GOODISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-15 published
CRISP, Fredrick Barr
Veteran of World War 2. Peacefully, at the Extendicare Nursing Home, Brampton, on January 13, 2006, in his 90th year. Loving husband of the late Christine CRISP (née COTE) (1981,) Scarborough. Brother of the late Evelyn (Peggy) EDWARDS, Warkworth. Survived by his sister Dorothy GOODISON (Jack,) Brampton. Uncle of six nephews and great-uncle to many great-nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Ward Funeral Home "Brampton Chapel," 52 Main Street South (Hwy. 10), Brampton, on Tuesday from 10-11 a.m. with Service to follow in the Chapel at 11 a.m. Interment Pine Hills Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. Condolences to the family may be sent to fredrick.crisp@wardfh.com

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODISON - All Categories in OGSPI

GOODLETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-07-20 published
Crash shatters 2 families
Newmarket, Huntsville couples killed
One family was moving west, the other returning
By Bob MITCHELL and Tamara CHERRY, Staff Reporters
Two Ontario couples en route to fresh starts in their lives -- one moving out west, the other returning -- met tragedy instead when their vehicles collided on a northern highway. Five people were killed.
Shawna BAKOS- BIANCHI, 32, and her husband, David BIANCHI, 34, were moving back from Winnipeg to Newmarket to await the arrival in three weeks of their second child.
Huntsville residents Blair PALADICHUK, 41, and Sandy FELLER- PALADICHUK, 46, were heading to hotel jobs in the northern Saskatchewan town of La Ronge.
They were killed on Highway 17 near White River last Sunday when their pickup collided with an sport utility vehicle driven by BAKOS- BIANCHI, who died in the accident along with her 1½-year-old daughter, Victoria, and her mother, Joan BAKOS, 64.
David BIANCHI, 34, who was driving ahead of his family in a U-Haul filled with their belongings, discovered the terrible scene moments after seeing dust and dirt flying into the dusk sky in the rear-view mirror of his rented vehicle.
"David stopped the vehicle and ran back and found them. I don't think there are any words that can describe what he saw or felt," BIANCHI's uncle, Ciro LUPO, said yesterday.
"This is something that's going to take a long time for everybody to get over. Oh God. It's going to get a lot worse before it gets better. A lot worse."
Originally from Scarborough, the couple married in May 2003 and moved to Winnipeg soon after when BAKOS- BIANCHI was transferred there by General Motors, LUPO said, adding her husband is a self-employed painter.
"She had taken maternity leave and they decided to move back to Ontario so they could be close to their family and even bought a home right next door to (her parents) Joan and Vic," LUPO said.
"Vic is an only child so he has nobody now. He's lost his wife, his daughter and his granddaughter."
The Paladichuks were a close couple as well, relatives say.
"Blair was a chef. Sandy ran hotels and resorts," PALADICHUK's sister, Kristin INGRAHAM, said from her parents' home in St. Catharines.
"They worked together; they did absolutely everything together."
They were regarded as "very much free spirits," INGRAHAM said, passing on words from her parents. "They were not big-city Toronto people at all. They were just a couple who were truly in love."
INGRAHAM said her family has been under a lot of stress since the tragedy. Her parents are devastated.
"My parents loved her as much as they loved him."
The couple married about 12 years ago, each bringing two children from previous relationships. They spent a few years living in the Yukon before moving to a home just outside Algonquin Park.
The decision to move out west didn't come easily, as it meant PALADICHUK would have to leave INGRAHAM, his only sibling, as she battled cancer.
"He was just kind of torn because I have cancer and he was really against it (the move,)" INGRAHAM said. "I'm really quite sick and he really didn't want to leave because I'm right between my treatments. He was very involved in my kids' lives."
However, with his wife's family in Edmonton, the couple decided to move to be closer to them.
"They kind of went back and forth to decide whether or not to fly," INGRAHAM said. "They decided to drive because they thought that it would be more of an adventure."
But not without stopping in St. Catharines to spend a week with PALADICHUK's family.
"It was just a nice week. The whole family was together and we went out for dinners, we had barbecues," INGRAHAM said, adding the family celebrated FELLER- PALADICHUK's 46th birthday during their visit.
"They had left here at 8 o'clock Sunday morning and I guess the accident happened exactly 12 hours later. We were waiting for them to call (that night) and we never got the call."
It wasn't until the following afternoon that they got word on the couple's fate.
FELLER- PALADICHUK was pronounced dead at the scene, they were told, while PALADICHUK held on for a while longer before being pronounced dead in hospital.
Staff Sgt. Dan DAWSON of the Ontario Provincial Police's Superior East detachment in Wawa said their investigation indicates that BAKOS- BIANCHI was driving when she suddenly slid onto the gravel shoulder.
"They were heading south on Highway 17 and she only was on the shoulder momentarily but then shot across into the path of the northbound pickup," DAWSON said.
"We have no idea what caused it. We don't know whether something distracted her. There was nothing mechanically wrong with either vehicle.
"No witnesses: survived the crash so we'll probably never know what happened."
Police said everybody involved was wearing seat belts and the child was strapped in a car seat.
"But it wouldn't have mattered considering the severity of the collision because nobody could have survived," DAWSON said. "Both vehicles were travelling at about the posted highway speed of 90 km/h and visibility was clear.
"Other than the husband's vehicle, they were the only vehicles on the road at that time."
Family members said they've learned their loved ones had initially stopped in White River to get some gas, but it was too busy so they decided to drive another 90 kilometres to Wawa where they were going to spend the night.
"Shawna's last day of work was Friday and they left on Saturday afternoon," LUPO said.
"After stopping at White River, they had only been on the road for about five or six kilometres when the crash happened.
"If you've ever driven up north, it doesn't take a lot to go onto the gravel. It's so easy to over-correct. I suspect that's what happened."
Once they got the call, LUPO and two other uncles immediately drove to Wawa to be with BIANCHI.
"He was all alone and we didn't want him to have to deal with the horrific events all on his own," LUPO said.
"I can't say enough about the people and the community of Wawa.
"Father Trevor (SCARFONE) stayed with David in a local church to comfort him until we got there. Everybody we dealt with was amazing, from Ontario Provincial Police officer Adam GOODLETT to the people who run the Wawa Motor Inn, who didn't charge us for the room."
Friends and family can attend visitation tonight from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. and tomorrow from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Chapel Ridge Funeral Home on Woodbine Ave. in Markham.
Funeral mass is at 11: 30 a.m. Saturday at Saint_John Chrysostom Catholic Church on Ontario St. in Newmarket with interment at Holy Cross Cemetery.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODLETT - All Categories in OGSPI

GOODMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-03-30 published
McNEIL, Shirley
Of Chesley, formerly of Southampton passed away suddenly on Tuesday, March 28th, 2006 in her 65th year. Mother of Tammy DONER (Al TAILOR/TAYLOR) of Southampton, Linda Trafelet GOODMAN (Don) of Guelph and Bruce TRAFELET (Mandy) of Southampton. Proud grandmother of Shawn, Lise and Tyson. Shirley is also survived by her sisters, Betty and Marg and brother, Crawford as well as many nieces and nephews. Long time friend of Bev and Ralph SHULAR. Former wife of Thomas TRAFELET of Southampton. Predeceased by her infant daughter Theresa, granddaughter Christine and her parents, Malcolm and Laura (MARTIN) McNEIL. A celebration of Shirley's life will be held on Saturday, April 1st, 2006 from 1: 00 to 4:00 p.m. at the Walker House (146 High St.) Southampton. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Parkview Manor Residents Fund or the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Funeral Arrangements entrusted to Cameron Funeral Home, Chesley.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-11 published
GOODMAN, Mary
In memory of a loving Mother and Grandmother, Mary, who passed away 19 years ago today. In our hearts your memory lingers, Sweetly tender, fond and true, There is not a day, Dear Mother, That we do not think of you. Sadly missed, ever remembered by son John and family.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-04-05 published
O'REILLY, Dorothy Jean
At Bluewater Health - Mitton St. Site, Sarnia, on Sunday, April 2nd, 2006, Dorothy Jean O'REILLY, age 81, loving wife of the late Irwin O'REILLY (1984.) She will be sadly missed by her children Evelyn WHITE/WHYTE, Barb JAKOBSEN (Bert), Sharon LONG (Allan), Dorothy GOODMAN (Don) and Bill SAVOIS and daughter-in-law Carol O'REILLY. 14 grandchildren, 19 great-grandchildren, 1 great-great-grand_son and several nieces and nephews also survive. She was predeceased by her son Dave O'REILLY (2003) and her son-in-law Ralph WHITE/WHYTE (2000). She was an avid bowler and dart player and a member of the Royal Canadian Air Force Association - 403 Wing. Funeral services will be held from the chapel of the D.J. Robb Funeral Home on Thursday, April 6th at 11: 00 a.m. Interment will follow at Resurrection Cemetery. Friends may visit with the family at the funeral home on Wednesday between the hours of 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. The Royal Canadian Air Force Association - #403 Wing, will conduct a memorial service at the funeral home on Wednesday evening at 6: 30 p.m. Memorial gifts to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family. Messages of condolence may be sent to the family through djrobbfh@ebtech.net

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.enterprise-bulletin 2006-03-01 published
MacDOUGALL, Dr. Alexander W. "Sandy"
Suddenly on Wednesday February 22, 2006 at his home in Duntroon at the age of 52. Sandy, beloved husband of Marni (née DORLAND.) Loving father of Beth, Katie, Sandy Jr., Margaret Grace, Rebecca and T.J.. Dear son of Daniel and Phyllis MacDOUGALL of Thornhill. Dear brother of Janet MacDOUGALL, Margaret and her husband Larry RIVERS, Mary and her husband Larry GOODMAN, Daniel and his wife Barb and Dr. Lorna MacDOUGALL. Brother-in-law of Nancy and her husband Lorne ROGERS. Sandy will be dearly missed by his many nieces and nephews. Dr. MacDOUGALL will be sadly missed by his staff and the many patients he cared for as he served his community for the past 23 years. Friends were received at the Carruthers & Davidson Funeral Home, 7313 Highway 26 (Main Street), Stayner (705- 428-2637) from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Friday. Funeral Service was held at New Life Brethren In Christ Church, 28 Tracey Lane, Collingwood (at County Rd 124) Saturday February 25, 2006 at 1 o'clock. Interment Stayner Union Cemetery. Remembrances to Ontario Pioneer Camp, 64 Prince Andrew Place, Toronto, Ontario M3C 2H4, Silvercrest Christian School, 3267 Mosley Street, Wasaga Beach, Ontario L9Z 1V2 or Focus on Family, P.O. Box 9800, Station Terminal, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 4G3 would be appreciated by the family. For more information or to sign the online guest book, log on to www.generations.on.ca

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.enterprise-bulletin 2006-03-01 published
MacDOUGALL, Dr. Alexander W. "Sandy"
Suddenly on Wednesday February 22, 2006 at his home in Duntroon at the age of 52. Sandy, beloved husband of Marni (née DORLAND.) Loving father of Beth, Katie, Sandy Jr., Margaret Grace, Rebecca and T.J. Dear son of Daniel and Phyllis MacDOUGALL of Thornhill. Dear brother of Janet MacDOUGALL, Margaret and her husband Larry RIVERS, Mary and her husband Larry GOODMAN, Daniel and his wife Barb and Dr. Lorna MacDOUGALL. Brother-in-law of Nancy and her husband Lorne ROGERS. Sandy will be dearly missed by his many nieces and nephews. Dr. MacDOUGALL will be sadly missed by his staff and the many patients he cared for as he served his community for the past 23 years. Friends were received at the Carruthers & Davidson Funeral Home, 7313 Highway 26 (Main Street), Stayner (705-428-2637) from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Friday. Funeral Service was held at New Life Brethren In Christ Church, 28 Tracey Lane, Collingwood (at County Rd 124) Saturday February 25, 2006 at 1 o'clock. Interment Stayner Union Cemetery. Remembrances to Ontario Pioneer Camp, 64 Prince Andrew Place, Toronto, Ontario M3C 2H4, Silvercrest Christian School, 3267 Mosley Street, Wasaga Beach, Ontario L9Z 1V2 or Focus on Family, P.O. Box 9800, Station Terminal, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 4G3 would be appreciated by the family. For more information or to sign the online guest book, log on to www.generations.on.ca

