GOO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-05-25 published
WONG, Lynn
Suddenly, in a motor vehicle accident on Friday, May 19, 2006, Lynn WONG of London in her 58th year. Beloved wife of the late Kenneth Poy WONG of London. Beloved mother of Roger WONG of Toronto and Brian WONG of London. Dear daughter of Tian Ci YUAN of Chicago, Illinois and C.Y. GOO of China. Predeceased by a brother Sher YUAN. Friends will be received at the Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas St. (between Waterloo and Colborne St.) on Friday, May 26, 2006 from 6-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at the Wortley Baptist Church, 250 Commissioners Rd. E. on Saturday, May 27, 2006 at 10 a.m. with Rev. Michael STOL and Rev. Daniel KWONG officiating. Interment Woodland Cemetery. Friends who wish, may make memorial donations to the Canadian Bible Society. Online condolences www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Lynn WONG.

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GOOCH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-04-25 published
GOOCH, William Arthur
Lately of Stratford in Stratford General Hospital, passed away April 18, 2006. Born in Saint Marys, June 28, 1925. son of the late Arthur and Lillian (STAPLETON) GOOCH. Husband of Ruth (WRAY) who predeceased him September 1st, 2003. Father of David and wife Pam, Linda and husband Gary TAILOR/TAYLOR, London; Barbara and husband Ivan BOA, Ingersoll; brother of Bob GOOCH, Ingersoll Thelma and husband Charles THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Woodstock; sister-in-law Rita GOOCH, Stratford; and Norma GOOCH, Saint Marys. Predeceased by son William (1989,) brothers Les (1995,) Don GOOCH (2003.) Funeral service was held April 21st, 2006 at W.G. Young Funeral Home, Stratford with burial in Saint Marys Cemetery.

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GOOCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-13 published
GOOCH, Evelyn Rosamond (née HODGSON)
Passed away peacefully at Saint_Joseph's Health Centre on Thursday, October 12, 2006 at the age of 89. Beloved wife of the late Peter. Dearly loved mother of Diana and her husband Gregory LOUIS, Gregory, Phillip and his wife Carole, and Eric. Loving grandmother of Winnifred LOUIS, Heather DICKSON/DIXON, Katherine and Angus GOOCH. Born in Lindsay, Ontario, Evelyn later trained and became a registered nurse at the Wellesley Hospital and married her husband Peter in 1939. As a young woman and homemaker in Montreal, Evelyn served on several hospital woman's auxiliaries and was involved in many theatre productions. Evelyn will be sadly missed by her Friends at the Lambton Golf and Country Club, where since 1968, she participated in bridge and golf. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W. at Windermere, east of the Jane subway on Sunday from 2-5 p.m. Funeral Service to be held in the Chapel on Monday October 16, 2006 at 1 p.m. Private interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the United Way.

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GOOCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-06 published
COULL, Margaret Edna (née McDOWELL)
It is with deep sadness the family announces the sudden passing of Margaret, peacefully at home, on Wednesday, January 4, 2006, in her 81st year. Margaret fought her battle with Multiple Sclerosis with the same strong will that she lived her life. Her laughter, impish smile, and joy in her family will be missed by all. Beloved wife of her dear late husband Robert (April 1997). Loving mother of John and wife Brenda, Douglas and wife Wendy, and Sandra and husband Ted FOSTER. Proud grandmother of Colin, Cheryl, and Megan. Caring sister of Audrey GOOCH, June and Sam SIMON, Frances and Wayne WITHERELL, and the late Catherine and Wally McLEOD. Mum will especially be missed by her devoted sister-in-law and best friend Mary BROWN. Marg will be remembered with affection by her many cousins, nieces, nephews and Friends. The family would like to acknowledge the wonderful care and support Mum received from her caregivers, Bridgett, Marilyn, and Stella. Many thanks especially to Doreen for her exceptional loving care over the past 11 years. Resting at the Paul O'Conner Funeral Home, 1939 Lawrence Avenue East (between Warden and Pharmacy), from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday, January 8, 2006. Service in our Chapel on Monday, January 9, 2006 at 11 a.m. Interment Resthaven Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada.

