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"NOL" 2006 Obituary


NOLAN  NOLAND  NOLFI  NOLIN  NOLLIE  NOLTE 

NOLAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-18 published
KWASEK, Stella
Peacefully after a long illness at London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital on Tuesday, January 17, 2006 Stella KWASEK in her 91st year. Loving wife of the late Peter KWASEK Sr. (Dec. 25, 1980.) Loved mother of Jeannette LESSARD and her husband Brad, Peter KWASEK Jr. and Joe KWASEK and his wife Margaret. Loving grandmother of Lisa NOLAN, Jennifer TAILOR/TAYLOR, Suzanne, Peter and Bradley LESSARD, Elliott KWASEK and Adrian KWASEK and her 4 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Frank SLOTA, John SLOTA and Jennie STRYBERG. Visitors will be received at John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass at Holy Cross Church, 10 Elm Street, on Saturday at 12 noon. Interment in St. Peter's Cemetery. Prayers Friday evening at 7: 30 o'clock. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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NOLAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-06-29 published
MacKAY, David John
Peacefully, surrounded by his family on Tuesday, June 27th, 2006, David John MacKAY (formerly of Caledon, Ontario) went to be with his Saviour. Cherished husband of Alberta. Loving father of Scott MacKAY and his wife Colleen NOLAN, Wendy SIBLEY and her husband Brent. Much loved grandpa of Sean MacKAY and Jonathon SIBLEY. Brother of Alexander MacKAY, Doctor James MacKAY and his wife Ann, and brother-in-law of Doctor Cyril HAMILTON and his wife Lyn. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. David proudly served Bell Canada for 37 years. He had a passion for photography and for building things, but his family always came first. Visitation will be held on Friday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, where the funeral service will be conducted on Saturday, July 1st, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of David are asked to consider the Prostrate Cancer Research, c/o London Regional Cancer Centre.

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NOLAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-29 published
Canada's first news anchor had flawless, direct delivery
Larry HENDERSON died Monday in London's Parkwood Hospital at By Joe MATYAS, Free Press Reporter, Wed., November 29, 2006
Larry HENDERSON was the first regular news reader on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television's The National News. (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation file photo)
The man who pioneered the role of television news anchor in Canada died Monday in London at the age of 89.
Larry HENDERSON was "the first real anchor and nationally known television news personality" in the country, Michael NOLAN said yesterday.
"He helped make the nightly news broadcast a national institution," said NOLAN, a former news anchor and professor of journalism at the University of Western Ontario.
"He embedded the notion of the anchor in people's minds at a time when Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television was expanding across the nation."
Born and raised in Montreal, HENDERSON studied music at McGill University and spent some time in England as a Shakespearean actor, sharing the stage with such notables as Alec Guinness.
In a 1990 interview with The Free Press, he told NOLAN "those years were useful to me because I learned there the hard rules of presenting words, ideas and yourself to the public."
HENDERSON joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio staff in 1940. He later enlisted in the Canadian Army, serving in North Africa and Italy during the Second World War.
Following the war, he returned to radio broadcasting in Toronto where he hosted the Headliners show on CFRB.
In 1950, HENDERSON became the first Canadian broadcaster to cover the Korean War. He spent three years in Europe, interviewing world figures for Headliners, and in 1954, he became Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television's National News reader.
Canadian television was barely two years old then, said NOLAN, adding there was "a hazy period" before HENDERSON became the anchor when various announcers delivered short reports.
"He had a knack for it. He could look at copy and memorize it well enough to deliver the news flawlessly while looking directly into the camera."
The fact he hardly ever made mistakes was amazing, considering there were no teleprompters, said NOLAN.
HENDERSON had an authoritative air and conveyed credibility largely because he was a newsman with field experience, NOLAN said.
"He wasn't just someone who read the news in a studio."
HENDERSON was the face of the National News until 1959. After that he worked for CFI radio, CHCH television and CTV National News.
During the 1970s, HENDERSON helped Tanzania organize its national broadcasting system. In 1974, he became editor of the Catholic Register. He was also managing editor of Challenge, a Catholic monthly, before retiring in 2002.
HENDERSON had been living quietly in London since 1988. He died in his sleep at Parkwood Hospital, said his son Graham, a Toronto lawyer.
HENDERSON's other son, Ross, a Strathroy resident, is also a lawyer.
A funeral mass for him is planned for tomorrow in Toronto.

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NOLAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-05 published
NOLAN, Dennis Brien
65, Hammonds Plains. In the early morning of December 4, 2006, a beloved husband, father, grandfather, brother and uncle slipped peacefully from the arms of his family into the arms of our Lord. He was a son of the late Clarence and Madeline (LECLEAR) NOLAN. He is survived by his wife, Frances Louise (RING) NOLAN; children, Gary NOLAN (Michele,) Leah LANG (Stan,) Heather NOLAN, Patrick NOLAN (Terri), Catherine Parker (Michael), and Sean NOLAN; cherished grandchildren, Melissa, Peter, Anne Marie, Stasia, Mackenzie, Sydney, Taylor, and Emma; brothers and sisters, Linda DILOSA (Phil,) Saint Thomas, Ontario; Mary DRAKE (Cyril,) Mississauga, Ontario; Joan WALSH (Martin,) Illinois, U.S.A.; Elizabeth LAUR, Illinois, U.S.A.; Jane CARR, London, Ontario; Patrick NOLAN (Debbie), Illinois; U.S.A.; Michelle ETHRIDGE (Glenn,) Sarnia, Ontario as well as several nieces and nephews. A devoted husband and father, Dennis dedicated his life to God and family. Dennis served in the Canadian Armed Forces (Navy) before moving his young family to Ontario where he was employed with General Motors. In retirement, Mom and Dad returned to Nova Scotia where they were able to enjoy many happy years with family and Friends. Visitation will be held Wednesday, December 6 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. in T.K. Barnard Funeral Home, Bedford. The funeral Mass will be celebrated 10: 00 a.m. Thursday, December 7, in St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church, Bedford. 'One Heart, One Path'

