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"KEO" 2006 Obituary


KEOGH  KEON  KEOPRULIAN  KEOUGH 

KEOGH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-10 published
KEOGH, Kenneth Thomas
Suddenly at his residence, 1229 Huron Street, London, on Saturday, January 7, 2006, Kenneth Thomas KEOGH, in his 74th year. Beloved son of the late Thomas A. and Anna J. (KAIRNS) KEOGH. Survived by sons Kenneth and Sherry KEOGH, Patrick KEOGH all of Barrie Granddaughters Megan and Kaytlin. Former wife Rosella Valerie KEOGH. Sister Leona M. (Michael) PIPA of Michigan. Nieces Judith (David) SHAHINIAN, Karan THOMAS, Michele (Vincent) SALVATO and nephew Mark (Diane) PIPA and many cousins. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Arn Funeral Home, 193 Shackleton Street, Dutton, on Wednesday, January 11, 2006 from Noon to service at 2 p.m. Interment in St. Helen's Cemetery. Donations to the Arthritis Society or Diabetes Association would be appreciated.

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KEOGH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-10 published
KEOGH, John " Jack"
Suddenly at his residence, on Wednesday, November 8th, 2006, John (Jack) KEOGH of London in his 76th year. son of the late Andy and Kathleen KEOGH. Loving husband for 48 years of Mary (McILHARGEY) KEOGH. Beloved father of Mike and Linda KEOGH of Saint Thomas, Pat and Sharon KEOGH of London, Lori and Will MacMURDO of Australia, John and Lianna KEOGH of Ailsa Craig and Kevin KEOGH also of London. Predeceased by daughter Mary Ellen. Sadly missed by his grandchildren Bryan, Lauren, Brent, Kristen, Bradley, Brendan, Katie, Thomas, Michaela, Breanne and Laurel. Dear brother of Helen and Jim DEFINNEY, and Winnifred and Ken SHEPPARD. Predeceased by his sister Catherine and by his brother-in-law Matt DUNAN. Visitation will be held at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, on Sunday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Holy Family Parish, 777 Valetta Street, on Monday, November 13th, 2006 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment, Saint Peter's Cemetery. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of John are asked to consider the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Alzheimer Society of London and Middlesex. Prayers will be held in the funeral home on Sunday at 7: 00 p.m.

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KEOGH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-25 published
KEOGH, Jack
The family of Jack KEOGH wish to thank everyone for their love and support during the loss of a dear husband, father and grandfather. To those who attended the visitation, offered expressions of sympathy, masses, floral tributes, charitable donations, cards, prayers, meals and phone calls. A special thank you to Doctor Eric NICHOLLS for his dedicated care. Our gratitude and thanks to Fr. Bob REMARK, Deacon John VALLELY and the choir of Holy Family Parish. Our thanks to Westview Funeral Chapel and Windermere Manor for their professionalism. Your acts of kindness will forver be remembered. Mary KEOGH and family.

