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"DEJ" 2006 Obituary


DEJAGER  DEJESUS  DEJONG  DEJOODE 

DEJAGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-06 published
Gordon MOORE, Airman (1925-2006)
Royal Canadian Air Force tail gunner claimed he won the Distinguished Flying Cross for saving his Lancaster, and buzzed Buckingham Palace into the bargain
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- Gordon MOORE spent a lifetime dining out on a yarn that told how he won the Distinguished Flying Cross in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. While winning such a medal was not unusual, he was a not a pilot but a tail gunner in a Lancaster.
This is the story he liked to tell: Flying home one dark night from one of the 64 bombing missions he flew over the German Reich, Mr. MOORE fired his guns at the Luftwaffe fighters attacking his stream of Lancasters. A few moments later, the bomber flying in front of his aircraft blew up and debris from the explosion shattered the cockpit windows and wounded the pilot. Mr. MOORE said he had some experience at the controls and, knowing this, the pilot called for help. Mr. MOORE snaked his way forward along the narrow fuselage, took over the controls, and managed to keep the aircraft in the air, putting it down safely at an airfield near London. Mr. MOORE even said he buzzed Buckingham Palace, though it had happened only because the plane was far off course.
Mr. MOORE liked to tell his Friends that he and his wife, Helen, had an audience with the Queen Mother years later. The incident came up and the Queen Mother said she recalled the low-flying Lancaster.
According to him, they also met in Toronto. During a Royal tour, he was a policeman on guard duty at the Royal York Hotel when she happened past. He said she did a double take and turned in surprise. "Gord?" she asked. "Is that you?"
Gordon MOORE grew up in Toronto during the Depression. After joining the Royal Canadian Air Force, he trained in Canada as an air gunner and was eventually posted to 428 Squadron. A diminutive five foot, three inches tall, Mr. MOORE was just the right size to fit in the turret. Once he climbed inside, dressed in his heavy flying suit, complete with parachute and harness, there was little room to move around.
Scanning the skies though panels of clear Perspex, Mr. MOORE strained his eyes to get the jump on high-speed German fighters. He learned how to lead his target, because if he fired directly at an aircraft then it was long gone when his stream of bullets arrived. Even so, he never managed to shoot down any enemy aircraft.
Years later, he told his Friends that he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for saving the Lancaster. An exhaustive check of the Royal Canadian Air Force association's web site, which is equivalent in length to 5,000 pages, did not support his claim. His name does not appear and, as an enlisted man, he would have won the Distinguished Flying Medal. The Distinguished Flying Cross was for officers.
Mr. MOORE never gloated about the Germans his Lancaster's bombs had killed or wounded. To him, it was a terrible, yet necessary job that had to be done. After reaching England and safety, he would sit in his turret for about 30 minutes, praying for the people he had helped kill, his friend Shelley HILL said.
After the war, Mr. MOORE joined the Toronto police force, where he continued to live an adventurous life as a sergeant in the traffic division. He later told how, in 1952, he had a hand in capturing the Boyd gang. Eddie BOYD and his boys had terrorized Toronto banks for almost five years. They also managed to escape twice from the Don Jail. Mr. MOORE's cousin, a police detective working on the manhunt, got a tip that the gang was hiding in the Don River valley. Mr. MOORE told his cousin he'd help find him if he could tag along. The cousins agreed and Mr. MOORE was present when police arrested the gang. Two of its members were hanged for murder, while Mr. BOYD got 14 years.
Years later, Mr. MOORE and his wife were vacationing in Victoria when he spotted someone who looked like Eddie BOYD. " He's done his time," he told his wife. "Let's invite him over for a coffee."
During the 1950s, decades before Canada abolished the death penalty, Mr. MOORE claimed to have spent time with three condemned prisoners. One wanted to play cribbage to pass his final hours on Earth, so Mr. MOORE obliged. When asked if he let the condemned man win, he replied no: "He had to earn it."
After retiring from the police, Mr. MOORE became a glass engraver. He then built furniture, also refinishing it. After undergoing successful triple bypass surgery in 1993, he decided to show his gratitude to London, Ontario's University Hospital by giving it money.
Over the years, Mr. MOORE and his wife gave between $100,000 and $500,000 to the London Health Sciences Foundation. "He was an exceptional gentleman," the foundation's Colleen DEJAGER told the London Free Press. "He liked recognition for what he had done. He loved telling stories, but he was a modest man, too."
