All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"GOM" 2006 Obituary


GOMARD  GOMBU  GOMERSALL  GOMERY  GOMES  GOMEZ 

GOMARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-12 published
FILEY, Karen Susan (née SANTARELLI)
Passed away peacefully February 10, 2006, with her family at her bedside at Henderson General, Hamilton, after a brief but courageous battle with cancer. Survived by her beloved husband Bob, son Jason, daughter Laura-Lea (Leanne), dear sister-in-law of Mike and Yarmila FILEY, and nieces and nephews Ellen REPASKY, Katharine, Jeff and Greg GOMARD and Erin and Megan FILEY. Missed by her beloved pets Tosh, Maggie and Murphy. A celebration of Karen's life will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate memorial donations to Breast Cancer Research, www.jccfoundation.on.ca/donations

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMARD - All Categories in OGSPI

GOMBU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-28 published
Bob MacDONALD, 76, chased the big stories
Longtime Sun reporter spent 55 years in business
'Banned for life' from press club several times
By Phinjo GOMBU, Staff Reporter
Bob MacDONALD, the Toronto Sun's legendary reporter and columnist, was a scrappy Maritime conservative skeptical of all politicians.
But he remained to the end a loyal admirer of Robert Stanfield, a fellow Nova Scotian who nearly became prime minister.
Like many other fellow Maritimers, MacDONALD had a stubborn streak that involved subservience to no one, recalled Peter WORTHINGTON, founding editor of the Sun, yesterday.
It was a trait that drove many of his editors crazy, WORTHINGTON said, although MacDONALD always managed to redeem himself by coming up with yet another great story.
MacDONALD, 76, died Sunday of prostate cancer. He was diagnosed with the disease about 14 years ago.
"(MacDONALD) probably represents the Sun newsroom more than any single individual," said WORTHINGTON as he paid the ultimate tribute to MacDONALD, a reporter and columnist for 55 years.
"The newsroom won't quite be the same without him."
MacDONALD was born in the small mining town of Plymouth Park, Nova Scotia, the son of a shop steward on the railroad.
He graduated from Acadia University and then studied journalism at Columbia University in New York City before being hired by the Toronto Star in 1953.
He later spent a decade at the Toronto Telegram before joining the Sun.
Colleagues yesterday remembered him as a brave, iconoclastic reporter who never tired of chasing a great story, but who always found time to mentor young reporters.
His scoops over the years were famous.
For the Star, using old contacts, he managed to sneak into the room where Prince Philip was visiting relatives of the victims of the Springhill mining disaster.
For the Telegram, he covered the FLQ crisis, and for the Sun, he wrote the paper's first front-page story about a $10 million boondoggle involving the sale of supposedly surplus jets the government had to replace.
WORTHINGTON said MacDONALD would drive the Ottawa press gallery nuts by breaking stories -- which they had to follow -- during his occasional visits to cover Parliament Hill.
He was such a great reporter that WORTHINGTON made sure that despite his desire to be a columnist, MacDONALD continued to break stories for the Sun for some time.
Outside of the newsroom, MacDONALD's exploits included the dubious distinction, along with Star cartoonist Duncan MacPHERSON, of being "banned for life" several times after dustups at the press club.
"When he was off the wagon, life was far more exciting, but it was much easier when he was on it," WORTHINGTON said.
After he became a Sun columnist in the late 1970s, MacDONALD was finally able to freely flaunt his blue Tory beliefs, while railing against the evils of communism and terrorism.
He had clear likes and dislikes. During the Bosnian conflict, he supported the Croatians and opposed the Serbians.
One story around that time had him so angry that his twice-weekly column had been cut to once a week that he organized members of the Croatian community to picket the Sun until the decision was reversed.
"The thing about my dad was that he talked to everybody, from the most glamorous movie star and well-known politician, to the guy walking on the street with his hand out because that's all he had," said his only child, Moira MacDONALD, a freelance writer.
"He was genuinely interested in people and the stories they had to tell," she said.
Besides his daughter, MacDONALD is survived by his wife Nellie-Joe, grand_son Holm GILL, sister Betty HEIGHTON, brother Russell MacDONALD and nine nephews and nieces.
A memorial is planned for Thursday at a time and place to be determined.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMBU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-14 published
Marie CURTIS, 94: Long Branch fighter on Metro Council
Marie CURTIS always spoke her mind
Fought doggedly for her constituents
By Phinjo GOMBU, Staff Reporter
As reeve of the long-gone village of Long Branch, Marie CURTIS took pride in being described as a plain-spoken housewife whose political commentary was as crusty as the scrumptious apple pies she loved to bake.
And as politicians -- including then-Toronto mayor Nathan PHILLIPS and Metro chairman Fred GARDINER -- soon realized, they crossed CURTIS's path at their peril.