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GOOCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-28 published
DALLISON, Christopher H.
At the Trenton Memorial Hospital on Friday February 24, 2006, age 95 years. Chris DALLISON of Brighton, son of the late Henry DALLISON and the late Ada Isobel (HODGETTS.) Beloved husband of the late Kathleen "Kay" (GOOCH.) Loving father of John and his wife Gloria of Georgetown, and Elizabeth and her husband Robert BUCHANAN of Scarborough. Sadly missed by his grandchildren, Elizabeth and her husband Steve, Sandra and her husband Paul, Paul, and his great grand_son Hunter. Predeceased by his three sisters. The family will receive Friends at the Walas Funeral Home, 130 Main Street, Brighton on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service at Carman United Church on Thursday, March 2nd 2006 at 1 o'clock. Cremation. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, care of P.O. Box 96 Brighton, Ontario K0K 1H0, would be appreciated by the family. www.walasfuneralhome.com

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GOOCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-19 published
FENNER, Shane William
Peacefully at his home in Sutton surrounded by his family on Friday, March 17, 2006 at the age of 12 years after a courageous fight with Leukemia. Shane, beloved son of Kim MITCHELL and her husband Stuart FENNER. Loving brother of Cheryl FENNER (Donnie GOOCH) of Oshawa, Darryl FENNER (Jessica SAVAGE) of Scarborough and Shawna FENNER of Sutton. Loving grand_son of William FENNER and the late Margaret FENNER of Sutton and Jim and Barb MITCHELL of Cambridge. Beloved nephew of Moira FENNER and her husband Gerard DAIGLE of Oshawa, Ken FENNER and his wife Karen of Sutton, Elaine FENNER of Scarborough, Dave MITCHELL and his wife Lisa of Sutton, and Deanna MITCHELL (Vlado) of Cambridge. Dear cousin of Alison, Alex, Colleen, Zachary, Tori, Justin and James. Loving uncle of Kaleb. Resting at the Taylor Funeral Home, 20846 Dalton Road, Sutton from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. Monday. Funeral Service in the Salvation Army Georgina Community Church, 1816 Metro Road, Jackson's Point on Tuesday at 11: 00 a.m., Father Steven HULL officiating. Interment Briar Hill Cemetery, Sutton. The family extends their gratitude to the staff and physicians at the Hospital for Sick Children especially those on 8A. Donations to The Hospital for Sick Children or to Camp Oochigeas would be appreciated by the family.

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GOOD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-04-21 published
MALLARD, Kathleen (née HARRINGTON)
Passed away peacefully on Wednesday, April 19th, 2006 at Golden Dawn Nursing Home in Lions head in her 95th year. Beloved wife of the late Harold Melford MALLARD (1992.) Dear mother of Marion (Dave) HILL of Sauble Beach and Jack (Jeanette) MALLARD of Oxenden. Cherished grandmother of Sharon (Dieter) NIEMEIER of Cargill, Roger (Kirsten) HILL of Owen Sound, David (Cecile) MALLARD of Oxenden, Kathleen (Bruce) CREIGHTON of Oakville, Sandra (Elliott) GOOD of Oliphant and Deanne (Blake) CROTHERS of Winnipeg, Manitoba and great-granchildren Webster, Elise, Emma Jane, Annaelise, Joshua, Ania, Kaitlin, Wesley, Jack, Hayden and Samuel. She will also be sadly missed by her many Friends. Kathleen was predeceased by her parents James and Mary HARRINGTON, her son Bert, grand_son Gary HILL and his wife Wendy and great-grand_son Dakota James MALLARD. Kathleen's family wish to express their heartfelt thanks to all who cared for her in all her years at Golden Dawn and in her final days there. The family will receive Friends at the George Funeral Home, 430 Mary Street, Wiarton on Monday, April 24th from 1: 00 p.m. until time of the service to celebrate her life at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Oxenden Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com
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GOOD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-11 published
FLEMING/FLEMMING, Beatrice G. (née POORE)
Formerly of Saint Thomas, passed away at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Monday, January 9, 2006. She was born in Kingsclear, New Brunswick, the daughter of the late Charles Wesley and Annie Marie (GOOD) POORE. Wife of the late George L. FLEMING/FLEMMING (1999.) Mother of the late Carol Dawn DUIN (2000) (her husband John of Saint Thomas,) and Barbara Lou BOURNE of London (her husband Ian died in 2004). Grandmother of George, Julie, Dwayne and Jody. Also survived by several great grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. She was the last surviving member of her own immediate family, having been predeceased by 6 sisters and 7 brothers. In keeping with Mrs. FLEMING/FLEMMING's wishes, there will be no public visitation and a private family funeral service will be held at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas. Interment in Union Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the charity of one's choice gratefully acknowledged.