Gordon Ross MOORE was born in Toronto in 1925. He died of internal bleeding on August 18, 2006, in London, Ontario He was 81. He is survived by his wife, Helen, and his sister Barbara.

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DEJESUS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-08 published
'An incredibly lovely person'
To her grieving family, Lisa POSLUNS was an inspiration
Murder cut short life of joy and energy, they tell Peter SMALL
By Peter SMALL, Staff Reporter, Page B1
On a heartbreakingly brilliant day in a cemetery north of Toronto, Helen POSLUNS points to a young sugar maple arching above her sister's headstone, its buds impatient to sprout.
The family planted it in her memory two years ago.
Every March 30, Lisa POSLUNS' birthday, family and Friends decorate it with coloured balloons.
"She loved cheerful things," her sister recalls, their mother, Margie, looking on from a bench placed in Lisa's honour.
"She was full of life and energy. She was very much a glass-is-half-full sort of person."
The 38-year-old commercial real estate broker's crumpled body was found November 3, 2002, in the ground-floor equipment room of the Yorkville building where she rented an office.
A jury found 36-year-old Nelson DEJESUS guilty yesterday of first-degree murder in her sexual assault and stabbing.
At the cemetery, Helen POSLUNS clears snow from the base of her sister's headstone to reveal a ceramic flowerpot fashioned by one of Lisa's nieces, and some small pumpkins.
"She loved pumpkins," Helen recalls. "She loved Halloween."
"She was the kind of person you would never want to let go of. Never," Margie POSLUNS says.
Pardes Shalom Cemetery is the last place Helen saw her sister, just 13 days before she was murdered.
It was during the unveiling of the headstone for Helen's first and only child, Zachary, who died just one day old on March 21, 2002, of a chromosomal disorder.
"She stood there with me and my husband, holding our arms," Helen says. Afterward they walked down the gentle slope from Zachary's grave to the cemetery road, Lisa's hair blowing in the wind, Helen recalls.
Now her headstone stands beside his.
"You are our inspiration and our guiding light," its inscription reads, in part. "We will never let go of you." Also inscribed is a long-stemmed broken rose -- the family's redefinition of a Jewish symbol for a child who dies before her time.
"Lisa was really an incredibly lovely person," Helen says.
"She was like a rose, a beautiful delicate rose, and we felt like she was snapped in half. We felt like we were snapped in half."
Lisa-Ann Lauren POSLUNS was born in Toronto in 1964 to Margie and lawyer Avrum POSLUNS, a few years after the births of Helen and their brother, Steve.
She spent most of her first two years in the Hospital for Sick Children, battling gastrointestinal problems.
"For someone who struggled and fought even at that stage of her life -- she faced challenges, and met them all -- to have her life taken …" Helen says.
She attended Associated Hebrew Day School of Toronto, then York Mills Collegiate.
A good all-around student, she excelled at math and loved the arts. She took piano lessons and ballet, and tried her hand at modelling.
Two years after her father died of cancer, the family moved to the St. Clair Ave. and Avenue Rd. area and she settled into Grade 13 at Forest Hill Collegiate.
She was a cheerleader and played drums in a school band, practising with her bandmates in the POSLUNS home. "Those were good days when you heard banging and music," Margie says.
Even as an adult, Lisa kept a set of drums in her apartment.
She loved the musical Annie, John Travolta in Saturday Night Fever, and was a lifelong member of the Donny Osmond fan club. He called the family after she died.
In the Talmud it says that to save a life is to save the world. By the same token, to take a life is to take the world -- a person's death affects so many people, Helen says.
Alicia ROSS, another woman killed in her prime, is buried metres from Lisa.
"When we bring flowers to Lisa, we leave a flower there for Alicia," Helen says. "I can't believe that these people aren't here any more."
Lisa earned a bachelor's degree in business management from Ryerson, graduating in 1988 on the dean's list.
She started in photocopier sales, then moved into real estate, first as an agent and then as a commercial broker.
In her scant spare time, she did charity work, particularly for children.
"She had a real heart for people who didn't have enough in life for the basic necessities," Helen says. "She was very selfless."
At work and at home, she was known as immaculate, super-organized and thoughtful. She could find the perfect gift for anybody, always wrapping it with care and adding her trademark extra touch: candy or chocolate coins.
