SHOUP o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-16 published
UNDERHILL, Harvey Wray
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on Friday, October 13, 2006. Harvey Wray UNDERHILL of Aylmer in his 75th year. Beloved husband of Alice (SCHNEIDER) UNDERHILL. Dear father of Doreen SMITH and husband Jim of Aylmer, Brenda STARR of Tillsonburg, Marilyn ANGER of Aylmer, Chris SHOUP and friend Carl SMITH of Aylmer, Beaver UNDERHILL and wife Tammy of Strathroy, Leonard UNDERHILL of Aylmer and step-father of Herb SHOUP and wife Nancy of Belmont, Doug SHOUP of Aylmer, Audrey PARKER and husband Vaughn of Simcoe, Nancy NEVILL and husband Max of Courtland, Phillip SHOUP of Saint Thomas, Lorna McLELLAN and husband Mike of Aylmer, Alan SHOUP of Saint Thomas, Ruth CLEARY and husband Dale of Saint Thomas and Roy SHOUP of Aylmer. Brother of Bill UNDERHILL and wife Fran, Mary Lou HRYCKOWIAN and husband Roger, Harold "Jiggs" UNDERHILL and wife Elvie and Linda CORSAUT and husband Bev. He will be sadly missed by aunt Evelyn DUNSBY, 22 grandchildren, 14 great-grandchildren and a number of nieces and nephews. Born in West Zorra Township on June 20, 1932 son of the late Harold and Irene (COUPLAND) UNDERHILL. Harvey was a retired carpenter and served in the Royal Canadian Air Force in Saskatoon and Winnipeg from 1951-1961. He was a member of the Port Burwell Legion 524. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Sunday and Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation will follow. Interment of ashes in the Springfield Cemetery. Rev. Norman JONES, officiating. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the War Amps would be appreciated. Condolences at can be expressed at kebbelfuneralhome.com

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SHOVLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-21 published
SHOVLIN, Joan
On January 20th, 2006, Joan, loving wife of the late Tony. Dear mother of Gerald and his wife Angie, Doreen and her husband Carlo DIPUCCHIO and Chris and his wife Brenda. Cherished grammy of Amanda, Hannah, Craig, Katrina and Laura. Sister of Helen O'NIELL, Ann McBRIDE and Doreen BRYANT. Special Aunt of Joan WYANNE. Friends will be received at the Accettone Funeral Home, 384 Finley Ave., Ajax (905-428-9090) on Sunday, January 22nd from 7-9 p.m. and Monday, January 23rd from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass will be held on Tuesday, January 24th at 11 a.m. at St. Bernadette's Church (21 Bayly St. East), Ajax.

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SHOVLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-22 published
SHOVLIN, Joan
On January 20th, 2006, Joan, loving wife of the late Tony. Dear mother of Gerald and his wife Angie, Doreen and her husband Carlo DIPUCCHIO and Chris and his wife Brenda. Cherished Granny of Amanda, Hannah, Craig, Katrina and Laura. Sister of Helen O'NIELL, Ann McBRIDE and Doreen BRYANT. Special Aunt of Joan WYNNE. Friends will be received at the Accettone Funeral Home, 384 Finley Ave., Ajax (905-428-9090) on Sunday, January 22nd from 7-9 p.m. and Monday, January 23rd from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Mass will be held on Tuesday, January 24th at 11 a.m. at St. Bernadette's Church (21 Bayly St. East), Ajax.

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SHOWELL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-05-13 published
SHOWELL, Leone and Elmer
In loving memory of dear parents, grandparents, great-grandparents and great-great-grandparents, Leone who passed away May 9, 2001 and Elmer who passed away June 20, 2003.
Sadly missed along life's way
Quietly remembered every day
No longer in our lives to share
But in our hearts you are always there.
- Forever Loved by your family

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SHOWERS o@ca.on.brant.brantford.the_expositor 2006-04-01 published
SHOWERS, Murray
Suddenly, at home, in Brantford, on Thursday March 30, 2006, in his 64th year. Beloved son to Gerene McINTYRE of Paris, dear brother to Shirley SIMONS (Gord) of Paris, father to Richard, Karla, Tamy, Tod and Shannon. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his father Lloyd, his brother Brian and Aunt Gretta. Murray served with the Royal Canadian Mounted Police 'K-Division' in Alberta for 19 years. A Memorial Service will be held at the Wm. Kipp Funeral Home, 184 Grand River St. N., Paris on Thursday April 6, 2006, at 1: 30 p.m. with Pastor Scott BACON officiating. Private interment Windfall Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Kidney Foundation would be appreciated (cards available from the funeral home, wkfh@rogers.com) Wm. Kipp 519 442-3061.