The year was 1953, and CURTIS, who represented Long Branch -- a working-class community of about 10,000 long since incorporated into Etobicoke -- on Metro Council, was a reeve who believed in speaking her mind.
"If you wanted a job done, call Marie," recalled Mississauga Mayor Hazel McCALLION, whose long political career in local politics was beginning just as CURTIS's was ending.
"She was such an energetic, lively person who didn't hesitate to take a stand on an issue," McCALLION said. "When she was active, I was just a junior in local politics and I always admired her and had great respect for her."
From her epic battles against the east-west Toronto subway line, to helping the victims of Hurricane Hazel relocate, to creating Toronto's regional parkland system, CURTIS left her mark on a city that was just beginning to take form.
She lambasted builders who got a permit for one thing and then built another, called the youth of the day "big lumps" who didn't deserve publicly funded community centres, and fought tooth and nail for the interests of her constituents.
CURTIS, who is honoured today by Marie Curtis Park on the banks of Etobicoke Creek and Lake Ontario, died Sunday at her residence, Grey Gables, in Markdale, southeast of Owen Sound. She was 94.
She was predeceased by her husband of 55 years, Bryce CURTIS, in 1988, and by her son Bill in 1987. She is survived by her daughter Joan McGEE, five grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren.
Ann Marie McCARTHY, who was born on a farm in Wyebridge, near Midland, was a shy country girl until an aunt visited from St. Louis, Missouri, when she was 9 years old. Family lore has it that the aunt took a shine to her and the two went back to Missouri, where the girl discovered the joys of music, theatre and libraries things she didn't have back on the farm.
Ann Marie, who never went to high school or university, was a changed girl when she returned home. One of seven children, she was 14 when her mother died, and by 18 she was in Toronto working in a hat factory to help support the family.
A few years later she met her husband, Bryce CURTIS, and the couple settled in the village of Long Branch because -- much like today -- a house in Toronto was out of reach.
Back then, the village was a poor community made up of people who worked in about a half-dozen local industries that included making paint, bricks and water meters.
CURTIS's first foray into politics came when she was elected president of the local Home and School Association, where she led a victorious battle to get kindergarten classes. The ease of the victory piqued her interest, and she began attending local council meetings to learn about the business of politics.
In 1951, her life took a crucial turn when she learned the deputy reeve's spot was being filled by acclamation because nobody wanted to run against him.
"I thought that was awful," she told a journalist. "Why, he hadn't done anything but rubber-stamp the rest of the council all the time I was watching. So I went out to try and find someone to fight that drone."
Unsuccessful in finding the right candidate, she returned home one day and said she had found the perfect person: herself. She went on to win in 1952.
A year later, in 1953, CURTIS ran for reeve -- roughly equivalent to village mayor -- and was elected. Long Branch voters quickly learned they were on to a good thing and continued to re-elect her until she retired in 1962, a decade of municipal politics under her belt.
Betraying her housewife roots, CURTIS often said her proudest accomplishments included getting the village streets paved because she was fed up with complaints from parents about their kids tracking road tar into the house. She planted crabapple trees that still bloom every spring, and brought the village its first artificial ice rink by encouraging woman to sell kisses to gentlemen for $1 apiece.
But it was on Metro Council, where she was a charter member -- and the first woman to sit on the powerful executive committee with "Big Daddy" Gardiner -- that she began to make her mark.
CURTIS's politics were both populist and conservative.
She likened fathers who deserted their families to people who sold tainted meat from dead and diseased animals. Both, she pronounced, should be horsewhipped.
CURTIS wanted police officers posted outside drinking establishments to keep drunks from driving. But she didn't think government could force people out of their cars and on to public transit, and supported the ill-fated Spadina Expressway.
It was, however, her opposition to the Bloor-Danforth subway line -- a pet project of the mayors of Metro Toronto's bigger municipalities in the early 1950s -- that propelled her into the limelight.
CURTIS said she couldn't support the idea because the residents of Long Branch were being forced to subsidize the Toronto Transit Commission while zoned bus fares in her village were rising unfairly.
The battle went all the way to the Supreme Court and twice cost her a place on council's executive committee. But both times she bounced back.
"My mother always told me that the only way she did really well at Metro Council was because she did her homework first," her daughter Joan said.
After she retired as reeve, CURTIS continued to play a role in politics for six years as executive director of the Association of Mayors and Reeves of Ontario -- forerunner to the Association of Municipalities of Ontario.
"She was well-respected by the elected people across the province," McCALLION said.
On leaving municipal politics, CURTIS was urged by all three political parties to run for the provincial Legislature. Instead, she moved to a farm near Markdale to be with her retired husband.
