TRUAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-11 published
MacWILLIAM, Doctor John Carlyle, M.D., L.M.C.C., F.A.C.S.
Died peacefully at Highview Residence in London on Saturday, December 9, 2006, in his 93rd year. He was predeceased by his wife Doris (TRUAN) MacWILLIAM., his parents John and Sarah (McLACHLAN) MacWILLIAM and his brother Douglas MacWILLIAM. Surviving are two daughters Elizabeth of Kingston and Heather of London. Also fondly remembered by two sisters-in-law, nieces and their families. Dr. MacWILLIAM graduated from Western University School of Medicine in 1939 and practised in Chatham for over forty-five years. During that time, he was the Medical Director at Thamesview Lodge, Past President of the Kent County Medical Society, District Medical Officer for Canadian National Railway (Chatham area), as well as the Medical Doctor for the Kent County Jail. He will be remembered with a smile for his sense of humour, his love of medicine, his great compassion for his patients and his deep love for his family. The family wishes to express their heartfelt thanks for the exceptional kindness and care given by Doctor William PAYNE of London for the past four years and all the staff at Highview Residence. Friends will be received at the Bowman Funeral Home 4 Victoria Avenue, Chatham (519-352-2390) for visitation on Wednesday, December 13 from 7-9 p.m. A private memorial service will be conducted on Thursday. Memorial donations to The Chatham Kent Community Foundation or Geranium House would be appreciated. Online condolences may be made at www.bowmanfh.ca

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TRUAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-12 published
MacWILLIAM, Doctor John Carlyle, M.D., L.M.C.C., F.A.C.S.
Died peacefully at Highview Residence in London on Saturday, December 9, 2006, in his 93rd year. He was predeceased by his wife Doris (TRUAN) MacWILLIAM., his parents John and Sarah (McLACHLAN) MacWILLIAM and his brother Douglas MacWILLIAM. Surviving are two daughters Elizabeth of Kingston and Heather of London. Also fondly remembered by two sisters-in-law, nieces and their families. Dr. MacWILLIAM graduated from Western University School of Medicine in 1939 and practised in Chatham for over forty-five years. During that time, he was the Medical Director at Thamesview Lodge, Past President of the Kent County Medical Society, District Medical Officer for Canadian National Railway (Chatham area), as well as the Medical Doctor for the Kent County Jail. He will be remembered with a smile for his sense of humour, his love of medicine, his great compassion for his patients and his deep love for his family. The family wishes to express their heartfelt thanks for the exceptional kindness and care given by Doctor William PAYNE of London for the past four years and all the staff at Highview Residence. Friends will be received at the Bowman Funeral Home 4 Victoria Avenue, Chatham (519-352-2390) for visitation on Wednesday, December 13 from 7-9 p.m. A private memorial service will be conducted on Thursday. Memorial donations to The Chatham Kent Community Foundation or Geranium House would be appreciated. Online condolences may be made at www.bowmanfh.ca

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2006-01-04 published
Josephine "Joy" ASSINEWAI
In loving memory of Josephine "Joy" ASSINEWAI, January 17, 1983 - December 18, 2005 of Wikwemikong who passed away suddenly on Sunday, December 18, 2005, age 22 years.
Beloved daughter of Donald K. ASSINEWAI of Sudbury and Deborah PHEASANT of Sault Sainte Marie. Dear sister of Marcia and Misty ASSINEWAI of Wikwemikong, Patricia and Trisha A. PHEASANT of Sault Sainte Marie and Derek and Megan TRUDEAU of Sudbury. Predeceased by brother Marlon ASSINEWAI (April 2003.) Will be missed by grandparents Reverend Isadore L. and Verna PHEASANT of Wikwemikong. Loving auntie of Kirsten and Haley ASSINEWAI. Predeceased by grandparents George and Josephine M. ASSINEWAI. She will be remembered by many family and Friends. Joy was very outgoing and fun to be with. She had a great personality and an awesome sense of humour, making everyone laugh and feel welcome. She loved spending quality time with her nieces and family. Visitation was from 6: 00pm Tuesday at Saint Ignatius Church, Buzwah. Funeral Service 11: 00 am Thursday, December 22, 2005 at Holy Cross Mission, Wikwemikong. Burial, South Bay Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2006-01-25 published
ALEXANDRINE " SANDY" ROSE ROY (NEE TRUDEAU)
In loving memory of Alexandrine "Sandy" Rose Roy (née Trudeau), January 25,
1953 - January 21, 2006, who died peacefully at Manitoulin Health Centre
with her family around her. Will be missed by special friend Gilbert Dokum,
sons Micheal and Raymond of Wikwemikong, Richard of Toronto, Jason of
Kingston, daughter Lorraine of Toronto, brother Raymond of Toronto, sisters
Mary Louise, Lucy Ann, Martha, Ellen Joyce and Joan of Wikwemikong and two
grand_sons. Will always be remembered by many nieces and nephews, godchild
Bajek Gabriel Debassige and special friend Joanne Fox and many others.