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GOOD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-02-08 published
LEE, Hazel Eileen (CLAYTON)
Peacefully, at Bobier Villa, Dutton on Tuesday, February 7th, 2006. Hazel Eileen LEE (CLAYTON) of Dutton and formerly of Rodney in her 86th year. Born in Orford Township, April 8th, 1921, Hazel was predeceased by her husband Arnold (2004). Lovingly remembered by her daughter Gayle McCALLUM and Eddie of Glencoe and Dennis LEE and Glenna of Rodney. Dear grandmother of Anna GOOD and Arron and their son Bowie, Denise and Lee and Daniel and Danielle. Family funeral service will be conducted at the Rodney Chapel with Reverend R. SINASAC officiating. Interment Ford Cemetery, West Elgin. If desired, memorial contributions to Bobier Villa, Four Counties Health Services, Parkinson's Society or the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Arrangements entrusted to Padfield Funeral Homes (519 785-0810).

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GOOD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-21 published
OSTRANDER, John " Verne"
A resident of R.R.# 1 Bothwell passed away suddenly at his home in the country where he wanted to be after a long illness on Friday, October 20, 2006 at the age of 79. The only son of John and Ora (LEARN) OSTRANDER. Verne was a former Central Pipe Line Ltd. manager in propane at Chatham Ontario He had many hobbies, making furniture to look its best, he also enjoyed gardening and nature. Loving and kind husband of 60 years to Gertrude (BOONMAN) OSTRANDER. Adored father to children Gary, Marlene (Howard,) Pat (Vince) ZANKI, and John OSTRANDER. Predeceased by daughter Sandra NISSEN (1988.) Special grandpa of Kim and Darren OSTRANDER, J.P. and Mike ZANKI, Steve QUICK and Carrie GOOD, Jenny OLIPHANT (Mike,) Sonya NISSEN, Krista and Jared NISSEN, Clinton, Ashlyn, and Cameron OSTRANDER. Also survived by 16 great-grandchildren. The OSTRANDER family will receive Friends at the Badder and Robinson Funeral Home and Reception Centre, 211 Elm Street, Bothwell on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral mass will be celebrated at St. Ignatius Roman Catholic Church, Bothwell on Monday October 23, 2006 at 11: 00 a.m. with Fr. Andy DWYER as Celebrant. Interment St. Ignatius Cemetery, Bothwell. Donations may be made at the funeral home by cheque to the charity of one's choice. Online condolences and donations may be left at our website www.badderfuneralhome.com. Prayers will be offered at the funeral home at 3: 30 p.m. on Sunday afternoon. A tree will be planted in memory of Verne OSTRANDER in the Badder and Robinson Memorial Forest, Mosa Twp.

