All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"COH" 2006 Obituary


COHAN  COHEN  COHN 

COHAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-21 published
GURLAND, Albert
After a lengthy illness, on Tuesday, June 20, 2006 at Cummer Lodge. Albert GURLAND, beloved husband of Betty. Loving father and father-in-law of Paul and Erella GURLAND, Karen and Mark COHAN, and Jennifer GURLAND. Dear brother of Ben and the late Bernie GUROFSKY. Devoted grandfather of Lauren, Daniel, Alexandra, Jordana, Brittany, and Adriana. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, June 21st at 12 noon. Interment Community Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 117 Yorkminster Road. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Na'Amat Canada 416-636-5425.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHAN - All Categories in OGSPI

COHEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-07-07 published
LEBEDEW, Evelyn Louise (GRAHAM)
Passed away July 5th, at University Hospital, peacefully and with Ky and Deb by her side. Evelyn was born June 7, 1934 in London, Ontario. She is predeceased by her parents and husband, Paul LEBEDEW. She will be sadly missed by her children; Paul and Glenda WADDELL, Ky WADDELL and Deb ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, and Alexander and Corry LEBEDEW. Zack WADDELL will never forget the time spent together playing games and talking with his "Meme". Jan (Brad), Mike (Kim), and Chris (Natasha) have many years of laughter and fun to remember Evie by. Dawson LEBEDEW, and his sister Fiona (yet to be born), will learn of their Grandma through stories. Evelyn is survived by her siblings; Ken GRAHAM, Cheryl and Fred SMALL and Marrianne and Marvin MAGILL, John and Burt Ann WARD were special Friends, and their presence in her life these past few years was greatly celebrated by Evelyn. Evelyn spent most of her adult life in London and then Exeter where she raised her three children with unconditional love and support. During her time in Exeter, she started the first "Beavers" pack and served for many years as a leader. These were happy times for Evelyn and nothing pleased her more than watching children, her own and others enjoying themselves. She returned to London 15 years ago, when her first diagnosis of breast cancer was received. Thankfully, she had been symptom free since that early treatment, and only very recently began the battle again. She spent her last weeks at home, as was her wish. Her family offer sincere thanks to Doctor Irene COHEN for her skilled and compassionate care of Evelyn during these last weeks. The Community Care Access Centre team and the Victorian Order of Nurses palliative team were also instrumental in supporting her stay at home. Special thanks to University Hospital palliative team, especially Carolyn. Family and Friends will be received at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North on Friday, July 7th from 3 p.m.-5 p.m. and 7 p.m.-9 p.m. The funeral service, officiated by The Rev. Sylvia BRIGHTWELL, will take place at Christ Anglican Church, 138 Hill Street, at Wellington, at 4: 30 p.m. on Saturday, July 8th. If so desired, rather than flowers, Evelyn has requested donations to Christ Anglican Church in her memory.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-08 published
OEFFER, Rachel " Ray"
On Tuesday, March 7, 2006 in Toronto. Ray OEFFER beloved wife of the late Edward (Eddie) OEFFER. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Beverly and Harold SHIFMAN, and Wendy DRAPER. Dear sister of Anne ERLICK, Mildred SCHWARTZ, Rose STEIN, Ralph EDSON and the late Eva URMAN, and Sara SCHWARTZ. Devoted grandmother of Jeffrey and Jean SHIFMAN, Ellie and Cara SHIFMAN, Debbie and Michael GLOGAUER, Aimee DRAPER and Jay STOLBERG, Russell DRAPER, and the late Susan COHEN. Devoted great-grandmother of Amanda, Josh, Eliana, Aaron, Judah, Baila, Daniel, Hannah, Mira, Naomi, Benjamin, Ruthie, Shayla, and Aleeza. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Wednesday, March 8, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Pride of Israel Section of Mount Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva strictly private. If desired, memorial donations may be made to The Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation 416- 499-1417 and The Canadian Cancer Society 416-961-7223.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-20 published
MUROFF- COHEN, Pauline
Surrounded by her loving family on Friday, March 17, 2006 at Humber River Regional Hospital - Church Site. Pauline MUROFF- COHEN, beloved wife of David COHEN, and the late Ruben MUROFF. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Helen and Jerry FISHMAN, and Edith and Arthur MAJER and step-mother of Ron and Marilyn COHEN. Dear sister and sister-in- law of Abraham and Millie Golinker, and the late Minnie and Lou Brown, Joe and Selma GOLINKER, Sally and the late Harry GALLINGER. Devoted grandmother of Mark and Doreen FISHMAN, Gary and Sheryl RUBINOFF, Marcy SUSMAN, Martin, Steven and Marlene, David and Tami, and Joel and Dina MAJER. Devoted great-grandmother of 17. Services were held on Sunday, March 19, 2006. Interment Shaarei Shomayim Section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 70 Blue Forest Drive. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Doctor Steven GALLINGER, G.I. Cancer Research Fund at the Lunenfeld Research Institute at Mt. Sinai Hospital, 416-586-8290 or Pioneer Woman Organization 416-636-5425.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-30 published
COHEN, Molly Shapiro
Peacefully in her 94th year on Wednesday March 29, 2006 at Toronto General Hospital. Molly Shapiro COHEN beloved wife of the late Al COHEN. Loving mother of Sondy and Bobby. Grandmother of Pam and Hilarie. Great-grandmother of Emma, Max, Allison and Matthew. Sister of Bernard and Harold SHAPIRO. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday March 31, 2006 at 10: 30 a.m. Interment Montreal. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Doctor Sheila Cohen Endowment or Women's Health, North York General Hospital Foundation at 416-756-6829

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-14 published
Magnus GUNTHER, Professor And Activist (1934-2006)
Raised in South Africa, he left to escape apartheid and eventually settled in Canada where he regrouped and mounted a private war on the racist regime in Johannesburg. He later became an expert on Inuit land claims
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Toronto -- The cut and thrust of politics fascinated Magnus GUNTHER. As a youth in Johannesburg and later in the Netherlands, he played active roles in the international student movement and in the struggle against apartheid. When those activities left him without a South African passport, he brought his passion for political science to Canada, where he taught at York and Trent Universities, and took on a number of fact-finding missions for the federal government.