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KEOGH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-11 published
Kenneth McILWRAITH, Officer and Diplomat (1917-2006)
The quiet ambassador had some remarkable wartime adventures -- patrolling Palestine on horseback and being taken prisoner by the French Foreign Legion, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
A very private, modest person, Kenneth McILWRAITH disliked talking about himself almost as much as he loved playing golf after he retired from the diplomatic service. Nevertheless, he had some extraordinary adventures in his long life.
Although Canadian born, he served with the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, one of the last British cavalry regiments to still use horses at the beginning of the Second World War. He was captured by the French Foreign Legion in the Syrian desert in 1941 and held for two months as a prisoner-of-war of Vichy France.
After the war he had a lengthy career as a diplomat and ultimately became Canadian ambassador to Norway and Iceland. "He was a man of infinite courtesy and patience and he helped train his juniors in a methodical and systematic way that was quite rare among senior officers and heads of missions," said Roy MacLAREN, a former High Commissioner to London and one of Mr. McILWRAITH's juniors at External Affairs. "The juniors in the department greatly admired him. He would take any amount of time helping to train us and showing us by example how to conduct ourselves," said Mr. MacLAREN. "He was a very fine person."
Kenneth Douglas McILWRAITH was the younger son of William Norman McILWRAITH and his wife Ruby (née SOMERVILLE.) His father, who had left school at 16, was hired as a clerk by George Herbert WOOD and James Henry GUNDY as one of their first two employees on the day they opened their investment firm in 1905. Mr. McILWRAITH became such an adept and valued investment analyst that five years later, when he was 30, the founders asked him to open the London office of Wood Gundy (which is now part of Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce).
Although a decidedly anglophile couple, the McILWRAITHs returned to Canada every summer to their cottage on Centre Island in Lake Ontario across the harbour from Toronto, and deliberately came back to Canada in the penultimate year of the First World War so that their second son, Kenneth, could (like his elder brother William) be born on Canadian soil. As well, Mr. McILWRAITH "did not trust the quality of British medical treatment," said his grand_son Bill McILWRAITH in a e-mail from Thailand where he owns a small resort.
Ken was sent to board at Boxgrove preparatory school in Guildford, Surrey, from the age of 8. At 13, he went to Rugby School, near Coventry in Warwickshire, the same school that the soldier-poet Rupert Brooke had attended, and then went up to Cambridge where he studied English literature at Clare College, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1939 and a master's the following year.
Mr. McILWRAITH joined the British Army as a second lieutenant and served with the Royal Wiltshire Yeomanry, a regiment that can trace its lineage back to 1794. At the time Mr. McILWRAITH enlisted, the regiment (which had been given the honorific Royal in 1831 and designated the Prince of Wales's Own in 1863 in tribute to the future King Edward VII) was still a cavalry unit, a tradition that must have appealed to the horse-loving Mr. McILWRAITH. He, along with his batman, served in Palestine, riding his own two horses (which he had shipped by train and boat from England) on patrols. It was only at the end of 1941, two years into the war, that the regiment was mechanized, following its transfer to the Royal Armoured Corps.
While serving as a regimental liaison officer in the Syrian desert, Mr. McILWRAITH and his batman were captured south of Palmyra on June 2, 1941, by a French patrol (of Arab soldiers with French officers, as he later explained in a letter to his parents). As France had fallen to the Germans the year before and established the Vichy collaborationist government, the French and the British were technically at war.
Mr. McILWRAITH was taken to the local commandant, a captain in the French Foreign Legion. After a noisy exchange, the commandant sent his prisoner on his first flight by "aeroplane" to Homs, about 145 kilometres west of Palmyra. "The plane was a very ancient affair (four-seater biplane), the air currents over the desert were particularly active, and the pilot and navigator were more concerned with some bottles of wine they had brought with them than with the smooth progress of their flying chicken-crate," he wrote to his parents in September, 1941.
Lieutenant McILWRAITH was transported along with other captured British officers to Alefsis on the outskirts of Athens. That's where he saw the Germans for the first time. "The Jerries paid no attention to us other than to glance with a certain bovine curiosity at the rather motley looking party of British officers. It was obvious, however, that the French depended on German authorization for every move they made," he wrote.