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SHOWERS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-11-06 published
METCALFE, Doris Margaret (SCHANK)
At Wingham and District Hospital on Sunday, November 05, 2006, Mrs. Doris METCALFE of R.R.#1, Wingham, age 60 years. The former Doris SCHANK beloved wife of Harold METCALFE. Loving grandmother of Stephen DAVIS of Waterloo and Gregory METCALFE of Listowel. Mother-in-law of Cheryl METCALFE and Dave SHOWERS of Listowel. Dear sister of Evelyn and Allan MARQUETTE of Lake Temagami, Helen LEE of Wingham, Sharon BAKER of London, and Stanley (J.R.) and Barb SCHANK of Owen Sound. Also survived by Harold's sisters and brothers and several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her parents Stanley and Margaret (SUBJECT) SCHANK, her son Keith METCALFE (1999,) her daughter Kim DAROSA (2004) and granddaughter Shannon Nicole DAVIS. Visitation at McBurney Funeral Home, Wingham, Ontario on Tuesday, 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral service will be held at Saint Paul's Trinity Anglican Church on Wednesday at 2: 00 p.m. Reverend Len MYERS officiating. Interment in Wingham Cemetery, Wingham, Ontario. Memorial donations in lieu of flowers to The Kidney Foundation or Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Online condolences at www.mcburneyfuneral.com

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SHOWERS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-12-19 published
EYRE, Earle Wilson " Bill"
Peacefully, at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound, on Sunday, December 17th, 2006. Earle Wilson (Bill) EYRE, of Owen Sound, in his 75th year. Dearly beloved husband of Helen EYRE (née SHOWERS.) Loving father of Gordon EYRE and his wife, Barbara, of Chatsworth, Brenda GREEN and her husband, David, of Owen Sound, Susan COWLING and her husband, Dennis, of Ottawa, Edward EYRE, of Owen Sound, Linda QUESNEL and her husband, Steve WHITE/WHYTE, of Sarnia and Sherry CORNFIELD and her husband, Barry, of Wiarton. Proud grandfather of seventeen grandchildren and two great-granddaughters. Dear brother of Wayne (Karie) EYRE, of British Columbia, Donna (Jerry) ROBINSON, of Lindsay and Irene (Gil) JOLLY, of Owen Sound. Bill will be missed by his sister-in-law, Evelyn WAITE. Predeceased by his parents, Thomas and Dorothy EYRE; his brother, Lynold WAITE; his sisters, Pat WALPOLE and Elaine BROWN. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound (519-376-7492) on Wednesday evening from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service for Bill EYRE will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Thursday, December 21st, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. David STEAD officiating. Spring interment in Bayview Cemetery, Wiarton. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Alzheimer Society or the charity of your choice as your expression of sympathy.

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SHOWLER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-03-30 published
SHOWLER, Patricia (WOODHAMS)
Of London passed away peacefully at Four Counties Health Centre on Monday, March 27th, 2006. Loving mother of Robert and his wife Jennifer HARRIS of Rodney. Dear grandmother of Darlene and special "G.G." to Nicole, Michael and Ryan. Predeceased by her brothers George, Jack, Arthur, Thomas and sister Florence. A long time member of Calvary United Church and the Lung Association, Pat spent many happy years at Saint_Joseph Camp. Her generosity was shown in her support of many worthwhile charities. Special thanks to the staff at Versa Care for their kind care and support of Mom. Friends may call at the Lloyd R. Needham Funeral Chapel, 520 Dundas Street, London on Thursday March 30th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service from the chapel on Friday at 1 p.m. Interment Mt. Pleasant Cemetery. Memorial donations to the charity of one's choice would be appreciated. Tributes may be left at www.mem.com