As a student leader, he lobbied for democracy in Franco's Spain, for an end to French rule in Algeria and for black rights in South Africa. Yet he steered clear of Communist groups that had similar aims. As an opponent of apartheid, he gave support from abroad to the African Resistance Movement's campaign of sabotage against property within South Africa. Although always to the left of the political centre, he became a target of leftist critics himself in 1992, over a report he wrote for the federal government. It took the side of Ottawa over Inuit villagers who claimed they had been relocated to the high Arctic against their will.
For more than three decades, Prof. GUNTHER suffered from Crohn's disease, undergoing major surgery and periods of hospitalization. Yet he continued to be involved in international political causes even into his retirement.
"He was a very skillful backroom politician," says John Shingler, a former South African student leader and now a financial consultant in Montreal. "He knew the dynamics of a group and how to garner a majority of support."
Magnus GUNTHER, an only child, was born in Germany in 1934. When he was 2, his parents, Johann and Katerina GUNTHER, moved to Johannesburg to escape the Nazi regime and ensure a Catholic education for their son. But the father was soon interned in his new homeland because of his German nationality. He moved to South-West Africa (now Namibia) when Magnus was 12, leaving the mother to raise the boy.
After dropping out of medical school at 19, Magnus GUNTHER worked underground in a Johannesburg mine. But he hated having to supervise black workers who were more experienced than he was. Later, while attending the University of the Witwatersrand, he served as president of the Student Representative Council in 1957-58 and led a highly-publicized march through the streets of Johannesburg to protest apartheid at the university. He went on to become vice-president of international relations with the National Union of South African Students. From 1959 to 1964, he worked in Leiden, the Netherlands, with the Co-ordinating Secretariat of the International Student Conference, which represented national student organizations from a number of countries. While there he gave speeches, organized conferences, wrote articles and travelled extensively, working to further the group's fights against racism and colonialism.
A rival organization, based in Prague, was believed to be directed from Moscow. But it was years later before he found out that his own group had been largely financed by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Despite the revelation, he continued his Friendship with an American student leader who had known all along. Friends cite that as an example of his forgiving nature.
Michael Stevenson, now president of Simon Fraser University, was involved in student politics at Witwatersrand in the early sixties. He recalls Magnus GUNTHER returning to South Africa from Holland at great personal risk to speak at a student conference. He showed up "like the Scarlet Pimpernel" with no advance publicity and was greeted as legendary hero.
By then, he was giving support from outside the country to the National Committee of Liberation, later the African Resistance Movement, a clandestine anti-apartheid organization of mostly white Liberals. It was founded in 1960 after 250 unarmed blacks were killed or wounded by police during a rally in the Township of Sharpeville. The group supported bombings and sabotage against property and government installations, as long as no people were killed or injured. African Resistance Movement was crushed by the South African government in 1964 after one member, Adrian Leftwich, testified against his associates under threat of execution. By then a professor at the University of York in England, he was disowned by most African Resistance Movement supporters. But Magnus GUNTHER continued to keep in touch.
"His view was there but for the grace of God go I," says Prof. Leftwich.
In his retirement, Prof. GUNTHER chronicled the history of African Resistance Movement in a chapter written for Vol. I of The Road to Democracy in South Africa, published in 2004. He writes there of his personal involvement in a failed attempt to use a Second World War torpedo boat to transport arms and explosives into South Africa and to bring exiles out. He also cites his various unsuccessful attempts to raise money and obtain explosives for African Resistance Movementusing his international student contacts in Algeria and elsewhere.
Leaving his post in Holland, he obtained a doctorate in political science at the University of North Carolina in the mid-1960s. While there he married his first wife, Phyllis SHAFER. With South Africa refusing to issue him a new passport, he was admitted to Canada in 1966 on a laissez-passer permit, which allowed him to teach at York University in Toronto.
Before long he had bought a 60-hectare farm near Keene, Ontario, with a friend and lived on it for a while with his wife and children. He loved ploughing fields with a tractor because it was one place where he could see instantly the results of his labours, says Phyllis GUNTHER. The professor believed he could teach himself to do anything, she says. So he took a course in plumbing and then installed running water and a bathroom in the dilapidated farmhouse.
In 1975, after Prof. GUNTHER was diagnosed with Crohn's disease at 40, he moved from York University to Trent in Peterborough, which was closer to the farm. Otherwise he refused to slow down. Few people were aware of his suffering, says Derek COHEN, a colleague at York. As always Prof. GUNTHER was the centre of attention at any social gathering. Friends say he had an infectious sense of humour, a love of conversation and a sincere concern for the problems of others, as well as a passion for books. While at Trent, Prof. GUNTHER supported many aboriginal and environmental causes, says Bruce HODGINS, then a history professor. The two were among dozens charged with mischief in 1989 for blocking a logging road in the Temagami wilderness in a bid to protect an old-growth forest. He was detained and fingerprinted, but the charges were dropped before trial.
From 1980 to 1983, Prof. GUNTHER took a leave from Trent to serve as a senior policy adviser with the federal ministry of social development in Ottawa as part of an executive exchange. Contacts he made then helped him win a number of future contracts with the federal government. In 1980, the professor separated from his first wife. Six years later, he married Jan DE CRESPIGNY, an Ottawa psychologist who had been born in South Africa.
In 1990, he wrote a report for the federal department of Indian affairs on the overlapping land claims of the Inuit, Métis and Dene in Canada's Arctic. John Parker, a former Northwest Territories Commissioner, used the research as source material when he advised Ottawa on the boundary line that would separate the new territory of Nunavut from the Northwest Territories. He calls Prof. GUNTHER's report "an important piece of work, well-done."
In 1992, the professor found himself embroiled in controversy after he was commissioned to write a report for the same department on the relocation of Inuit families in the early 1950s from Northern Quebec to the high Arctic. The Inuit were seeking compensation from Ottawa, claiming they were dumped and abandoned in order for Canada to assert sovereignty in the far north. Prof. GUNTHER's 400-page report, along with testimony he gave the following year at a royal commission into the issue, asserted that the Inuit were moved to an area where game was abundant, that the government had not acted maliciously and the relocation was actually a success story.