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-02-27 published
Pearl PALMASON, Musician (1915-2006)
Daughter of Icelandic immigrants took childhood lessons from her brother, Sandra MARTIN writes. Later, she broke gender barriers to become one of Canada's first female solo violinists and a Toronto Symphony Orchestra concertmaster
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
This is a story about two women and a violin. In 2003, Judy KANG needed an instrument worthy of her prodigious talents. Pearl PALMASON, a trailblazing musician who broke gender barriers at the Toronto Symphony Orchestra back in the 1940s, could no longer play her precious 1747 Gagliano violin to her own demanding standards. She agreed to lend it to the Canada Council so that younger fingers could make it sing.
"I've always wanted a warm, dark, deep quality in a violin," Ms. KANG, 26, said this week. She loved the sound of the Gagliano and the way it made her feel when she was playing it. "It made me think I could really push my limits."
Ms. PALMASON went to the Glenn Gould Studio in Toronto to hear Ms. KANG play during a competition and to watch the bow being passed from one dedicated player to another. But Ms. KANG was far from the only female musician to be touched by Ms. PALMASON through her long career as a violinist.
"I saw her when I was seven years old at Maple Leaf Gardens at a concert with Fritz Kreisel as the soloist," said violinist Andrea HANSEN. "I couldn't take my eyes off this redhead -- this beautiful regal person -- sitting there in a flowing black gown playing the violin with the Toronto Symphony. I was just smitten."
It was 1947 and Ms. HANSEN, who had already been playing the violin for four years, knew what she wanted to do for a career. Nearly 30 years later, the two women became neighbours, Friends and colleagues in the Toronto Symphony Orchestra. "We were the only two Scandinavian ones in the orchestra," said Ms. HANSEN who is of Finnish descent. "I was even more in awe then because of the kind of person she was. She opened the door for the rest of us."
Pearl PALMASON was born during the First World War in Winnipeg. She was the third of four children of Icelandic immigrants Sveinn and Growa PALMASON (née SVEINNSDOTTIR.) Her architect father prospered in construction, but the Depression wiped him out financially and the family moved to a farm.
No matter how stretched they were, the PALMASONs always found money for violin lessons for their eldest son Palmi, who was six years older than Pearl. He studied with the violin builder and teacher Olafur Thorsteinsson in Husavick, Manitoba, and then with John Waterhouse in Winnipeg before becoming a member of the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra.
Palmi would walk five miles home from his lessons and then teach everything he had learned to his little sister Pearl. From the time she was nine years old, she was officially her brother's student, acquiring both her Associate, Toronto Conservatory of Music and Licentiate, Royal Schools of Music qualifications and winning four medals from the Toronto Conservatory of Music for having the highest examination marks in the country.
They both performed at the Manitoba Music Competition Festival in Winnipeg and played with what would later be called the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra.
"My uncle Palmi would perform very respectably and get high marks, but never win, and Pearl always won in her class, and she would win overall," said her niece Valerie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. She was awarded both the Rose Bowl and an Aikens Memorial Trophy and won a scholarship at age 18 to study for three years with Elie SPIVAK, concertmaster of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and a teacher at the Royal Conservatory of Music.
In the late 1930s she went to England to study with Carl Flesch, the Hungarian-born violinist and also played solo concerts in Iceland in 1938 and in London. Years later she described Mr. Flesch as "a genius with the violin but not in his practical life." She also complained that he "had pupils from all over the world and he wiped the floor with every one of them."
She returned to Toronto when the Second World War broke out and studied briefly with Kathleen PARLOW, before moving to New York to be instructed by Demetrious Dounis. She found him secretive and mysterious. "You went in one door and out through another," she remembered. Apparently, concert masters studied privately with him and didn't want anybody to know so "it was very hush-hush."
In 1941, she left New York and joined the Toronto Symphony Orchestra at $25 a week for a five-month season. "The burning question," she said later, "was how to survive the other seven months of the year and pay the rent." Even so, she managed to find the money to buy a violin made in 1666, that had previously been owned by violinist Alexander Chuhaldin, and was thought (incorrectly) to be a Stradivarius.
Ms. PALMASON was married in the 1940s, after she joined the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, and supported her husband who lived in New York and studied with her former teacher, Dr. Dounis. By all accounts, the marriage was disastrous and quickly ended. On September 19, 1948, she performed a solo recital at the Town Hall in New York. "A metropolitan debut of promise," concluded the Musical Courier.
She considered pursuing a career as a concert violinist, but decided against it, partly because, as she said later, "you have to be absolutely great to be a concert performer and I knew I wasn't." There was another reason: the loneliness of the long-distance concert circuit. "I wouldn't have all this -- my home, my possessions and my Friends around me."
Essentially, Ms. PALMASON chose career over marriage in an era when it was extremely difficult to have both. "In those days, what happened to women violin soloists was that they got married and had children. Their career was put on hold for a while and then they tried to make a comeback, but it was never the same," she said in an interview in the 1950s.
Instead, she built a life around music, travel, a huge circle of Friends and her sister Ruby's children. "When my mother died, Pearl made the announcement that she now had three children," said her niece Valerie THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. "We were all past the age of majority, but she said she was adopting us."
By the mid 1950s, she was one of eight women playing with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra and was the first female to serve as assistant concert master and to slip into the senior role when her male colleague Hyman GOODMAN was unavailable. From 1960 to 1962, she played principal second violin. She also played with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Symphony (after having confronted the conductor about his male-only hiring policy), the Singing Stars Orchestra, the Hart House Orchestra and the York Concert Society group.
An article by Florence SCHILL in The Globe and Mail in October of 1954, under the tag "Earning a Living," focused on Ms. PALMASON. The column began by quoting Sir Thomas Beecham (1879-1961). Apparently, the famous British conductor liked to explain the paucity of women in his orchestra by saying: "If they're pretty, they bother the men; if they aren't, they bother me."
Jack ELTON, manager of the Toronto Symphony Orchestra, denied there was discrimination against women. "We have never said: Let's not take her because she's a woman -- especially if they look like Pearl." And she was definitely a looker, with flaming red hair, usually called Titian in newspaper clippings from the era, striking blue eyes and luscious red lips.
In 1960, she bought the Gennaro Gagliano violin with the rich velvet sound for $3,500 (U.S.) -- about the price of a new car at the time, according to violin-maker and restorer Ric HEINL of the Toronto firm George Heinl and Co. It was made in Naples, Italy, in 1747 by Gennaro Gagliano, who was arguably the best in a large family of expert violin-makers.
A salesman for the Rembrandt Wurlitzer company in New York brought the violin to Toronto to show to a potential client, who declined to purchase it. Ms. PALMASON fell in love with it "at first play" and insisted the instrument wasn't going back, according to Mr. HEINL. The violin is now insured for $220,000.
After her farewell concert in front of 10,000 people at Ontario Place in August of 1981, she told The Globe that she had "spent more of my life at Massey Hall than at home." Although she had reached retirement age, she had no intention of putting her violin away. She played with the Canadian Opera Company orchestra from 1981 to 1985, and continued to teach privately, play with chamber groups, give recitals with her string group. In 1987 she became concertmaster of the Oakville Symphony Orchestra.
Ms. PALMASON lived in a spacious home in North Toronto until the mid-to-late 1990s when she moved into a large retirement condominium with her Boesendorfer piano and her beloved violins. She continued to have "drinkie winkies" (Beefeater gin with a splash of tonic and one ice cube) with Friends and gave at least two concerts in her condo for her neighbours.
She practised every day, but after she broke her ankle in 2002, life became harder. After she agreed to lend her Gagliano to the Canada Council instrument bank, she played every day on her "second" violin. A year ago in January, Ms. KANG, who had been sending Ms. PALMASON letters regularly, paid the woman she calls "her angel" a visit. "She was very warm and very sweet," Ms. KANG said. "It was really moving to see her playing the violin," she said, and "inspiring to see somebody who loves music so much that she plays every day just to have it in her life."
Pearl PALMASON was born on October 2, 1915, in Winnipeg. She died in Toronto of heart failure on February 17, 2006, after having suffered a stroke in September. She was 90. She is survived by a niece, two nephews and their families.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-01 published
NASH, Sarah
Peacefully, in her 92nd year on Thursday March 30, 2006. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Ruth and Jeffrey GOODMAN. Devoted grandmother of Jordan, and Michele. Dear sister of the late Leo GOLDFARB. Special friend to Eti STEIN. Many thanks to the nursing and caregiving staff at Gibson Long Term Care Centre for their care and support. A graveside service will be held at Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park, Stashover Young Men's Society section on Sunday April 2nd at 2: 30 p.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Soldiers of Israel (416) 783-3053.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-01 published
NASH, Sarah
Peacefully, in her 92nd year on Thursday March 30, 2006. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Ruth and Jeffrey GOODMAN. Devoted grandmother of Jordan, and Michele. Dear sister of the late Leo GOLDFARB. Special friend to Eti STEIN. Many thanks to the nursing and caregiving staff at Gibson Long Term Care Centre for their care and support. A graveside service will be held at Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park, Stashover Young Men's Society section on Sunday April 2nd at 2: 30 p.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Soldiers of Israel (416) 783-3053.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-17 published
PHILLIPS, John Lawrence (November 6, 1926-April 14, 2006)
Peacefully at the Carpenter Hospice on Good Friday, April 14, 2006 surrounded by his family. Lovingly remembered by his wife of 50 years, Barbara (née CHAMBERLAIN.) Devoted father to Kim (Phil BRUCKLER,) Kevin (Gina WATSON,) Keith (Shelley,) and John (Laura) and grandpa to Beth GOODMAN, Derek, Katherine, Mark, Jamie, Jennie, Sarah and John PHILLIPS. Brother of Donald Arthur PHILLIPS (Millicent) and Derwyn PHILLIPS (Janice,) all of Florida and brother-in-law to Dick (Olive) CHAMBERLAIN, Joan (Don) PRUNER, Jean ALLEN, and Cliff (Karen) CHAMBERLAIN. Predeceased by his parents, Rev. John A. and Margaret PHILLIPS, and sister Mary PHILLIPS. Great-grand_son of Sir John Joseph Caldwell ABBOTT. John enjoyed a large extended family throughout Ontario. A proud Queen's University graduate (Arts '50), many people know John as "J.L.", principal of Nelson High School from 1966 to 1980. Since his retirement in 1986, he has enjoyed a variety of travels with family and Friends, and has been active at Hidden Lake Golf Club. Cremation has taken place. Friends are welcome to visit with the family at Smith's Funeral Home, 1167 Guelph Line (one stoplight north of Queen Elizabeth Way,) BURLINGTON (905-632-3333) on Friday, April 21, 2006 from 3-5 p.m. and 6-9 p.m. Visitation will continue at St. Christopher's Anglican Church, 662 Guelph Line, Burlington, on Saturday, April 22, 2006 from 10: 00 a.m. until the time of a Celebration of John's Life at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Christopher's Anglican Church or to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. Private interment at a later date at Holy Trinity Church, Chippawa. www.smithsfh.com