"Lisa had her running shoes on all the time," her mother recalls. "She didn't walk, she ran. She made everything fun for me."
And she always found time for her two nieces and nephew, who called her Auntie Lis.
One of Helen's strongest images of her sister is what it was like to walk into their mom's house with Lisa already there helping in the kitchen.
She would come out chewing on a piece of celery, "and she would give you a very, very tight hug. She would give you bear hugs."
In 2000, she left her job as vice-president of a real estate company to found her own, Posluns Realty Inc. The modest office suite she leased on the fifth floor of 94 Cumberland Street, near Bay and Bloor Sts., was just a five-minute walk from her apartment.
She travelled across North America scouting malls and commercial buildings for clients, often large chains including Dairy Queen and Tim Hortons.
Jane COONEY, founder of Books for Business, hired Lisa to help her renew her lease. Soon they were Friends.
"She was very generous and would take the time I needed," COONEY recalls. "She just always gave more than she got."
Early media reports that styled Lisa as a rich, sex-in-the-city stereotype baffled the family. She was just an average working woman trying to turn her dreams into reality, Helen says.
The nine-storey building where she hung her shingle had low rents, she says. "That's why we laughed when they said it was her 'posh Yorkville office.'"
Nor are the POSLUNS the prominent family portrayed by some, Helen says. Their branch is only distantly connected to the POSLUNS involved with the Dylex clothing empire.
After Lisa died, some media coverage seemed to imply she deserved what she got, Helen says. "They went out of their way to say she was single and had no children. It was very sexist."
Some reports also focused on lawsuits she had launched against former clients, including Starbucks and Mark's Work Wearhouse, over alleged breach of contract.
Helen, a lawyer who carried on the lawsuits in Lisa's honour, won't discuss them in detail. But she called her sister a tough negotiator with strong ethics, always out to get the best deal for her clients.
"The men didn't like her because she worked harder than them," Margie says. "She was one little person in one little company."
Lots of women work hard and put in long hours, Helen says. They don't expect a killer to strike as they leave for the night.
Lisa's last day was mundane, albeit in a nice part of town.
She got her hair done at Holt Renfrew, the upscale Bloor St. W. retailer where she also bought clothes. She was acutely aware that she was the public face of her firm, virtually a one-woman operation, and had to meet company presidents looking right, Helen says.
That night, she had dinner alone at a small Bay St. eatery.
She returned to her office around 7 p.m. to prepare legal documents for the lawsuit against Mark's. "She was so upset and nervous about the case," Helen says.
Her mother called briefly. Lisa said she was leaving soon and promised to call her mom when she got home. "I hung up the phone about 8 o'clock," Margie says. "I said, 'I love you.' And she said, 'I love you,' and that was the last I heard of her voice."
This past March 30 marked the fourth of Lisa's birthdays the family has commemorated since her death.
"We try to make it through the day and stay alive," Helen says.
But the manner of Lisa's death keeps her family and Friends from finding any peace of mind.
A physically shy, modest woman, she was brutally sexually assaulted, stabbed and left with her throat slit in a dirty equipment room.
"We know what absolute hell she went through and there will never be any peace for us around her death. In this kind of death, we can't get over what happened to her and what she had to suffer through all by herself, and in such pain. She must have been beyond petrified of all she had to face, and all alone."
It's hard to sit at the family dinner table knowing she won't be there, Helen says.
To this day, they set a wine glass on the table filled with Coke and ice, Lisa's usual Friday-night drink.
For the POSLUNS family, "she is still alive and will always be alive in some way," Helen says.
"We can't accept that she's not here.
"No matter what we do, there is always sadness," her mother says.
A woman at a bereavement group said it best, Helen recalls: When someone so significant to you dies, you can never have the same life because a part of yourself has died.
"It's like being a fish on land. That's the closest anyone has put it to me."

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DEJONG o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2006-10-25 published
HARVEY, Alieda (DEJONG)
In loving memory of a dear wife, mother and grandmother, Alieda October 26, 2900.