One critic of his stand was Andrew J. Orkin, a McGill professor. Ironically Prof. Orkin was also a South African and an opponent of apartheid, although the men were not aware of this link. In an opinion article in The Globe and Mail, Prof. Orkin wrote: "In short, the government-commissioned report is a systematic assault on the veracity and understanding of the Inuit who have testified about the event and its effects on their lives and society. As a result, it compounds the profound wrong done to them by the relocation itself."
But Sheila Meldrum, a former bureaucrat in the Indian affairs department, says Prof. GUNTHER produced a thorough and competent report, and was criticized only because opinion was polarized on the issue. The royal commission's findings were that Canada's attempt to restore "the natural state of the Inuit" had been "dishonest, inhumane and illegal." Eventually Ottawa paid $10-million in compensation.
After taking early retirement from Trent in 1998, Prof. GUNTHER continued to travel widely in pursuit of his political interests. He attended a United Nations summit against racism in Durban in 2001, was a member of Oxfam Canada's observer mission to the fist post-apartheid elections in South Africa in 1994, and travelled to Ukraine over Christmas in 2004 to monitor elections there.
Magnus GUNTHER was born on September 17, 1934, in Munich. He died in Ottawa on March 7, 2006, two months after being diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas. He was 71. He is survived by his wife Jan de Crespigny, and by his children David, Katherine, Julian and Harriet. He also leaves his first wife Phyllis and three grandchildren.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-29 published
SOLOMONS, Carolyn (née KLEINBERG)
Peacefully, surrounded by her loving husband, children and sister, following a courageous battle with cancer, it is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our dear wife, mother, grandmother, daughter and sister, Carolyn SOLOMONS, on May 27, 2006. Carol will always be lovingly remembered by her husband of 45 years, Syd SOLOMONS, by her children, Susie (Ephraim) DLOOMY, Hayden (Robyn) SOLOMONS, Lesley (Stephen) COHEN and Lori (Shawn) GOLDENBERG, by her adoring grandchildren, Josh, Zack, Dean, Brooke, Michelle, Madison, Max, Stephanie, Carly, Jordana and Halle, by her dear mother, Gertie KLEINBERG and her predeceased father Irving KLEINBERG, and by her sister, Simmy (Robert) SHNIER. Bubby Carol's energetic spirit is and will always be felt in our hearts forever. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday May 29, 2006 at 12: 00 noon. Internment at Pride of Israel Section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva at 20 Simeon Court. If desired, donations may be made to The Carolyn Solomons Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C3 (416) 780-0324.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-19 published
COHEN, Stan
On Saturday, June 17, 2006 at his home. Stan COHEN, beloved husband of Sheila and the late Susan. Beloved father, father-in-law, and step-father of Dana and Adam, Jonathan and Simone, Alysa and Mitch, and Josh and Dori. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Hushy and Estelle, Ava and Bernie, Sy and Carrol, and Bea and Joe. Devoted grandfather of Sophie, Jenna, Liam, Marlie, and Noah. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue W., (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday, June 19th at 12: 00 noon. Interment Pardes Shalom Cemetery, Holy Blossom Temple section. Shiva 415 Bedford Park Avenue. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-04 published
LEVINE, Freda (formerly FINKELSTEIN, née ROSNER)
(4 January 1904-3 July 2006)
Dedicated daughter of Priscilla and Samuel ROSNER, loving sister of Saidye BRONFMAN, O.B.E., Leah Monica AMDUR and Frances GROSSMAN, devoted wife of Doctor Manly FINKELSTEIN (1898-1949) and Moe LEVINE (1903-1978). She will be especially missed by her immediate family, Tom FINKELSTEIN and his wife Pamela MADALENA of Comox, British Columbia, Sue and Bernie PUCKER of Boston, Massachusetts, Roselle ABRAMOWITZ of Stowe, Vermont and Harvey LEVINE and his partner Louise Trudel of Montreal. She adored and was adored by her grandchildren: Cara FINKELSTEIN, Marcie and Bill SCUDDER, Joseph and Melanie ABRAMOWITZ, Naomi and Michael COHEN, Michael and Gigi PUCKER, Ken and Leslie PUCKER, Jon and Marcie PUCKER. Her great grandchildren were a great source of joy and focus for her. Daniel, Jeremy and Elana SCUDDER, Allison EDEN and Isaac ABRAMOWITZ, Loren and Adam COHEN, Abby Maggie and Jessica PUCKER, Oliver PUCKER and Hannah and Isabella PUCKER will miss having her in their lives - always remembering their birthdays and their special desires. She was a devoted aunt and great aunt to Edgar BRONFMAN, Charles BRONFMAN, Phyllis LAMBERT, Barbara BRONFMAN and Jean DEGUNZBURG who often traveled from France to visit with her; Jeff GROSSMAN and Nancy GIDWITZ, Cynthia GROSSMAN and Nancy GROSSMAN. Freda was loved and honoured by the entire Levine family as represented by Michael and Donna LEVINE of Toronto, Allan and Suzie LEVINE of Israel, Ruth and Arthur PENN of Boston. So many around the world counted Freda as a friend and many others adopted her as family because she cared so much about the well-being of so many. The family is eternally grateful to her assistant, Marie-Claire Freeme DE WALLENS and her loving and attentive caregivers for their attention and support. May she find peace in her passing as she did joy in her living. Funeral service from Paperman and Sons, 3888 Jean Talon St. W., Montreal on Tuesday, July 4th at 2: 00 p.m. Burial in Montreal. Shiva at 4300 de Maisonneuve St. W. #328, Westmount, Québec through Thursday evening, shiva daily from 3-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, Freda can be remembered with support for Birthright Israel Foundation in Canada, (416) 398-7785 Ext.: 2, in the U.S. - (212) 457-0040.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-15 published
COHEN, Edgar Horace