Visitation is at Gentle Shepherd Community Church, 8th Concession and Inkerman St. in Eugenia, near Markdale, today from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. A celebration of CURTIS's life will be held at the church tomorrow at 1 p.m.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMBU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-29 published
'I just want to see my son'
They can only see him after autopsy has been done
By Phinjo GOMBU, Staff Reporter
Linda and Frank BROWN were woken up by a 4 a.m. phone call from an acquaintance with chilling news that their son, Jermaine, had been shot dead.
But grief soon turned to anger and frustration as they spent a frantic day yesterday crisscrossing the city in a futile bid to view his body.
By day's end, the parents of 23-year-old Jermaine Lincoln BROWN, a high school high-jump champion and Humber College culinary arts student, were bewildered.
"All I want to do is see my son," Linda BROWN, a cafeteria supervisor for the Toronto school board said last night in her townhouse in the Bramalea Rd. and Steeles Ave. area of Brampton.
"I wanted to make sure that's the person they said is dead. I wanted to see his face before they cut him up and did whatever they want to do with his body."
The problem was that a girl who claimed to be their son's sister falsely identified herself as Nisha BROWN, went to 31 Division with an ex-girlfriend and identified his body.
BROWN was fatally shot Monday night on Grandravine Dr. in the Jane St. and Sheppard Ave. W. area. He had moved into an apartment there in December after being accepted by Humber College where he was training to become a chef.
Police at 31 Division told the BROWNs there was nothing they could do because their son's body had already been identified, and they would only be able to see him after an autopsy was conducted.
The BROWNs said they then drove to the city morgue on Grosvenor St. downtown where they were told they couldn't see the body because they could "contaminate" evidence.
"I really feel deprived of not being able to see my son for the last (time) the way he left this earth," Linda BROWN said. "I'm really upset. I thought the police were supposed to be working with the community and family members. Right now, they are not working with us."
The parents also said they are completely in the dark about what might have precipitated the shooting because police have yet to tell them or even officially notify them of the death.
Linda and Frank BROWN know, their son, the oldest of six children, as a kind-hearted, quiet young man whose passion was cooking.
"I can't swear for him," said Frank BROWN, who also works for the Toronto school board as an educational worker. "He's 23 years old. Anything can happen.
"In my house, I have strict rules and regulations they follow. I raised them the way I was brought up (in Jamaica) …to be sturdy. I gave him the best."
What they do remember, however, is a superb athlete who won the Ontario secondary school championships in high-jumping for Westview Centennial College on Oakwood Ave.
They said their son would always come home after work and cook up a storm for the family. Linda said his favourite meals were all things seafood: sometimes shrimp, other times lobster. He was also a fan of pasta dishes.
"He took after me," said Linda BROWN, a smile breaking out for the first time during the conversation. "He wanted to be a chef and own his own business. He loved gourmet cooking."
To fulfil his dream, she said, her son enrolled in Humber College in September for a two-year cooking course, after which he wanted to either work or open his own business somewhere in downtown Toronto.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMBU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-09-11 published
Fisherman dies off Port Credit
Son, girlfriend survive 3-metre swells
3 in water 90 minutes before rescue
By Phinjo GOMBU and Jim WILKES, Staff Reporters
A routine fishing trip for salmon off Port Credit on Lake Ontario turned into a tragedy when a 16-foot aluminum boat suddenly began to draw water and capsized, killing a 55-year-old Georgetown man.
And for almost 90 minutes after the boat sank yesterday morning, Bryan RICHARDS, 27, and his girlfriend Elizabeth SUTTON, 24, hung on for dear life, bobbing up and down in three-metre waves, desperately waiting for help
SUTTON had a life jacket on, while RICHARDS, who didn't, lay flat across a floating seat from the boat, all the while clinging to his dead father. RICHARDS said his father, Albert "Roger" RICHARDS, died within moments of hitting the water. Police said it is unknown whether the father was wearing a life jacket, but his son said he was.
"My dad started panicking," said RICHARDS yesterday from his hospital bed at the Trillium Health Centre where he was being treated for hypothermia.
"I reached over, grabbed him, and as I pulled him back he turned around and said 'I'm cold' and then passed away."
"I knew he was dead. It was just the look on his face."
RICHARDS said the three had headed out on their boat called the Left-Handed Newfie around 7.30 a.m. to take part in a salmon derby. Around 9.30 a.m., just as they were in the process of changing lures on a downrigger system, the boat suddenly began to draw water at the back and went down, stern first, throwing all three into the water.
"It went back, up, down," said RICHARDS, describing how his girlfriend managed to grab on to a life jacket for herself in the nick of time.
RICHARDS said while he bobbed in the waves in a bay just west of Port Credit holding on to his dead father, he tried to keep in touch with SUTTON. Both of them shouted back and forth at each other, encouraging each other to stay conscious and saying they loved each other, he said.
