All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"JOU" 2006 Obituary


JOUBERT  JOUDREY  JOUDRIE  JOUDWA  JOUSSE 

JOUBERT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-02-08 published
DAVISON, Alexandra Marie
Suddenly and unexpectedly while on vacation with her family in Varadero, Cuba on Monday, January 30, 2006, Alexandra Marie DAVISON, of London, at the age of 27, peacefully passed away. Survived by her loving parents Lucyanne and John DAVISON, her brother Johnny and his fiancée Richelle BEST, and her brother Patrick and his fiancée Caroline JOUBERT. The light of Alex's life most recently was her nephew Joshua, son of Johnny and Richelle - who always had a smile for Alex. Predeceased by her baby brother Christopher. Also survived by her grandfather Leon LIBAWSKI of Brampton. Alex will be missed by her many aunts, uncles, cousins, Friends and neighbours, as well as her cat Chloe. Alex was a graduate of S.T.A. High School, Fanshawe College, and was currently working on her degree in Women's Studies through Athabasca University. Alex faced many challenges throughout her life and yet she met each day with a smile. Alex was our Angel on earth. Funeral service will be held on Friday, February 10th at St. Pius X Church on Valetta Street, at 10: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, or the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of Canada. Cremation has taken place. Private family interment of ashes at St. Peter's Cemetery, London, will take place at a later date.

  J... Names     JO... Names     JOU... Names     Welcome Home

JOUBERT - All Categories in OGSPI

JOUDREY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-28 published
JOUDREY- KINNEY, Donna Marie
At Victoria Hospital on Tuesday, December 26, 2006, Donna Marie JOUDREY in her 59th year. Beloved wife of Vern KINNEY. Loving mother of Theresa, Jamie, Joe, Jodi, John, Justin, Sherry, Sem and Mark. Also survived by thirteen grandchildren, seven brothers and sisters and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Visitors will be received on Thursday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. in the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William Street (between King and York) where the Funeral Service will be conducted in the Chapel on Friday at 2 p.m. with Reverend Lynn NICHOL officiating. Private cremation at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery followed by interment in the family lot in North Bay, Ontario.

  J... Names     JO... Names     JOU... Names     Welcome Home

JOUDREY - All Categories in OGSPI

JOUDRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-12-01 published
JOUDRIE, H. Earl
It is with great sadness that the family of H. Earl JOUDRIE announce his passing on November 29, 2006. "A little while and I will be gone from among you, whither I cannot tell. From nowhere we came, into nowhere we go. What is Life? It is a flash of a firefly in the night, it is a breath of a buffalo in the winter-time, it is as the little shadow that runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset." (Crowfoot, Chief of the Blackfoot Nation). A Celebration of Earl's Life will be held at the Ranchmen's Club (710 - 13th Avenue S.W.) in Calgary, Alberta at 2: 00 p.m. on December 4, 2006. A Memorial Service will also be held in Ontario at a date to be announced in the future. In Lieu of flowers, donations in Memory of Earl can be made to the H. Earl Joudrie Scholarship Fund the University of Alberta (6th Floor, GSB University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T2G 2H1) or to the Canadian Cancer Fund.

  J... Names     JO... Names     JOU... Names     Welcome Home

JOUDRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-12-02 published
JOUDRIE, H. Earl
It is with great sadness that the family of H. Earl JOUDRIE announce his passing on November 29, 2006. 'A little while and I will be gone from among you, whither I cannot tell. From nowhere we came, into nowhere we go. What is Life? It is a flash of a firefly in the night, it is a breath of a buffalo in the wintertime, it is as the little shadow that runs across the grass and loses itself in the sunset.' (Crowfoot, Chief of the Blackfoot Nation). A Celebration of Earl's Life will be held at the Ranchmen's Club (710 - 13th Avenue S.W.) in Calgary, Alberta at 2: 00 p.m. on December 4, 2006. A Memorial Service will also be held in Ontario at a date to be announced in the future. In Lieu of flowers, donations in Memory of Earl can be made to the H. Earl Joudrie Scholarship Fund the University of Alberta (6th Floor, GSB University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T2G 2H1) or to the Canadian Cancer Fund.

  J... Names     JO... Names     JOU... Names     Welcome Home

JOUDRIE - All Categories in OGSPI

JOUDWA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-15 published
NUSS, Carl Stephen
Died suddenly on March 10, 2006. Predeceased by father Carl. Beloved son of Marilyn, brother of Robin JOUDWA and Karen PHELPS, uncle to Erin, Meagan and Benjamin. A private funeral was held March 14, 2006 in Oakville. He has been committed into the Hands of God.