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NOLAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-06 published
LINDLEY, Gladys Irene (formerly McARTHUR, née OLIVER)
Passed away Monday, December 4, 2006 after a long and wonderful life. Loving mother of Lynda (Rick) CAMPBELL and Evelyn (Denis) DOWMAN. Cherished grandmother of Keith CAMPBELL, Doctors Bruce and Lynette PEGLAR and Murray PEGLAR. Sister-in-law of Kay OLIVER and Douglas WRIGHT. Predeceased by her first husband Charles McARTHUR, daughter Christine, second husband Martin LINDLEY and her siblings Corinne, Helen, Mary and Jack, all of Thamesford. She will also be sadly missed by John and Peter LINDLEY and their families, many Friends, nieces and nephews in the Oliver, McArthur and Lindley families and especially Kathi WRIGHT- TURNER. Gladys was a graduate nurse, Class of 1931 from Saint_Joseph's Hospital in Hamilton. She was a member of the Burlington Garden Club and was an avid golfer and curler. Special thanks to Doctor John NOLAN for his care in Gladys' final days. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street, (one block north of City Hall) Burlington (905-632-3333) on Friday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. where Funeral Service will be held on Saturday, December 9, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. Private Interment, Woodland Cemetery, Hamilton on Monday. If desired, expressions of sympathy to the charity of your choice would be sincerely appreciated by the family. www.smithsfh.com

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-20 published
Darcia NOLAN, Model (1961-2005)
Runway and television model had it all - magazine covers, commercials, soap ads -- until cancer struck
By Kathy FEDORI, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Calgary -- Darcia Nolan was a beautiful, red-haired young model who had it all -- magazine covers, television spots, a trendy Toronto Beaches address complete with a Jeep parked outside -- until she was diagnosed with breast cancer. She spent the next 13 years in determined survival mode.
As a model, it never mattered what Ms. NOLAN was wearing as she floated down the runway or appeared on television commercials. Men took a second look, women wanted to be just like her and everyone wanted to have what she had. She was a stand-out on the pages of Chatelaine, the cover of Vogue Brazil, and as the Maxwell House Max girl.
Her phone never stopped ringing until one day in 1992 she took a call that changed everything. She had breast cancer. A misdiagnosed cyst had become a malignant tumour and the prognosis was bleak. She had to face the reality of a double mastectomy in an industry where breasts were a non-negotiable job requirement.
Ms. NOLAN's world turned upside down and the Dove soap faces, Miller beer smiles and hugga-mugga Maxwell House labels all fell away. As a single parent with a four-year-old, her new goal was to see her daughter Chanelle graduate from high school.
To achieve that, she gave up her boutique clothes, donned a hospital gown and lay on an examining table to be scanned by teams of doctors. From that time on, the only cameras aimed her way had a diagnostic purpose.
Darcia NOLAN grew up in Toronto to a show-business family. Her father, Jimmy NOLAN, sang in clubs. From 1967 to 1977, her mother Coralie NOLAN was one of The Allan Sisters, a singing sensation featured on the Tommy Hunter Show. The other sister was her aunt Jackie. It was inevitable that young Darcia's first television spot was in a Tommy Hunter chorus of celebrity children singing The Candyman as part of a tribute to the comic strip, Charlie Brown.
For her part, Ms. NOLAN set her sights on becoming a star of fashion rather than song. The walls of her childhood bedroom were plastered with high-fashion pin-ups and she and her best friend Roberta spent years dancing in pink ballet tights, swooning over Donny Osmond or designing their own hot psychedelic looks.
In 1980, she enrolled in a modelling program at Sheridan College in Oakville, Ontario After graduating, she found steady work in Toronto and Los Angeles and success seemed assured until the misdiagnosis was discovered in 1992. She won time through a mastectomy, reconstructive surgery, chemotherapy, meditation and naturopathic remedies, all the while attending a two-year course in fashion design at George Brown College in Toronto.
In June of 1996, her doctors said the disease was in remission and Ms. NOLAN and her daughter packed up and moved to Vancouver, full of hope for the future.
Five years later, almost to the day of being told she was clear of cancer, her doctor found it had spread beyond the original tumour. By 1998, the diagnosis was stage-four metastasis growth and she was given two months to live. Undeterred, she remained determined to see her daughter graduate. She set some attainable goals and asked her mother to move to Vancouver to be their caregiver.
In a crowd of 21,600 Canadian women who develop breast cancer each year, Ms. NOLAN stood out as a composed and determined patient. Undetected cells migrated through her body and she bounced back, time and time again. "I called her the cat with nine lives who survived for 13 years," said Doctor Paul Klimo, an oncologist at Lion's Gate Hospital in North Vancouver. "It was nothing short of a miracle."
Part of her strength came from the help she found at the Callanish Society, a non-profit group that helps families come to grips with cancer by offering counselling, support programs and week-long retreats.
"Darcia was a model of what is possible when cancer strikes," said Janie Brown, executive director of the British Columbia Callanish Society. "She was a pioneer in facing darkest fears."
At one wilderness retreat she attended, Ms. NOLAN was so weak that she was unable to walk. Out of a forest of Douglas firs and cedars, she appeared behind the wheel of a hijacked golf cart. "Look at me, I'm still here," she announced with determination.
"My mom taught me to reach out for help when I need it without being scared," said Chanelle now 17. "And we shopped for an awesome grad dress -- for hours -- and laughed the whole time."
Ms. NOLAN survived to see Chanelle graduate and was on the dock in Vancouver Harbour in December to watch her grad party cruise set sail.
Darcia Gayle NOLAN was born in Toronto on May 1, 1961. She died in Vancouver on December 29, 2005, after a long battle with breast cancer. She was 44. She is survived by her mother Coralie, sisters Jamie and Sandie and daughter Chanelle. Darcia NOLAN was one of an estimated 5,300 women who died from breast cancer in Canada last year.