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SHOYAMA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-12-30 published
SHOYAMA, Thomas Kunito " Tommy"
Died peacefully on December 22 in his 91st year, after several years of declining health. Predeceased by his cherished daughter, Kiyomi, sisters Fumi and Mitsu, and brothers Kuz, Art, and Masato, he will be deeply missed by his loving companion Hazel, nieces Naomi and Mitsu, great nephew Jamil, as well as Friends and former colleagues across the country. Tom had a remarkable life. Born and raised in Kamloops, British Columbia, he graduated from the University of British Columbia in 1938 with two degrees: a B.A. in Economics and a B.Comm. (Honours). From 1939-1945, Tom served as the editor of 'The New Canadian', a weekly civil rights newspaper which was published first in Vancouver and then later in Kaslo, British Columbia, where he was interned during the war. In this role, Tom became an eloquent spokesman for the rights of the Japanese Canadian community and an important community leader during the wartime evacuation and resettlement. Through 1945-1946, Tom served his country in the S-20 Intelligence Corps of the Canadian Army. Upon discharge, he was encouraged to go to work for the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation government in Saskatchewan, initially as a research economist, and later as economic advisor to the Premier, serving in this capacity with both Premiers T.C. Douglas and W.S. Lloyd. In 1964, along with other prominent public servants, known fondly as the 'Saskatchewan Mafia,' Tom moved to Ottawa, first joining the Economic Council of Canada, then moving to the Finance Department in 1967. In 1968, he was appointed Assistant Deputy Minister of Finance, and by 1975, after a brief term as Deputy Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources, he returned to the Finance Department as Deputy Minister, serving under three Ministers of Finance: John Turner, Donald Macdonald, and Jean Chrétien. Among the many contributions Tom made to public policy initiatives during his long career in public service, he was personally most proud of the role he played in establishing hospital and medical care insurance in Canada, in instituting child tax credits, and in providing for the entry of foreign banks into the banking system. Retiring from the Finance Department in 1979, Tom served in the Privy Council Office, advising Prime Minister Trudeau on economic aspects of the Constitution. As well, he was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of Atomic Energy of Canada that year. In 1980, at the age of 64, Tom moved to Victoria to become a visiting professor at the University of Victoria, teaching in both the School of Public Administration and the Department of Pacific and Asian Studies. Ottawa's loss became Victoria's gain, as Tom enjoyed this new career so much that he continued working with students in one capacity or another for a further 15 years. Victoria also allowed Tom a chance to indulge in his true passion: gardening. While he enjoyed fishing, curling, travelling, golf, bridge, and poker, he was truly happiest when tending his roses or digging his vegetable bed for a new season. Tom's many contributions to public service, to his various communities, and to Canada, have been recognized through many national awards, including Officer of the Order of Canada (1978), Outstanding Achievement in the Public Service of Canada (1978), the Vanier Medal in Public Administration (1982), as well as several honourary degrees. In 1992, the government of Japan awarded him the Order of the Sacred Treasure (gold and silver star) in recognition of his contributions to the Japanese Canadian community. A remarkable man with a generous spirit, Tom was deeply loved and his loss will be felt by all who knew him. A memorial service will be held in Victoria in January (date, time and place to be announced). No flowers by request. If desired, donations may be made to the Nikkei Museum and Heritage Centre in Burnaby, or to the University of Victoria Bursary Fund. 'And every winter turns to spring.'

