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"GEI" 2006 Obituary


GEIGEN  GEIGER  GEIS  GEISENDORF  GEISLER  GEISSLER 

GEIGEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-04-12 published
Teenager remembered as friendly, full of fun
Cassandra HARDWICK was fatally injured while using a crosswalk on her way to school.
By Peter GEIGEN- MILLER, Free Press Reporter, Wed., April 12, Grieving Friends and classmates remember Cassandra HARDWICK as outgoing, friendly and full of fun.
The Grade 12 student at Sir Wilfrid Laurier secondary school was fatally injured Monday morning while using a Southdale Road crosswalk a block from the school.
It's the latest in a spate of pedestrian accidents that have killed seven people on London streets in 2004 and 2005 and injured many more.
Yesterday, shocked classmates responded to HARDWICK's death by creating a memorial at the accident site.
The roadside tribute features flowers, photos and a large poster filled with hand-written messages and memories of HARDWICK, 17.
The popular student, voted funniest at Laurier this year, laughed a lot and made others laugh, classmates remembered yesterday.
"She was the queen of funny faces," said Grade 12 classmate Katie ELDRIDGE. "If you had a bad day, you could talk to her and she'd cheer you up."
Jessie FOSTER, also in Grade 12, said HARDWICK always made her smile.
"If you didn't know her, you missed out on something," FOSTER said.
Laurier principal Frank GALIZIA spoke about HARDWICK before her name was officially released, describing her as "a lovely young lady, just a good person."
He said the young woman was a good student and well thought of by staff and students alike.
GALIZIA said guidance counsellors and the Thames Valley District school board's traumatic events response team have been at the school to provide support for any staff and students who need it.
GALIZIA said the student body has responded to the death with compassion, supporting each other in their grief.
The accident occurred at a crosswalk on Southdale west of Millbank Drive, where the school is located.
The crosswalk is controlled by buttons that are pushed to turn traffic lights on Southdale red and give pedestrians a walk signal.
Police are investigating the role of the crosswalk in the accident.
Area resident Wilfrid VOAKES said he'd like to see more protection for pedestrians crossing heavily travelled Southdale Road.
He would like to see school zone warning signs and reduced speeds on Southdale Road near the crosswalk.
"We need signs to slow the traffic down and make drivers more aware of the kids," VOAKES said.
He points out the neighbourhood has Laurier secondary school and two elementary schools.
"It will probably happen again if they don't do something," VOAKES warned.

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GEIGEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-04-14 published
Hit-and-run victim popular
Michael Salentyn was due to graduate from Western in June with a degree in aviation.
By Peter GEIGEN- MILLER, Free Press Reporter, Fri., April 14, A 23-year-old man, struck and fatally injured in London by a hit-and-run driver this week, had just completed a four-year commercial aviation training program and was heading for a career as a pilot.
Michael SALENTYN of Grand Bend was on his way to achieving his lifetime dream.
He'd just finished four years of classroom and flight training in the University of Western Ontario's commercial aviation management program and was to receive his degree at convocation in June.
The death of the popular, dedicated and fun-loving student has hit people hard in University of Western Ontario's close-knit aviation program, leaving classmates in tears, said Keith FLEMING/FLEMMING, director of Western's commercial and administrative studies program.
"It's a horrific loss," said FLEMING/FLEMMING. "It has really affected people deeply."
SALENTYN was a highly accomplished student who excelled in a rigorous program that requires students to carry a full academic load and complete flight training.
"He was very strong academically and he excelled at the flight training," FLEMING/FLEMMING said. "He had to satisfy not just the university, but also Transport Canada."
SALENTYN is remembered as a bright, pleasing, gregarious and happy individual.
"I never encountered him in the hall when he didn't have a big smile on his face," said FLEMING/FLEMMING. "He clearly was in his element entirely and was doing what he wanted to do. He loved aviation."
SALENTYN had concern for others and took an interest in students in earlier years of the aviation program, FLEMING/FLEMMING said.
"I have many accounts of his caring way and how he was always looking out for others. He was watchful and considerate of others, a real leader."
SALENTYN was out with Friends when struck early Tuesday by a vehicle that failed to stop. He died later that day in hospital.
The hit-and-run occurred at Castlegrove Boulevard and Walmer Gardens in northwest London in a popular living area for Western students.
London police located the suspected vehicle several hours later a short distance away.
Oscar MARROQUIN- PONCE, 23, of Castlegrove Boulevard, was charged with leaving the scene of an accident.
A memorial fund is being created in SALENTYN's memory. The money will create a bursary to support a student in the University of Western Ontario aviation program.
Donations can be arranged through the Hopper Hockey Funeral Home in Exeter, phone (519) 235-1220, or can be sent to Foundation Western, Room 11, Alumni Hall, University of Western Ontario, London, N6A 5B9.
Cheque donations should be made payable to Foundation Western and should mention SALENTYN.