Peacefully at home in Montreal in his ninety-third year surrounded by his loved ones on Thursday, July 13, 2006. Husband of Ruth GOLDBERG for 57 years. Father and father-in-law of Lenore and Paul HARRIS, Judy and Michael JACOBS, Andrew and Mary COHEN. Grandfather of Michelle, Kenny, and Andrew HARRIS; Jesse JACOBS Alexander and Rachel COHEN. Brother of Elsa and the late Bernard RUBIN, the late Arthur E. COHEN, the late Riva and the late Harvey GOLDEN and brother-in-law of Sol GOLDBERG, Rita and the late Archie WOLFSON. Mourned by his nephews and nieces. The family thanks his loyal secretary of twenty-five years, Hyacinth MOULTON, and our other family - Marieta, Venus, Cynthia and Amapola -- who cared for him in his later years with affection and devotion. Funeral service from Paperman and Sons, Montreal, 3888 Jean Talon St. W.on Sunday, July 16 at 12 noon. Burial at the Shaar Hashomayim Congregation Cemetery, Mt. Royal Blvd. Shiva private. Contributions in his memory may be made to the "Ruth and Edgar H. Cohen Endowment Fund", c/o Jewish General Hospital Foundation (514) 340-8251 or to the "Ruth and Edgar H. Cohen Fund," c/o Congregation Shaar Hashomayim (514) 937-9471.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-20 published
COHEN, Edgar Horace
Died peacefully at home, on July 13, in Montreal. Ruth Goldberg COHEN, his beloved wife of 57 years, was at his bedside. He was 92 years old. Edgar COHEN was born in Montreal on October 28, 1913. He was the son of Abraham Zebulon COHEN, a coal merchant and scion of the Jewish Montreal, and Malca (VINEBERG) COHEN, an erudite and witty conversationalist. He was the brother of Arthur, Riva and Elsa. He attended Roslyn School and Westmount High School. He went to McGill University and graduated with an Honours Bachelor of Arts in 1934. Upon the sudden death of his father in 1937, he abandoned plans to study medicine and became president of L. Cohen and Sons Ltd., founded by his grandfather, Lazarus COHEN. There he introduced innovations such as profit-sharing and rebuilt a struggling business. He sold the company in 1959 and entered real estate as a consultant, running Yarco Building Corp. and LJA Investments; he successfully represented a consortium of investors in the United States and Western Canada. His real loves, though, were travel, writing and learning. After 13 trips to Europe and extensive archival research, he wrote Mademoiselle Libertine: A Portrait of Ninon de Lanclos, the 17th century French libertine. It was published in 1970 in Canada, the United States and Britain. He also wrote poems, limericks, short stories, commentary and satire, which appeared in publications including The Canadian Forum and The Montreal Star, as well as a novel and a memoir (unpublished). From 1977 to 1980 he was president of The Canadian PEN Centre. He was a member of the Board of Governors of Jewish General Hospital, a trustee of Congregation Shaar Hashomayim, chair of his McGill class reunion, and a member of the Friends of the McGill Library, the Writers Union of Canada and World Federalists. A student of history, biography and the Bible, he was a lover of opera and the outdoors, a sailor, a skier and tennis player, a wry and funny observer, a loving husband, an attentive father and unfailing friend. He is survived by his wife, Ruth, and his sister, Elsa RUBIN; his children Lenore, Judy and Andrew, and their spouses Paul HARRIS, Michael JACOBS and Mary GOODERHAM; and his grandchildren Michelle, Kenny and Andrew HARRIS, Jesse JACOBS, and Alexander and Rachel COHEN.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-12 published
Herbert WHITTAKER, Theatre Critic And Writer: (1910-2006)
He discovered theatre in London as a boy during the First World War and was forever smitten by a love for the stage
By Alex DOBROTA with files by the late Donn DOWNEY and Jan WONG, Page S9
Toronto -- He imagined himself a war correspondent on a battlefield, writing about costumed soldiers that bled emotions on a stage. But the struggle that Herbert Whittaker documented and supported for almost half a decade was a real one. As The Globe and Mail's emeritus drama critic until 1975, Mr. WHITTAKER found himself on the front lines of the creation of a distinct Canadian theatre.
And much like the war correspondent who sometimes feels compelled to pick up a rifle in the thick of battle, Mr. WHITTAKER never shied away from using his pen to forward the cause he embraced since early childhood.
"Canadian critics tend to be crusaders," he wrote in a 1985 article. "Their very occupation determines this."
Indeed, when Mr. WHITTAKER, a tall and courtly man, started his career at the Montreal Gazette in 1935, theatre was not high on the national agenda. The country had to survive the rest of the Depression and the Second World War before Canadian theatre came of age in 1953 with the Stratford Shakespearian Festival.
It opened in a big tent and Mr. WHITTAKER was there on behalf of The Globe. He had been with the paper for just four years. "The most exciting night in the history of Canadian theatre," he wrote after the festival's first production, Richard III.
His enthusiasm did not diminish over the years. When he retired, Mr. WHITTAKER was invited to Stratford to accept a gift from the festival. He was offered a prop from any of its productions and, in a rare moment of practicality, he chose the sword used by Alec Guinness, who appeared as Richard in 1953. "I knew his sword, being a hard object, was likely in good repair," Mr. WHITTAKER said. He also wanted something that was closely associated with the event.
Some said Mr. WHITTAKER's reviews were too kind -- less than satisfactory for the theatregoer who wanted to know if a play was worth the price of a ticket. But Toronto readers had the advantage of placing his review alongside the one in The Toronto Star. Its critics, most notably Nathan COHEN, had the reputation of being cold and analytical, and the intelligent reader learned how to strike a balance between the two.
Mr. WHITTAKER offered further reasons to explain the differences. The Star was then an afternoon paper so it could not echo The Globe's review, which appeared in the morning. And Mr. WHITTAKER tended to put positive impressions in his first paragraphs. The Star tended to do the reverse. "I was trying to build up Canadian theatre," Mr. WHITTAKER said in a 1999 interview.
He covered drama with the zeal of an evangelist, showing up at The Globe in the early afternoon to write a chatty, name-dropping column or a weekend feature. He would then return in the evening, Sundays included, to write a thoughtful review for a deadline usually less than an hour away.
The computer had not come of age and his typewritten copy looked like a crossword puzzle with unreadable inserts scribbled in by hand. The reviews were the dismay of the copy editors but represented, given the time constraints, a minor journalistic miracle.
While he covered the theatrical mainstream, he paid equal attention to the smaller theatres, where he would see untried, but promising, Canadian performers and, quite frequently, a play that was making its Canadian debut. He also drew no distinction between amateur and professional performances. "In certain instances, some of the best work is done by amateurs," he said.