Another "hair-raising" flight later, the prisoners reached Salonika, where they were kept in filthy conditions in a warehouse for five days and then interned for two weeks in the hold of a French passenger ship in the harbour. After the Saint Jean d'Acre Armistice was signed on July 14 between British forces in the Middle East and Vichy France forces in Syria under General Henri Dentz, he should have been returned to the British. The prisoners were shown the armistice and allowed to read the clause demanding their immediate return to the British, but they were still loaded on a train and sent across enemy-occupied Europe and through Germany to Toulon, France -- all the time in ghastly conditions, without adequate food or water.
In Toulon, he and the other officers were finally released under the terms of the armistice and sent back to Beirut on a French ship that sailed through the Mediterranean, enjoying considerably better conditions than he had endured on his outward journey. He arrived in Cairo on August 19, a little more than two months after his capture and after 10 days leave, returned to the fighting.
The Royal Wiltshire was the first British tank regiment to engage the German (and Italian) forces under General Erwin Rommel at the crucial battle of El Alamein in North Africa in 1942. Mr. McILWRAITH missed the fighting because he was ill with jaundice and desert sores, (a virulent form of impetigo that was exacerbated by sand, heat and the confined quarters in tanks). The sergeant who took his place was killed almost immediately, according to Mr. McILWRAITH's daughter Mary.
He later served in Norway and was demobilized with the rank of captain in 1946. Although he survived the war, many of his school Friends and army colleagues were killed and he suffered from horrible nightmares about the horrors he had witnessed. His daughter, Mary McILWRAITH, can still remember him shouting in his sleep and waking everybody up. As a result they rarely talked about their father's war experience.
When peace came, his father wanted him to join Wood Gundy, but he resisted and opted instead to study Canadian history at the University of Toronto for a year with a view to joining External Affairs (now Foreign Affairs and International Trade), which he did on September 1, 1948, after successfully writing the entrance examinations. As a student, Mr. McILWRAITH lived in a boarding house on Lonsdale Road. That's where he met Ruth (née KEOGH) RICHARDSON, a widow one year his senior and the mother of two little girls, Deirdre and Darragh. Her husband Pat had fought with the Canadian forces and been killed in Holland near the end of the War.
Although of different religions -- Mr. McILWRAITH was Protestant and Mrs. RICHARDSON was Irish Catholic -- they married in 1951 just before he received his first foreign posting to Geneva. During their three years in Switzerland, the McILWRAITHs' daughter Mary was born. The family returned to Canada and lived in Ottawa where Mr. McILWRAITH was a member of the inspection service, charged with travelling the globe to observe and report back on conditions in Canadian embassies and diplomatic missions. The McILWRAITH's final child, Sheila, was born in Ottawa just before their next posting to Tokyo in 1958. They travelled by ship, as Mrs. McILWRAITH disliked flying, a trip that her daughter Mary still remembers as the height of luxury and glamour. After a three-year stint, the family went back again to Ottawa where Mr. McILWRAITH was head of personnel for External Affairs.
In 1964, the fluently bilingual Mr. McILWRAITH was posted to Paris at the height of the first wave of Front de Liberation du Québec violence in Quebec and during a troubled diplomatic period between French president Charles de Gaulle and the Canadian government. While working in the embassy he took some pleasure in recounting to his colleagues how an earlier French administration had held him as a prisoner-of-war, according to his old friend and colleague Peter Towe, former Canadian ambassador to the United Nations. Mr. McILWRAITH's final posting was to Oslo where he served as ambassador to Norway and Iceland from 1972 until 1976.
He took early retirement at 60 and continued to live in Ottawa where he enjoyed playing golf, meeting with old Friends from External and reading. He and his wife separated in 1990 and she returned to Toronto where she died in 2004.
Mr. McILWRAITH, who continued to live in Ottawa in the family home with his step-daughter Darragh, was in good health, surviving prostate cancer and melanoma, until the cancer metastasized to his urinary tract. He died shortly after receiving the diagnosis and having refused treatment.
Kenneth Douglas McILWRAITH was born in Toronto on May 25, 1917. He died in Ottawa on September 11, 2006. He was 89. He is survived by his four daughters, three grandchildren and his extended family.