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-18 published
Tom HODGSON, Artist And Athlete: (1924-2006)
The last surviving member of the Painters Eleven group that introduced abstract art to Toronto was an anti-academic who favoured spontaneity over skill. He was also a champion canoeist
By John CHAPUT, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Tom HODGSON grew up on Toronto's Centre Island near Hanlon's Point, a locale named after the legendary 19th-century rower Ned HANLON, but chose canoeing as his water sport. That proved wise as he became a Canadian Olympian on the water and even symbolic in his lifelong occupation as an artist. Whereas a rower gazes back on the water he has spanned, the paddler always looks ahead.
Technically a master of representational fundamentals, Mr. HODGSON enjoyed a long career in advertising, could paint striking realistic portraits, and picked up extra money doing courtroom sketches. His quest as an artist, however, was to find new means to express creativity, even if it meant suppressing skill and rebelling against an establishment he regarded as stifling.
"He thought the most creative people were the young who weren't influenced by anything," says daughter Lise SNAJDR. "My father was a skilled draftsman, but, in a way, he was against skill because it was all stuff you picked up from life experience. He was left-handed, but he went through a period of drawing only with his right hand in an attempt not to be too skillful. As it turned out, he developed an ambidexterity that proved to be another skill.
"His painting was spontaneous -- everything he did was -- but he wanted it to look that way. He could be free and liberal with paint, and put his feelings into a work."
Described by some as "anti-intellectual," Mr. HODGSON was, in fact, a deep thinker who would be better described as anti-academic. "He had his own ideas," says artist Gary MILLER of Peterborough, Ontario "He had great admiration for Willem de Kooning, but he didn't want to just cater to someone's opinion. He was stubborn and, because he was anti-academic, there was a movement to squelch Tom."
In his book Creativity Is Change, Mr. HODGSON declared skill to be "in some ways the antithesis of creativity, a sort of disrespect for man's time, and certainly for his individualism&hellip
"Creativity is curiosity, concern, trial and error, invention, not knowing, discovery. Skill is knowing how to do something…. The essence of creativity is uniqueness."
Mr. HODGSON was sometimes dismissed as a "jock painter" because many couldn't see athleticism and aesthetics harmonized in one personality. He won more than a dozen national titles at the juvenile and junior levels, and then nine more as an adult. In 1952, he took eighth place at the 1952 Helsinki Games in the 1,000-metre tandem with Art Johnson. At the Melbourne Games in 1956, he placed ninth in the 10,000-metre tandem with Bill Stevenson.
Standing just under six feet tall and weighing about 140 pounds, Mr. HODGSON was a whirlwind in the studio, his frenetic energy bustling as if his body was struggling to keep up with his train of thought. Although articulate, he could lapse into a stutter that affected his speech in childhood but was brought under control through therapy he took early in his professional life.
Mr. HODGSON's first serious painting was done from 1943 to 1945 while he was training as a pilot and gunner in the Royal Canadian Air Force. The Second World War ended and he was discharged before he could be assigned to combat, but he made numerous renderings of military life and later donated them to the War Art Museum. He first achieved artistic prominence a decade later as one of the Painters Eleven, the association of Toronto avant-garde painters who challenged artistic conservatism and gave the city its first healthy dose of abstract modernism. With Jack BUSH, Oscar CAHEN, Hortense GORDON, Alexandra LUKE, Jock MacDONALD, Ray MEAD, Kazuo NAKAMURA, William RONALD, Harold TOWN and Walter YARWOOD, they broadened the scope of Canadian art through mutual support and group exhibitions from their 1953 formation through their gradual fragmentation and dissolution from 1956 to 1960. Their affiliation was more professional than theoretical; they used disparate approaches and had no aesthetic commonalities.
