winnie and Margaret. Also predeceased by her niece Meg CHAMPAGNE and nephew David WILSON. Veronica was the first female principal in the Montreal Catholic School Commission from 1966-1976. She was a co-founder of the Thomas Moore institute for adult education in Montreal. Veronica was very active in the Catholic Church for many years. Veronica had touched many lives throughout her life. Friends were invited to share memories of Veronica at The Baldock Funeral Home, 96 Norfolk St. N., Simcoe on Tuesday, January 31, 2006 from 7-9 p.m. Parish Prayers were said at the funeral home Tuesday evening at 7: 30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial was celebrated from St. Cecilia's Roman Catholic Church in Port Dover on Wednesday, February 1, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. Father Pio BEORCHIA celebrant. Interment followed at Port Dover Cemetery. Donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated by the family. Baldocks 519-426-0291

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-13 published
MOASE, Gordon Wells
Peacefully, on Saturday, February 11, 2006, at the Lakeridge Health Centre in Bowmanville, 3 days before his 95th birthday. Gord MOASE (formerly of Billings Avenue in Toronto,) beloved husband of the late Amy (née MEADES.) Loved father of Wayne MOASE, Gary MOASE, Ron MOASE, Glen MOASE and Gail SMYTH. He will be lovingly remembered by his 13 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Gord is survived by his sister Marjorie BROWN, and he was predeceased by his brothers Earl, Harold and Al MOASE. The family of Gord MOASE will receive Friends at the Wagg Funeral Home, "McDermott-Panabaker Chapel," 216 Queen Street in Port Perry (905-985-2171), on Monday, February 13th from 12 noon-1 p.m. A Service to celebrate his life will be held in the Chapel at 1 p.m., with Dr. John SULLIVAN officiating. Interment Pleasant Point Cemetery in the Spring. If desired, memorial donations may be made by cheque to the charity of your choice. On-line condolences may be left at www.waggfuneralhome.com

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-04 published
JAMES, Mary Fraser (née WATTS)
Passed away peacefully at Scarborough Grace Hospital on her 91st birthday, February 28, 2006. Beloved wife of Norman JAMES. Lovingly remembered by her nephews David SMYTH (Margaret) and Allan SMYTH (Leslie). Devoted great-aunt of Elizabeth and Mark (Vania). Retired employee of Unilever and a long time resident of Oakville. A private family service was held. Psalm 91: 2

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-29 published
OICKLE, Patricia Gail
At her home on Sunday, March 19, 2006. Patricia, only daughter of the late Alfred and Muriel (YOUNG) OICKLE. She is survived by her Aunt Elva (Maxwell) GRIMM and a number of cousins in Nova Scotia. Dear friend of Cathy, Jim and Jason SMYTH. She enjoyed the theatre and movies. Memorial Service to be held on Thursday afternoon at 1 p.m. in the Chapel of the Paul O'Conner Funeral Home, 1939 Lawrence Ave. E. (between Pharmacy and Warden). Memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, Heart and Stroke Foundation or charity of your choice.

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SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-29 published
SELLERS, Hazel (née CRYDERMAN)
Suddenly at her home in Jackson's Point, on Tuesday, March 28, 2006 at the age of 83 years. Hazel SELLERS (née CRYDERMAN) beloved wife of Stan. Dear mother of Peggy and her husband Alex BELL and Susan SMYTH. Loving grandmother of Andrea, Justin, and Krista. Dear sister of Mary WOODCOCK, Wellington CRYDERMAN, Edith CRYDERMAN, Jack CRYDERMAN, Miles CRYDERMAN, Marion ELMER, Evelyn THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and her husband Fred and Florence HOSEY. Predeceased by her brother Robert CRYDERMAN and her sisters Mildred MILLER and Geraldine CRYDERMAN. Resting at the Taylor Funeral Home 20846 Dalton Road, Sutton from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Thursday. Private family funeral service in the chapel Friday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Briar Hill Cemetery, Sutton.