Predeceased by older siblings Julie, Ruth, Eugene, Joe Alex and parents
Catherine Shigwadja and Steven Murray. Sandy enjoyed her life with her
family, her flower and vegetable gardens, pickling, babysitting, visiting
Friends, camping, the challenge of making a jig saw puzzle, and the company
of her feline friend "Peter." Visitation was from 2 pm, Sunday in Kaboni
Church Basement. Funeral Mass was at 11 am Tuesday January 24, 2006 in
Kaboni Church. Burial Kaboni Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island
Funeral Home.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2006-02-01 published
NELLIE BERTHA TRUDEAU " ZIIBIIKWE"
In memory of Nellie Bertha Trudeau "ZiiBiikwe", who passed away peacefully
at home surrounded by family and Friends on Friday, January 27, 2006 at 6
am. Daughter of Louis and Mary Trudeau (both predeceased). Loving sister to
Ann McEwen and Ernie, Jeff Trudeau (predeceased) and Rosemarie, Clement
Trudeau and Doris, Julie Ominika and Agillius (both predeceased), Agnes
Trudeau (predeceased), Frank Trudeau (predeceased) and Mary Agnes, Elsie
Jamieson, Phillip Trudeau (predeceased), Marjorie Trudeau. Sadly missed by
many nieces and nephews, god children and relatives. Fondly remembered by
her Rain Dance Lodge family and community. Rested at Wasse Abin High School,
Wikwemikong, Ontario from 4: 30 pm Friday January 27, 2006 until Funeral Mass
11: 00 am Monday January 30, 2006 at Holy Cross Mission Church, Wikwemikong,
Ontario. Interment in Wikwemikong Cemetery. Donations to Bertha's memory
would be appreciated to Daffodil Terrace. Arrangements in care of Island
Funeral Home.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-12-29 published
EDWARDS, William " Douglas"
Of Saint Thomas, on Wednesday, December 27, 2006 at his late residence, in his 55th year. Beloved son of the late William George and Teresa Mary (CLOWREY) EDWARDS. Dearly loved brother of Barbara EDWARDS of Saint Thomas, George and his wife Nora EDWARDS of Saint Thomas, Rosemary EDWARDS and friend Chris TRUDEAU of R.R.#1 Union and Cathy and her husband Gary THOMAS of R.R.#7 Saint Thomas. Dear uncle of Dean EDWARDS of Saint Thomas, Aaron and his wife Robyn EDWARDS of Toronto, Bradly and Michelle THOMAS of Saint Thomas, Bill THOMAS and friend Char of Saint Thomas and Teresa THOMAS and friend Joe of Saint Thomas. Doug was born in Saint Thomas on March 4, 1952. He worked at Contran Manufacturing and the Saint Thomas Dragway. He was an avid drag racing fan. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Saturday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment to follow in Elmdale Cemetery. Visitation Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Diabetes Association.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-13 published
Mary MacDONALD, Civil Servant (1918-2006)
For decades, she guarded the gates of power in the Prime Minister's Office, first as an 'indispensable' executive secretary to Lester PEARSON and then to Pierre TRUDEAU
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S11
Ottawa -- In 1967, Prime Minister Lester PEARSON needed to find a birthday gift for his executive assistant, and it had to be special. Mary MacDONALD had been with him 20 years and, as he admitted handsomely in his autobiography, "[she was] indispensable as my Girl Friday. Nobody ever served anyone with greater devotion."
So, what to give Miss MacDONALD for her 49th birthday on April 30, 1967? In the end, he settled on the perfect gift: the Bible presented to him by Prime Minister Mackenzie KING on September 10, 1948, when Mr. PEARSON was sworn as a member of the King's Privy Council for Canada. At the same time, Mr. PEARSON, arguably Canada's most famous diplomat, was appointed secretary of state for External Affairs, and the Bible had become a treasured family memento.
On the flyleaf, Mr. PEARSON wrote a warm and heartfelt message: "To Mary, with all of my best wishes and grateful appreciation for helping a P.C. become a p.m. … L. B. PEARSON." The Bible is now held in trust by Mr. PEARSON's grand_son, Michael, for his infant son.
Miss MacDONALD first joined Mr. PEARSON in 1947 at the then-Department of External Affairs. They had made a terrific team together, travelling the world when he was minister of External Affairs and then the country after he became leader of the Liberal Party of Canada in 1958.
As one of the gatekeepers to Mr. PEARSON, Miss MacDONALD did not suffer fools gladly. "My father owed his success in part, to her," said retired diplomat Geoffrey PEARSON at her funeral last week. "Success in politics, as in life, is often due to those who stand at the door."
Miss MacDONALD's working day always extended past 5 p.m., for 10 or 12 hours overall. She once wrote 91 letters in one day. Politics was her life, to the exclusion of everything else including marriage, except her family. Weekends were no different. If Mr. PEARSON and his wife Maryon needed her, Miss MacDONALD would be there.
"She really knew who was useful and kept him in touch with his constituents and vice-versa. She was a great organizer," said retired senator Landon PEARSON.
Mary MacDONALD grew up in Ottawa during the Depression. After graduating from the University of Ottawa in 1938, she spent five years with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. In 1941, she joined the Canadian Red Cross Corps, shipping out to Britain two years later. A month after D-Day, June 6, 1944, she was sent to No. 12 Canadian General Hospital as a welfare officer. Since there was a shortage of nurses, her organizational skills were used to regulate the efficient flow of patients from the wards to the operating theatres.
Janet FLANDERS of Ottawa first met Miss MacDONALD in 1943, in a battered London at war. "She was bright and cheerful… She could do anything."
After returning to Ottawa in December of 1945, Miss MacDONALD joined the Department of External Affairs. Soon after, she was assigned to the new undersecretary of external affairs, just back from Washington as Canadian ambassador. Lester "Mike" PEARSON was a rising star and it took very little time for them to develop a working relationship, although she never called him anything other than "Mr. PEARSON."
For the next 12 years, Miss MacDONALD received an education in foreign affairs, as her boss helped Prime Minister Louis SAINT_LAURENT make Canada an important player on the world stage. It was the beginning of the Cold War and Canada's foreign policy included giving strong support to her allies in North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the United Nations. She also obtained a master's degree in political science in 1948, but paused in her own advancement to help old Friends, one of whom was Janet FLANDERS. " After the war, she got me a job in External in 1947&hellip We were close Friends for 60 years. You don't come across people of her calibre very often."
Another of her Friends was Aline CHRÉTIEN, wife of former prime minister Jean CHRÉTIEN. They had met in 1963 after Mr. CHRÉTIEN was first elected to the House of Commons. "We saw her all the time. She was devoted to her boss, Mr. PEARSON, her Friends and family," said Mrs. CHRÉTIEN. " She was like a mother to all sorts of people… Jean and I loved her."