RICHARDS said that throughout the experience, rage built inside him because he had his father in his arms and just wanted to get SUTTON to safety.
"This is a dream and I want it to end right now," he recalled thinking, but since it wasn't, he said he began to think about his mother and his girlfriend's 14-month-old baby.
"I wanted to do more but I couldn't," he said. "I wasn't going to let (my father) go."
Several fishing boats passed by but didn't see them despite the fact that fishing gear was strewn all over the water. One boat finally saw them and immediately radioed a distress signal around 11 a.m.
That was when police and other boaters converged around the scene to mount the rescue.
Both RICHARDS, who works as a shipper and receiver with PL Foods in Georgetown, and SUTTON were taken to the Trillium Health Centre. SUTTON was discharged late yesterday afternoon, while RICHARDS was kept overnight for observation.
RICHARDS said his father, whose passion was fishing, was on disability from a workplace accident in a brake factory that had resulted in his right leg being amputated.
He said his father, whom he called his dearest friend, had taken part in countless fishing derbies in the area over the decades. "All I know is that I won't step on another boat," said RICHARDS. "I may not even go fishing anymore. It was 'our' thing."
Among the first on the scene of the rescue were Peter FAIRWEATHER and Dan LETUAL of Oakville, who found RICHARDS and SUTTON shivering in another fisherman's boat. The son was reaching over the stern, holding onto his father's leg, unable to pull him over the gunwale.
"There was no way to hoist him," said FAIRWEATHER, 42. "He was a pretty big guy."
He said they looped a rope around the drowned man's leg, so the son could be treated by police and paramedics.
"The son was definitely in shock," he said. "That was just his reaction to hold on to him."
FAIRWEATHER said it was a rough day on the lake, with waves nearly three metres high.
"We were bouncing around a lot," he said, adding that in such conditions things can go from good to bad in an instant. "It doesn't take much water in the back of the boat to swamp it."
"If you get hit by a wave sideways, the whole thing goes down in 30 seconds it's gone," said fishing charter operator Brian SLANEY, 45, whose huge boat dwarfs the 16-foot open aluminum craft belonging to RICHARDS. " You have no time to get on your radio and call.
"Wind is a powerful thing, water is powerful. I don't think it would take long for them to start getting into trouble" once the boat started filling with water, he said. "It's a real tragedy."
Another boater said it was "the worst conditions I've ever seen," recalling how the wind-whipped waves pushed his boat's bow "way up into air."
Paul KRISTOFIC, who runs Salmon Strike Charters, was about three kilometres offshore when he heard the mayday call over his radio.
"That's your duty as a boater on the water," he said. "So I pulled the rods up and burned over there as quick as I could."
He saw debris from the sunken boat floating in the water, including two seats later brought to shore by police.
"This is a tight community down here," he said. "It really hits home.
"The water was pretty rough this morning, so you just have to be careful out there."
He called the man a "friendly guy" who hung out at the dock to chat up the charter captains and learn about good fishing spots.
Fishing Friends said Roger RICHARDS' nickname was also the name of his boat. Others said they simply called him Lefty, because his amputated leg had been replaced by a prosthetic one.
SLANEY recalled the man as "a real jovial guy" who loved to prowl the docks near the mouth of the Credit River.
"This is where he liked to be," he said. "That's all we talked about -- boating and fishing.
"It was his passion."
KRISTOFIC said boaters and anglers alike have to be ready for trouble.
"Accidents happen everywhere, on the road and on the water," he said. "So you just have to be careful and make sure you're well-prepared out there for anything.
"A lot of times the water can be pretty cold, so you should wear your lifejacket all the time."
LETUAL was more pointed.
"You're a fool to go out if you're not wearing a life jacket," he said.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMBU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-11-15 published
Medical pioneer dead at 61
Noella LECLAIR received artificial heart
Defied the odds, lived for 20 years
By Phinjo GOMBU, Staff Reporter
When Noella LECLAIR made history on May 1, 1986, as the recipient of Canada's first artificial heart, doctors gave her at most five years to live.
She proved them wrong. To the delight of her family and Friends, LECLAIR went on to live a normal, healthy and happy life for 20 years.
The resident of the Ottawa suburb of Orleans, who died Saturday at the age of 61, even opened up her own small store in the Byward market, which she ran for more than 15 years.
"She always looked at (her life) as if she had been given a second chance, which a lot of people don't get," her daughter Sophie LECLAIR- MICETICH recalled yesterday.
LECLAIR was 41 when she received a Jarvik-7 artificial heart at the Ottawa Heart Institute. A week later, she received a human heart from a 44-year-old Montreal man who had died after a traffic accident.
LECLAIR died in the same Ottawa institute.