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-04 published
WYNSTON, Irwin Robert (July 14, 1920-May 2, 2006)
A proud World War 2 Canadian Air Force Veteran, passed away at home. Predeceased by parents Meir and Yetta WEINSTEIN, older siblings Jack WYNSTON (Bert), Ben WYNSTON (Teresa), Katie CADESKY (Moe,) Dina SPECTOR (Nelson) and Molly RAPOPORT (Morris.) Also predeceased by his first wife, Bernice (GOODMAN.) He will be greatly missed by his wife Jackie, daughter Gail, son-in-law Michael GREEN and many Friends and relatives. Funeral Services Thursday, May 4th, 12 noon at Steeles Memorial Chapel. Shiva daily after 2: 00 p.m. Service 8:00 p.m. 14 Wendy Crescent. Memorial donations to: Crohn's and Colitis Foundation, (416) 920-5035 or a charity of your choice. Very special thanks to Doctor David KENDAL, nurse Ashita, Vasilka, Tess, Maureen and Isabell.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-20 published
George BAIN, Journalist And Teacher (1920-2006)
He compensated for his minimal education by hard work, deep research and a fastidiousness that won him a string of plum reporting jobs at The Globe, writes Sandra MARTIN. It also won him the ire of Pierre Trudeau after he pilloried the then prime minister for swearing in the House of Commons
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
A self-described contrarian, George BAIN was the pre-eminent political columnist of his era, and undoubtedly the most versatile. He was equally adept at skewering prime ministers and crinkling the morning pages of the good grey Globe and Mail with clever playful conceits. Self-educated, debonair and proud -- some might say arrogant -- he was proprietorial about his prose and he rarely brooked interference with either the content or the style of his copy.
Mr. BAIN opened The Globe's first foreign bureau in London and in Washington. He was an early opponent of the War Measures Act when it was proclaimed by Pierre Trudeau as a Draconian defence against a feared separatist insurrection and he later took Mr. Trudeau to task for swearing in the House of Commons and fibbing about it afterward in what came to be known as the "fuddle duddle" incident. That gave Mr. BAIN another first -- the deliberate use of the word "fuck" in a Globe and Mail column.
"He combined the free-spirited moxie of the old school with the thoughtfulness and professionalism of the new," wrote David Hayes in Power and Influence, his 1992 history of The Globe. "He was a master at developing sources, learning that small fry within the departments were often more useful than big-name politicians and bureaucrats."
Intense, and suffering from diverticulitis, a disease of the colon, Mr. BAIN often vomited from stress when he was writing his column. Poking fun at himself, he once mockingly denied the "widespread belief" that "when the BAIN stomach suffers an overdose of acidity, the BAIN wit flowers most brilliantly."
High principled, bristling with integrity and fastidious in his attire, Mr. BAIN was "impossible" to manage, said Clark DAVEY, a former managing editor of The Globe and a friend since the 1950s. "George had his view and the rest of the world could go to hell, which is a great thing in a columnist and a helluva problem in an employee."
Describing Mr. BAIN as passionate about writing, reading, drinking fine vintages, building stone walls and the practise and process of politics, Mr. DAVEY said he will always remember his elegance not only in the way that he dressed and wrote, but in the way he thought about the world. "He made me feel good about myself because I was in the same business."
George Charles Stewart BAIN was the eldest of four children of William Steward and Mary (née ROSS) BAIN. His father was president of the Bain Coal Co. and his mother was a homemaker. The family lived in north Toronto, where George attended Hodgson Public School and then North Toronto Collegiate.
At 16, he wrote a letter to the city editor of the Toronto Daily Star, presenting his services as a "journalist," an offer that was politely declined. Finish the school year, the editor advised, and then come and ask about a summer job as a copy boy. When George showed up in June, the editor was on vacation. So he went to the rival paper, the Toronto Telegram, told them he had come from the Star and was hired right away. "Newspapers are like that. They have a tendency to think the people at the other place are better than the ones they have," he observed later. "In any event, it turned out to be a good move; the Tely was paying $8 for a five-and-a-half-day week, whereas the Star was paying only Two dollars was an important distinction in the mid-1930s, especially since his father had died of a heart attack that summer and his mother passed away in 1939. "We were sort of adrift," said Mr. BAIN's younger brother, Ian, now a retired social worker. "George was on his own and the rest of us were farmed out to relatives." Ian was sent to Winnipeg, and Moyna and Sheila to Scotland.
As for George, he stayed at the Tely and never again saw the inside of a classroom -- at least as a student. For the rest of his working life, he camouflaged his lack of formal education by hard work, deep research and meticulous attention to his literary and sartorial style. Sounding, reading and looking the part of a well-educated professional became a protective armour. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1940 and spent four years overseas as a bomber pilot. Assigned to 424 Squadron, he flew Wellingtons over Europe, North Africa, Italy and Sicily, returning to Canada late in 1944. On December 16, he married Marion Jene BREAKEY, whom he had met before the war when both of them were working in downtown Toronto. A former secretary and an accomplished cook, she typed all his book manuscripts and supplied all the recipes for his 1972 book, Champagne is for Breakfast. They had one son, Christopher, who was born in 1953. She died in 1998.
After Mr. BAIN was demobilized, he briefly went back to the Telegram, then joined The Globe and Mail as a reporter in October of 1945. He covered city hall and the provincial legislature at Queen's Park and acquired the nickname Basher after an altercation with a policeman "of considerable height and weight," according to Mr. BAIN's recollection. There is probably no connection between this anecdote and The Globe's decision to send Mr. BAIN to Ottawa as its parliamentary correspondent in the two-person Ottawa bureau in 1952.