During Mr. PEARSON's 20 years in federal politics, Miss MacDONALD played a part in getting him elected eight times in his riding of Algoma East, in Northern Ontario. He was fortunate to have Miss MacDONALD as his riding secretary, he once wrote. She was a "very friendly, outgoing person who enjoyed meeting new people. She became the bulwark of my political life and soon knew everyone in the constituency, to my great advantage."
In fact, Time magazine said the only person who could ever dethrone Mr. PEARSON in Algoma East was Miss MacDONALD. After Mr. PEARSON was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo in 1957 for helping secure peace in the 1956 Suez Crisis, he found himself out of office when John Diefenbaker's Conservatives won the next election. An exhausted Louis SSAINTURENT resigned as Liberal chief and Miss MacDONALD became the executive assistant to the new leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition. Five long years in opposition followed, until Mr. PEARSON beat Mr. Diefenbaker and became the 14th prime minister of Canada on April 22, 1963.
A devoted Liberal, she also served Mr. PEARSON's successor. When Pierre Elliott TRUDEAU took over as Prime Minister on April 20, 1968, he was advised that continuity in the Prime Minister's Office was important and that Miss MacDONALD could provide it. After all, she knew everyone in Ottawa.
For the next 11 years, she was Mr. TRUDEAU's administrative and constituency liaison officer, ruling a staff of 15 secretaries with tact and humour. Isabel METCALFE of Ottawa was one of them. "She was marvellous to us. She encouraged us, gave us advice she was fun. She was meticulous in upholding the standards of the Prime Minister's Office. She was an inspiration to us in the context of political activism."
It was the role in which she probably felt most comfortable and most effective. In 1968, rumours swirled around Parliament Hill that Mr. PEARSON was thinking about appointing her to the Senate. For reasons that may never be fully known, it didn't happened. Instead, former Liberal cabinet minister Paul Martin, Sr., got the call.
Landon PEARSON, who was Lester PEARSON's daughter-in-law, believes Miss MacDONALD "would have made an excellent senator. She had excellent political instincts and knew politics. She was a great organizer. In my view, she was never adequately recognized by the men."
In 1979, Miss MacDONALD retired and the following year she was content to receive the Order of Canada. From her point of view, it was probably more than enough. After sitting at the right hands of Lester PEARSON and Pierre TRUDEAU, she had seen it all.
"Behind every great man is a surprised woman, my mother used to say," said Geoffrey PEARSON. " Mary was never surprised."
Mary Elizabeth MacDONALD was born on April 30, 1918, in North Cobalt, Ontario She died of a stroke on June 5 in Ottawa. She was 88. She leaves her sister Kay, her nephews Peter, Joe, Paul, John and Greg. She was predeceased by her brother Neil.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-08 published
Bill HOPPER, Oilman (1933-2006)
Executive had the top job at Petro-Canada for 17 years and helped build the former Crown corporation into a major company, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
A government bureaucrat and oil-industry consultant, Bill HOPPER was the first head of Petro-Canada, the Crown corporation established by Pierre TRUDEAU in the aftermath of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis in the early 1970s.
"He was a very knowledgeable and dynamic entrepreneur and we hit it [off] very well right away," said Marc LALONDE, who was appointed minister of energy, mines and resources in 1980 by Mr. TRUDEAU.
Saying that Mr. HOPPER, who was already ensconced at Petro-Canada when Mr. Lalonde became his political boss, was "absolutely" the right man for that time, Mr. LALONDE noted that he brought a wealth of experience in the oil and gas industry. "He was not your traditional bureaucrat. He knew these people [oil-industry executives] inside out, he spoke their language and he was as aggressive as any of them," he said. "He had very strong views about everything…. I was probably as much as a son of a bitch as he was."
Mr. LALONDE believes that Petro-Canada would not have grown the way it did if Mr. HOPPER had not been at the helm. "A more sedate, easygoing guy would have made Petro-Canada vegetate," he said. "He was a key player in the notion of getting an integrated oil company, from drilling to selling gas at the corner store. That's how we first acquired Petrofina as an entry into the field."
A politician of an entirely different stripe, Calgarian Harvie Andre, a former Progressive Conservative cabinet minister, said Mr. HOPPER "became the target for a lot of the animosity toward Petro-Canada and what it represented to the oil industry, but he didn't create Petro-Canada. Mr. TRUDEAU and Mr. LALONDE did."
Mr. HOPPER's son Christopher had yet another perspective. "My dad had an incredible sense of humour, a way with people that put them automatically at ease. He had a wonderfully sharp mind, loved to have great discussions on public policy, family business and was just a joy to be around," he said in Ottawa yesterday.
According to a HOPPER family story, which journalist Peter Foster relates in his 1992 book Self-Serve: How Petro-Canada Pumped Canadians Dry, Wilbert (Bill) HOPPER was almost born in Ithaca, New York rather than in Ottawa. His parents were living there while his father, Wilbert Clayton HOPPER, was studying for a doctorate in economics at Cornell. Apparently, Mrs. HOPPER (née Eva HILL) borrowed the family car (a converted 12-cylinder hearse) in the very late stages of pregnancy and drove herself back to Ottawa, where she delivered her son.
After finishing his PhD, Doctor HOPPER was hired by the Canadian Department of Agriculture and moved his family back to Ottawa. Young Bill went to Rockcliffe Park Public School and Lisgar Collegiate in Ottawa. When his father was appointed agricultural counsellor to the Canadian high commission in Canberra, Bill shifted first to the Scots College, a boarding school in Sydney, and then to Wellington College in New Zealand. After high school, he returned to North America to study geology at the American University in Washington, graduating with a bachelor of science degree in He began working for Imperial Oil as a geologist, but soon went back to school, earning an M.B.A. from the University of Western Ontario in 1959. By then, he had married Patricia (née WALKER.) They eventually had two sons, Sean Wilbert and Christopher Mark.