Works of the Painters Eleven grew in demand and value in the '60s, but just a little too late for Mr. HODGSON to take full advantage of it. Short of materials at the time, he painted over some of the canvasses that could have brought in good money. Bad luck also struck in 1993 when a fire at his cottage destroyed many of the works he had stored there.
As a senior instructor at the Ontario College of Art, he was in the forefront of outrage at the upheaval of the school brought about by the policies of new president Roy ASCOTT in 1971-72. As a tenured professor, Mr. HODGSON was able to keep his job while many of his colleagues were fired, only to quit himself within a few months. Ironically, he was one of only two people on staff who had opposed the institution of tenure at the Ontario College of Art in the 1960s.
"Tom believed in the process of creativity as one of constant change and in the freedom of artists," says Mr. MILLER, then a student at the Ontario College of Art. " ASCOTT and later Royden RABINOVITCH were from the New York school, very radical and modern, and they were telling students their work was garbage. So Tom broke away, formed the Z School, and took half the student body with him."
As protests go, it was symbolically powerful and a practical failure.
"The Z School lasted about six months," recalls Don MORRISON, an artist and illustrator who was Mr. HODGSON's long-time friend and business partner. "You can't very well have a school without a structure or bureaucracy."
Mr. MORRISON and Mr. HODGSON shared studio space, first on Church Street across from St. James Cathedral, then in a warehouse on the corner of Dufferin and Bloor. Those were also venues for Drawing Night in Canada figure classes held every Thursday. The classes were conducted as the antithesis of the typically sombre gathering of sketchers and painters around a nude model.
"Usually at classes like that, it's like listening for a pin to drop," Mr. MORRISON says. Drawing Night in Canada was different. "These were noisy, vocal, 10 to 18 artists talking and joking. Anyone could grab a cold beer for 50 cents. The model would talk back and tell stories, too."
Inevitably, Mr. MORRISON wearied of the back-lane access to the warehouse and told his partner he'd prefer a storefront studio.
"A storefront?" Mr. HODGSON retorted. "I need a storefront like I need a hole in the head." In a matter of weeks, they had two storefront studios, one of them facing the historically infamous but architecturally engaging Mental Health Centre at 999 Queen Street West.
"Tom was impulsive, just like his painting. He would do exactly what he wanted," Mr. MORRISON says. "He built a swimming pool in the backyard of every house he owned. He would attempt to do almost anything. One day, he had a plumber come to his home on MacPherson Avenue because of a leak and the plumber said a lot of digging was necessary to get at the incoming line in front of the house. When he told Tom what it would cost, Tom said: 'I'll tell you what, I'll dig it myself.' After he had dug this enormous hole, I told Tom: 'Well, it may have been a lot of work to dig, but it'll be easy to fill in.' 'I don't want to fill it in,' he told me. 'I'm going to build a ramp so I can drive my bike right under the front porch and into the basement.' He had three motorcycles -- a BMW, a Husqvarna, and a Can-Am. So he built the ramp.
"It didn't occur to me that if he took the ramp to come in the basement, he'd use it to get out, too. I was renting on the second floor, and the first time he revved up one his bikes -- VRRRROOOOM! I jumped right out of bed."
Mr. HODGSON's energetic and impulsive nature, bohemian cultural surroundings and enjoyment of good times were an ideal formula for trouble in a man ripe for midlife crisis. He had a number of lovers and ended his first marriage to Wilma HODGSON before settling into a peaceful lifestyle with his second wife, Catherine GOOD. They moved to Peterborough in 1990. A few years later, he began to display the first signs of Alzheimer's. He was the last surviving member of the Painters Eleven.
Thomas Sherlock HODGSON was born on June 5, 1924, in Toronto. He died on February 27, 2006, near Peterborough, Ontario, of Alzheimer's disease. He is survived by his sons Mark, Rand and Timothy, daughters Lise Snajdr and Kara Warburton, and sister Jane HODGSON. He was predeceased by his wife, Catherine.