Herbert WHITTAKER fell under the spell of stage performance as a boy growing up in London, England. With his family, he moved there before the outbreak of the First World War and events had transpired to keep them on the wrong side of the Atlantic until peace returned. Pantomime fascinated him, as did the antics of Elsie Janis, the musical comedy star who entertained British troops.
After the war, Mr. WHITTAKER's family returned to Montreal, where the theatre scene offered little or no Canadian content and most productions were imported from England or the U.S. With great delight, Mr. WHITTAKER discovered John Martin-Harvey's rendition of Hamlet, an experience that would leave an indelible mark on the rest of his life.
"Young as he was, these experiences shaped his critical standards throughout his career and it is remarkable how often his reviews harken back to Martin-Harvey…" Anton Wagner wrote in Establishing Our Boundaries -- English-Canadian Theatre Criticism.
But for all his love of drama, Mr. WHITTAKER shunned the stage, opting instead for positions as speech writer and art director during his school years at Strathcona Academy in the Outremont neighbourhood of Montreal. As a boy growing up in Outremount, he once played the Toff, a crime solver, in a performance staged in the hall of a local church -- an experience he qualified as the peak of his acting career. He was never seen on a theatre stage again. "I was too shy," he said. "Then I got tall and gangly and started wearing these glasses."
He dropped out of school around the age of 16 to help his family make a living during the harsh years of the Depression. He took up a job as an office clerk with the Canadian Pacific Railway in Montreal's Windsor Station.
But his fascination with theatre never subsided.
"I'm afraid I cheated the Canadian Pacific Railway, for I eventually discovered that by going down to the stacks to search out invoices, I could find time to design costumes for church plays," he would later write in a book about the Montreal theatre scene.
He quit his job in 1935. That same year, he started working at the Gazette as a junior critic who was responsible for just about everything.
And by the late 1930s, he was directing plays in Montreal, taking some of them to the Dominion Drama Festival. He was also designing sets for Montreal productions.
When the Second World War broke out, the army rejected him for military service, mainly because of his less-than-perfect eyesight and because of his somewhat frail physical condition,
"As WHITTAKER recalls, he was rejected for military service," University of Waterloo English professor Rota LISTER once wrote. "[He] did not much care whether it was because he had diminished eye sight, a weak heart or varicose veins; he was simply relieved and let his soldier brother defend the values of civilization while he battled on for Canadian theatrical culture."
For all that, he viewed his work as a theatre critic for The Gazette as a contribution to the war effort. He praised the verve of two Canadian troop shows meant to entertain Allied soldiers, Meet the Navy and Army Show. "His wartime reviews do not seem out of place in The Gazette of the time, rubbing shoulders with news flashes from the front and wartime propaganda," Mr. Wagner wrote.
In 1949, Mr. WHITTAKER joined The Globe as its theatre and film critic and began his long association with the University of Toronto as a director and designer.
At times, he reviewed the plays he directed. In 1950, for instance, he worked on the set design for Going Home, a play written by Morley Callaghan and performed by the New Play Society. He later reviewed the performance for The Globe and Mail. The article's last line read: "The settings were adequate."
He might have chosen either critic or designer as a career but thoughts of a regular pay cheque decided the issue. The remuneration for a designer or director was, at best, a modest honorarium, while newspapers put their contributors on a payroll -- $35 a week to start, in Mr. WHITTAKER's case.
His salary must have improved over the years because when he arrived in Toronto he discovered there were few restaurants that matched what he had grown accustomed to in Montreal. Winston's was one of the few exceptions and Mr. WHITTAKER adopted it. The actors who were appearing at the Royal Alexandra Theatre down the street followed suit and it became the restaurant of the celebrities.
The names of the theatrical giants fell easily from his lips. He said the actor Sir John Gielgud helped him get the job with The Globe by describing Mr. WHITTAKER as "the only intelligent theatre critic in Canada." The favourable notice from Sir John came after Mr. WHITTAKER had bestowed a favourable notice for one of Sir John's performances.
In 1961, Mr. WHITTAKER designed the sets for the 1961-62 season of the Canadian Players, an offshoot of the festival that toured Canada with the classics and provided winter work for some Stratford performers.
King Lear was included in the company's season and Mr. WHITTAKER, who had designed Lear productions twice before, decided to move the play out of ancient Britain into a Far North setting. The set design was serviceable, a bare-bones portable affair that relied on colour to match the mood of the play.
Over the years, Mr. WHITTAKER's name was attached to countless productions as either the director or designer. He had a separate career as an adjudicator with the Dominion Drama Festival's regional festivals and other productions. The Encyclopedia Britannica and the Encyclopedia Americana both asked him for special articles which he supplied.
He was also a frequent recipient of theatrical awards and picked up honorary doctorate degrees in arts from York University and McGill University in Montreal.
In 1976, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada. The accompanying citation read: "actor, adjudicator, director and drama critic, whose contributions to the theatre in Canada are legion."!
Long after he retired, Mr. WHITTAKER continued writing theatre reviews and other various articles for The Globe and Mail, The New York Times and the Herald Tribune. He also authored or co-authored as many as six books, including one about Winston's, the restaurant he so often frequented.
And, in the early 1980s, he shouldered the task of founding the Theatre Museum of Canada. "Nobody could talk to him for more than 30 seconds without talking about the theatre museum," recalled Kate Barris, now the museum's president.
The museum was established in 1992 and, over the following years, Mr. WHITTAKER would donate much of his memorabilia collection hundreds of items that included play bills, portraits of artists and even Alec Guinness's sword.
"Theatre was his life," said Kate Barris, the museum's president. "He had many Friends but his main love was the theatre."
In 1999, Mr. WHITTAKER wrote Setting the Stage, which documents Montreal English theatre from 1920 to 1949. The book opens with a sentence that could very well encapsulate the driving force behind its author's career: "In many countries, no matter how thinly populated, no matter how widely scattered across a continent, people must eventually produce their own theatre, as objects on a landscape must produce their own shadows."