According to her daughter, LECLAIR's heart was not functioning well in recent months, but doctors advised against another transplant.
"She took it gracefully," said LECLAIR- MICETICH. " She was happy and ready to go. She looked at the 20 years she had with us as a bonus."
Dr. Ross DAVIES, a cardiologist at the Ottawa institute who had had LECLAIR as a patient from the beginning, described her as a lovely lady, beloved by all the patients and staff.
"I don't think we would have dreamt that people would have lived more than 20 years with such good quality of life," said DAVIES.
"It has just been a remarkable story all along, very satisfying for the patient and family and very satisfying for the heart institute and the medical staff."
Born in the small community of Plantagenet, northwest of Ottawa, LECLAIR was destined to live a quiet life in Orleans with her husband, Simon, who ran a furniture business.
Before her illness, she raised nine foster children, in addition to her own daughter.
But on April 25, 1986, she suffered a heart attack that left her on life support and technically dead.
A few days' later, family members gave doctors permission to insert the Jarvik-7 artificial heart, and after a 3½ hour transplant operation led by Doctor Wilbert KEON, Canadian medical history was made.
"Heart transplantation was still somewhat young, so doing a transplant was still pretty exciting," recalled DAVIES. "It was very exciting to be involved in the first mechanical circulatory-assist device in Canada."
Back then, only the Ottawa institute performed such complex surgery, something that is now routinely performed in select hospitals across Canada.
LECLAIR's gratitude was such that she went on to become the Ottawa Heart Institute's most enthusiastic volunteer: She organized bingo games, took part in telethons and assisted doctors to help calm patients who were nervous about impending surgery by discussing her own experiences.
"At one point her doctor told me that she was (the institute's) best spokesperson, obviously because she was living proof of their capabilities," said LECLAIR- MICETICH.
DAVIES said the relationship between patient and the hospital was long and fruitful.
"Our objective when we went into this was to improve her quality of life," he said. "It turns out we couldn't have done it to a more wonderful person because not only did we help her… she returned the favour many fold both to the heart institute and the community."
Funeral services are scheduled for Monday at Saint_Joseph Church in Orleans. LECLAIR is survived by her husband, Simon, and daughter Sophie.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMBU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-11-28 published
Pepper-sprayed Croatian soldier dies
Friend who says DRNASIN was 'black and blue' after altercation on Toronto Transit Commission bus doubts that spray alone was the cause of his death
By Phinjo GOMBU, Staff Reporter
A Croatian soldier who was pepper-sprayed by Toronto Transit Commission special constables following an altercation on a bus this month has died.
Jasen DRNASIN, 32, a Croatian war hero and the country's first graduate from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, was taken to hospital on November 12 in critical condition after an altercation on a bus in the Eglinton Ave. W. and Royal York Rd. area.
DRNASIN reportedly showed signs of improvement a few days later but died yesterday afternoon around 2: 40 p.m. at Humber Regional Hospital.
DRNASIN's father Anton said earlier that his son suffered from post-traumatic stress as a result of military service in Croatia. He said he had been told that his son's heart may have stopped because of the excessive use of pepper spray.
He said at the time he was angry and did not think his son deserved to be pepper-sprayed but has not spoken publicly since.
At least seven Toronto police officers also responded to the disturbance. The incident is under investigation by the province's Special Investigations Unit, which probes circumstances involving police and civilians that result in death or serious injury.
Friends of the Croatian-born DRNASIN, who was also a Canadian citizen but moved back to Croatia as a teenager, said they don't believe he died just as a result of being pepper-sprayed.
"This isn't a case of someone having a bad reaction to pepper spray," said Ranko PLEJIC, who has known DRNASIN since he was 10 and was his soccer coach.
When PLEJIC -- who along with others held a vigil for DRNASIN last week -- spoke to the Star he said DRNASIN was "black and blue over every part of his body."
"The whole pepper spray story, I think, is secondary. This man was severely beaten, he's actually missing parts of flesh on his throat. This man was beaten… His bladder catheter is strictly pouring out blood. He's unrecognizable," said PLEJIC.
PLEJIC also said that while DRNASIN may have gone to fight in Croatia as a young man, he wanted to stress that he remained a Canadian.
He said DRNASIN also served in the Canadian military when he was 16 or 17.
Not long after his military service here DRNASIN moved to Croatia to fight in its civil war in the early 1990s. He later went on to graduate from West Point in 2000, the first Croatian soldier to do so.
A year later, things went tragically wrong when he was charged with stabbing his girlfriend Tanja Milanovic several times while under the influence of drugs.
The case, according to Croatian news reports, brought out in the open stories about rampant drug use in the Croatian army during the preceding decade.
PLEJIC said that DRNASIN, an engineer by training, had been back in Canada since September and was looking to make some money here.