In the mid-1950s, while still covering the House of Commons, Mr. BAIN was given a signed editorial column, a very unusual move in those days. "He may not have invented the genre, but he certainly perfected the breezy, shoot-from-the-hip style of political column-writing," Mr. Hayes observed in his book. Mr. BAIN delighted in breaking free from the constraints of the inverted pyramid style of newspaper writing that allowed editors to cut from the bottom and encouraged writers to produce action-packed top-heavy lead paragraphs.
Instead of writing for his editors or his colleagues, Mr. BAIN aimed directly at readers, shaking them awake with provocative ideas and shrewd analysis. He loved turning a phrase, switch-hitting political analysis with lighter fare or in introducing a budget discussion with a verse or two, as in: "Forget for the moment the taxes, / There's some cause for some feeble hosannas: / Pay heed that the budget relaxes/ The tariff that's paid on bananas."
The newspaper sent him to London in 1957 to open its first foreign bureau in a style that his son said belongs to a different era. They lived in Mayfair, he went to private school, they travelled extensively and entertained lavishly. Mr. BAIN arrived in Washington to open The Globe's first American bureau in 1961, just as John F. Kennedy was making American presidential politics glamorous. And he was there to cover the assassination from a Canadian perspective.
Back in Ottawa in 1964, he revived his national affairs column and published many of his older pieces in a book, I've Been Around and Around and Around. The next year, he published Nursery Rhymes to be Read Aloud by Young Parents with Old Children, which won the Stephen Leacock Award for Humour. A Guide to Canadian Parliamentary Procedure came out in 1970.
In journalistic circles, he will always be remembered for his rejection of the War Measures Act after it was proclaimed on October 16, 1970. Such a Draconian law enraged his civil libertarian principles. "What's going on here?" he demanded the next morning in his column. He went on to argue that "either the government previously grossly underestimated the potential of the F.L.Q. and has only recently come into possession of alarming new facts, or its recent extreme actions are the result of panic, which itself is the result of frustration at being unable to do anything about the two kidnapped men."
Four months later, when Mr. Trudeau mouthed an obscenity in the House at John Lundrigan, a Progressive Conservative from Newfoundland, Mr. BAIN was riled again. He had never liked Mr. Trudeau's easy superiority, which probably rankled him because of his own carefully concealed hardscrabble roots. Sneering at "the-snotty-rich-kid-from-Outremont syndrome," Mr. BAIN condemned the prime minister's "covert, behind-the-hand" gesture because it enabled him to "express contempt for the opposition, without harming his image with the sweet little old ladies up and down the land who will insist upon believing that the Emperor is a much-abused man."
Mr. BAIN left The Globe twice. The first time was in 1973. Feeling stale and restless as a five-times-a-week columnist, he accepted an offer from the Toronto Star to become the paper's editorial page editor. "Where's BAIN?" came a letter from Mr. Trudeau, the same prime minister who had refused to give Mr. BAIN an interview all the time he had worked for The Globe, according to Dic DOYLE in his memoir, Hurly-Burly: A Time at The Globe.
Administration not being Mr. BAIN's strength, he wisely extracted a promise of a foreign posting from Martin GOODMAN, then editor of the Star, as an escape tunnel if he and the editorial board proved incompatible -- as it surely did under the idiosyncratic demands of publisher Beland HONDERICH. Before he departed for London as European and Middle East correspondent for The Star, Mr. BAIN left a note for his successor at the editorial board he had probably borrowed from H.L. Mencken: "Writing editorials is like wetting your pants while wearing a blue serge suit. Nobody notices and it leaves you with a warm feeling."
In 1978, he published Letters from Lilac, with illustrations by Duncan MacPHERSON, a collection of the whimsical columns he had written in The Globe as fictional letters from Clem Watkins Jr., a rural Pepys reporting on the state of the nation from the imaginary town of Lilac, Saskatchewan. Mr. BAIN, who wrote five times a week, had invented Clem and Lilac as comic relief for himself and his readers.
He worked at the Star for six years until he resigned to take up an appointment as director of the journalism school at King's College in Halifax in 1979. Writer Stephen Kimber, who still teaches at the school, was one of Mr. BAIN's early hires. He remembers a time, probably in 1980 or 1981, when Clark Davey was visiting Halifax. "George, who had a habit of dropping in on the all-night production sessions for the school's weekly newspaper, dragged him along. They arrived somewhere around 2 in the morning and were quickly put to work writing headlines for The Monitor. That they cheerfully pitched in left a real impression on the students."
Although Mr. BAIN had officially left daily journalism for academe, he kept on writing columns and articles for a number of outlets. In the 1980s and '90s, he wrote regular columns for various outlets, including a media column in Maclean's, features for Saturday Night, a wine column for Air Canada's En Route magazine and a national affairs column in Report on Business magazine. With a change of editorship at the Report On Business magazine, Mr. BAIN was dropped, a decision he took very hard.
Having disappeared from The Globe once before, he was determined to write a final column to mark his exit this time. The Globe wouldn't print it, citing a policy of not publishing final columns, but the Toronto Sun's Douglas FISHER had no such qualms. "The eventual final parting has been in the works for some time in circumstances of extraordinary unpleasantness… and when I sat down this morning… ready to add another to what must be more than 3,000 columns, on this page, I found myself asking, 'What in hell am I doing here?' " In a final word to his readers, he wrote: "I'll be seeing you around. But not here, not here."