That year, the HOPPERs moved to Calgary, where he worked as a petroleum economist with Foster Associates for two years before taking a position as an energy economist with the National Energy Board in Ottawa from 1961 to 1964. He went back to private industry, working as a senior petroleum consultant for Arthur Little in Cambridge, Massachusetts., for the next three years. Mr. HOPPER "revelled in the globe-trotting, frayed-passport life of the international petroleum consultant, living out of a suitcase, dispensing advice to companies and governments in West and North Africa, Europe and all over South America and Southeast Asia," Mr. Foster wrote in Self-Serve.
Nevertheless, Mr. HOPPER moved back to Ottawa and the public service, working as an assistant deputy minister in the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources in 1973, just in time for the oil crisis that began that October.
The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries, a cartel that includes Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, unilaterally raised its oil prices and dramatically cut back on the amount of oil it was willing to supply to nations that had supported Israel in the Yom Kippur War against Syria and Egypt. The sudden increase in oil prices led to stagflation, a combination of high inflation (edging 11 per cent in 1975) and high unemployment (which reached 7 per cent in 1975) in Canada.
Even before the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, Canada was in a quandary about oil and gas exploration. There was a bitter dispute about taxes, revenues and exploration subsidies between Mr. TRUDEAU's Liberal government on one side, and the industry and Alberta premier Peter Lougheed's Conservative government on the other. In 1970, Mr. TRUDEAU had asked Jack Austin, then deputy minister at Energy, Mines and Resources, to prepare a major study of the situation, including the possibility of creating a publicly owned oil company.
One of Mr. HOPPER's tasks when he arrived at Energy, Mines and Resources three years later was to work on this study. Mr. Andre, who was first elected to the House of Commons to represent a Calgary riding in 1972, remembers being impressed when he watched Mr. HOPPER present the oil study to a Commons committee.
"He seemed like a reasonably knowledgeable guy about the industry and the things that they were talking about in that policy were actually not bad," said Mr. Andre. The energy policy was to "ensure that there were markets for Canadian oil and gas" and measures "to stimulate the exploration industry." Then came the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries crisis, and everything changed. "And off we went on this wild excursion," said Mr. Andre.
The energy policy was shelved, controls were clamped on oil and gas prices, the Alberta industry went into a deep depression and Petro-Canada was founded in 1975 as a Crown corporation to provide "a window in the industry," with Maurice Strong as inaugural chair of the board. He hired Mr. HOPPER as chief executive officer. "Mr. Strong was not an operational guy," said Mr. Andre.
The situation in Calgary was tough, said Mr. Andre, because Mr. Strong and Mr. HOPPER represented "everything that was bad from the perspective of the oil and gas industry." Mr. HOPPER never moved to Calgary, arguing that one of his sons was in a special school in Ottawa and he didn't want to disrupt his family. Consequently, he never became part of the local community. Instead, he commuted to the heart of the oil industry from the seat of government on a private company jet every week. Then Petro-Canada erected a lavish building faced with red granite, imported from Finland, that dominated the Calgary skyline.
During Mr. HOPPER's tenure, Petro-Canada changed from a "window on the oil industry" and a resource-based company to an acquisitions-hungry monolith that also became a refinery- and retail-based company, buying Pacific Petroleums Ltd., Petrofina Canada Inc. and the network of Gulf Canada service stations, among other purchases. Mr. HOPPER eventually became a director of the corporation and chairman of the board as well as Chief Executive Officer of the company.
"The empire grew, but it didn't become profitable," said Mr. Andre, adding that "it couldn't have done it without the largesse of the federal government."
The upside of being a Crown corporation is that you have almost unlimited resources, so there is almost no possibility of bankruptcy. The downside is that you are accountable to the Canadian taxpayers and the political will of the government of the day.
Even after Brian Mulroney became prime minister, wining a landslide victory in 1984, Mr. HOPPER was still able to persuade the Conservatives to purchase the downstream assets of Gulf Oil from the Reichmann family. But, in the late 1980s, there was a concerted push to get the government out of the business of pumping gasoline.
Mr. HOPPER wasn't opposed to privatization, but he was not the right person to do it, in Mr. Andre's opinion, because "you were asking him to undo everything that he had done." The company began selling shares to the public in July of 1991. But Petro-Canada remained 70 per cent owned by the federal government during Mr. HOPPER's tenure.
By the early 1990s, the board had many experienced financial and oil-industry directors, several of whom were less supportive of Mr. HOPPER's managerial style. Rumours started circulating that Mr. HOPPER was an autocratic boss. Added to these problems, the company posted a $143-million loss in 1991. The next year, the results were dramatically better, showing a profit of $109-million, but the board had lost confidence in Mr. HOPPER, feeling, among other complaints, that he didn't work hard enough.
At a board meeting in January of 1993, Mr. HOPPER was fired. James Stanford, who had been named president of Petro-Canada in April of 1990, succeeded him as Chief Executive Officer.
After leaving Petro-Canada, Mr. HOPPER returned to Ottawa. "It didn't come out of the blue," he told a Globe and Mail reporter who asked him about his ouster. "I feel terrific. I'm 60 years old, I've been in this for a long time. For 17 years I've commuted, much to the dismay of Calgarians," he said. "I'm not unhappy about all this."
The exact details of his severance package were not clear, but, based on his more than $400,000 annual salary, it was speculated at the time that he received more than $1.2-million.
After that, Mr. HOPPER, the man who had been such a large and often contentious figure in the oil industry, kept a low profile, although his name was linked with business interests connected to his old friend, Mr. Strong. "He's been doing some board work as well as being a great father and grandfather," his younger son, Christopher, said yesterday.