  J... Names     JO... Names     JOU... Names     Welcome Home

JOUDWA - All Categories in OGSPI

JOUSSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-30 published
James BURK/BURKE, Writer And Editor: (1917-2006)
Paralyzed by an auto accident in 1942, he survived to become one of Canada's longest-surviving paraplegics
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- James BURK/BURKE was 22 and only weeks from getting a pilot's licence when an accident left him paralyzed. The year was 1940 and Toronto's health system was ill equipped to deal with civilian paraplegics. Hospital authorities basically told him to "pray and die," he said later.
He spent long years in institutions before the availability of the personal collapsible wheelchair -- combined with his own willpower -- helped him start a new life on the outside. He worked as a freelance writer and editor, married radio and stage personality Laddie DENNIS, and authored two comic novels in the 1960s. He was to spend more than six decades in a wheelchair and was one of Canada's longest-surviving paraplegics.
"He never allowed himself to be shackled by remorse," says William GEISLER, one of the doctors who helped with his rehabilitation. "He didn't ruminate on what had been. He knew those emotions would sap him of the energy he required." Friends say he avoided talking about his handicap, had a strong sense of humour and was always willing to help others.
For a number of years, Mr. BURK/BURKE edited the Caliper, the journal of the Canadian Paraplegic Association. He also wrote Return to Action, a history of treatment programs for spinal-cord patients. But he never mentioned disabilities in his other writings, which included a physical fitness course, short stories, book reviews for The Globe and Mail and two novels.
Flee Seven Ways (1964) is the rollicking tale of a corrupt businessman. It was published in Britain, the U.S. and Germany to favourable reviews. "A very funny first novel," wrote The New York Times. The paper's Literary Supplement noted: "His novel is a complex construction, bravely undertaken and creditably carried out."
In The Firefly Hunt (1969), mischief and mayhem bedevil the hero after he inherits a castle from an eccentric uncle. Argosy magazine called it "a sparkling Roman-candle of a fantasy." Mr. BURK/BURKE drafted a third novel, but health problems halted completion.
Christened James KAPHALAKOS, he changed his last name to BURK/BURKE as a young man. He was the second of five sons of Panogiotis (Peter) KAPHALAKOS, a Greek immigrant who operated a Toronto coffee business, and his wife, Florence (née COCHRANE.) Young James excelled at school and in athletics but, because of his father's death in 1930, he abandoned his studies. To support his family, he graduated from high school and then went looking for whatever work he could find.
An avid weightlifter with a striking physique, he earned some income as a live model at the Ontario College of Art. But his main job in 1940 was on the bull gang at a paper mill. He was also taking flying lessons at the Toronto Island airport, but only when he had some extra money. That all changed when the car in which he was a passenger was involved in an accident. The impact broke his back and left him paralyzed from the mid-back down.
At the time, life expectancy for paraplegics was considered low. As a result, Mr. BURK/BURKE was given little more than food, a bed to lie in and drugs to fight off infection. In all, he spent seven years at a succession of Toronto hospitals. Later, he said he only talked about those missing years "to counter the canard" that he had spent them in jail.
He gave details of his dreary hospital years in lengthy interviews conducted in the early 1990s by Mary TREMBLAY, an associate professor of health sciences at McMaster University. She used his experiences in a series of academic papers on the evolution of Canada's treatment of spinal-cord injuries.
At Saint Michael's Hospital, nuns asked Mr. BURK/BURKE to accept his fate and make peace with God. "I somehow didn't feel like taking on the chore of dying at that moment," he told Ms. TREMBLAY. The Queen Elizabeth Hospital was "very restrictive" with few activities, but at Runnymede Hospital he found the staff to be more sympathetic. Somehow, he obtained a typewriter and took up writing. One of his first successes as a freelancer was a correspondence course on fitness that he sold through magazine ads.
His life changed dramatically in 1946 when he was visited by Dr. Al JOUSSE and John COUNSELL, a paraplegic veteran who had been injured at Dieppe. Along with neurosurgeon Doctor Harry BOTTERELL, they had helped set up Lyndhurst Lodge in Toronto as a centre for spinal-injury rehabilitation programs for veterans of the Second World War. As a deserving civilian, Mr. BURK/BURKE was squeezed into the program. He began travelling to Lyndhurst for physiotherapy twice a week. More importantly, he was given one of the Everest and Jennings folding, self-propelled wheelchairs that had provided freedom and hope to paraplegic veterans.
In 1948, he moved to the Young Men's Christian Association in downtown Toronto where he pursued his writing career. He wrote short stories and book reviews, and also worked as a copy editor. It was at the Young Men's Christian Association coffee bar that he met Laddie DENNIS, then a stage actress and radio announcer. She later appeared regularly on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television and became a travel writer. One friend called their romance "the love story of the century." Ms. DENNIS says she "made the first move" and was also the one who proposed. They were married in 1951 and spent their honeymoon in Mexico.
In 1955, they purchased a former five-car garage that once belonged to the historic Falcon Inn in Scarborough. The partly finished structure was considered a white elephant, but the couple turned it into a comfortable home where they often entertained 40 guests at a time.
In 1963, Mr. BURK/BURKE was invited to England to turn his first novel into a screenplay. The project fell through, but along the way he picked up an assignment to write the script for a British Broadcasting Corporation Radio play based on Nikolai Gogol's Diary of a Madman. It starred comedian Kenneth Williams.
Despite his handicap, Mr. BURK/BURKE drove a car, raked lawns, got in and out of a rowboat and even chopped wood.
Mary TREMBLAY started one interview saying she wanted to talk about Mr. BURK/BURKE's ideas about disability. His reply summed up his attitude: "I'm against it."
James BURK/BURKE was born in Toronto on September 16, 1917. He died in Toronto on October 15, 2006, of complications of paraplegia. He was 89. He leaves his wife, Laddie DENNIS, and brothers Paul and Peter KAPHALAKOS.

  J... Names     JO... Names     JOU... Names     Welcome Home

JOUSSE - All Categories in OGSPI