Always acerbic, often testy, Mr. BAIN got grumpier as the decades passed. In 1994, he published his most serious book, Gotcha: How the Media Distort the News, a heavily researched critique of the way journalists (mainly from a generation younger than his) covered news and especially political stories. Derived mainly from his media column in Maclean's, Mr. BAIN was particularly incensed about the way broadcast and print journalists had covered the Mulroney government: "The most intense and unrelenting campaign of denigration that any Canadian government has faced at least this side of the Second World War."
Journalists have both power and influence, so having someone with the integrity and credentials of Mr. BAIN take them to task on ethical issues is both useful and instructive. But he seemed incapable of mixing any wine with his vinegar in Gotcha, with the result that he often sounded simply sour.
The BAINs continued to live in Nova Scotia after he retired from teaching at King's, having bought a property and built a home (with a cellar for his vintage wine collection) on the water in Mahone Bay. Carleton University gave him an honorary degree in 1983 and so did King's in 1986. Although he never was appointed to the Senate, like his old boss Dic DOYLE, he was made a member of the Order of Canada in 2001. He travelled to Ottawa for the investiture and made a witty speech, but, by then, he had begun his serious decline into Alzheimer's disease. Old habits continued, and he was still trying to write in the fall of 2004 when he could no longer live on his own and moved into a veterans hospital.
George BAIN was born in Toronto on January 29, 1920. He died in Halifax on May 14. He was 86. He is survived by his son Christopher, two grandchildren and his three younger siblings and their families.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-05 published
GOODMAN, Millie (1927-2006)
On June 2nd 2006. Beloved wife of Wolfe D. GOODMAN, mother of Joy and Nomi GOODMAN and grandmother of Lisa, Dana and Tali MAILHOT. Donations in her memory may be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada www.mssociety.ca. The funeral will be held on Monday, June 5th at 1: 30 p.m. at Temple Sinai, 210 Wilson Avenue, Toronto. Shiva at Hazelton Place, 111 Avenue Road to follow cemetery, and Tuesday and Wednesday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. and 7-9 p.m.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-07 published
GOODMAN, Sheree Lynne (née FEINSTEIN)
Passed away peacefully after a long, courageous battle with cancer on Sunday, June 4, 2006. Survived by her beloved husband Ken, loving daughters Samantha, Katie, Vicki and Heather, cherished mother Marlene DAS NEVES, father Bernard (Bunny) FEINSTEIN and wife Barbara, grandmother Fanny FEINSTEIN, in-laws Tilly and Ken GOODMAN, brother and sister-in-law Todd FEINSTEIN and Jennifer SHULMAN, step-sister Deborah KAPLAN and step-brothers Jamie KAPLAN and Stacy STEINBERG, sister and brothers-in-law Dennis, Valerie, David and MaryLynne GOODMAN, and also her loving nieces and nephews Steven, Jackie, Christopher and Lindsey GOODMAN and Aidan FEINSTEIN. A funeral service will take place at Shaarei Beth El Synagogue, 186 Morrison Rd., Oakville on Wednesday, June 7 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment at Trafalgar Lawn Cemetery. Memorial donations in Sheree's memory may be made to the National Ovarian Cancer Association 416-962-2700 or Ian Anderson House, a cancer hospice, 905-337-8004.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-10 published
GOODMAN, Ethel
It is with great sorrow that we announce the death of our much loved mother and grandmother, Ethel GOODMAN. Wife of the late Sholom GOODMAN; mother of Osher and Sylvia, David and Doba, and Helen and Stephen FREEDHOFF; bubby of Michal and Michael, Noam and Elana, Yoni and Stacey, Rachel and Hudi, Ayala and Shimmy, Dvora and David, Ilan and Aliza; and great-bubby of thirteen. The funeral will take place at Steeles College Memorial Chapel on Friday, June 9th, at 10 a.m. Shiva at 3636 Bathurst Street, Apt. 403, commencing Sunday morning at 8: 30 a.m.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-15 published
FINE, Ben " Pinky"
Formerly of Montreal, Quebec. Passed away after a short illness in Boca Raton Florida, on June 28, 2006. Loving brother of Adina WEINSTEIN (Herb,) the late Lily RUTTENBERG (Philip,) the late Mary GOODMAN (Morrie.) Sadly missed by his nieces, nephews: Judith HAIT (Aviram), Neil WEINSTEIN (Carol), Shana (Gidon ZAMERET), Arlene MERVES (David), Barbara RUTTENBERG, Barry RUTTENBERG, Howie GOODMAN (Susie,) Laurie GOODMAN (Liliane) and by his many great nieces and nephews. Ben (Pinky) is remembered by many as a devoted friend and a great sportsman who excelled in baseball, hockey and golf. Ben served overseas with the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War 2. Funeral and Shiva were held in Florida. His passing marks the end of an extraordinary generation.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-11 published
MacTAVISH, Kenneth Neil
Passed away at the Henderson Hospital, Hamilton, on Tuesday, October 10, 2006, at the age of 68. Beloved husband of Vera. Loved father of Neil MacTAVISH and his wife Sheri of Burlington, Heather MacTAVISH and her husband Duncan McCREADY of Oakville and Beverly GOODMAN and her husband David of Vancouver. Cherished grandfather of Dylan, Jessica, Morgan, Gavin, Tyler, Lindsey and Matthew. Dear brother of Duncan MacTAVISH and his wife Frances of Hawkesbury, Heather CONNELLY and her husband Brent of Ottawa, Bonnie LAVIS and her husband Jack of Lachute, Quebec, Del MacTAVISH and his wife Nadia of Florida and the late Lynn MacTAVISH. Ken was employed for many years with Royal Bank and later retired from VISA Canada in 1997. The family wishes to thank the Medical Team of Ward 396 at Henderson Hospital for all of their wonderful care. Cremation has taken place. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 1167 Guelph Line, (one stoplight north of Queen Elizabeth Way) Burlington (905-632-3333) on Thursday from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m., where a Service celebrating Ken's life will be held Friday, October 13, 2006, at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Cancer Society or the Juravinski Cancer Centre, would be appreciated by the family. www.smithsfh.com