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GEIGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-24 published
ORR, Lorraine Amanda (née EMARD)
Surrounded by her family at Bluewater Health - Palliative Care on Friday, April 21, 2006. Lorraine Amanda (EMARD) ORR, age 86 of Sarnia. Beloved wife of Red. Dear mother of David and his wife Catherine, Marilyn ORR, and Stephen and his wife Karen all of Sarnia. Loving grandmother of Christina, Thomas, David and Amanda, Lindsay and Brendan. Sister of Bill EMARD, California, Ted EMARD, Oregon, Marie GEIGER, Vancouver, and Joan MacDONALD, Sarnia. Predeceased by parents James and Amanda EMARD, brothers Ernest and Raymond EMARD and sister Terry BOHMIER. Visitation at the McKenzie and Blundy Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 431 Christina St. N., Sarnia, on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where prayers will be offered at 3: 30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated by Fr. Len DESJARDINS 11: 30 a.m. Wednesday at Sacred Heart Church. Interment Resurrection Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, Friends who wish may send memorial donations to Breast Cancer Society, 401 St. Clair Street, Point Edward, N7V 1P2 or Saint_Joseph's Hospice Resource Centre, 110 Water Street, Sarnia, N7T 5T3, Messages of condolence and memories may be left at www.mckenzieblundy.com

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GEIGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-03 published
CAUTIUS, John
Passed away peacefully on March 31, 2006. Beloved husband of Christine. Loving father of Werner (Linda). Wonderful Opa to Cassandra, Alannah and Justin. Loving father of Ron (Cheryl). Wonderful Opa to Brandon, Jeffrey, Trevor and Ryan. Beloved brother of Eva JANDEL (Alfred), Waltraut GABERT and Reneta GEIGER (Herman). He will be sadly missed by brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law, nephews and nieces. A special thank you to Leisureworld Ellesmere for their dedication, care and concern for John. Visitation will be held at the Ogden Funeral Home, 4164 Sheppard Ave. East, Scarborough (east of Kennedy Rd.) on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at the Warden Full Gospel Assembly, 2210 Warden Ave., Scarborough (north of Sheppard Ave.) on Wednesday at 1 p.m. Interment Pine Hills Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to Bethel Park Bible Camp Society would be appreciated.

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GEIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-23 published
MEYER, Harold George (January 26, 1920-November 20, 2006)
Harold MEYER, beloved husband of Mary Bernice MEYER of Kitchener, passed away peacefully at the Grand River Hospital on Monday November 20, at the age of 86. Harold will be lovingly remembered by his children Annette (Donald) McKINNON, Brian (Zinta) MEYER, Nancy (Michael TANNER) MEYER, Connie (Paul TIMMINS) MEYER from Toronto, Ontario and Lynn (Marcel) SAVOIE from Calgary, Alberta as well as six grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, many nieces, nephews and extended family members. Harold was born in Waterloo, Ontario to Theodore and Sarah (GEIS) MEYER and was brother to three sisters - Mary Ann (KENNEDY,) Charlotte (STOCKIE) and Leona (ZETTEL.) He is survived by his sister Mary Ann KENNEDY of Oakville, Ontario who will dearly miss him and their many conversations. Harold married Bernice DILLON on July 8th, 1944 in Elmira, Ontario. After the birth of their children they traveled extensively from 1966 until Bernice suffered a stroke in December of 1998. Harold worked tirelessly to give her as comfortable and full a life as possible since that time. They had celebrated 62 years of marriage. Harold was a salesman all his life and had two careers, one with The W.T. Rawleigh Company as his father had been, and the second in the investment business. As a stockbroker he had a long and productive career spanning 30 years. Harold worked for many companies before he retired from RBC Dominion Securities in 1993, although he never lost his passion for following the market. Harold was involved in several different Investment Clubs over the years and made many Friends. He also enjoyed playing cards, his favorites being bridge and solo. He was a member of The Knights of Columbus Kitchener Council since 1940 (the second longest member). Visitation will be held on Friday from 2: 00 until 4: 00 p.m. and from 7:00 until 9:00 at Henry Walser Funeral Home at 507 Fredrick Street, Kitchener, Ontario. Funeral Prayers will be held at 8: 15 during the Friday evening visitation. The Funeral Mass will be on Saturday, November 25th at 10: 00 a.m. at St. Francis Church, 49 Blueridge Avenue, Kitchener, Ontario. Interment will follow at Williamsburg Cemetery and the reception will follow interment in St. Francis Church, lower level. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made at the funeral home to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Deep appreciation to Doctor Lana TAN, Doctor Natalie KONTAKOS, Doctor Satish RANGASWAMY and all the nursing and support staff of Saint Mary's and Grand River Hospitals. Visit www.henrywalser.com for Harold's memorial.