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-03 published
NOLAN, Sheelagh Margaret
43, Halifax. It is with heavy hearts that we announce the passing of a much loved mother, sister, daughter and friend. Fiesty to the end, Sheelagh passed away peacefully at the QE2 in Halifax on May 1, 2006, with family and Friends at her side after a courageous 4 year battle with cancer. Born in Halifax, she grew up in Saint_John's, Newfoundland., and later returned with her family to Halifax where she attended Halifax West High School. She went on to attend St. Francis Xavier University, where she fell in love with her husband, Danny GRAHAM. Sheelagh graduated from X in 1984 with a B.Sc. and went on to work as a dietitian at the VG Hospital. She loved her work and brightened the days for all of her patients. Sheelagh was active with numerous school and community events, most recently throwing herself into the Autism Golf Ball fundraiser in Halifax. She loved traveling, reading and researching her family genealogy. A natural athlete, Sheelagh enjoyed beating her brother's-in-law at tennis and ping pong, and was a proud, hockey, lacrosse and soccer Mom. She was a mediocre tarabish player but played with gusto. Most importantly, Sheelagh was a devoted and dynamic mother, and was incredibly proud of her boys. She had an indomitable spirit, a great sense of humour and loved a good laugh. She and her family have been very grateful for the deep love and support they received from their many Friends as well as neighbours (who have been like family). They are indebted to countless medical professionals who cared for her and fought with her for these challenging years. She is survived by her loving husband of 20 years, Danny GRAHAM, sons Patrick, Andrew and Colin; parents, Frank and Maureen (Casey) Nolan; sisters, Kathleen (Louis BOILEAU,) Maura (Mike SMELTZER,) Coleen (Luke ELIOT,) all of Halifax and brother Chris (Paula) of Ottawa; many adoring nephews and nieces, and sisters-in-law and brothers-in- law. She was pre-deceased by her pal, sister-in-law, Norma GRAHAM. Visitations will be held at Pier 21 National Historic Site, 1055 Marginal Rd. (behind the Via Rail Station) on Thursday May 4, noon-3 p.m. There will be a memorial service at 7 p.m. on the same day (May 4) followed by further visitations. A private family funeral will be held Friday. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Provincial Autism Centre, 1456 Brenton Street, Halifax. B3J 2K7. Online condolences snowfh@alderwoods.com