Mr. HOPPER, who had always enjoyed an expansive lifestyle, had suffered from heart disease in recent years. He had valve surgery and suffered from heart-rhythm problems, but these had been corrected, according to his younger son.
Last Friday, Mr. HOPPER suffered a fall and broke one of his shoulders. On Monday, he underwent shoulder-replacement surgery, then suffered what appeared to be a heart attack or stroke.
Wilbert (Bill) HOPPER was born in Ottawa on March 14, 1933. He died at Queensway Carleton Hospital in Ottawa on Monday of complications following surgery. He was 73. He is survived by his wife, Patricia, two sons and five grandchildren.

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-18 published
VAN WYCK, William Lewes
World War II Veteran Royal Canadian Air Force - 35 year executive for Garrett Canada
It is with profound sadness that we announce the peaceful passing of our beloved husband, Dad and Grandfather, with his family by his side at the Avalon Care Centre, Orangeville, on Friday, September 15th, 2006 in his 81st year; devoted husband of Marvene (née HIGGINS;) much loved dad of Catherine TRUDEAU (Norm,) David (Terri) and Lisa PODOLAK; cherished and loved "Paw" of Lindsay, Luke, Kati, Joshua, Billy, Julia "Dee Dee", Anna and Benjamin predeceased by his parents Mildred and Lorne and his sister Audrey McNALLY. He will be sadly missed but will live on in the hearts of people he loved and touched. The family wishes to thank the caring staff at Avalon Care Centre for their kindness and compassion. A celebration of Bill's life will be held at the Dods and McNair Funeral Home and Chapel, 21 First Street, Orangeville (519-941-1392), on Wednesday, September 20th, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. The family will receive Friends 1 hour prior to the service time. Memorial donations in memory of Bill may be made to the Salvation Army, Orangeville. (Condolences may be offered to the family at www.dodsandmcnair.com). Perhaps they are not stars in the sky, but rather openings where our loved ones shine down on us to let us know they are happy. Eskimo Legend

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-06 published
NAZAR, Linda Lorraine (formerly BALDWIN, née TRUDEAU)
Passed away suddenly on Thursday March 2, 2006. Linda Nazar at the age of 64 years, beloved wife to Ray NAZAR for 20 years. Loving mother of the late Darren M. BALDWIN and Ron C. BALDWIN (Caroline ILAQUA) of Toronto. Cherished grandma of Tyler, Alexandria and Saida. Dear daughter of the late Naomi Trudeau MORRIS. Dear sister of Renee TAILOR/TAYLOR (Larry) of Toronto and the late Andre MORRIS. Daughter-in-law of Shirley and Ed NAZAR. Sister-in-law of Mike KIRKHAM, Ken McLEAN, Kevin NAZAR and Vickie CAVANAGH (Roger). Linda will be deeply missed by all her loving pets. She will be fondly remembered by her many relatives in the Burrill, BALDWIN and NAZAR families. Friends may call at the Northwood Funeral Home (942 Great Northern Road, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 5K7 705-945-7758) on Tuesday afternoon from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and again from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. Funeral service in the Chapel on Wednesday March 8, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. In keeping with Linda's fondness for animals, memorial donations made to the Sault Ste. Marie Humane Society would be appreciated by the family. A special thank you from the family to the two gentlemen who came to Linda's aid, the Goulais River Fire and Rescue and to the many Friends and neighbours who have shown enormous support to us in the past few days. www.northwoodfuneral.com

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TRUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-27 published
KOTZER, Reuben
It is with great sadness that the family announces the passing of Reuben KOTZER. Adoring husband of the late Frances. Loving and devoted father of Lorne, Craig, Shelly and special zaidy to Aaron. He is survived by his brother Jack. Predeceased by his brother Sam and sister-in-law Rae, sister Ida and brother-in-law Louie, and sister-in-law Rose. He will be greatly missed by all his family and Friends. A funeral service will be held on Thursday, April 27, 2006 at 1: 30 p.m. from Steeles Memorial Chapel, 350 Steeles Ave. West (between Yonge and Bathurst). Interment Mount Sinai Cemetery, Pride of Israel Section. Our heartfelt thanks to Doctor M. TRUDEAU and her staff for all their wonderful care and support and Doctor KENDAL for all his support. Special thanks to Josie for all her exceptional care and compassion. We know Dad appreciated it. In lieu of gifts, we ask that you make a donation in Dad's honour to the Toronto Sunnybrook Regional Cancer Centre, 416-480-4483.

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TRUDEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-06 published
MORGAN, Emily
It is with broken hearts that Tony and Dianne MORGAN announce that their 14-year old daughter Emily died on Saturday morning, November 4, 2006. Emily was the courageous big sister of Lucy, who has sadly lost her very best friend. Emily will be greatly missed by her brothers Clayton and Dylan. She was so very proud to be the young aunt of Dylan and Julie's sons, Tavis, Wyatt, and Jackson. Emily had Cystic Fibrosis and received a double-lung transplant in 2002. From that moment on, she became an inspiration to the community. With her sparkling eyes, her gorgeous smile, and her tremendous laugh, Emily brought happiness to all who have known her. Emily will leave a huge void in the lives of her grandmothers, Gwen STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Jerry MORGAN; her uncles and aunts and their families: David ORMANDY, Michael ORMANDY, Charlie and Trish MORGAN, David and Carla MORGAN, Linda and Yves TRUDEL, Frank and Louise MORGAN, Marie MORGAN, Dorothy and Jim HOWELL, and Susan BRADNAM and Jon VANDERZWAN. Just enrolled in Grade 9 at Parkside Collegiate Institute, Emily was a former student of the French Immersion Program at Wellington Street School and Homedale Elementary School. She was a creative and imaginative girl who loved to perform in plays, sing with her dad and her sister, and play the drums. Emily volunteered at school as office helper, lunch monitor, and safety patroller, and also at the Union Daycamp and the Men's Canadian Fastball Championships. She was an extraordinary babysitter who absolutely adored young children. In the summer of 2004, Emily represented her country at the World Transplant Games and was a gold medallist. She was also a proud spokesperson for the Annual Kinsmen 10k Run for Cystic Fibrosis. Despite a demanding daily medical regimen, she never hesitated to give to her community. We will celebrate Emily's life at Saint Anne's Centre in Saint Thomas on Wednesday, November 8, 2006 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. We have chosen to establish an Emily Morgan Foundation, and your donation to this fund is welcome. All arrangements are being coordinated by the good people at Williams Funeral Home. To quote a friend, "All our lives are richer for having known Emily."