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-18 published
McELREA, Garth Edward, C.M.A.
The McELREA family announces with great sadness the unexpected passing of Garth Edward McELREA, 71, at Joseph Brant Hospital in Burlington on September 16, 2006. Garth had a zest for living, was highly esteemed and widely loved. A very active member of Nelson United Church, he also enjoyed learning to play the bass at the CPSP music school and woodcarving with his Friends at the BAC. His energy, warmth, generosity, integrity and humour will be missed. Beloved husband of Marilyn for 45 years, and adored by his children Nancy and her husband Scott GOOD, Laurie Ann and Heather and her husband Kevin BUNT. Very special Papa of Benjamin Garth, Malcolm Bruce, Adam Edward and Calvin Everett. Visitation is on Thursday 7-9 p.m. and Friday 3-5 and 7-9 p.m. at Smith's Funeral Home, 1167 Guelph Line (just north of Queen Elizabeth Way). A Celebration of Garth's Life will be held at Nelson United Church, 2437 Dundas Street (west of Guelph Line), on Saturday, September 23 at 2 p.m. Donations may be sent to The Canadian Cancer Society. www.smithsfh.com 905-632-3333

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-27 published
WEDD, Margaret Marion (née EARL) (May 29, 1921-September 24, Peacefully at Belmont House, Toronto. Beloved wife of the late Andrew Allan WEDD. Loving mother of Gretchen McKAY (Allan) and Nancy WEDD. Grandmother of Andrew MATTHEWS, Alexandra McGOEY, Katherine McGOEY and great-grandmother of William and Sydney GOOD. Dear sister of Patsy McLAUGHLIN (Dick) and Marilyn DURANT (Ross) and sister-in-law of Diane EARL. Predeceased by her siblings Betty GROFF and Peter EARL. The funeral service will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), on Thursday, September 28th at 11 o'clock. Donations in Margaret's memory may be made to the charity of your choice.

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-01-31 published
GOOD, Ethel
Peacefully at Peel Memorial Hospital on Friday, January 27th, 2006 in her 92nd year, formerly of Shepherd Manor, Agincourt. Survived by her niece Audrey ROSS, her cousins Minnie STANLEY and Ann WEBB. In accordance with Ethel's wishes cremation has taken place, a memorial service will be announced at a later date. Giffen-Mack "Danforth" Chapel 416-698-3121.

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-04 published
HODGSON, Thomas Sherlock
Passed away peacefully on February 27, 2006 after a long battle with Alzheimer's Disease. Tom was born in Toronto on June 5, 1924 and grew up on Centre Island. In 1943, after graduating from the art program at Central Technical high school, Tom enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force and was trained as a pilot and gunner. He produced many pieces depicting army life which were later donated to the War Art Museum. Discharged in 1945, he enrolled in the Ontario College of Art. As a founding member of the Painters Eleven in the 1950's, Tom was a pioneer of abstract art in Canada. Painters Eleven is credited with having introduced Abstract Expressionism to Canada. Tom had abrilliant career in commercial art advertising, and taught art at various institutions. From 1968 to 1973 he taught at the Ontario College of Art during what is often referred to as its most creative period… his philosophies about creativity influenced many of his students. Between 1952 and 1989, there were more than 20 exhibitions of his work in Canada and throughout the world. His works are on display in various Canadian galleries including the Robert McLaughlin Gallery, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Canadian War Museum, Glenbow Museum, the Galérie d'arts contemporains de Montréal, and the National Gallery of Canada. Tom was also a renowned athlete. He had a highly esteemed career as one of Canada's premier competitive canoe athletes, dominating canoe tandem racing in Canada for more than a decade. He competed over more than 50 years; he won his first Canadian title in 1941 and, 44 years later, raced in the First World Masters Canoe Championships. He won over 20 Canadian Championships and represented Canada at two Olympic games: Helsinki in 1952 and Melbourne in 1956. Tom leaves behind his first wife, Wilma, and five children: Mark, Rand, Lise, Kara and Timothy; and Jeannie BROADWAY, the mother of his fifth child Timothy; ten grandchildren; and his sister Jane. He was predeceased by his second wife Catherine GOOD who was dedicated to him during the difficult years when he was suffering from Alzheimer's. To celebrate his life, a reception will be held at the Balmy Beach Canoe Club, 10 Ashbridges Bay Park Rd. on Tuesday, March 7 at 1 p.m.

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-01 published
GOOD, Ethel
The interment service will take place at Pine Hills Cemetery (Birchmount and St. Clair), on Saturday, April 8, at 1: 30 o'clock. Please meet at the cemetery office inside the Birchmount gate.