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GEISENDORF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-18 published
GEISENDORF, Hans
Peacefully at Greater Niagara General, Niagara Falls on Monday, January 16, 2006, in his 79th year. Hans who lived in Bradford, was full of life, and was the beloved husband of the late Mary GEISENDORF. Loving father of David and his wife Shannon and Rudi and his wife Susan. Wonderful grandfather of 7 grandchildren and 4 great-grandchildren. Friends and family may call at Skwarchuk Funeral Home, 30 Simcoe Rd., Bradford for visitation on Thursday, January 19, 2006 from 1 p.m. until the time of a funeral service held in the Lathangue Chapel at 2 p.m. Interment Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, Bradford.

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GEISLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-30 published
James BURK/BURKE, Writer And Editor: (1917-2006)
Paralyzed by an auto accident in 1942, he survived to become one of Canada's longest-surviving paraplegics
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- James BURK/BURKE was 22 and only weeks from getting a pilot's licence when an accident left him paralyzed. The year was 1940 and Toronto's health system was ill equipped to deal with civilian paraplegics. Hospital authorities basically told him to "pray and die," he said later.
He spent long years in institutions before the availability of the personal collapsible wheelchair -- combined with his own willpower -- helped him start a new life on the outside. He worked as a freelance writer and editor, married radio and stage personality Laddie DENNIS, and authored two comic novels in the 1960s. He was to spend more than six decades in a wheelchair and was one of Canada's longest-surviving paraplegics.
"He never allowed himself to be shackled by remorse," says William GEISLER, one of the doctors who helped with his rehabilitation. "He didn't ruminate on what had been. He knew those emotions would sap him of the energy he required." Friends say he avoided talking about his handicap, had a strong sense of humour and was always willing to help others.
For a number of years, Mr. BURK/BURKE edited the Caliper, the journal of the Canadian Paraplegic Association. He also wrote Return to Action, a history of treatment programs for spinal-cord patients. But he never mentioned disabilities in his other writings, which included a physical fitness course, short stories, book reviews for The Globe and Mail and two novels.
Flee Seven Ways (1964) is the rollicking tale of a corrupt businessman. It was published in Britain, the U.S. and Germany to favourable reviews. "A very funny first novel," wrote The New York Times. The paper's Literary Supplement noted: "His novel is a complex construction, bravely undertaken and creditably carried out."
In The Firefly Hunt (1969), mischief and mayhem bedevil the hero after he inherits a castle from an eccentric uncle. Argosy magazine called it "a sparkling Roman-candle of a fantasy." Mr. BURK/BURKE drafted a third novel, but health problems halted completion.
Christened James KAPHALAKOS, he changed his last name to BURK/BURKE as a young man. He was the second of five sons of Panogiotis (Peter) KAPHALAKOS, a Greek immigrant who operated a Toronto coffee business, and his wife, Florence (née COCHRANE.) Young James excelled at school and in athletics but, because of his father's death in 1930, he abandoned his studies. To support his family, he graduated from high school and then went looking for whatever work he could find.
An avid weightlifter with a striking physique, he earned some income as a live model at the Ontario College of Art. But his main job in 1940 was on the bull gang at a paper mill. He was also taking flying lessons at the Toronto Island airport, but only when he had some extra money. That all changed when the car in which he was a passenger was involved in an accident. The impact broke his back and left him paralyzed from the mid-back down.
At the time, life expectancy for paraplegics was considered low. As a result, Mr. BURK/BURKE was given little more than food, a bed to lie in and drugs to fight off infection. In all, he spent seven years at a succession of Toronto hospitals. Later, he said he only talked about those missing years "to counter the canard" that he had spent them in jail.