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TRUDEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-07 published
MORGAN, Emily
It is with broken hearts that Tony and Dianne MORGAN announce that their 14-year old daughter Emily died on Saturday morning, November 4, 2006. Emily was the courageous big sister of Lucy, who has sadly lost her very best friend. Emily will be greatly missed by her brothers Clayton and Dylan. She was so very proud to be the young aunt of Dylan and Julie's sons, Tavis, Wyatt, and Jackson. Emily had Cystic Fibrosis and received a double-lung transplant in 2002. From that moment on, she became an inspiration to the community. With her sparkling eyes, her gorgeous smile, and her tremendous laugh, Emily brought happiness to all who have known her. Emily will leave a huge void in the lives of her grandmothers, Gwen STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Jerry MORGAN; her uncles and aunts and their families: David ORMANDY, Michael ORMANDY, Charlie and Trish MORGAN, David and Carla MORGAN, Linda and Yves TRUDEL, Frank and Louise MORGAN, Marie MORGAN, Dorothy and Jim HOWELL, and Susan BRADNAM and Jon VANDERZWAN. Just enrolled in Grade 9 at Parkside Collegiate Institute, Emily was a former student of the French Immersion Program at Wellington Street School and Homedale Elementary School. She was a creative and imaginative girl who loved to perform in plays, sing with her dad and her sister, and play the drums. Emily volunteered at school as office helper, lunch monitor, and safety patroller, and also at the Union Daycamp and the Men's Canadian Fastball Championships. She was an extraordinary babysitter who absolutely adored young children. In the summer of 2005, Emily represented her country at the World Transplant Games and was a gold medallist. She was also a proud spokesperson for the Annual Kinsmen 10k Run for Cystic Fibrosis. Despite a demanding daily medical regimen, she never hesitated to give to her community. We will celebrate Emily's life at Saint Anne's Centre in Saint Thomas on Wednesday, November 8, 2006 from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. We have chosen to establish an Emily Morgan Foundation, and your donation to this fund is welcome. All arrangements are being coordinated by the good people at Williams Funeral Home. To quote a friend, "All our lives are richer for having known Emily."

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TRUDEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-01 published
TRUDEL, Louise M., R.N.
Louise passed away on March 23, 2006 at Toronto Grace Hospital after a two year struggle with cancer. Born in St. Boniface, Manitoba on August 23, 1936, Louise was predeceased by her parents Margherita (Rita) Chevrier TRUDEL and Doctor Jean-Joseph TRUDEL, her brothers Doctor André TRUDEL (Anne) and Hubert TRUDEL (Annick,) her nephew Scott JAMIESON, and her niece Yvonne PREFONTAINE. She is survived by her brother Robert TRUDEL (Louise,) sisters Solange HESS, Valerie JAMIESON and Rose-Marie TRUDEL, nieces and nephews, nineteen great-nieces and nephews, and by many close Friends, including her circle of O.R. nursing Friends and her very close friend Lloyd BODIE. After graduating from St. Boniface School of Nursing in 1958, Louise worked at various hospitals in Manitoba and Ontario before pursuing Post Graduate studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Maryland. She moved to Toronto in 1966, beginning a 30 year career at Toronto Western Hospital where she excelled as an Operating Room nurse and supervisor, also playing a significant mentoring role to many nurses who remained close to her throughout the years and who provided heartfelt support during her illness. Louise will be remembered for her beautiful smile, kindness, warm and friendly manner, sense of humour, and gift for Friendship. Highly competent and keenly intelligent, Louise was also modest and low-key. She was a pillar of strength for all those in her life, and faced her own illness with her customary strength of character, spirit, and positive attitude. While the cancer overcame Louise's body, she was certainly not defeated by it - rather she was victorious in handling it with courage, grace and style, and her last months and days were happy and peaceful ones. Louise continues to serve as an inspiration to her Friends and family, and she played a special role in the lives of her nieces and grand-nieces as a model of independent living who was also feminine and caring - a career woman who went on exciting adventures around the world, yet never forgot her family and Friends back home and took the time to correspond and keep in touch. Louise was a cultured person in the larger sense, firmly grounded by an understanding of the past and her French-Canadian roots, but open-minded and interested in new ideas and approaches as well. She was an avid and discriminating reader, as well as an independent thinker. She enjoyed music, literature, art and design. Louise had excellent taste and believed in quality, and was a connoisseur of fine crystal and china. Louise was a lover of nature and the great outdoors too, and believed in fitness of mind and body. As a young woman, Louise distinguished herself as a leading speedskater, winning many awards across Canada and the United States. Night after night Louise would brave the cold Winnipeg winter weather, working that outdoor oval at the Norwood - St. Boniface Speedskating Club, pushing herself to be her best, becoming National Junior Speedskating Champion and also earning a place in Manitoba's Sports Hall of Fame. Speedskating gave way to downhill skiing, with Louise taking yearly trips to Vail and other top destinations, also going on many hiking and birding expeditions and remaining active throughout her retirement and illness. Family was all-important to Louise. She was a loving daughter, sister, and aunt, and was the Toronto anchor for the Chevrier-Trudel family, especially for the many nieces and nephews who lived and traveled there over the years, opening her home on countless occasions and hosting birthday celebrations marked by her love and individual flair. She had a gift for knowing how to make people feel special, not only acknowledging hallmark events in their lives but also in supporting their individual talents and endeavours and following their careers with interest. Her family history was a source of great pride to Louise - a rich and colourful history, so much a part of Canada's history - replete with coureurs de bois, fur trade merchants, city fathers and Members of Legislative Assembly and senators, with Suffragettes and community leaders, with clergy and teachers and public servants, with writers and artists and actors - all their contributions equally celebrated by Louise. This passion was nurtured by her mother, and shared with her brother Hubert. He was the historian and archivist, Louise the keeper of the stories and protector of family artifacts and heirlooms. Yet she also did her share of gathering pieces of the story, mostly in the form of (all those!) newspaper clippings. Part of Louise's legacy rests in the way she transmitted this rich heritage to the next generation. The family would like to thank everyone who provided caring support and expressions of love and kindness, with a special mention to Louise's 'wonderful team of specialists at Princess Margaret Hospital and to her Friends Lenore, Shirley, and Joan. Louise found immense solace in being at home in her final months, and greatly appreciated the devotion and care provided by her dear sister Val and her friend Lloyd who made that possible. In accordance with Louise's wishes, no formal service will be held. An interment will take place later this spring at St. Boniface Basilica Cemetery, where she will rest next to her parents. Condolences may be for warded to Trull Funeral Home. Donations may be made to Toronto Grace Hospital, which provided exceptional care to Louise and family in her final hours. Thank you Louise, for all the interest, encouragement, and kindness you've shown us. We love you and cherish the love you've given. Watch over us. 