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-05 published
SELKE, Frank, 1985 -- Died This Day
Hockey coach, manager and executive born on May 7, 1893, in Kitchener, Ontario
Frank SELKE became the manager of the Iroquois Bantams ice-hockey team in Kitchener when he was just 13. His enthusiasm for the sport brought him into the orbit of Conn SMYTHE, who enlisted his help in building both the Toronto Maple Leaf hockey team and Maple Leaf Gardens. In 1946, he and Mr. SMYTHE parted company and Mr. SELKE moved to Montreal to manage the Canadiens. Under his leadership, the team won six Stanley Cup championships. The Frank J. Selke Trophy is annually given to the National Hockey League's best defensive forward.

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-20 published
George MARA, Hockey Player And Executive: (1921-2006)
Well-born amateur player who became the captain and key to Canada's gold-medal success at the 1948 Olympics later ran the Toronto Maple Leafs
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Victoria -- In 1947, the Cold War was chilling Europe. The Royal Canadian Air Force desperately sought recruits. They needed skaters, not pilots. The Olympic hockey tournament was just weeks away. Canadian officials had balked at sending a team, a decision that outraged senior Royal Canadian Air Force medical officer Sandy Watson. He persuaded the officials and his superiors to allow him to recruit a team from scratch.
The Royal Canadian Air Force Flyers, as they were dubbed, were whipped in their first exhibition game by a lightly regarded varsity team. The air force feared being humiliated on the world stage. The call went out for reinforcements, and George MARA was asked to sign up.
Mr. MARA, who had just turned 26, was a Toronto businessman and a navy veteran. He moonlighted as a forward for the Barker's Biscuits team in an amateur league in Toronto. A hard-skating player known for shifty stickhandling, he had a touch with the puck.
Mr. MARA answered his country's call. In doing so, he would add to hockey lore.
George Edward MARA was the namesake son of a well-known Toronto sportsman. The elder Mr. MARA had been a star inside wing with the Argonauts football team until a broken ankle ended his playing days. He then became a shareholder in the Ontario Jockey Club, and he belonged to the Royal Canadian Yacht Club. His brothers were Bay Street stockbrokers. At one time, the family's liquor import business boasted the largest wine cellar in the Dominion, occupying almost an entire city block in downtown Toronto.
George Jr. grew up in privilege with a Cadillac in the garage and his own private rink in the backyard of the family home. He first won notice as a hockey player at Upper Canada College, where he was coached by retired Leafs star Gentleman Joe PRIMEAU. Mr. MARA led the prep-school circuit in 1939-40, recording 16 goals and five assists in six games. He scored two goals, including the winner, in a 6-1 victory over Saint Michael's to give his private school an undefeated season and its first hockey championship in more than 20 years.
He graduated to the Toronto Marlboros, where his skills attracted the attention of National Hockey League teams. The Detroit Red Wings' Jack Adams, who had him on the club's negotiating list, thought the prospect could find a starting role with the club in 1942. Instead, Mr. MARA joined the Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve.
He skated for a stellar navy team in the senior Ontario Hockey Association, served aboard a corvette and two minesweepers, and saw sea duty on the Newfoundland-Ireland run. He was promoted to lieutenant.
After the war, Mr. MARA attended the training camp of the Toronto Maple Leafs at Owen Sound, Ontario He turned down an offer to play for a minor-league team in the Leafs' system. He wound up, instead, on the roster of the Ontario Hockey Association's Toronto Staffords while tending to the family business, which had suffered with the death of his father on Christmas Day, 1942.
In January of 1946, the New York Rangers announced he had signed a contract. He was to play a game with the minor-league New York Rovers before joining the parent club. Mr. MARA suited up as a spare for a Rovers game against the Boston Olympics, but he never did join the Rangers, or play an National Hockey League game.
By the time the desperate Royal Canadian Air Force Flyers came looking for help, Mr. MARA was playing on the Barker's Biscuits team of the Toronto Hockey League. His recruitment happened after a chance meeting at Maple Leaf Gardens with prominent hockey official W.A. HEWITT, the father of hockey broadcaster Foster HEWITT. When Mr. MARA returned to his office, he found a message saying that Mr. HEWITT had called with an invitation to join the Olympic team. Mr. MARA balked, suggesting they try teammate Wally HALDER, a sales director for a chocolatier with whom he had also played in the navy during the war.