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GOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-03 published
Tom HODGSON, 81: Passion for art, life
Abstract painter helped revitalize Canadian art
Kid from islands paddled a canoe like few others
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary Writer
People always talk about the parties. That's what they remember about Tom HODGSON's life. They happened wherever he lived or in whatever studio he worked -- be it the Pit, as it was called, at King and Church Sts., the house on Shaw Street, where he built a swimming pool in the kitchen, or the storefront on Queen St. W. opposite the mental hospital.
Cold cuts infamously served on the reclining body of a nude woman adorning the buffet table, body-painting women's bare breasts, art student orgies, rich and powerful art patrons swinging on the rope from his studio ceiling.
HODGSON's sons used to drop by to meet girls because there were always women around their dad -- if not the models he hired to pose nude for life drawing classes, then the dewy-eyed students he taught at the Ontario College of Art during the '70s, when mores were exploding in the name of creativity, the muse and the worship of the artist.
You can get away with it when you're also one of Canada's greatest painters, a founder of the audacious Painters Eleven -- the gang of abstract artists who broke the stranglehold of the Group of Seven and revolutionized the Canadian art world, at the same time as you're an Olympic athlete, marathoner, dirt-bike champ and master paddler winning dozens of national championships.
"Tom was a gifted person. Some people are just touched a certain way, but he was very easy about it, not full of himself," said Christopher CUTTS, HODGSON's art dealer.
In 1987, when CUTTS was an upstart on the art scene, a friend arranged a meeting with the artist known as a superb colourist, as well as for his style of action painting -- arm's-length hurling, scraping, pouring oil paints on horizontal canvases on a table surface held in place by an elaborate system of blocks and tackle.
"He had a natural way of dancing on the canvas. He could make it work," CUTTS said.
HODGSON's last solo show was at Cutts's gallery in 1992, the year the artist was diagnosed with Alzheimer's. This year, five days after HODGSON died from the disease -- at 81 on February 27 CUTTS opened a major group show of abstract painters. HODGSON's piece in the show was priced at $30,000.
HODGSON and his kid sister grew up in a 35-room house on Centre Island that their family rented out to tenants. Their father was an insurance broker, a convivial alcoholic who threw parties at their home, known throughout the island as the Hodgson House of Nonsense, according to Jane HODGSON.
"The kids all hung out at the clubhouse on the lagoon," she recalled. "All of us paddled."
But HODGSON was just that much more intense about the sport and much more skilled. When he was 12, it also was clear he was also a talented artist. He began the balancing act between art and athletics that he would maintain for decades.
He trained hard, dodging the ice in Toronto's harbour, winning more than 20 Canadian solo championships. With another islander, Art JOHNSON, and later Bill STEPHENSON, he finished eighth in the tandem at the Helsinki Olympics in 1952 and in ninth place four years later in Melbourne, Australia.
HODGSON married Wilma STEIN, an island girl, and they moved into a house on Centre Island on a lot that extended to the lagoon, where he built a north-facing studio on stilts.
When the property of Centre Island's residents was expropriated in the late '50s, HODGSON moved to the city, becoming very successful in advertising at the same time as he was making a name for himself in the art world with Painters Eleven.
But he walked away from advertising after assessing that he had enough money either to buy a sports car or support himself as an artist for two years. When his marriage ended in 1968, his wife had to get a job to support their four kids. "His life was more important than anybody else and that was hard," said daughter Lise SNAJDR. "He wasn't a good father, but he was a good person in many ways."
"He was not the kind of dad who hugged or kissed you or told you he loved you," said Tim BROADWAY, HODGSON's fifth child, born to Jeannie BROADWAY, an artist. They never married.
Painters Eleven officially disbanded in 1959. By the 1960s and early '70s, HODGSON was a famous artist, as well as a popular teacher at the Ontario College of Art. A nudist, he hosted many parties around the indoor pool at his Shaw St. home. He never had more than three beers, but others did.
"They were orgies," said Neil COCHRANE, an assistant art director at the Toronto Star who was studying at the college then. "That's what happens when you get naked art students, water and drink."
HODGSON met his second wife, Cathy GOOD, when she was his student. She was 19, he 46. He and GOOD moved to a horse farm near Hastings, Ontario, where he built a pond and paddled until 1996, when he went over a dam on the Trent River. By then, Alzheimer's had robbed him of the ability to talk in full sentences or complete a painting.
HODGSON then moved into a care facility and Good to an apartment in Warkworth. He could neither walk nor talk. GOOD, who was devoted to him, visited him three times a day, until her unexpected death last year of an embolism.
HODGSON was saluted by Friends and family at the Balmy Beach Club last month. At one point, one of his Friends shouted, "Here's to Tom," then took off all his clothes (except for his socks) and ran around the whole assembly, past HODGSON's trophies and his art, before sitting down and putting on his clothes.
"Dad would have loved it," SNAJDR said. "But I think he would have preferred it have been a beautiful young woman."