'Et certes il existe, l'irréparable, mais il n'y a rien là qui soit triste ou gai, c'est l'essence même de CofE qui fut.' 'Traveler, there is no path. The path is made by walking.'

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TRUDEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-01 published
TRUDEL, Louise M., R.N.
Louise passed away on March 23, 2006 at Toronto Grace Hospital after a two year struggle with cancer. Born in St. Boniface, Manitoba on August 23, 1936, Louise was predeceased by her parents Margherita (Rita) Chevrier TRUDEL and Doctor Jean-Joseph TRUDEL, her brothers Doctor André TRUDEL (Anne) and Hubert TRUDEL (Annick,) her nephew Scott JAMIESON, and her niece Yvonne PREFONTAINE. She is survived by her brother Robert TRUDEL (Louise,) sisters Solange HESS, Valerie JAMIESON and Rose-Marie TRUDEL, nieces and nephews, nineteen great-nieces and nephews, and by many close Friends, including her circle of O.R. nursing Friends and her very close friend Lloyd BODIE. After graduating from St. Boniface School of Nursing in 1958, Louise worked at various hospitals in Manitoba and Ontario before pursuing Post Graduate studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Maryland. She moved to Toronto in 1966, beginning a 30 year career at Toronto Western Hospital where she excelled as an Operating Room nurse and supervisor, also playing a significant mentoring role to many nurses who remained close to her throughout the years and who provided heartfelt support during her illness. Louise will be remembered for her beautiful smile, kindness, warm and friendly manner, sense of humour, and gift for Friendship. Highly competent and keenly intelligent, Louise was also modest and low-key. She was a pillar of strength for all those in her life, and faced her own illness with her customary strength of character, spirit, and positive attitude. While the cancer overcame Louise's body, she was certainly not defeated by it - rather she was victorious in handling it with courage, grace and style, and her last months and days were happy and peaceful ones. Louise continues to serve as an inspiration to her Friends and family, and she played a special role in the lives of her nieces and grand-nieces as a model of independent living who was also feminine and caring - a career woman who went on exciting adventures around the world, yet never forgot her family and Friends back home and took the time to correspond and keep in touch. Louise was a cultured person in the larger sense, firmly grounded by an understanding of the past and her French-Canadian roots, but open-minded and interested in new ideas and approaches as well. She was an avid and discriminating reader, as well as an independent thinker. She enjoyed music, literature, art and design. Louise had excellent taste and believed in quality, and was a connoisseur of fine crystal and china. Louise was a lover of nature and the great outdoors too, and believed in fitness of mind and body. As a young woman, Louise distinguished herself as a leading speedskater, winning many awards across Canada and the United States. Night after night Louise would brave the cold Winnipeg winter weather, working that outdoor oval at the Norwood - St. Boniface Speedskating Club, pushing herself to be her best, becoming National Junior Speedskating Champion and also earning a place in Manitoba's Sports Hall of Fame. Speedskating gave way to downhill skiing, with Louise taking yearly trips to Vail and other top destinations, also going on many hiking and birding expeditions and remaining active throughout her retirement and illness. Family was all-important to Louise. She was a loving daughter, sister, and aunt, and was the Toronto anchor for the Chevrier-Trudel family, especially for the many nieces and nephews who lived and traveled there over the years, opening her home on countless occasions and hosting birthday celebrations marked by her love and individual flair. She had a gift for knowing how to make people feel special, not only acknowledging hallmark events in their lives but also in supporting their individual talents and endeavours and following their careers with interest. Her family history was a source of great pride to Louise - a rich and colourful history, so much a part of Canada's history - replete with coureurs de bois, fur trade merchants, city fathers and Members of Legislative Assembly and senators, with Suffragettes and community leaders, with clergy and teachers and public servants, with writers and artists and actors - all their contributions equally celebrated by Louise. This passion was nurtured by her mother, and shared with her brother Hubert. He was the historian and archivist, Louise the keeper of the stories and protector of family artifacts and heirlooms. Yet she also did her share of gathering pieces of the story, mostly in the form of (all those!) newspaper clippings. Part of Louise's legacy rests in the way she transmitted this rich heritage to the next generation. The family would like to thank everyone who provided caring support and expressions of love and kindness, with a special mention to Louise's 'wonderful team of specialists at Princess Margaret Hospital and to her Friends Lenore, Shirley, and Joan. Louise found immense solace in being at home in her final months, and greatly appreciated the devotion and care provided by her dear sister Val and her friend Lloyd who made that possible. In accordance with Louise's wishes, no formal service will be held. An interment will take place later this spring at St. Boniface Basilica Cemetery, where she will rest next to her parents. Condolences may be for warded to Trull Funeral Home. Donations may be made to Toronto Grace Hospital, which provided exceptional care to Louise and family in her final hours. Thank you Louise, for all the interest, encouragement, and kindness you've shown us. We love you and cherish the love you've given. Watch over us. 'Et certes il existe, l'irréparable, mais il n'y a rien là qui soit triste ou gai, c'est l'essence même de CofE qui fut.' 'Traveler, there is no path. The path is made by walking.'