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-11 published
Brian NOLAN: Producer, Teacher And Writer (1932-2006)
With his friend Peter JENNINGS, he was among a corps of Canadian broadcasters who took American networks by storm. He returned home to help transform the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and to teach at Carleton University
By F.F. LANGAN, Page S11
Toronto -- Brian NOLAN was only a few metres away when Jack Ruby shot Lee Harvey Oswald in the Dallas police station at 11: 26 on the morning of November 24, 1963. He was the CTV field producer working with Peter JENNINGS, then a 25-year-old reporter, and cameraman Larry Brown.
It was one of the most dramatic moments in the lives of the three men who had rushed from Ottawa to Dallas to cover the assassination of U.S. President John Kennedy. Their work soon found Mr. JENNINGS and Mr. NOLAN working for ABC News in New York. They were in the vanguard of many Canadians who worked in U.S. television news. Their training and, for on-air people, their neutral accents made Canadians ideal candidates for the Am-Nets, as the American networks are known in the television biz.
On some assignments, their Canadian passports did not hurt either. One of Mr. NOLAN's big television scoops was the Soviet suppression of Prague Spring -- the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia in August of 1968. He and a German cameraman, Jorg Weiland, filmed Soviet tanks in the streets of Prague and managed to get their footage over the frontier when it was closed to all other crews. Anchored by Mr. JENNINGS, it was broadcast from ABC's London bureau as a U.S. television exclusive.
Mr. NOLAN's career included much more than a four-year stint with a U.S. network. He was a pioneer in television news in Canada and worked for all three Canadian networks: the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation -- where he was a producer on This Hour Has Seven Days in the mid-1960s -- CTV and Global.
In 1972, he wrote the Nolan Report for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation News in which he suggested changes that had already been adapted by U.S. networks, such as the use of satellites to bring news material from overseas instead of shipping reports by air. "It is inconceivable that the corporation would demand that its radio news service collect overseas news by mail instead of using transoceanic circuits," Mr. NOLAN wrote. "In essence, this is what the present policy demands of the television news service."
Many of his suggestions were subtle, such as the use of actuality sound from the field instead of silent footage or, even worse in his view, phony sound effects. Most were ideas that could come only from someone with a real understanding of television news. "Almost all his recommendations came to pass. He was quite prophetic," said Bill CUNNINGHAM, a foreign correspondent and chief news editor of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation at the time.
A true television pioneer, Mr. NOLAN was a field producer before anyone even came up with the name. A field producer travels with a camera crew and a reporter to make editorial decisions, and also figures out such logistical problems as how to get the footage to a "feed point" where it can actually make it on to a newscast.
"NOLAN almost invented the job of field producer. And he was one of the first television producers to use the bird [satellite] on a daily basis to put Peter JENNINGS on the air from London for the ABC nightly newscast," Mr. CUNNINGHAM said. "He was known to be so honest that producers from the other networks trusted him to run the satellite pool feeds because they knew he wouldn't cheat them out of their satellite time."
Brian NOLAN grew up in Hamilton, Ontario His father, Joe NOLAN, was a plumber and a local legend known as Pike who played for the Hamilton Tigers, as one of the two professional football teams in the city was known at the time.
As a young man, Brian joined the U.S. Army "for the adventure," as he later told one of his sons. His unit was about to be shipped to Korea when he was plucked out of the infantry and given a job of writing for Stars and Stripes, the U.S. military newspaper. He did end up in the Korean War, but as a solider-reporter rather than as a combatant.
In 1953, he returned to Hamilton to settle into his old life and wonder what to do next.
"He was sitting in a pool hall reading a book when one of the regulars came over to him and said 'I've never seen anyone in here reading. Do you want a job at a newspaper?' " said his son Philip, in recounting the family legend of how his father landed his first newspaper job. "He started work at The Hamilton Spectator."
Mr. NOLAN stayed at the Spectator for three years as a police reporter, sports reporter and general news reporter and the left to work for the Hamilton radio station CHML. He liked to tell a studio story about one night in February of 1959 when a plane crash killed the rock 'n roll stars Buddy Holly, Richie Valens and the Big Bopper, a Texas disk jockey turned singer whose real name was Jiles P. Richardson. Mr. NOLAN had wanted to break into the regular programming to make a news flash, but the sportscaster, an older man with no appreciation for young rock stars, refused. By all accounts, something close to a fist fight occurred before the bulletin finally went to air.
In 1961, Mr. NOLAN moved to his first television job and joined CTV News, which produced its national newscast out of CJOH in Ottawa. It was there that he teamed up with the young Mr. JENNINGS. They travelled all over North America with forays into Europe.
One of Mr. NOLAN's first big stories was the building of the Berlin Wall. As field producer, he also doubled as a second cameraman, carrying a Swiss-made, 16-mm Bolex camera. It was lightweight and held just a little more three minutes worth of film, but its quality added something to his reports. On November 29, 1963, Mr. NOLAN, just back from Dallas, took his Bolex to Ste. Therese, Quebec -- just north of Montreal -- to film The wreckage of a DC-8 there. Later, he and journalist Patrick WATSON made a documentary of the crash that killed 118 passengers and crew.
When Mr. JENNINGS made the jump to ABC News, Mr. NOLAN didn't follow right away. He enjoyed working on This Hour Has Seven Days, co-hosted by maverick broadcasters Mr. WATSON and Laurier LaPierre. The program was irreverent and quite unlike anything seen on television. It caused such controversy -- especially in Parliament -- that it lasted only two years.
"Brian started at the beginning of the program, making short and long documentaries. He came to story meetings with great ideas that were almost always accepted," Mr. WATSON said.
After Seven Days, Mr. NOLAN went to ABC News as a senior producer and moved to New York with his family.
"As soon as he started working for ABC News we hardly saw him," said his son Philip, who expresses no bitterness. He and his two brothers are now camera operators for television news. "One night the phone rang. He put it down and said 'You're not going to believe this. They shot Bobby Kennedy.' He was gone for a week."
A short while later, Mr. NOLAN moved his family to London. He was made senior producer for Europe, the Middle East and Africa. It was during this period that he produced many of Mr. JENNINGS's news reports and handled the complexities of early satellite feeds to New York.
In 1971, he left ABC News and returned to Canada. He wrote the Nolan Report and, a short time later, went to Global television where Mr. CUNNINGHAM had become vice-president of news. One of their coups was a 90-minute documentary called The Last Nazi. It was about Albert Speer, Hitler's architect and the man who ran Nazi Germany's armaments program.
"CUNNINGHAM and NOLAN just picked up the phone and called Speer and got the Canadian television rights for his autobiography," recalled Mr. WATSON, who was the writer and interviewer on the program. "They called me and asked me if I would work with them. And Brian and I were off to Europe for several weeks."
The documentary won many awards in Canada and was nominated for an Emmy in the United States.
After he left television he took up teaching and writing. In 1978, he took a job at the school of journalism at Carleton University and remained there for 18 years. More recently, he indulged an interest in military history and wrote seven books, including a well-received biography of Buzz Beurling, the enigmatic Second World War fighter pilot from Verdun, Quebec He also wrote a biography of Donald Brittain, the legendary documentary filmmaker from the National Film Board.
In his later years, Mr. NOLAN showed an entrepreneurial streak and, with his wife Holly owned a mustard shop and a restaurant in Ottawa. Last week, a wake was held at the restaurant, which is called L'Ange, on the Sparks Street Mall.
Brian NOLAN was born in St. Catharines, Ontario on January 18, He died of lung cancer in Ottawa on August 31, 2006. He was 74.
He leaves his wife Holly, a daughter Catherine and three sons, Philip, Mike and Paul.