He gave details of his dreary hospital years in lengthy interviews conducted in the early 1990s by Mary TREMBLAY, an associate professor of health sciences at McMaster University. She used his experiences in a series of academic papers on the evolution of Canada's treatment of spinal-cord injuries.
At Saint Michael's Hospital, nuns asked Mr. BURK/BURKE to accept his fate and make peace with God. "I somehow didn't feel like taking on the chore of dying at that moment," he told Ms. TREMBLAY. The Queen Elizabeth Hospital was "very restrictive" with few activities, but at Runnymede Hospital he found the staff to be more sympathetic. Somehow, he obtained a typewriter and took up writing. One of his first successes as a freelancer was a correspondence course on fitness that he sold through magazine ads.
His life changed dramatically in 1946 when he was visited by Dr. Al JOUSSE and John COUNSELL, a paraplegic veteran who had been injured at Dieppe. Along with neurosurgeon Doctor Harry BOTTERELL, they had helped set up Lyndhurst Lodge in Toronto as a centre for spinal-injury rehabilitation programs for veterans of the Second World War. As a deserving civilian, Mr. BURK/BURKE was squeezed into the program. He began travelling to Lyndhurst for physiotherapy twice a week. More importantly, he was given one of the Everest and Jennings folding, self-propelled wheelchairs that had provided freedom and hope to paraplegic veterans.
In 1948, he moved to the Young Men's Christian Association in downtown Toronto where he pursued his writing career. He wrote short stories and book reviews, and also worked as a copy editor. It was at the Young Men's Christian Association coffee bar that he met Laddie DENNIS, then a stage actress and radio announcer. She later appeared regularly on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television and became a travel writer. One friend called their romance "the love story of the century." Ms. DENNIS says she "made the first move" and was also the one who proposed. They were married in 1951 and spent their honeymoon in Mexico.
In 1955, they purchased a former five-car garage that once belonged to the historic Falcon Inn in Scarborough. The partly finished structure was considered a white elephant, but the couple turned it into a comfortable home where they often entertained 40 guests at a time.
In 1963, Mr. BURK/BURKE was invited to England to turn his first novel into a screenplay. The project fell through, but along the way he picked up an assignment to write the script for a British Broadcasting Corporation Radio play based on Nikolai Gogol's Diary of a Madman. It starred comedian Kenneth Williams.
Despite his handicap, Mr. BURK/BURKE drove a car, raked lawns, got in and out of a rowboat and even chopped wood.
Mary TREMBLAY started one interview saying she wanted to talk about Mr. BURK/BURKE's ideas about disability. His reply summed up his attitude: "I'm against it."
James BURK/BURKE was born in Toronto on September 16, 1917. He died in Toronto on October 15, 2006, of complications of paraplegia. He was 89. He leaves his wife, Laddie DENNIS, and brothers Paul and Peter KAPHALAKOS.

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GEISSLER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-05-27 published
WAGNER, Elsbeth (née GEISSLER)
At Trillium Villa Nursing Home on Thursday, May 25, 2006 Elsbeth WAGNER, age 91 of Sarnia. Beloved wife of the late Richard WAGNER (1972.) Loved mother of Walter WAGNER and his wife Loretta, Herbert WAGNER and Richard WAGNER and his wife Pamela. Dear grandmother of Darin WAGNER and his wife Kathy, Deborah WAGNER and her husband Mark DICKSON/DIXON, Natalie WAGNER, Heidi WAGNER, Paul WAGNER, Alese WAGNER. Great grandmother of Lloyd, Edward, Harrison and Kyle. Predeceased by her parents Paul and Olga GEISSLER and a sister Irmgarde GEISSLER. Elsbeth was a member of Trinity Lutheran Church in London and was retired from Westminster Hospital Prosthetic Services. A funeral service will be held on Monday, May 29, 2006 at 2: 00 p.m. at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia with Rev. Roger ELLIS officiating. Interment to follow in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London. Sympathy through donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Memories and condolences may be sent online at www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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