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TRUDEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-01 published
TRUDEL, Louise M., R.N.
Louise passed away on March 23, 2006 at Toronto Grace Hospital after a two year struggle with cancer. Born in St. Boniface, Manitoba on August 23, 1936, Louise was predeceased by her parents Margherita (Rita) Chevrier TRUDEL and Doctor Jean-Joseph TRUDEL, her brothers Doctor André TRUDEL (Anne) and Hubert TRUDEL (Annick,) her nephew Scott JAMIESON, and her niece Yvonne PREFONTAINE. She is survived by her brother Robert TRUDEL (Louise,) sisters Solange HESS, Valerie JAMIESON and Rose-Marie TRUDEL, nieces and nephews, nineteen great-nieces and nephews, and by many close Friends, including her circle of O.R. nursing Friends and her very close friend Lloyd BODIE. After graduating from St. Boniface School of Nursing in 1958, Louise worked at various hospitals in Manitoba and Ontario before pursuing Post-Graduate studies at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Maryland. She moved to Toronto in 1966, beginning a 30 year career at Toronto Western Hospital where she excelled as an Operating Room nurse and supervisor, also playing a significant mentoring role to many nurses who remained close to her throughout the years and who provided heartfelt support during her illness. Louise will be remembered for her beautiful smile, kindness, warm and friendly manner, sense of humour, and gift for Friendship. Highly competent and keenly intelligent, Louise was also modest and low-key. She was a pillar of strength for all those in her life, and faced her own illness with her customary strength of character, spirit, and positive attitude. While the cancer overcame Louise's body, she was certainly not defeated by it, rather she was victorious in handling it with courage, grace and style, and her last months and days were happy and peaceful ones. Louise continues to serve as an inspiration to her Friends and family, and she played a special role in the lives of her nieces and grand-nieces as a model of independent living who was also feminine and caring - a career woman who went on exciting adventures around the world, yet never forgot her family and Friends back home and took the time to correspond and keep in touch. Louise was a cultured person in the larger sense, firmly grounded by an understanding of the past and her French-Canadian roots, but open-minded and interested in new ideas and approaches as well. She was an avid and discriminating reader, as well as an independent thinker. She enjoyed music, literature, art and design. Louise had excellent taste and believed in quality, and was a connoisseur of fine crystal and china. Louise was a lover of nature and the great outdoors too, and believed in fitness of mind and body. As a young woman, Louise distinguished herself as a leading speedskater, winning many awards across Canada and the United States. Night after night Louise would brave the cold Winnipeg winter weather, working that outdoor oval at the Norwood - St. Boniface Speedskating Club, pushing herself to be her best, becoming National Junior Speedskating Champion and also earning a place in Manitoba's Sports Hall of Fame. Speedskating gave way to downhill skiing, with Louise taking yearly trips to Vail and other top destinations, also going on many hiking and birding expeditions and remaining active throughout her retirement and illness. Family was all-important to Louise. She was a loving daughter, sister, and aunt, and was the Toronto anchor for the Chevrier-Trudel family, especially for the many nieces and nephews who lived and traveled there over the years, opening her home on countless occasions and hosting birthday celebrations marked by her love and individual flair. She had a gift for knowing how to make people feel special, not only acknowledging hallmark events in their lives but also in supporting their individual talents and endeavours and following their careers with interest. Her family history was a source of great pride to Louise - a rich and colourful history, so much a part of Canada's history replete with coureurs de bois, fur trade merchants, city fathers and Members of Legislative Assembly and senators, with Suffragettes and community leaders, with clergy and teachers and public servants, with writers and artists and actors - all their contributions equally celebrated by Louise. This passion was nurtured by her mother, and shared with her brother Hubert. He was the historian and archivist, Louise the keeper of the stories and protector of family artifacts and heirlooms. Yet she also did her share of gathering pieces of the story, mostly in the form of (all those!) newspaper clippings. Part of Louise's legacy rests in the way she transmitted this rich heritage to the next generation. The family would like to thank everyone who provided caring support and expressions of love and kindness, with a special mention to Louise's 'wonderful team' of specialists at Princess Margaret Hospital and to her Friends Lenore, Shirley, and Joan. Louise found immense solace in being at home in her final months, and greatly appreciated the devotion and care provided by her dear sister Val and her friend Lloyd who made that possible. In accordance with Louise's wishes, no formal service will be held. An interment will take place later this spring at St. Boniface Basilica Cemetery, where she will rest next to her parents. Condolences may be forwarded to Trull Funeral Home. Donations may be made to Toronto Grace Hospital, which provided exceptional care to Louise and family in her final hours. Thank you Louise, for all the interest, encouragement, and kindness you've shown us. We love you and cherish the love you've given. Watch over us. "Et certes il existe, l'irréparable, mais il n'y a rien là qui soit triste ou gai, c'est l'essence même de CofE qui fut ". "Traveler, there is no path. The path is made by walking".

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TRU surnames continued to 06tru002.htm