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-11 published
SAVAGE, Brian Colson
Died peacefully in his 55th year, on Wednesday, February 8, 2006, after a courageous battle with cancer at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. Brian leaves his beloved wife, Mary Ann POULOS, and her parents, Vasiliki and Tasso POULOS. He also leaves his dearest Friends Denise HALSEY, Thomas SAMS, Leslie BERNARD, and James NOLAN. Brian devoted his last 4 years to the task of helping others. He developed a new and innovative G.E.D. program to help people complete their high school education, so often a barrier to a better life for the people we serve. But Brian's true legacy will live on in Scarborough Centre for Addiction Recovery and Employment Services - which he co-created with his wife to provide a safe haven, counselling, support and training to people dealing with life's challenges. It is Brian's strongest and final wish that his work through Centre for Addiction Recovery and Employment Services continues. Friends may call at the Jerrett Funeral Home, 660 Kennedy Road, Scarborough (between Eglinton and St. Clair Aves. E.) on Sunday from 12 noon until 2 p.m. A complete funeral service will be held in the chapel at 2 p.m. followed by cremation. Brian has left us with a job to do. It is with this job in mind that we ask in lieu of flowers or other donations, that all donations be made to Centre for Addiction Recovery and Employment Services, 3160 Eglinton Ave. E., 2nd floor, Scarborough On. M1J 2H4.

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-17 published
NOLAN, Thomas Leo
Peacefully on March 15th, 2006, in his 83rd year, at the Credit Valley Hospital in Mississauga, Ontario. Beloved husband of 61 years to Laura (WEERES.) Loving father of 4 children: Karen (Mike) SIMMONS of Fredericton, New Brunswick, Noreen (Gary) SEELEY of Saint John, New Brunswick, Jack (Susan) NOLAN of Aurora and Cathy (Mati) HOLLAND of Mississauga. Cherished grandfather to Greg (Holly) SIMMONS, Mathew (Lacey) SEELEY, Jason SEELEY, Jessica and Danny NOLAN. He is survived by sisters Teresa FINORA of Pensecola, Florida, and Kay REID of St. Catharines. A former Flying Officer in the Royal Canadian Air Force, Tom completed an extensive Tour of Bomber Operations during World War 2. He was a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force Association and Royal Canadian Legion. After a successful career with PPG Industries in Atlantic Canada, Tom went on to become very well known in the store fixtures industry and founded his own successful company Nolan Sales and Marketing Inc. He was a member of Rotary Club, the Canadian Professional Sales Association and the Toronto Board of Trade. Tom will be fondly remembered by many Friends and business associates across the country. Friends may call atthe Neweduk Funeral Home - Mississauga Chapel, 1981 Dundas St. W., Mississauga (1 block east of Erin Mills Pkwy.) on Friday, March 17th between the hours of 2 and 5 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Saturday, March 18th at 1 p.m. Cremation to follow. If desired, donations can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. Neweduk Funeral Home (905) 828-8000 www.neweduk.com

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-18 published
FREEDMAN, Ben
On Thursday, March 16, 2006. Ben FREEDMAN, devoted and loving husband of the late Lillian FREEDMAN. Devoted and loving father and father-in-law of Marla and Howard ROSEN, and Robert and Caren. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Doris and the late Harry FRIMERMAN, Harry and Lillian, Morris and Dorothy, Libby and Ron ROSENBERG, and Sidney and Dawn. Dear brother-in-law of Harvey and Elise KALLES, and Grace and Dave HORENFELDT. Devoted and loving zaida of Jonathan, Taryn, Brianne, Aleeza, Jenna, and Shawn. Beloved Uncle Benny to his many nieces and nephews. Lovingly missed by Clara KLEIN- NOLAN. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Sunday, March 19, 2006 at 3: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva 198 Old Forest Hill Road. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Princess Margaret Foundation, 416-946-6560, Baycrest Palliative Care Unit, 416-785-2875, and The Scarborough Hospital Grace Division, 416-495-2505. His kindness and warm humour will be missed and forever cherished.

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-30 published
Bert OLDERSHAW, 84: Olympic paddler
Competed for Canada in '48, '52, '56 Games
Canoeist spawned dynasty spanning three generations
By Daniel NOLAN, Torstar News Service, Hamilton Spectator
Bert OLDERSHAW certainly didn't let the grass grow under his feet.
From taking part in three Olympic Games to designing artwork made out of flotsam he found washed up on a Lake Ontario beach, it seemed OLDERSHAW was always doing something.
His latest passion was working on restoring the old Burlington Canal lighthouse and the lighthouse keeper's cottage.
"He was a doer right to the end," said his son Dean last night. "He was into everything and anything. He did it all. He was a going concern right to the end."
OLDERSHAW died Tuesday morning at Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital in Burlington. He was 84.
His son said he went into the hospital Monday after collapsing at Lakeshore Place, an assisted retirement home he had moved into only two weeks ago to try out.
He was revived in the ambulance on the ride to the hospital, but he never regained consciousness. Dean and his sisters, Lee and Lynn, were at their father's side when he died.
OLDERSHAW's name will be forever associated with the sport of canoeing. He got his feet wet with the Toronto Island Canoe Club in 1939 and founded the Mississauga Canoe Club in 1957, was a finalist in the 1948 Olympic Games in London, the 1952 Games in Helsinki and the 1956 Games in Melbourne.
He also spawned a canoeing dynasty. Dean and brother Reed each represented Canada in kayaking in the 1972 Games in Munich and the 1976 Games in Montreal. His youngest son Scott paddled for Canada at the 1984 Games in Los Angeles.
In 2001, the torch was passed to a new generation. His grand_son, Mark, won two gold medals at the world junior canoe championships in Brazil.
During World War 2, OLDERSHAW worked as a tool machine designer, assembling anti-submarine devices. Later, he embarked on a career in creative sales and promotion.
OLDERSHAW leaves his five children: Dean, 59, Reed, 55, Scott, 53, Lee, 52, and Lynn, 49. He also leaves 13 grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. His wife Marcelle, from whom he was separated after 37 years of marriage, died in a car crash.
The family is holding a memorial at the Burloak Canoe Club, 150 Water St. in Oakville Sunday between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m.
His sons are planning to spread his ashes at some special places, including Toronto Island, the Credit River and the site where his cottage on Burlington Beach used to stand.