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KEON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-15 published
LECLAIR, Noella, 61
First Canadian artificial heart recipient
Canadian Press, Page S7
Ottawa -- Noella LECLAIR, who became part of medical history as the recipient of Canada's first artificial heart transplant, died at Ottawa Civic Hospital on Saturday. She was 61.
A little more than 20 years ago, Ms. LECLAIR, then 41, was all but dead from heart disease when her family gave permission for her to receive a temporary, Jarvik-7 artificial heart. On May 1, 1986, a surgical team led by Doctor Wilbert KEON, one of the country's leading heart specialists, performed the 3½-hour transplant operation.
One week later, in another long surgical procedure, she received a heart from a 44-year-old Montreal man who had died after a traffic accident near London, Ontario
Ms. LECLAIR died November 11 at the Ottawa Heart Institute in the same hospital where she underwent both heart transplants in 1986. She is survived by her husband, Simon, and daughter, Sophie.

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KEON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-14 published
McCORKELL, Clarence Harold
At his home surrounded by family after a battle with cancer on Sunday evening, February 12th, 2006. Clare McCORKELL of Barrie was born in Toronto on September 17th, 1934. Beloved husband of Helen (née BILOTTI) McCORKELL. Loving father of John McCORKELL of Barrie. Dear brother of Lillian O'NEIL (late Andy) of Virginia, Ontario, and late Herbert McCORKELL (Marie) of Newmarket. Predeceased by his parents Earl and Mary Bridget (née KEON) McCORKELL. Dear son-in-law of Carolina and the late Frank BILOTTI of Timmins. Dear brother-in-law of Val (Lucille), Louisa, Norman, Elizabeth (Michael) and their families. He will be sadly missed by many nieces, nephews, relatives and Friends. Friends may call at the Steckley-Gooderham Funeral Home (201 Minet's Point Road at Yonge Street) Barrie on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held from Saint John Vianney Church (13 Baldwin Lane), Barrie on Friday, February 17th, 2006 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Saint Mary's Cemetery, Barrie. Memorial donations to the Royal Victoria Hospital Regional Cancer Care Centre or the St. Vincent de Paul Society would be appreciated.

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KEON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-11-15 published
Medical pioneer dead at 61
Noella LECLAIR received artificial heart
Defied the odds, lived for 20 years
By Phinjo GOMBU, Staff Reporter
When Noella LECLAIR made history on May 1, 1986, as the recipient of Canada's first artificial heart, doctors gave her at most five years to live.
She proved them wrong. To the delight of her family and Friends, LECLAIR went on to live a normal, healthy and happy life for 20 years.
The resident of the Ottawa suburb of Orleans, who died Saturday at the age of 61, even opened up her own small store in the Byward market, which she ran for more than 15 years.
"She always looked at (her life) as if she had been given a second chance, which a lot of people don't get," her daughter Sophie LECLAIR- MICETICH recalled yesterday.
LECLAIR was 41 when she received a Jarvik-7 artificial heart at the Ottawa Heart Institute. A week later, she received a human heart from a 44-year-old Montreal man who had died after a traffic accident.
LECLAIR died in the same Ottawa institute.
According to her daughter, LECLAIR's heart was not functioning well in recent months, but doctors advised against another transplant.
"She took it gracefully," said LECLAIR- MICETICH. " She was happy and ready to go. She looked at the 20 years she had with us as a bonus."
Dr. Ross DAVIES, a cardiologist at the Ottawa institute who had had LECLAIR as a patient from the beginning, described her as a lovely lady, beloved by all the patients and staff.
"I don't think we would have dreamt that people would have lived more than 20 years with such good quality of life," said DAVIES.
"It has just been a remarkable story all along, very satisfying for the patient and family and very satisfying for the heart institute and the medical staff."
Born in the small community of Plantagenet, northwest of Ottawa, LECLAIR was destined to live a quiet life in Orleans with her husband, Simon, who ran a furniture business.
Before her illness, she raised nine foster children, in addition to her own daughter.
But on April 25, 1986, she suffered a heart attack that left her on life support and technically dead.
A few days' later, family members gave doctors permission to insert the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, and after a 3½ hour transplant operation led by Doctor Wilbert KEON, Canadian medical history was made.
"Heart transplantation was still somewhat young, so doing a transplant was still pretty exciting," recalled DAVIES. "It was very exciting to be involved in the first mechanical circulatory-assist device in Canada."
Back then, only the Ottawa institute performed such complex surgery, something that is now routinely performed in select hospitals across Canada.
LECLAIR's gratitude was such that she went on to become the Ottawa Heart Institute's most enthusiastic volunteer: She organized bingo games, took part in telethons and assisted doctors to help calm patients who were nervous about impending surgery by discussing her own experiences.
"At one point her doctor told me that she was (the institute's) best spokesperson, obviously because she was living proof of their capabilities," said LECLAIR- MICETICH.
DAVIES said the relationship between patient and the hospital was long and fruitful.
"Our objective when we went into this was to improve her quality of life," he said. "It turns out we couldn't have done it to a more wonderful person because not only did we help her… she returned the favour many fold both to the heart institute and the community."
Funeral services are scheduled for Monday at Saint_Joseph Church in Orleans. LECLAIR is survived by her husband, Simon, and daughter Sophie.