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-03 published
ROTMAN, Sally
On Thursday, November 2, 2006 at York Central. Sally ROTMAN beloved wife of the late Joseph ROTMAN. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Elaine and Lou MILRAD, Phil and Jane, and Sheldon and Patti. Dear sister of the late Carl and Julius GOODMAN. Devoted grandmother of Melissa and Stuart GOLDSTEIN, Justin MILRAD, Rebecca, Shauna, Aaron, Shaun, Lauren, Jodi, and Robin and great-grandmother of Noah, and Layla. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Sunday, November 5, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva 72 Gordon Rowe Crescent, Thornhill. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Princess Margaret Hospital for Breast Cancer, 416-946-6560.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-06 published
SCHMIDT, Kathleen Mary (née PLUMBTREE)
Passed away peacefully in Toronto at the age of 91 on Wednesday, November 1, 2006. Kathleen was the beloved wife of the late Zdenek SCHMIDT and the late Harley MORDEN. Loved mother of Mary MORDEN and Harley MORDEN. She was the devoted grandmother of Sarah, Britta, Spencer and Kelsey. Sadly missed by her great-grandchild, Royal. For 50 years Kay was the dear friend of her boss and champion the late Eddie GOODMAN, Q.C. Kay will be lovingly remembered by the Hruby-Holy family - Thomas and Dominique in Prague, Jaroslav, Fran, Michael and Matthew in Montreal as well as many other relatives and Friends. We would like to thank the wonderful staff, past and present at Central Park Lodge, Spadina, who showed Kay the utmost kindness and care along with her faithful companions there, Angela TENENBAUM, Lorna ROSS and Jim TRACEY. Friends may call at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home 159 Eglinton Ave. West, Toronto, (2 stoplights west of Yonge Street), Friday, November 10, from 7-9 p.m. A funeral mass will be held in Blessed Sacrament Church 24 Cheritan Ave. Toronto, (west off Yonge Street, first street south of Lawrence Ave.) Saturday November 11, at 11 a.m. Interment Maple Cemetery (north side Major MacKenzie Doctor east of Keele Street). If desired, donations to the Alzheimer Society, Suite 500, 2323 Yonge Street, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2C9, would be appreciated by the family.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-27 published
GOODMAN, Wolfe David, Q.C. (1925-2006)