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-14 published
HUNTER, Bryony Fraser (1947-2006)
Bryony "Bry" HUNTER passed away April 8, 2006 at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre, at the age of 58. She will be dearly missed by her mother Loraine HUNTER of Georgetown, her brother and sister-in-law Ian and Shirley HUNTER of Oshawa, three nieces Jennifer HUNTER of Toronto, Stephanie NOLAN (Anthony) of Courtice, and Chandra BRIGGS (Ryan) of Kitchener, and a dear friend Lilly YOUNG (Derryl) of Calgary and other relatives and Friends. Bry was predeceased by her father George HUNTER in 1999. Bry was born in Lachine, Québec, lived in the Toronto area for many years and moved to Calgary in 1978. Bry loved animals and had a special fondness for dogs, cats and horses. She was proud of her ribbon winning Shelty, Katti, as well as her pedigreed horses. Bry was employed with the National Bank of Canada, formerly The Mercantile Bank of Canada, for 34 years where she was a valued employee and had many dear Friends. Memorial service will held at J.S. Jones and son Funeral Home, 11582 Trafalgar Rd., north of Maple Ave., Georgetown, 905-877-3631 on Wednesday, April 19th, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. In memory contributions made to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. To send expressions of sympathy visit www.jsjonesandsonfuneralhome.com

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NOLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-11-23 published
Tough and cheerful on a medical marathon
Hiked in Peru with brain tumour Never stopped to ask, 'Why me?'
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
Because it was her favourite colour, Kate BARNES' family put on orange toques to walk five kilometres last month, on the day of the Toronto Marathon. They were walking to support the Gerry and Nancy Pencer Brain Tumor Centre at Princess Margaret Hospital, as were many others. But, yes, they stood out in that crowd that day -- "just like Kate, who always got noticed," said her sister, Jen NOLAN.
And they felt wonderful.
Policemen gave them the thumbs up, pedestrians waved. There were cheers whenever anyone crossed the finish line at Queen's Park.
"There were 5,000 people walking and they all knew someone with cancer," said Brian LINDSAY, her stepfather.
"It was very joyful," said her mother, Jane LINDSAY.
"You felt a lot less alone," said her brother, John BARNES, who vows to jog the course next year.
The walk took them one hour and nine minutes -- a short journey compared to the one taken by BARNES in the 10 years between her diagnosis and death on January 25 from a brain tumour.
Their Katy had kept them comforted with her toughness, her honesty and her wisecracks. She would introduce herself to people quite cheerfully as the BT girl, as in brain tumour, lest anyone not know how to acknowledge or refer to her reality. When told she had only a short while to live, she replied: "Sh -- happens." She'd joke about opening a Tim Hortons -- her source for hot chocolate -- on the other side, especially with the doctor who was hooked on Starbucks.
But it was only after October 15 this year, when they had walked her walk, that her family was ready to tell her story.
Born in Montreal, brought up in Lorne Park, BARNES was off to see the world as soon as she could. After finishing school, she left for nine months and came home three years later. She visited Australia, New Zealand, London, Indonesia, Ethiopia, breaking up her travels only once, in typical dramatic fashion, to appear on her mother's doorstep in a surprise visit on Christmas Day.
And everywhere, she made good Friends. Outgoing and chatty, genuine and friendly, it was her gift.
Almost 11 years ago, when she did come home to Canada, she got a job as traffic controller for the television station run by Torstar Media Group and started taking flying lessons at Toronto Island Airport. Six months later, in May 1996, BARNES was taking the ferry back from the airport after one of her first solo flights when she had a seizure and was rushed to hospital. Medical experts are still mystified about what causes brain tumours. Hers came out of the proverbial blue.
"Everything crashed with that," said her mother. "She lost her dream."
But not her spunk.
Doctors operated right away; after six weeks of radiation, her gorgeous, wild, untamed curls fell out and she had to move home to be looked after by her mother and stepfather. There would be many more challenges to come, but not once did her family see her cry. They never even heard her say, "Why me?"
"But she did say, 'Goddammit, I'm a Leo and it's not going to beat me,'" Brian LINDSAY said.
She flew to Australia to be at a friend's wedding, dyed her cropped hair bleach-blond, and was back at work by February 1997. She was being monitored, going for an Magnetic Resonance Image every six months. "She would get very anxious before every Magnetic Resonance Image," recalled her sister, but for four wonderful years she was in remission.
Then the Magnetic Resonance Image picked up something -- the tumour was growing again. Once again, she was rushed into surgery, then put on a pharmaceutical clinical trial and monitored monthly. When she was able, she went back to work, moved back downtown, and decided to hike the Inca trail in Peru. Her doctor made her promise she would tell her group leader about her tumour and her medication. On the last morning of the four-day hike, she burst into tears.
"It made me realize I can do what I need to do. I can do what I want to do. Yes, I have a brain tumour and yes, I take Dilantin on a daily basis. But I took care to prepare myself to be as strong as possible," she wrote in an article published by the Pencer Brain Tumor Centre. "It was the pride I felt when I walked through the Inca trail and through the Sun Gate that has given me the strength to move on with my life."
She and her sister got in a trip to Ecuador, the Amazon and the Galapagos -- where BARNES became very vocal when she discovered the litter left by the party of the Ecuadoran president also visiting the island, NOLAN recalled -- and BARNES was bridesmaid at NOLAN's wedding in the summer of 2004.
Then, that September, BARNES had to undergo more emergency surgery. A month later, after she demanded the truth, her doctor told her she had months, possibly a year, left to live.
"It was a wonderful year for all of us," said her mother.
There were movie nights, afternoons in the garden, a helicopter ride over Niagara Falls, walks with her mother and long talks with LINDSAY, whom her mother married two years after BARNES' father died when she was 16. "We were buddies," LINDSAY said.
In May 2005, she visited family in England and Ireland -- a hard trip because everyone knew they were saying goodbye to her. By October she was ready to go into palliative care -- in fact, after she and Brian LINDSAY visited it, she chose Ian Anderson House in Oakville.
She was 35 and she had accepted her death. "She made it so easy for us," said her admiring mother. BARNES started a webpage to keep in touch with her Friends around the world. She was still irrepressible. "We are almost at the end of October… time is flying by when having fun?" she wrote October 19. "I am still having trouble speaking, tired or not. Can I blame it on the colder weather? I smirk!"
She planned her party -- as she called her funeral wake -- right down to the quesadillas she wanted served, and told Maureen DANIELS, co-ordinator at the Pencer Brain Tumor Centre, that she wanted to live until Christmas. She wanted her recipe for pancakes and real maple syrup served up Christmas morning, and that is what her family made happen for her at Anderson House.
But she also told DANIELS she would be ready to die after that.
"'My Dad's waiting for me and we've got plenty to talk about,' she told me," DANIELS said. "We see upwards of 300 people with newly diagnosed brain tumours a year here, but she was pretty amazing. It is hard to be positive and realistic at the same time, but she was."