But for all his love for Canadian theatre, Mr. WHITTAKER also enjoyed Western European productions. In his free time, he travelled to England, France and Spain in search of the local flavour producers and theatres bring to classical plays there. In one 1978 adventure unrelated to theatre, he visited China at a time when outsiders were seldom seen. His experiences left him somewhat rueful: "A much-travelled man may be a well-travelled man but not necessarily a man who travels well," he later wrote in an article in The Globe that appeared under the headline "What went wrong."
Herb WHITTAKER never married. Before he moved into a retirement home in 2003, he spent two years at Toronto's Performing Arts Lodge on The Esplanade, where married couples are allocated to two bed-room apartments. Mr. WHITTAKER was hoping for an extra room to use as his study. He argued his case, telling staff that he was married to his work. "He only got one bedroom," said Ms. Barris. "It didn't work."
And, as Mr. WHITTAKER's living quarters shrank, the museum's collection swelled with his donations. He kept his typewriter, though, which often clanked away in his room as he crafted letters to Friends and acquaintances the world over.
Well into his 90s, Mr. WHITTAKER continued to attend theatre performances. He was a familiar sight at Toronto premieres and at theatre festivals in Stratford and Niagara.
In 2002, when he attended a Chekhov play at SoulPepper Theatre Company, director Albert Shultz led the crowd in a standing ovation to mark Mr. WHITTAKER's 91st birthday.
"He was quite moved," Ms. Barris said.
By all accounts, he last saw a play the following year when he watched Richard McMillan perform in Through the Eyes at The Factory Theatre Company. Soon thereafter, his frail health confined him to his retirement home on St. George Street, where he continued reading theatre reviews.
"Herb's passing really marks the end of a certain generation in Canadian theatre," Phillip SILVER, Dean of the Faculty of Fine Arts of York University wrote in a statement. "He had a view of our history that no one else will ever have. And on top of that all, he was truly a gentleman."
Herbert WHITTAKER was born in Montreal September 20, 1910. He died of natural causes in Toronto on Saturday.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-29 published
SOLOWAY, Pearl
Peacefully on Wednesday, September 27, 2006 at her home. Pearl SOLOWAY, beloved wife of Irving. Caring daughter of the late Bella and Zelig SCHWARTZ. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Lavi SOLOWAY of New York, Zelig SOLOWAY, and Rachelle SOLOWAY and Rick HENDERSON. Cherished sister and sister-in-law of Rhea and the late Tom COHEN, Sylvia and Charles SMITH, and the late Abraham SCHWARTZ, all of Montreal. Devoted grandmother of Brandon, and Ethan. Dear niece of Donald AXELROD. Remembered by her nephew and nieces. A graveside service will be held at the All For One section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park on Friday, September 29th at 12: 00 noon. Shiva 149 Steeles Avenue East. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Soldiers of Israel Fund 416-783-3053.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-02 published
WRIGHT, Doctor Alexander McBride
81, of Brookline, Massachussetts, formerly of British Columbia, died on September 27, 2006. Former chief of spinal surgery at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston, Massachussetts. Survived by his beloved wife, Marcia WRIGHT, daughter, Marissa WRIGHT of Toronto, son, Alistair WRIGHT of Sudbury, Ontario, brother, Richard WRIGHT of Vancouver, British Columbia, mother-in-law, Hortense COHEN of Indianapolis, Indiana and his loving Airedale, Daisy. Preceded in death by his parents, Alexander and Kathleen McBride WRIGHT, and father-in-law, Charles Philip COHEN. A memorial service will be held at 11: 00 a.m., Saturday, October 7, at Newton Cemetery Chapel, Newton, Massachussetts. Memorial contributions may be directed to the American Heart Association, 20 Speen Street, Framingham, Massachussetts 01701, www.americanheart.org

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-04 published
FRIEDLICH, Lewis
In his 106th year, and 80th year of marriage, left us peacefully in his sleep at Baycrest Hospital on October 2, 2006. The patriarch of the Friedlich family survived the first and second world wars and nazi persecution with most of his family in Hungary, escaped from the communist regime and started a new life from scratch in Canada with his wife and two sons. He leaves behind a legacy of a large family of grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was a great humanitarian, who no matter how short of funds always wanted to help the less fortunate. Family had always been the focus of his life to pave the way for the next generation at often great personal sacrifices. He will be sadly missed by his beloved wife Aurelia. He was a loving father to Steven FRIEDLICH, Georgine FRIEDLICH- ROSMAN, Claire FRIEDLICH- MARKUS and Doctor Tom FRIEDLICH (deceased) and cherished his grandchildren Joey and Linda FRIEDLICH; Marty and Janice FRIEDLICH; Michele and Stuart POLLOCK Diane BETEL; Ruthie and Chad BAYNE and Monica and Michael COHEN. He was a devoted great-grandfather to Jessica, Joshua, Justin, Jaclyn and Tommy FRIEDLICH; Michael, Jordan and Hannah BETEL; Matthew and Sarah POLLOCK and Will COHEN. Lewis also leaves behind his sister Sara KAVENSTOCK and her family in Israel; the Kepecs/Fixler families in Hungary and the Sardi family in Budapest and is predeceased by his brother Tibor FRIEDLICH (Mauthausen) and his sisters Iren SZABOVSZKI and Aranka BAN. Services were held at Beth Tzedec Synagogue on Tuesday October 3 at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva at 355 St. Clair Avenue West, Apt. 605, afternoons only. If desired, donations may be made to the Lewis Friedlich Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324. Thank you for the loving care to all the staff at Baycrest giving quality to his last days.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-05 published
WRIGHT, Doctor Alexander McBride
81, of Brookline, Massachussetts, formerly of British Columbia, died on September 27, 2006. Former chief of spinal surgery at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston, Massachussetts. Survived by his beloved wife, Marcia WRIGHT, daughter, Marissa WRIGHT of Toronto, son, Alistair WRIGHT of Sudbury, Ontario, brother, Richard WRIGHT of Vancouver, British Columbia, mother-in-law, Hortense COHEN of Indianapolis, Indiana and his loving Airedale, Daisy. Preceded in death by his parents, Alexander and Kathleen McBride WRIGHT, and father-in-law, Charles Philip COHEN. A memorial service will be held at 11: 00 a.m., Saturday, October 7, at Newton Cemetery Chapel, Newton, Massachussetts. Memorial contributions may be directed to the American Heart Association, 20 Speen Street, Framingham, Massachussetts 01701, www.americanheart.org