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SHOYAMA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-12-30 published
Thomas SHOYAMA, Civil Servant And Teacher: (1916-2006)
After spending much of the Second World War in an internment camp, he joined the Saskatchewan government of Tommy Douglas and helped create Canada's first medicare program. He later advised prime ministers Pierre Trudeau, John Turner and Jean Chrétien
By John CHAPUT, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Regina -- Thomas SHOYAMA began adulthood as a much-disparaged "Jap," which was a tough break for a fellow who just wanted to be an accountant. Such was life in British Columbia in the 1930s, though: If people happened to be of Japanese or Chinese descent, no matter how Canadian their upbringing, the racism of the era relegated them to the derogatory status of "Japs" and "Chinamen" in newspaper headlines, mainstream society and the halls of power.
"Whereas the standard of living of the average Oriental is far lower than that of the white man, thus enabling him to live comfortably on a much lower wage than our white men… be it resolved that this house go on record as being utterly opposed to further influx of Orientals into this Province." So said the British Columbia Legislature in a 1935 decree. At that time, immigrants, and even native-born Canadians of Far Eastern ancestry, weren't wanted as doctors, lawyers or professionals in any line of work -- only as menial labourers, servants, shopkeepers and the like.
So Thomas SHOYAMA never did become an accountant. His perseverance, however, led to a long and distinguished career as one of Canada's leading civil servants, one of Tommy Douglas's closest advisers through the heyday of the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation's governance of Saskatchewan, a vital participant in the development of Saskatchewan Crown corporations and medicare, a key deputy minister in the federal government under Pierre Trudeau and a cherished academic at the University of Victoria.
Ultimately, he not only achieved the basic rights and recognition of full Canadian citizenship that he deserved, but became a major contributor to the country that had branded all of his race as outcasts.
The Canadian branch of the SHOYAMAs began in the 1870s, when some of their Samurai ancestors emigrated after Japan revoked class privilege. His father, Kunitaro SHOYAMA, operated a bakery in Kamloops, British Columbia, that was popular in the 1920s and '30s among regular railway travellers, including Andy Johnson of Vancouver. The baker arranged a bargain with his Vancouver friend: Kunitaro's son Thomas would attend the University of British Columbia and live rent-free at Mr. Johnson's home in exchange for domestic services. Each summer, the student would work (first in Japanese businesses on Vancouver's Powell Street, later at a pulp mill) for his tuition money.
Thomas SHOYAMA graduated from University of British Columbia in 1938 with a bachelor of arts in economics and a bachelor of commerce in accounting. A white man with those credentials would have been employed instantly, but Mr. SHOYAMA found himself shut out of his chosen profession. In 1939, he settled for the post of English-language editor of a fledgling newspaper. Called the New Canadian, it was dedicated to news and advocacy of the Nisei, the largest segment of British Columbia's Japanese-Canadian population that was essentially made up of three groups: Issei (about 10,000 immigrants from Japan and Hawaii, the most senior and influential of the three); Kibei (a few thousand Canadian-born but Japanese-educated adolescents and adults); and Nisei (about 12,000 people born and educated in Canada).
Everything changed with the attack on Peal Harbour in Hawaii by the Japanese navy in 1941. The following year brought about the forced detention of all Japanese-Canadians, and the New Canadian found itself publishing in Kaslo, British Columbia, one of five "ghost towns" that were converted into mass internment camps. In running the paper, Mr. SHOYAMA and his colleagues walked a fine line to avoid the ever-looming threat of closure by government censors, staunchly backing the Canadian war effort while decrying the persistent racism that permeated the country and urging their readers to retain hope.
"We had a sense of mission in the sense that it was very important to do everything we could to sustain morale," he said in retrospect. "We had to tell people: 'Look, in spite of all these terrible things that have happened to you, stand on your own feet. Look within yourself, to your own strength and self-respect and your own sense of dignity.' "
Near the end of the Second World War, Mr. SHOYAMA enlisted in the Canadian army and spent a year in the Canadian Intelligence Corps. Mustered out in 1946 with the rank of sergeant, Mr. SHOYAMA met his destiny while visiting a friend, George Tamaki, in Regina. Mr. Tamaki, who would enjoy an outstanding legal career, was already in the employ of Saskatchewan's two-year-old Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation socialist government. When he took Mr. SHOYAMA to hear premier Tommy Douglas speak, the newly discharged soldier was enthralled and eager to join his friend in the provincial civil service. Mr. Tamaki quickly arranged an interview with Tom McLeod, then economic adviser to the government's executive council.
"I was gathering staff for research," Mr. McLeod said from his Victoria home. "Once I saw his educational background in economics, he joined us -- much to the discomfort of some Co-Operative Commonwealth Federationers in British Columbia."