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NOLAND o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2006-02-22 published
Herbert " Herb" Alvin NOLAND
In loving memory of Herbert "Herb" Alvin Noland who died peacefully at
Mindemoya Hospital on Sunday, February 19, 2006 at the age of 88. Survived
by his beloved wife Gladys (née McKinley). Loved by his two sons Lyle and
wife Donna, Larry and wife Fay all of Spring Bay. Cherished grandpa of
Chris, Connie and husband Scott Willis, Karen and husband Keith Jakubos,
Julie and husband Ray Byers, Cynda and husband Ken Hogg, Dennis, Tammy and
fiance Jeff McKelvie. Special great grandpa of Caleb and Carter Byers, Cody
and Jenna Hogg and Benjamin Willis. Visitation was from 12 Tuesday until
Funeral Service at 2 pm Tuesday, February 21, 2006 at Island Funeral Home,
Little Current. Burial in Mills Cemetery in the spring. Donations to
Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary in Herb's memory would be appreciated.

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NOLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-21 published
BYERS, Marion Marguerite (née PATTERSON)
At the Ridgetown Village Retirement Residence, on Wednesday, December 20, 2006, Marion Marguerite BYERS, formerly of Rodney in her 88th year. Predeceased by her husband Adam (2004). Daughter of the late Archibald and Lillian PATTERSON. Dear mother of Don of R.R.#2, Rodney, Ken and his wife Sharon of Rodney and Jean LOCHHEAD and her husband Ian of Flamborough. Marion will be sadly missed by her six grandchildren and ten great-grandchildren. Survived by sisters Marge BOLANDER of Port Elgin and Gladys NOLAND of Peterborough. Friends may call at the Rodney Chapel on Friday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where funeral service will be held on Saturday at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Rodney Cemetery. If desired, donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or Cancer Society would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Arrangements entrusted to Padfield Funeral Homes (519 785-0810). Online condolences may be made at www.padfieldfuneralhome.com

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NOLFI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-26 published
NOLFI, Giovanni
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved Nonno on October 25, 2006. Nonno was born in Bugnara, Italy on April 7, 1932 and was so fiercely proud of his birthplace that it forever remained in his heart. Nonno is survived by his beloved and devoted wife of 45 years, Elena, who never left his side throughout his life and illness. He is also survived by his two devoted sons Nick and Jerry and loving daughters-in-law, Olena and Jill. He will be sadly missed by his six beautiful grandchildren - Alexander, Julian, Daniel, Christopher, Emily and Benjamin. They adored their Nonno and his great love of family. He is lovingly remembered by his many special relatives in Italy and the United States, especially those in Italy, whom he was able to visit only a few months ago. Nonno had many great loves in life - opera, soccer and pasta to name a few. He also loved to chat even with complete strangers. Nonno loved people and the stories they told about their lives. But no love was greater than the love he had for his family. He worked tirelessly to ensure that his boys would be University Graduates and have the life that he could never have. He did everything for his family and asked for nothing in return. He was the epitome of a selfless, honest and humble man with great moral fibre and character. He was our Nonno and we will miss him greatly. Ciao Nonno. Ti amiamo tanto. We love you very much. Visitation will be held at Frank Lynett Funeral Home, 3299 Dundas St. W. (416) 767-1176 on Thursday, October 26th and Friday, October 27th, 2006 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be held at St. Cecilia's Catholic Church, 161 Annette St, Toronto on Saturday, October 28th at 9: 45 a.m. followed by internment at Prospect Cemetery, 1450 St. Clair Ave, W. In lieu of flowers, Nonno has requested that donations be made to the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto.