Gone are the days we used to share
But in our hearts you are always there
The gates of memory will never close
We miss you more than anyone knows
With tender love and deep regret
We who love you will never forget
- Love you always and forever, Leonard, Shayla, Jeffery, Tanya and family
Page 3

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DEJONG o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-05-13 published
MacINTYRE- CURRIE, Marion Pearl (AITCHESON)
Passed away at the Hanover and District Hospital on Thursday, May 11th, 2006. The former Marion Pearl ACHESON in her 95th year. Beloved wife of the late Archibald (A.D.) MacINTYRE and the late Rev. Robert CURRIE. Loving mother of Robert MacINTYRE and his wife Gerry of Midhurst, Alan MacINTYRE of Toronto, and Ron MacINTYRE and his wife Bonnie of Durham. Step-mother of James CURRIE and his wife Gail of Kitchener and Margaret and her husband Case DEJONG of Perkinsfield. Cherished grandmother of Art MacINTYRE, the late Rob MacINTYRE, Larissa BAILEY, Gena WELLWOOD, Heather MacINTYRE, Brian MacINTYRE and Jessie DEJONG. Fondly remembered by 10 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by her brothers Ivan and Morley AITCHESON, and her sisters Verna STEVENS and Jennie SAULTER. Friends may call at the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham on Saturday from 2 4 and 7 9 p.m. A Celebration of Life for Pearl will be held at the Durham Presbyterian Church on Monday afternoon at 2 o'clock, with visitation one hour prior to the service. There will be no visitation on Sunday. Interment Durham Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Durham Presbyterian Church, the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation or the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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DEJONG o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-09 published
SCOTT, Clara
Peacefully at her residence on Saturday October 7, 2006 Mrs. Clara SCOTT of Bayfield in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late Morris SCOTT. Loving mother of Myrna VODDEN of Clinton, Joyce SCOTT of Clinton, and Ray SCOTT of Bayfield. Cherished grandmother of Cindy and James DEJONG, Jennifer SCOTT and James DUNBAR, Samantha SCOTT, David SCOTT, Amanda, Meghan, and Ryan VODDEN. Great-grandmother of Ondrea and Courtney DEJONG. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Thelma BYE, Louise PRESBER, Alice BRANDON, Beulah and Keith KEYS, and Viola and Ted PATRICK. Predeceased by sister Nora HEARD. Friends will be received at the Falconer Funeral Home 153 High Street Clinton, on Monday from 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Tuesday October 10, 2006 at 2 p.m. Interment Bayfield Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Clinton Public Hospital Foundation would be greatly appreciated.

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DEJONG o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-30 published
SNELL, Arthur Royce " Art"
Suddenly at his residence on Saturday October 28, 2006 Arthur Royce "Art" SNELL of Clinton in his 56th year. Beloved husband of Ruth (SMITH) SNELL. Loving father of Terrence SNELL of Kelowna, British Columbia and William SNELL of Vanastra. Sadly missed by his granddaughters Megan SNELL and Brittany HEERSINK. Loved son-in-law of Rita DEJONG and her husband George of Goderich. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Charles and Pearl SNELL of Lower Sackville, Nova Scotia; Coreen LEVIN of Carbon, Alberta Bob and Sherry SNELL, John SNELL and Brad and Deborah SNELL all of Clinton; Stewart SMITH of Brockville, Susan and Dave McLINDEN of Oshawa and David SMITH and Katherine MILES of Brantford. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Gordon SNELL and Gwyn SNELL- GLIDDON, stepfather Eldon GLIDDON and by his father-in-law Clifford SMITH. Friends will be received at the Falconer Funeral Homes Ltd. - Clinton Chapel, 153 High Street, Clinton on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Thursday November 2, 2006 at 2 p.m. Interment Clinton Cemetery. Donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Friends of Hullett would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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DEJONG o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-26 published
SIPKENS, Marie " Minke" (née BERG)