DRNASIN's wife, from whom he was estranged, and his 18-month-old daughter flew to Toronto from Croatia after he was hospitalized.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMBU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-11-29 published
Brick attack victim, 25, dies
By Phinjo GOMBU, Staff Reporter
A 25-year-old Toronto man and college hockey star hit in the head by an object police say might have been a brick died yesterday.
Mike SERBA, who was home in Toronto for American Thanksgiving from Norwich University in Vermont, was attacked early Saturday morning in an alleyway near Bloor St. W. and Jane St.
Toronto police said SERBA had been at a nearby bar. When he went to get money from a nearby bank machine, SERBA said somebody "sucker-punched" him.
Rather than call police, he and his Friends who were at the bar went outside in search of the attacker. SERBA was then attacked with a blunt object, which put him in a coma.
SERBA, who was doing his master's in business at Norwich University, was also captain of the hockey team last year.
Nicholas CROWDIS, 22, of no fixed address, is charged with attempted murder. Police said yesterday the charge will be upgraded at his next court appearance at Old City Hall on Monday.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMBU - All Categories in OGSPI

GOMERSALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-29 published
GOMERSALL, Bill
By Ken MITCHELL, Page A18
Cowboy, father, rancher, poet. Born March 21, 1905, near Carp, Ontario Died March 20, in Moose Jaw, of natural causes, aged Bill GOMERSALL was often called the last Saskatchewan cowboy. He was certainly the oldest, when he died the day before his 101st birthday. He had vowed to be on horseback on his 100th. Bill's final years were among the best of a colourful life, for at 97 he became a nationally celebrated cowboy poet, a craft he had been apprenticed to the age of 12. His relationship with horses went back even further.
In 1912, his father, J.J. GOMERSALL, loaded his family and two teams of horses into a "settler's special" boxcar, and headed for the western boomtown of Moose Jaw. They ended up in a homestead shack at Galilee, about 30 miles south, in the Dirt Hills. "The good homestead land was long gone," Bill said. "We got a quarter-section of rocks, hills and alkali sloughs."
Fortunately the patch was beside the C.N. railway line and the train to Moose Jaw. J.J. acquired milk cows and promptly went into the dairy business, shipping fresh cream to the city. Bill and his siblings milked 20 cows, twice a day, and developed strong hands. Their daily three gallons of sweet cream earned $120 a month.
Bill GOMERSALL's schooling was also basic, terminating in Grade 6. But he learned self-education fast. And resourcefulness. Entertainment in the Twenties consisted of Saturday night "socials." Bill learned to recite cowboy poems, memorizing them from newspapers. Until his death, Bill could still recite the epic (and classic) Face on the Barroom Floor.
When Bill left school, he took up horsemanship. J.J. taught him to train "singles," or buggy horses. He started breaking horses for local ranchers, and became a legendary bronc-buster at 14. He rode in the early Calgary Stampede. Bill was a horse-whisperer who bonded with the wildest mustangs. He organized rodeos all over Saskatchewan, building up his horse ranch, the Running W.
Bill acquired his first herd by taking green horses in lieu of cash, and became a shrewd horse-trader. For the next 50 years, the first thing he did every morning was ride a horse. On a morning ride he met up with his childhood sweetheart, Irene PATON, and they married.
To buy his ranch, he spent his winters on horseback hunting coyotes through the Big Muddy Badlands. One winter he took 157 pelts (average price, $11). Bill bought his half-section ranch with cash in 1939, in a high coulee west of Spring Valley. At the crest of the highest hill was a native tepee ring of stone. From that ring he could see 20 miles across the hills.
Bill and Irene had four children: Bill Jr., Peggie, Doug and Sherry. The family lived in the original homestead shack for years before Bill could afford a new house. But they saw their ranch expand to 17 sections of land. Bill had eight grandchildren, and eight great-grandchildren. His granddaughter Rusty QUAM became a Canadian barrel racing champion.
When Irene died in 2000, she asked Bill to scatter her ashes in the tepee ring above the ranch. He maintained an active independence, driving into Moose Jaw daily for supplies. In 2003, Bill went onstage to perform for the first time in 60 years. He delivered The Face on the Barroom Floor at Regina's Royal Saskatchewan Museum, in a clear bass voice that hypnotized the audience. He travelled the country for three years with The Mitchell Boys, performing cowboy poetry. He got standing ovations. On his (and Saskatchewan's) 100th birthday in 2005, Bill launched his first CD. Then he went for his long-promised horse ride. Bill GOMERSALL cracked his second century wrangler-style.
After the funeral his ashes, too, were scattered round the ancient tepee ring atop the Cactus Hills.