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-18 published
MARTIN, Ruth Marion (née ORMSBY)
Ruth died peacefully at home with her children at her side, on October 16, 2006 at the age of 81. Daughter of Helen M. MacDONELL and Gerald Y. ORMSBY. Predeceased by Douglas, her loving husband of 56 years. Survived by her children Ned and his wife Judy of Manitoulin Island, Sue and her husband David GARSKEY of Lindsay, Tom and his wife Margaret of Toronto and Mary and her partner Tim TOPPER of Whitehorse. Sister of Anthony J. ORMSBY of Kilrie, Scotland and Diana B. COHEN (Williams) of Micanopy, Florida. Ruth was a very supportive wife and strong character model for her children. She was a loving and devoted grandmother of Oona (Matthew FRENCH,) Janet (Scott and Rebecca CHALLENGER,) Jay, Adam, Matthew, Grace, April, Frank, Molly, Sophie and Helen, and was recently thrilled to be the great-grandmother of Everett FRENCH. Her grand-dogs Perdy and Iris will miss her ready supply of welcoming ginger-snaps. She was born in Toronto and educated at Miss Wyn Roberts' School, Brown Public School, Bishop Strachan School and Trinity College, Toronto. She proudly signed up for the Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service, trained at HMCS Conestoga (Galt) and was posted to HMCS Stadacona (Halifax) until her discharge in 1945. Ruth was a supporter of Humewood House, the Church of the Messiah and, especially, the Toronto Branch of the Needlework Guild of Canada. She also greatly enjoyed the meetings of the Current Events Club. Ruth will be sadly missed by her family and network of Friends and cousins, especially those she grew up with during the summers of her youth in Nares Inlet, Georgian Bay, a place she loved and enjoyed all her life. Funeral service followed by a reception at the Church of the Messiah, 240 Avenue Road, Toronto on Friday, October 20, at 11: 00 a.m. Committal of ashes will be at the family cemetery, Saint_John's Cemetery on the Humber. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care, 60 Murray Street, Box 13, Toronto, Ontario, M5T 3L9, or a charity of your choice.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-18 published
GOLDFARB
Avi and Rachel GOLDFARB lovingly welcome Anna Ruth GOLDFARB, born November 13, 2006, weighing 6 lbs 12 ozs. Overjoyed grandparents are Ron and Ellen COHEN and Marty and Joan GOLDFARB; great-grandfathers Ike COHEN and Harry BAIN; uncles and aunts David, Alonna, Michael, Baila, Rebecca, Paul, Daniel, and Marianna; nieces and nephews Sarah, David, Lee, Jacob, Matthew, and Ellie. We love you Anna. You're wonderful.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-27 published
GROSS, Solly
On Thursday, January 26, 2006, at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. Solly GROSS, beloved husband of Ida GROSS, and the late Lillian GROSS. Loving father and father-in-law of Fran and Alan LUBORSKY, and Ferne and Paul SWARTZ. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Doris and Eddie COHEN. Devoted grandfather of Lindsay, Andrew, Adam, Nicole, and Bryan. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin), for service on Friday, January 27, 2006 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment Sons of Abraham section of Lambton Cemetery. Shiva 21 Rosemount Avenue, Thornhill. If desired, donations may be made to Solly Gross Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-27 published
SHADNEY, Pearl (formerly BOLJKOVAC, née SUZACK)
Unexpectedly, at the Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital, Burlington, Ontario on Wednesday, January 25th, 2006. Beloved wife of Owen SHADNEY of Burlington, Ontario and the late Dr. Nicholas BOLJKOVAC. Dearest mother of Chris (Catherine ROSS) of Maitland, Ontario, Craig (Maria Cristina Cárdenas FISCHER) of Geneva, Switzerland, Kim PEITCHINIS of Hamilton, Ontario, Kathy (Dr. Kim PARLETT) of Bracebridge, Ontario, and Karen (Mrs. Scott WEAR) of Hamilton, Ontario. Beloved step-mother of April (Mrs. Mark KLEIN) of Thornhill, Ontario, and Carol-Ann COHEN of Thornhill, Ontario. Will be missed by her sister Sylvia of Toronto. Beloved Grandma/Nana of Alicia Maria Boljkovac CÁRDENAS, Adam and Ryan BOLJKOVAC, Brittney and Blake PARLETT, and Samantha and Nicole WEAR. Beloved Step-grandmother of Alana and Matthew KLEIN. Pearl will be missed by several nieces and nephews and many Friends in the Hamilton and Burlington area. Visitation at Bay Gardens Funeral Home, 1010 Botanical Drive (across from the Royal Botanical Gardens), Burlington, Ontario (905-527-0405) on Sunday, January 29, 2006 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m., where Funeral Prayers will be held in the Chapel on Monday, January 30, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Holy Sepulchre Cemetery. Reception to follow at Bay Gardens Reception Centre. If so desired, expressions of sympathy to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be sincerely appreciated by the family. The family would like to express special appreciation to the Intensive Care Unit staff at the Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital. Please sign the Book of Condolence at baygardens.ca or you may email the family at baygardens@cogeco.net

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-05 published
FIDLER, Ruby (née COHEN)
On February 3, 2006. Beloved wife of the late Sonny FIDLER. Loving mother of Michael JESSEL (Diana), Steven JESSEL and Jamie JESSEL (Kirsten.) Adoring " Grandma Ruby" of Julia and Zachary JESSEL. Cherished Aunt of Marc and Ivy DAVIS, Elli DAVIS and Paul WISE, Joni HENDLER and Barbi and Ellie FIDLER and great-aunt of Neely and Lauren DAVIS, Matthew and Zachary HENDLER and Alex Fidler WENER. Dearest sister to the late Myrtle DAVIS (Murray,) devoted daughter of the late Bertha and Sam COHEN. Deeply loved by her whole family and huge circle of wonderful Friends. Call Benjamin's 416-663-9060 for details. Shiva 473 Spadina Rd. (from 2 p.m. daily). Donations to Camp Oochigeas 416-961-6624 or charity of your choice.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-06 published
SALINAS, Eva