Surrounded by her loving family at Bluewater Health on Saturday, December 23, 2006 Marie (Minke) SIPKENS (BERG,) age 82, of Sarnia, was called to her eternal home by the Lord she loved. Beloved wife of the late William (Wietse) SIPKENS (2006.) Marie was a member of the Living Hope Christian Reformed Church, Sarnia. Dear mother of Marg and John VANSICKLE of Stoney Creek, John and Cathy SIPKENS of Wyoming, Ray SIPKENS of Dorchester, Helen and Paul DE BRUIN of Brights Grove, Herman SIPKENS of Sarnia, Bill and Margaret-Anne SIPKENS of Wyoming. Dearly loved grandmother of Sherri, Greg, Kelly, Julie, Janice, Michael, Darryl, Amanda, Tara, Justine, Heather, Elisha, Bill, Karisa, LeeAnn, Stephen and Kaelynn. Loving great-grandmother of Noah, Kaden, Kate and Olivia. Predeceased by her parents Renze and Maaike BERG. Dear sister of Herman and Nel BERG of Brights Grove, Fred and Clara BERG of Sarnia, Wilma and the late John VANDERLINDE of Sarnia, Meino and Lodewyk ZYLSTRA of Wyoming, Donna and Wilco VANDERWAL of Courtright, Pat and the late Wesley KOOTSTRA of Sarnia, Ina and Harry BOERSMA of Sarnia, Andy and Jennie BERG of Brights Grove, Martha BERG of Sarnia, Mike and Barb BERG of Bradenton, Florida. Predeceased by father and mother-in-law Jan and Helen SIPKENS. Dear sister-in-law of Francis and Tony BROUWER of Cambridge, Gertie and the late John SIPKENS of Wyoming, Stan and Leni SIPKENS of Sarnia, Clarence DEJONG and the late Gertrude of Sarnia, Agnes SIPKENS of Sarnia, Joan and John HUIZINGA of Sarnia, Earl and Janet SIPKENS of Sarnia, and Clara and Bill BARNEVELD of Woodstock. A special thank you to Doctor BOREK and the nursing staff of the 4th Floor at Bluewater Health -- Norman St. The funeral service will be held on Thursday December 28, 2006 at Living Hope Christian Reformed Church 1281 Exmouth Street, Sarnia at 1: 00 p.m. Internment at Blackwell Cemetery. Family and Friends will be received at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia on Wednesday from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Sympathy donations gratefully accepted to the Canadian Cancer Society. Memories and condolences may be sent online at www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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DEJONG o@ca.on.peterborough.north_monaghan.peterborough.the_peterborough_examiner 2006-03-18 published
WILSON, Violet Catherine Merle
Peacefully, at Springdale Country Manor on Thursday, March 16, 2006, in her 95th year. Merle, dearly beloved wife of the Mansell (formerly of Warsaw), and loving mother of the late Wayne (Peterborough). Dear grandmother of Jacqueline LANTHIER and her husband David, and Tanya DEJONG, and her husband Ralph. Great grandmother of Tyson, Calvin, Kelsey, and Jordan. Dear daughter of the late George and Mabel CLARK. Sister of Chester CLARK and his wife Ethel (Peterborough), and the late Royal, Shirley, Viola, Leslie, and Eunice CLARK. Merle will be missed by several nieces and nephews. Friends may call at Community Alternative Funeral Home, 83 Hunter Street West (at the Bridge), Peterborough, from 1 p.m. on Sunday, March 19th, for a funeral service in the chapel at 2 p.m. Interment Saint Mark's Cemetery, Warsaw, at a later date. If desired, condolences to the family, directions to the funeral home, and remembrances to the Gideon's may be made at www.CommunityAlternative.ca or by calling 742-1875.

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DEJOODE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-05-08 published
VERBURG, Antje (DEJOODE)
The Lord took our mother Antje (DEJOODE) VERBURG to her eternal rest on Saturday, May 6, 2006 in her 92nd year. Beloved wife of the late Johannes VERBURG (1989.) Dear companion and friend of Doeke BUFFINGA. Loving mother of Peta and John BRANDERHORST of Hensall, Janie and Martin WILTS of Londesborough, Koos and Rita VERBURG of R.R.#1 Auburn, Tony and Roely VERBURG of R.R.#1 Auburn, Wilma and John Hessels of R.R.#2 Goderich, , and John and Margaret VERBURG of Londesborough. Grandmother of 22 grandchildren and 49 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Cor BOS of Alberta, Adrianna UYL of Blyth, Freda UYL of Clinton, Jannie VANDEN DOOL, and Wim DEJOODE both of The Netherlands. Predeceased by infant grand_son (1966) and by nine sisters and brothers. Friends will be received at the Blyth Visitation Centre of the Falconer Funeral Homes, 407 Queen Street, Blyth on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at the Blyth Christian Reformed Church, Blyth, on Tuesday, May 9, 2006 at 11 a.m. Interment Hope Chapel Cemetery, Hullett Twp. As expressions of sympathy memorial donations to the Clinton Public Hospital Foundation or Goderich Community Living would be greatly appreciated.

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