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NOLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-13 published
NOLIN, William Manly
(Income Support Manager, M.C.S.S.)
Born January 26, 1943 and passed away on Saturday, February 11, 2006 at the Toronto East General Hospital. Loving father of Terry and her husband Slim and Billy and his wife Karen. Dear grandfather of Sean, Brooke, Adrian, Chantelle and Benjamin. Beloved brother of Dorothy, Nancy, Linda, Sonny, Debbie and predeceased by Danny and Dennis. Billy was a great friend to all who knew him. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Tuesday, February 14, 2006 from 2-6 p.m. A time to remember and pay tribute to his life will begin at 4 p.m. Cremation has taken place. For those who wish, memorial donations may be made to the Terry Fox Foundation.

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NOLLIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-06 published
JAMES, Norman Graham
Surrounded by his loving family on Thursday the 5th day of October, 2006, at Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital, Norman JAMES of Burlington, in his 83rd year. Beloved husband for 29 years of Noël (NOLLIE) JAMES. Much loved father of Deborah THOMAS (Wayne), Colin JAMES (Beth,) and Valerie SCORGIE (Daniel.) Loving stepfather of John SOULE (Ginny), Barbara SOULE, and Colin SOULE (Jackie). Cherished Boppy of Leah (Erik), Ted, Danielle, Taylor, Fraser, Lindsay, James and Jeffrey. Beloved Gramps to Amy, David, Claire and Ally. Dear brother of Daphne DAVIES of New Zealand and predeceased by his brother Ken. Norman attended Cambridge University until 1941 when he joined the Royal Air Force reaching the rank of Squadron, Leader. He served concurrently with the Royal Indian Air Force, during which service he received the Burma Star. Following the war, he served with the Royal Canadian Air Force Reserve - 424 Squadron - out of Hamilton. During Norman's active business career he held a number of offices, including: President of Abbey Life Insurance Co.; Vice-President of External Affairs with The University of Toronto; and Chairman of Canadian National Sportsmen's Shows. Among his many volunteer activities, Norm served on the Board of the World Wildlife Fund Canada and its International Committee, as a Trustee and Director of the North American Wildlife Foundation and a President of the Canadian Cancer Society. He was an avid skier, sportsman and world traveller, which experiences he loved to share with his family and Friends. Special thanks to the nurses and staff of 6 South, Joseph Brant for their care and compassion. Funeral Service will be held at St. Luke's Anglican Church, 1382 Ontario Street, Burlington (parking and church entrance off 1371 Elgin Street) on Wednesday October 11, 2006 at 11: 30 a.m. Friends are invited to a celebration of Norman's life which will take place at the Tamahaac Club, 180 Filman Road, Ancaster, following the service. Private Interment Woodland Cemetery, Hamilton. If desired, expressions of sympathy to the Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum, North American Wildlife Fund or Heart and Stroke Foundation would be sincerely appreciated by the family. (Arrangements entrusted to Smiths Funeral Home, Burlington, 905 632 3333 www.smithsfh.com)

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NOLTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-30 published
ZWIRZ, Frederick
At his residence on Friday, May 26, 2006. Frederick George ZWIRZ of Alexandria; age 73 years. Loving father of Thomas ZWIRZ (Renee) of Massena, New York and Christine ZWIRZ (Gino CANDUSSI) of Pickering, Ontario. Dear sister of Margot STIPP and Gerda RAUH (Edgar) both of Germany. Former husband of Helga KOHLER of Quebec. Dear son of the late Emil ZWIRZ and the late Erna NOLTE. Fond and loving grandfather "Opa" of Andrew, Gabriella, Carter and Tayler. Frederick worked most of his life in Montreal as a Chartered Accountant and a Lecturer at Concordia University. Relatives and Friends may call at the Munro and Morris Funeral Homes Ltd., 114 Main St. Alexandria (613-525-2772) on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 from 10 a.m. until 11 a.m. A Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel of the Munro and Morris Funeral Home on Wednesday, May 31, 2006 at 11 a.m. As expressions of sympathy Memorial Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated by the family. As a Memorial to Frederick a tree will be planted in Memory Woods. A tree grows- memories live. Condolences may be made online at www.munromorris.com

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NOLTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-17 published
VALGE, Sigrid
On January 13, 2006, at Centenary Hospital, Toronto, at age 90. Beloved wife of the late Nikolai VALGE. Loving aunt and great-aunt of Tiia NOLTE, Steven, Karen, and their children Michaela, Stephanie, Tyler and Katie. Service will be held in the chapel of the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mt. Pleasant Rd. (south of Eglinton) on Thursday at 11 a.m. Visitation will be one hour prior to service. Cremation.

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