"I put the phone down and realized I was missing an exciting opportunity," he once told National Hockey League writer Mike Wyman. "So I called HEWITT back and said that I'd managed to make myself available."
When the Flyers goalie failed the physical, Mr. MARA suggested the Barker's goalie, Murray DOWEY, who would need a leave of absence from the Toronto Transit Commission.
The trio, with Mr. MARA as team captain, would be vital to a Canadian triumph.
The Olympic tournament, the first since the end of the Second World War, took place at a time when Europe was still suffering from the deprivations of war. The Canadian players were advised to pack their own bars of soap, as the item was still being rationed overseas.
The games were played on an outdoor rink in the winter playground of St. Moritz, Switzerland. The ice used for the skating surface, which was open to rain and snow, was poor. The rink had boards so low a skater could step over them as easily as climbing a sidewalk.
The Canadians struggled to adopt to rules forbidding hip checks, hitting near the boards, and playing the puck with a knee on the ice. As well, a player leaving the penalty box was expected to skate to his own blueline before returning to the play.
"They're not used to bodychecking there," Mr. MARA said on his return, "but how they hook and slash! We used to sizzle. Every game we played, we were determined not to get mad. Ten minutes after we'd start, we'd be boiling."
In one game, the incensed centre bowled over two opponents before poking another in the nose with his fist. A female fan tossed sand in his face and he was temporarily blinded. A teammate got hit by a snowball as he rushed the puck.
The Flyers cruised through most of the tournament, recording a 15-0 win over Poland before steamrolling over Italy 21-1. The team had six wins and a 0-0 tie with Czechoslovakia before meeting the Swiss in the gold-medal game before a partisan crowd. Canada won 3-0, as Mr. DOWEY recorded his fifth shutout in the tournament. The top scorers were Mr. HALDER (29 points) and Mr. MARA (17 goals and nine assists).
The trio rejoined the Barker's Biscuits team, but one can image that industrial-league hockey was less attractive after the excitement of the Olympics. Mr. MARA accepted the entreaties of Montreal Canadiens general manager Frank Selke. The centre was to play for the Montreal Royals before moving up to the parent Canadiens. He had collected eight points in seven games when an injury ended his season, as well as his playing career.
Stafford SMYTHE, the son of Conn SMYTHE, the owner of the Maple Leafs and Maple Leaf Gardens, invited Mr. MARA to join a committee to operate the hockey club and its namesake building in 1957. In 1961, Conn SMYTHE sold control of the team and eight years later, after a power struggle, Mr. MARA found himself elected president. He held the post for a year before resigning.
During his tenure in Leafs management, Mr. MARA was known to skate with the team at practice. He was also involved in one of the more famous incidents in club history. During the 1964 Stanley Cup finals, defenceman Bobby Baun suffered a broken leg. In the dressing room, Mr. MARA and coach Punch IMLACH got into an argument about whether he could return to play. Mr. MARA counselled caution for an athlete whose livelihood depended on his good health, while the coach profanely made the opposite case. As it turned out, Mr. Baun skated on the broken leg, scoring the winning goal in overtime of Game 6. The Leafs completed their comeback with a victory over Detroit two nights later to claim their third consecutive Stanley Cup.
Mr. MARA was long associated with the family firms and other industrial concerns, including the William Mara Company, founded in 1871, importers of wines and spirits, including such brands as Teacher's, Beefeater, and Hennessy, and Jannock Ltd., a diversified Toronto manufacturing company with operations in the sugar, brick, tubular steel and electrical products businesses. He also served on the boards of many charities.
Perhaps his greatest contribution to the nation's sporting history came not on the ice but in the boardroom. Mr. MARA was one of the founders and inaugural chairman of the Olympic Trust of Canada, launched in 1970 as the fundraising arm of the former Canadian Olympic Association (now Canadian Olympic Committee).
Mr. MARA was named a member of the Order of Canada in 1976 for his tireless work in raising funds to support Canadian Olympians competing at the 1972 Munich and 1976 Montreal Olympics. He was inducted into the Canadian Olympic Hall of Fame in 1989 as both an athlete and a builder, while Canada's Sports Hall of Fame enshrined him in 1993.
The Hockey Hall of Fame has in its collection Mr. MARA's captain's sweater from the Royal Canadian Air Force Flyers. So far, however, it has not seen fit to include him among the inductees.
George MARA was born on December 12, 1921, in Toronto. He died on August 30, 2006, while undergoing heart surgery. He was 84. He was predeceased by his wife, the former Margaret RODDICK, whom he married in 1947. He leaves a son and a daughter.