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-28 published
GOODMAN, Wolfe David, Q.C. (1925-2006)

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-23 published
GOODMAN, Harry " Goody"

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-31 published
ERVIN, Flora Naomi
Peacefully at Fenelon Court, Fenelon Falls on Sunday, January 29th, 2006. Flora Naomi ERVIN, in her 89th year. Loving wife of the late Chesley. Beloved mother of Janet and her husband Ross WOOD, Eleanor and her husband Richard GOODMAN, David and Scott. Cherished grandmother of Christopher and his fiancée Leila, Laura and her husband Cameron, Kristen and her husband Neale, Alison and Eric. Resting at the Newediuk Funeral Home, Kipling Chapel, 2104 Kipling Ave., Etobicoke (two blocks north of Rexdale Blvd.) from Wednesday 6-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Albion Gardens Presbyterian Church, 80 Thistletown Blvd. on Thursday at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Angola Memorial Scholarship Fund, 28 Marsh Rd., Scarborough, Ontario M1K 1Y8 or the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-05 published
GROSS, Ann (née FELDMAN)
Beloved wife and best friend of the late Philip GROSS for 64 years, passed away in her 90th year, Friday, February 3, 2006. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Barbara and Kenneth NORWICH, Howard and Linda GROSS, Judith and Uri PRIWES, and Jacqueline GROSS. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Rose NORWICH and the late Harry NORWICH, Max and Betty FELDMAN, the late Gert and Harry GOODMAN, the late Jean and Harold HABERMAN, Lil and Joe COLE, Sylvia and the late Frank GROSS, Marilyn and the late Dr. Ben GROSS, Hélène ESTRIN and the late Sylvia and Ben ESTRIN, the late Dave and Blanche GROSS. Energetic and fun-loving grandmother of Marni NORWICH and Tim, Stephanie NORWICH and Joe, and Liora NORWICH; Vida and Adam GROSS; Daliah and Brian CHAPNIK, Courtney and Steven WEINER, Jordana and Brian BRITT. Great-grandmother of Lily, Eve and Paige. Ann will be missed by her many good Friends, nieces and nephews. Ann was lovingly cared for during the latter years of her life by Meridee BOWLES and the angels on the staff of the Apotex Centre, 7-South. Donations in her memory may be made to Hadassah-Women's International Zionist Organization Canada, an organization for which Ann worked tirelessly. Arrangements by Steeles Memorial Chapel (905-881-6003; http://www.steeles.org).

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-26 published
NEPON, Florence
With deep sorrow her beloved family announces her peaceful passing on March 25, 2006 at Sunnybrook Hospital from complications following heart surgery. She is mourned by her loving sons Bruce (Mary Pat) and Gary (Sandra) and her daughter Shelley (Elliot) BERLIN. She will be greatly missed by her grandchildren Jared (Elyse), Hayley, Jordana (Jay), Harris and Jaclyn. She is also mourned by her sisters Rheva ROSEN and Rhoda GOODMAN and brother Arlie KATZMAN. Funeral services will be held at the Butler Funeral Home, 33 Duke Street, St. Catharines at 2: 00 p.m. on Sunday, March 26, 2006. Interment B'Nai Israel Cemetery. Shiva at 9 Holm Crescent, Thornhill, Ontario (from Monday, March 27, 2006). The family would appreciate memorial donations to the Melissa Katzman Memorial Fund c/o The Princess Margaret Hospital (416-946-6560).

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-01 published
NASH, Sarah
Peacefully, in her 92nd year, on Thursday, March 30, 2006. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Ruth and Jeffrey GOODMAN. Devoted grandmother of Jordan, and Michele. Dear sister of the late Leo GOLDFARB. Special friend to Eti STEIN. Many thanks to the nursing and caregiving staff at Gibson Long Term Care Centre for their care and support. A graveside service will be held at Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park, Stashover Young Men's Society section on Sunday, April 2nd at 2: 30 p.m. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Soldiers of Israel (416) 783-3053.

  G... Names     GO... Names     GOO... Names     Welcome Home

GOODMAN - All Categories in OGSPI

GOO surnames continued to 06goo004.htm