Playwright Ken MITCHELL is a friend of Bill.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMERSALL - All Categories in OGSPI

GOMERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-03 published
SMITH, Margery Louise (née GOMERY)
Peacefully, and with dignity, on April 29th, 2006 in her 76th year. Beloved wife of the late Arthur Lloyd SMITH, loving mother of Leslie Diane (DEVINS,) Susan Mary (FOSTER,) David Arthur and Kevin Lloyd. Cherished sister of Frances (Allen). Predeceased by her mother Gwendolyn Gladys JOHNSON, her father, Geoffrey Godwin GOMERY and her sister Joanne Rosemary GOODYEAR. Sadly missed by grandchildren Caren, Jason, Kristen, Ryan, Angela, Olivia and Spencer. Friends will be received at the Neweduk Funeral Home "Mississauga Chapel" 1981 Dundas St. W. (one block east of Erin Mills Pkwy.) from 6-8 p.m. on Friday, May 5th. In celebration of Margery's life, a private graveside service will take place at Springcreek Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be gratefully appreciated. Condolences dsmith01@sympatico.ca Neweduk Funeral Home 905-828-8000 www.neweduk.com

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMERY - All Categories in OGSPI

GOMES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-14 published
JONES, Catherine Lorraine (MacCONNELL)
Suddenly at Strathroy Hospital on Thursday, January 12, 2006 Catherine Lorraine (MacCONNELL) JONES of Carlisle in her 69th year. Beloved wife of Robert JONES. Dear mother of Liz and Glen STEWARD/STEWART/STUART of Carlisle, Ken JONES of London and Keith and Helena JONES of Carlisle. Dear grandma of Amanda, Dawn, Danielle, Samantha and T.J. Dear great-grandma to Joseph. Dear sister of Peggy ZUBYK, Jean WELBURN and Helen GRIFFITH all of London. Predeceased by a dear daughter-in-law Jane JONES, brothers Frank MacCONNELL and Fredrick MacCONNELL and sister Marlene MAY and special brother-in-law Orville GRIFFITH. Resting at the T. Stephenson and son Funeral Home, Ailsa Craig where the funeral service will be held on Monday, January 16th at 2 p.m. with Reverend Ken TAILOR/TAYLOR officiating. Cremation to follow with private interment of ashes at Carlisle Cemetery. Visitation 7-9 p.m. Sunday, January 15th and 1 hour prior to the service on Monday. Thanks to all staff of Strathroy Hospital, Intensive Care Unit Nurses, Dr. VANDEWALLE, Dr. GOMES and the Paramedics who assisted time and time again. Donations to Strathroy Hospital or Carlisle Cemetery Board would be appreciated. A tree will be planted in memory of Mrs. Catherine JONES.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-03-25 published
MALIN, Frank
The family of the late Frank MALIN would like to say a big thank you to everyone who sent food, flowers, cards and kind words to us during the time of our sad loss. Your thoughtfulness will always be remembered. Thank you to the wonderful caring staff of the Emergency and Intensive Care Unit at Strathroy Hospital special thanks to Doctor Gary PERKIN and Doctor David GOMES for their care and attention to Frank over the last 4 years. A big thank you to Jean BRODIE, Barb GRAY/GREY, Lynda CROZIER and Rob and Josie EASTON for being there for us at the hospital; Rev. Richard GOLDEN for his prayers and support at the hospital and the interment the ladies of Melbourne for the lovely lunch that was served to the guys at Blue Dragon for holding the fort; Elliott-Madill Funeral Home for their understanding and compassion. A heartfelt thanks from us all. - Chris MALIN and family.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-06-01 published
BOYLE, Dennis George
Of Exeter, age 36, passed away at Victoria Hospital, London on Tuesday, May 30, 2006 after suffering a severe heat stroke at his work place. Dennis is the beloved son of Dorothy SCHUETT, and her partner Jim WRIGHT of Walkerton; dear brother of Marilyn and her husband Dave O'DRISCOLL, Julie BOYLE and her friend Sean GOMES and Scott all of Guelph. Dennis will be sadly missed by all his family and Friends. Predeceased by his father William BOYLE and infant sister Deborah. Visitation at Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton, on Thursday from 7-9 p.m. with parish prayers at 8: 45 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Friday, June 2, at 11: 00 a.m. at Sacred Heart Church, Walkerton. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Epilepsy-Huron, Perth Bruce would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-30 published
KASPERSMA, Cornelis " Kees"
The family of the late Cornelis (Kees) KASPERSMA wish to express sincere thanks and appreciation to Friends, family and neighbours for their words of kindness, cards, flowers, food, donations to the North Caradoc Presbyterian Church, the ALS Society, or expressed their sympathy in any other way. We are greatful to Doctor BUMA and Doctor GOMES for their dedicated care over the years. Special thanks to the nurses and staff at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital. Rev. Kathy FRASER, your support, beautiful service and personal touch will always be remembered. To the North Caradoc Presbyterian Church Choir and the Mount Brydges Community Choir, thank you for the wonderful, powerful songs. To Denning Funeral Home for your professional help and care, thank you. Special thank you to the staff at Brookside Retirement Living in Watford where Dad spent his last few months in their loving care.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-26 published