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-02 published
Ike HILDEBRAND, Athlete (1927-2006)
Pint-sized competitor may have been a world champion in hockey, but he happened to be an even better box lacrosse player
By Tom HAWTHORN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Victoria -- Ike HILDEBRAND led a hockey team from small-town Ontario to the world championship tournament in 1959. A small, baby-faced athlete, he was a sparkplug on the ice and a general on the bench.
His greatest moment occurred as playing coach of the Belleville McFarlands. The Macs faced a gruelling schedule of exhibition matches across Europe before arriving in Czechoslovakia for the round-robin tournament in March of 1959.
A senior club team, the Canadians wore a maple leaf on the chest of their sweaters. They were defending on Canada's behalf the world title, won the previous winter by the Whitby Dunlops. Few hockey fans back home appreciated the difficulty of the task. The Czechs were no longer patsies, the Soviets were on the cusp of becoming the dominant force in hockey, and the Americans would show their skill by winning the Olympic tournament the next year. Anything but a championship for the Macs would have been regarded as failure.
The Canadians opened by defeating Poland 9-0, then shut out Finland 6-0 in a chippy game in which Mr. HILDEBRAND suffered a facial cut.
The next game featured the undefeated Soviet Union, seen as the only likely challengers. The Macs gained a 2-0 lead before Mr. HILDEBRAND scored what would be an insurance goal in Canada's 3-1 victory. The Macs mobbed their goaltender and celebrated for 10 minutes before the end-of-game ceremonies could begin. "They acted as if they had already won the title," the New York Times reported.
The Macs then defeated Sweden 5-0, before knocking off the United States 4-1. Mr. HILDEBRAND, one of five Macs with National Hockey League experience, scored in each of the games.
The only way the Macs could lose the title would be to lose to the hometown Czechs by a large margin. After exchanging gifts of Canadian cheese and Czech chocolate on the ice at Prague, the local side came out roaring, gaining a 2-0 lead in the first period. With the score 4-3 for the home side, the Canadian playing coach ordered his goalie off the ice in favour of an extra attacker. The move backfired. The Czechs won the game, 5-3, but Canada claimed the championship.
Surrounded by teammates on the ice, Mr. HILDEBRAND hoisted a trophy in the air while still wearing hockey gloves.
Back home, the accolades were restrained. The Toronto Star's story was headlined: Macs are champs, but… folks will recall loss to Czechs.
"We were meeting a club that was fresh," the coach explained to the paper's readers. "I still think we should have beaten Czechoslovakia, but I cannot begrudge the Czechs this win. They played well. We did not play a good game.
"It could be that the grind is beginning to catch up with us. In the last 20 weeks the McFarlands have played roughly 85 games and have barnstormed through Europe."
He spent another season with the Macs before being fired, an ignominious end to a solid career at a sport that was not even his best. For Mr. HILDEBRAND, a world champion in hockey, was perhaps the best box lacrosse player of his day.
Isaac Bruce HILDEBRAND was born in Winnipeg and raised near Grande Prairie, Alberta. He had never heard of lacrosse until he was 14 and his family moved to New Westminster, British Columbia, then, as now, a hotbed for the sport.
In 1943, the city's Salmonbellies won the Mann Cup as national champions with 16-year-old Ike on the roster. The 'Bellies again qualified for the Mann Cup playoff the next season.
Although they lost to the St. Catharines Athletics of Ontario, the teenaged phenomenon from New Westminster won the Mike Kelly Award as the most valuable player in the series. He remains the youngest person to have won the award.
The same teams met again in the 1946 Mann Cup, by which time the slick, 5-foot-7, 147-pound attacker found himself a target. "Little Ike HILDEBRAND, leading scorer in western competition, looked like a midget on the big [Maple Leaf] Gardens floor and he found the going rough and nasty," the Globe and Mail's Jim VIPOND reported in 1946. The Athletics again won the cup.