A 1947 headline in the Vancouver Sun succinctly summarized the Saskatchewan situation: "Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation Government Opens Posts to Japs." The yellow peril on the Prairies consisted of three appointees. Saskatchewan's practice of employing people of Asian heritage, however, was based at least as much on merit as policy.
"So many people were interested in joining the new government," Mr. McLeod explains. "Recruiting was not a major problem. The Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation emphasized social reform, but economically we had to be realistic about it. Saskatchewan was making its way out of years of depression and crop failures. There was very little financial leeway.
"Tommy SHOYAMA established himself immediately in a number of areas, not the least of which was his command of the English language. He was frequently called on to write memos to cabinet and other documents; few were his equal."
With the dynamic and inspirational Mr. Douglas as premier (until Woodrow Lloyd succeeded him in 1961) and the innovative Clarence Fines as treasurer, the provincial civil service established a nationwide reputation for economic and administrative efficiency. In 1950, Mr. SHOYAMA, whose responsibilities had gradually grown since his initial appointment as a research economist, was named secretary of the Economic Advisory and Planning Board, placing him on the top tier of the legislative bureaucracy along with Treasury Board secretary Al Johnson, and tightening a relationship that would span three full decades.
"In one of our earliest meetings in my office, he said, 'I think we would serve our premier best if we specialized in our roles, with you concentrating on social policy while I focus on economic matters,' " Mr. Johnson said from Ottawa. "We did that, but we also made sure that we working together rather than apart. There was nothing self-serving about it. It was very difficult to be self-serving in the Tommy Douglas government because the premier himself was not self-serving."
Mr. SHOYAMA's economic brilliance, aided by the input he encouraged from all sections of the Economic Advisory and Planning Board, was crucial to the early success of Crown corporations, whose three goals of efficient service, low rates and reasonable profit left little room for error. He proved his mettle again between 1959 and 1961, when the provincial hospital-care program, instituted in 1947 and under Mr. Johnson's guard since then, was expanded into the country's first medicare program. While premiers Douglas and Lloyd were at the forefront of the political battle, Mr. Johnson and Mr. SHOYAMA were constantly occupied behind the scenes in committee work and drafting of legislation.
Mr. Douglas described Mr. SHOYAMA as "not the sort of guy you can con -- and he won't fall for a sob story. Yet he's got a good deal of compassion for other people's problems." Versatility was another asset, particularly when Mr. Douglas became national leader of the fledgling New Democratic Party. While other leaders and prominent politicians made use of private or chartered aircraft, Mr. Douglas and the New Democratic Party's campaign war chest of $116,000 made do with commercial flights and a one-man entourage of Tommy SHOYAMA, accompanied on occasion by New Democratic Party secretary Clifford Scotton. Mr. SHOYAMA served as campaign strategist, press aide and baggage handler. He also provided the chicken soup when the leader fell ill.
A turning point for many Saskatchewan civil servants occurred when Ross Thatcher's Liberals took over power in 1964. A "Saskatchewan Mafia" of 70 bureaucrats, including Mr. SHOYAMA, Mr. Johnson and Donald Tansley, were lured to Ottawa to take prominent jobs in the federal bureaucracy. Mr. SHOYAMA rose from senior economist with the Economic Council of Canada to assistant deputy finance minister in four years, headed the task force that prepared the federal position for the Western Economic Opportunities Conference after the 1972 election, and in 1974 began a five-year term as deputy finance minister under three noteworthy ministers: John Turner, Donald Macdonald and Jean Chrétien.
One anonymous cabinet minister lauded Mr. SHOYAMA's conciliatory skills by comparing them with the confrontational style of his predecessor, Simon Reisman: "Simon used to come into a meeting and bluster, unload on anyone who questioned his reasoning.&hellip Tommy never does that, so far as I know. But I've seen him, more than once, get that slightly amused look in his eyes, and then at the end demolish the whole argument with a single, gentle, seeming casual question or observation."
Mr. SHOYAMA retired from public service in 1980 after serving in the Privy Council as a special adviser to prime minister Pierre Trudeau on economic aspects of the repatriation of the Constitution and his election as chairman of the board of the Atomic Energy Commission. Finally, in 1980, he returned to his native province to become a "visiting professor" in the school of public administration and the department of Asian and Pacific studies at the University of Victoria. His "visit" lingered far beyond the usual year or two of most such appointments, as he taught classes until 1991 and, at an annual salary of one dollar, maintained an office to continue individual studies and supervise theses until 1998.
Thomas Kunito SHOYAMA was born September 24, 1916, in Kamloops, British Columbia He died of congestive heart failure and Parkinson's disease on December 22, 2006, in Victoria. He was 90. He is survived by his companion, Hazel MORRIS.

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