On Saturday, February 4, 2006 at Mount Sinai Hospital. Eva SALINAS beloved wife of Armando. Loving mother of Liliana MORAIS, and Jacqueline COHEN. Devoted grandmother of Robert and Rochelle, Jennifer and Doug, Danielle, Alanna, and Michael. Devoted great-grandmother of Sarah, Noah, Yael, Nathan, and Matthew. At Holy Blossom Temple, 1950 Bathurst Street, (south of Eglinton) for service on Monday, February 6, 2006 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Holy Blossom Temple Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 153 Tansley Road, Thornhill. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Mazon Canada 416-783-7554 or to the charity of your choice.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-26 published
HANIFORD, Edythe (née DIAMOND)
Passed away Friday, February 24, 2006, peacefully after a lengthy illness at the age of 91. Beloved wife of the late Leo HANIFORD. Devoted mother of Trudi and Les NIRENBERG and Gayl HANIFORD. Grandmother of Melissa and Morley NIRENBERG. Loving sister of Lillian COHEN. Sister-in-law of Bessie WILKS and Irving and Minabel HANEFORD. She was the daughter of Pearl and Morris DIAMOND. Special friend of Yitz and Bernice PENCINER. Services at Steeles Memorial Chapel on Sunday. Please call for time, 905-881-6003. In lieu of flowers, donations in honour of Edythe HANIFORD can be sent to Baycrest Foundation. Shiva at 107 Clifton Ave., Downsview.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-08 published
COHEN, Lewis
On Monday, March 6, 2006 at the North York General Hospital. Lewis COHEN, beloved husband of the late Zelda COHEN. Loving father and father-in-law of Marvin and Marilyn, Moishe and Alaine, Aaron and Sheila, Stephen, Sandra, Myrna COHEN- DOYLE and Steven DOYLE. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Mary GAINES, and Ralph and Helen. Devoted grandfather of Sherri and Alan, Lyndsey, Allisson, Sherri and Dion, Alexander, Vanessa, Adam, and Tara. Devoted great-grandfather of Hayley. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Wednesday, March 8, 2006 at 12: 30 p.m. Interment Shaarei Shomayim Section of Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park. Shiva, 257 Cocksfield Avenue. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Lewis Cohen Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-10 published
CALVERT, Phoebe (née COHEN)
On Thursday, March 9, 2006 at Princess Margaret Hospital. Phoebe CALVERT born in Glasgow, Scotland. Beloved wife of Sidney. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Angela and Doug GRAHAM, Adam and Sarah, and Andrew and Tami. Dear sister of Edna, and Brian. Devoted grandmother of Matthew, Carly, and Jacob. For a graveside service on Sunday, March 12th at 3: 00 p.m. in Solel Congregation section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to The Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation 416-946-6560.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-10 published
COHEN, Martha
On Wednesday, March 8, 2006 at her home. Beloved wife of Harry for 63 years. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Donna and Art SIEGEL, Mel and Ann, Richard and Mina, and Terry and Randi, and the late Michael. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Sidney and Shirley, and Harvey and Charlotte. Devoted grandmother of Rebecca and Michael, Laurel; Stephanie and Ted, Erin and Nathan; Daniel, Yuki and Rafael; and Jeremy, Brandon, and Michael. Devoted great-grandmother of Hyla, Lauren, and Nicolas. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave W. (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, March 12th at 1: 30 p.m. Interment Farband Labour Zionist Section of Mt. Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 29 Regina Ave. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society 1-888-939-3333 or to The Parkinson Society of Canada 416-227-9700.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-30 published
COHEN, Molly Shapiro
Peacefully in her 94th year on Wednesday, March 29, 2006 at Toronto General Hospital. Molly Shapiro COHEN beloved wife of the late Al COHEN. Loving mother of Sondy and Bobby. Grandmother of Pam and Hilarie. Great-grandmother of Emma, Max, Allison and Matthew. Sister of Bernard and Harold SHAPIRO. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, March 31, 2006 at 10: 30 a.m. Interment Montreal. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Doctor Sheila Cohen Endowment for Women's Health, North York General Hospital Foundation at 416-756-6829.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-31 published
COHEN, Harry
On Thursday, March 30, 2006 at his home. Beloved husband of the late Martha for 63 years. Loving father and father-in-law of Donna and Art SIEGEL, Mel and Ann, Richard and Mina, and Terry and Randi, and the late Michael. Dear brother of Jeannette COHEN and Geoff SCOTT, Shirley and the late Al, and the late Esther. Devoted grandfather of Rebecca and Michael, Laurel; Stephanie and Ted, Erin and Nathan; Daniel, Yuki, and Rafael; and Jeremy, Brandon, and Michael. Devoted great-grandfather of Hyla, Lauren, and Nicolas. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, April 2nd at 12: 00 noon. Interment Farband Labour Zionist section of Mount Sinai Memorial Park. Shiva 29 Regina Avenue. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society 1-888-939-3333 or to the Parkinson Society of Canada 416-227-9700.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHEN - All Categories in OGSPI

COHN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-20 published
COHN, Peggy (née MAY)
On Wednesday, July 19th, 2006, Peggy COHN passed away in Toronto, while visiting her family. Beloved daughter of the late Celia and the late Louis MAY, Peggy was predeceased by her husband Simon COHN. She will be lovingly remembered by her children Jonathan and Heather COHN, Roberta and Mitchell OSAK, and by her grandchildren, Shawn and Matthew COHN, and Simon and Summer OSAK. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Norman and Gloria MAY. Peggy was a kind and gentle soul, who devoted her life to her family. To her grandchildren, she was more than a grandmother, she was "Peggy", a truly special friend. We will forever miss her warmth, love and wisdom. Funeral service from Paperman and Sons, 3888 Jean Talon St. W., Montreal on Friday, July 21st at 11: 30 a.m. Burial in Montreal. Shiva in Montreal Friday only, continuing Sunday at 102 Roxborough Lane, Thornhill, Ontario L4J 4T4. Donations in her memory may be made to the Children's Wish Foundation, 4220 St. Laurent, Montreal Québec, (514) 289-1777 or (800) 267-9474.

  C... Names     CO... Names     COH... Names     Welcome Home

COHN - All Categories in OGSPI