Mr. HILDEBRAND would score more than 900 goals and 700 assists in his lacrosse career, which saw him play in five Mann Cup series. He was named to league all-star teams 13 times in 15 seasons. He won scoring titles in 1946, 1948, 1954 and 1955, the last two coming while playing for the Peterborough Timbermen.
A talent in both of Canada's national sports, he played hockey in winter and lacrosse in summer.
He had two successful seasons with hockey's Oshawa Generals and another with the Toronto Marlboroughs, before being invited to training camp for the National Hockey League's Maple Leafs at Owen Sound. He practised during the day and then flew to Peterborough to play in the Mann Cup. The Leafs owner wanted the budding star to sign.
"Major Conn SMYTHE called me into his office and here's the deal he offered me -- $1,000 up front, $3,000 a year if I played in the minors at Tulsa, $4,000 if I went to Pittsburgh, and $5,000 if the Leafs kept me," Mr. HILDEBRAND once told Toronto Star columnist Jim PROUDFOOT. "I told him I'd have to talk it over with my mom and dad."
Instead, he telephoned Charlie CONACHER, the retired National Hockey League star who had been his coach at Oshawa. His advise was to ask for $1,000 on top of each of those figures. When Mr. HILDEBRAND did so, suggesting the higher salary came as parental advice, Mr. SMYTHE became furious. "You little so-and-so, have you been talking to CONACHER?"
Mr. HILDEBRAND wound up playing for the Los Angeles Monarchs and would spend five high-scoring seasons in the minors, all the while studying to become a structural engineer for a career he would later follow.
In 1954, he finally broke into the National Hockey League when the New York Rangers put him on a line with Don (Bones) Raleigh and Nick Mickoski, a fellow Winnipegger. He scored two goals and added three assists in his first five games.
Despite the terrific early success, Rangers coach Frank Boucher juggled lines, placing Mr. HILDEBRAND with rookie winger Billy Dea and centre Max Bentley. The goals stopped coming and the Rangers sold him to the minor-league Vancouver Canucks before being flipped to the National Hockey League's Chicago Black Hawks.
He soon rediscovered his scoring touch, but his season came to a sudden end after he broke a leg in a game in Toronto in February of 1954. He wound up with just seven goals and 11 assists in a 41-game National Hockey League career.
As a coach, he had success behind the bench at both lacrosse and hockey, as he handled junior and senior Ontario teams in Pembroke and Orillia. He led Belleville to an upset Allan Cup championship over the Kelowna Packers in 1958, earning nomination as Canada's representative to the world championship the next March.
In 1985, he was inducted into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame in Toronto. He had earlier been enshrined in the Canadian Lacrosse Hall of Fame at New Westminster and the sports halls of fame in the Ontario cities of Peterborough, Belleville and Oshawa.
Even so, being a small man in a roughneck sport like lacrosse was not the most dangerous job Mr. HILDEBRAND ever held. As a young man in New Westminster, he painted bridges along the wind-swept Pacific Coast.
Ike HILDEBRAND was born on May 27, 1927, in Winnipeg. He died on August 27 in St. Albert, Alberta. He was 79. He leaves his wife Barbara, two sons, three daughters, four grandchildren, a sister and a brother.

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SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-16 published
SMYTHE, Conn, 1980 -- Died This Day
Athlete, coach and sports executive born in Toronto on February 1, Sent to Upper Canada College only for as long as his journalist father could afford the fees, he later attended the University of Toronto, where he led the Varsity Blues to the 1915 Ontario championship. Later, he formed the Varsity Grads team that won the Olympic gold medal at St. Moritz in 1928. By then the manager of the New York Rangers, he bought the Toronto St. Pats and renamed them the Maple Leafs. In 1932, he built Maple Leaf Gardens in Toronto. In 1964, the National Hockey League created a special trophy in his name. He also fought with distinction in two world wars.

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