RODRIGUES, Mabel Alice
Passed away peacefully at Chelsey Park Nursing Home on Tuesday, January 24th, 2006 at age 93. Beloved wife of the late Percy RODRIGUES Sr. Loving mother of daughter Edith GOMES and her husband Rudy, from England, son Percy Jr. and his wife Maureen, and daughter Marian. Dear grandmother of Mark and his wife Ellen, Neil, Elaine and Alison and great-grandmother of Noah. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Friday from 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held at St. Patrick's Church, 921 Flagship Drive (at Tomken) on Saturday, January 28th, 2006 at 10 o'clock. Cremation to follow. As an expression of sympathy, donations may be made to the St. Vincent de Paul Society.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-01 published
GOMES, Joao Manuel (November 20, 1953-January 31, 2006)
Of Campbell Avenue. Visitation 11 a.m-4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. today at the Ryan and Odette Funeral Home, 1498 Dundas St. W., at Dufferin, Toronto. Mass 10 a.m. Thursday at St. Sebastian's Church to Beechwood Cemetery. Mr. GOMES, who died at home, is survived by: wife Cidalia children Paulo GOMES, Nancy GOMES, Julie GOMES; grandchild Tyler GOMES; sister Maria GOMES. Parking is no problem - simply enter from Dufferin, just north of Dundas.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-04 published
GRAHAM, Anne
Peacefully on Wednesday, March 1, 2006 at Bradford Valley Long Term Care, in her 91st year. Loving wife of the late William. Beloved mother of Marian MOEN (Jim,) Bill (Olga) and the late Margery GOMES. Anne will be sadly missed by son-in-law George GOMES, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, great-great-grandchildren, and all other relatives and Friends. Friends may call at Skwarchuk Funeral Home, 30 Simcoe Rd., Bradford for visitation on Sunday from 3-4 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held at the Holy Martyrs of Japan Church, 167 Essa Street, Bradford on Monday, March 6, 2006 at 10 a.m. Interment Saint John's Cemetery, Newmarket. Donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMES - All Categories in OGSPI

GOMEZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-12 published
SHEK, Jean Avon (née ALDERWOOD)
Jean SHEK, beloved wife of Professor Emeritus Ben-Z. SHEK, mother of Elliot and Ghitta (Wendy GOMEZ,) died on Wednesday, May 10, 2006 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Daughter of the late Doctor Henry ALDERWOOD and Ruby M. GANDIER, she is survived as well by her dear siblings: Kay PAGET, Hope STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Ruth PERRY (Jack), Faith SUTHERLAND, and Philip ALDERWOOD (Helen.) Jean had a long and distinguished career in Social Work. She had a profound love of humanity in all its varieties and colours and a firm belief in social justice. Her funeral will take place at Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park (s. of Steeles, e. of Bathurst) at 10.30 a.m. on Sunday, May 14. A celebration of her life and a reception will follow at the Winchevsky Centre, 585 Cranbrooke Ave. (six blocks north of Lawrence, east of Bathurst). If desired, donations in her name may be made to the Toronto Jewish Folk Choir or the Morris Winchevsky Schools (416-789-5502), or to the Jean A. Shek Memorial Scholarship, Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto (416-978-2011). The family thanks Doctor Geoff BOVETT and the nursing staff at floor C-4, Sunnybrook, for their utmost care.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMEZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-10 published
CULLINAN, Jeanne Anne, M.D.
January 7, 2006 in Rochester, New York after a courageous battle with cancer. She is survived by her daughter Amanda Marie; her parents, John and Angeline CULLINAN and her sisters, Mary (Patty) and Bob SPINELLI, Diane GOMEZ, and Terry and "Kip" FYKE. She is also survived by many nieces, nephews and good Friends. Most recently, as an associate professor of Radiology at the University of Rochester, she was program director for the Diagnostic Radiology Residency Program and was the director of the Women's Imaging Center. Following a career in Ob-Gyn, she studied Radiology at Mount Sinai Medical Center (1989-92) in Miami Beach, Florida and has had clinical and academic appointments at the University of Rochester, New York, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, and Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee and at Allegheny University Hospital: City Avenue, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Services will be held in Rochester, New York later this week. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made in Jeanne's name to the Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave., Box 704, Rochester, New York 14642. To light a candle in her memory visit www.anthonychapels.com

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOM... Names     Welcome Home

GOMEZ - All Categories in OGSPI