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KEOPRULIAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-19 published
KEOPRULIAN, Beverley Ann (née MORRIS)
We are saddened to announce that Beverley passed away suddenly on Monday, May 1, 2006 at the North York General Hospital at the age of 67. Beloved wife of Levon. Dear sister to David (Anne), Robert (Marry Ann) and the late Ernie. Beverley will be sadly missed by her brother and sister-in-laws, Melik (Lilly) and Anouche. Dear aunt to Andrew, Laura and Stepshen. A memorial service will be held at The Holy Trinity Armenian Church of Toronto, 920 Progress Avenue, Scarborugh (south of Hwy 401 and east of Markham Road) at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday, May 23, 2006. Donations can be made to the North York General Hospital Foundation in memory of Beverley.

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KEOUGH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-06-04 published
MORLOCK, Alma Irene (SMITH)
Peacefully, at Queensway Nursing Home, Hensall, Friday, June 2, 2006, Alma Irene (SMITH) MORLOCK, age 102, formerly of Crediton. Beloved wife of the late C. Gordon MORLOCK (1993.) Mother-in-law of Gladys (BECKER) MORLOCK of Waterloo. Grandma of Scott and Janet MORLOCK, Lynn and Mike KEOUGH and great-grandma of Mark, Peter and Weston MORLOCK, Austin, Kevin and Sean KEOUGH. Remembered by her nephew Donald FINKBEINER, great-nieces, great-nephews and their families. Predeceased by Doctor Frederick MORLOCK (1993,) brothers William, Roy and Eldon SMITH, sisters Idella SIMS, Beulah SPARLING and Lavina FINKBEINER. Resting at the T. Harry Hoffman and Sons Funeral Home, Dashwood, with visitation Sunday evening 7 to 9 p.m.; where the funeral service will be held Monday, June 5, 2006 at 1 p.m. The Rev. Sheila MacGREGOR officiating. Interment Crediton Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to the Zion United Church, Crediton or charity of choice would be appreciated. Alma was a life-long member of Zion United Church and the Crediton Women's Institute. Condolences at www.hoffmanfuneralhome.com

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KEOUGH o@ca.on.peterborough.north_monaghan.peterborough.the_peterborough_examiner 2006-04-01 published
EGGLETON, Olive Violet (née FIFE)
(formerly of Driscoll Terrace)
It is with great sadness that the family of Olive EGGLETON announce her passing at Extendicare Peterborough on Thursday, March 30, 2006 in her 102nd year. Beloved wife of the late Charles EGGLETON (1995.) Dear Mother of Marion MILBURN and her husband Gerald of Peterborough, Norma KEOUGH and her husband Micheal of Douro, Kenneth EGGLETON and his wife Margaret of Peterborough and the late Mansel EGGLETON and his surviving wife Bonnie of Oshawa. Loving Grandma of Gordon, Janet, Micheal, Connie, Leanne, Angula, Coleen, Mark, David, Robert and Katie. Loving Great-grandma of many. Predeceased by her siblings Vina, Elizabeth and Russell. A funeral service will be held at Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 356 Rubidge Street on Monday, April 3, 2006 at 3 p.m. with visitation one hour prior, Reverend Doctor Robert ROOT officiating. Interment Rosemount Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, donations to Five Counties Children's Centre or the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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