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GOODALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-04-10 published
LAWRENCE, Hilda (KNIGHT)
Of Caressant Care on Bonnie Place, Saint Thomas, passed away at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Friday, April 7, 2006, in her 86th year. Wife of the late A.W. "Ab" Lawrence (1991). Mother of Larry C. LAWRENCE and his wife Martha " Marty" of Saint Thomas, Mary M. "Peggy" GOODALL and her partner Brian ASHFORD of R.R.#1, Aylmer, and Bonnie C. RICKWOOD and her partner Paul HODGES of Saint Thomas. Sister of Pat FILLMORE and her husband Charles of London, Eva HAMACHER of Townsend, Minerva HURST of Wiarton, late Dorothy, late Elsie and late Harvey KNIGHT. Also survived by 7 grandchildren, 8 great-grandchildren, and several nieces and nephews. Born in Wiarton, Ontario, March 19, 1921, she was the daughter of the late Ezra KNIGHT and late Amy (Burke) Knight CRAWFORD, and step-daughter of the late William CRAWFORD. Friends and relatives will be received at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas on Monday evening from 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held Tuesday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in South Park Cemetery. Memorial donations to the charity of one's choice gratefully acknowledged.

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GOODALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-04-23 published
A terrible price
4 more Canadians die in Afghanistan.
By Murray BREWSTER, Canadian Press and Free Press Staff, Sun., April 23, 2006
Kandahar, Afghanistan -- Taliban militants struck with fury early yesterday, killing four soldiers in one of the worst one-day combat losses for the Canadian army since the Korean War.
The soldiers were identified as:
- Cpl. Matthew DINNING of Wingham, stationed with the 2nd Canadian Mechanized Brigade in Petawawa.
- Bombardier Myles MANSELL of Victoria.
- Lieut. William TURNER of Toronto, but stationed in Edmonton.
- Cpl. Randy PAYNE, born in Lahr, Germany, but stationed at Canadian Forces Base Wainright, Alberta.
Two of the troopers were part of Brig.-Gen. David Fraser's personal protection force. The third was an artillery non-commissioned officer and the fourth man was a liaison officer with local tribal leaders.
In Wingham, Friends of the DINNING family paid tribute to Matthew.
"He was a tremendous young chap, a great young fellow," said former neighbour Jack GOODALL.
Matthew DINNING, 23, was inspired to join the military by his father, an Ontario Provincial Police officer who served as a peacekeeper in Kosovo, Friends said.
"It's closer to home," said Fraser, having to look away after being asked about the close-knit group he often calls his posse. "Every soldier over here is important to me. I feel that way about everybody in the brigade, but I knew these guys."
A bomb, which may have been buried in the road, detonated just outside the village of Gumbad, 75 kilometres north of Kandahar. The huge explosion was reportedly felt kilometres away.
The four-vehicle convoy was returning to Kandahar after Fraser's goodwill visit Friday with village elders. The general, who is also the multi-national brigade commander in southern Afghanistan, returned by helicopter Friday night.
The third vehicle in the convoy, a G-Wagon carrying the four soldiers, was struck by an improvised explosive device at about 7: 30 a.m. local time.
Three of the soldiers died at the scene and the fourth died in hospital after being airlifted by a U.S. Blackhawk helicopter.
"While we are saddened by their loss, we will not forget them or their sacrifice," said Fraser, calling the soldiers "outstanding Canadians" who believed in what they were doing in Afghanistan.
"We will redouble our efforts in southern Afghanistan in their memory."
There was stunned disbelief among troops at Kandahar airfield, the main coalition base in southern Afghanistan.
"It was so many at once, four guys," said Capt. Janus Cihlar.
"When you know them, perhaps not personally, but have worked with them, it hits even harder."
Cihlar said the loss strengthens the resolve of soldiers on the ground.
"Once everyone has a chance to take their pause and get over the initial shock of the news, certainly everyone buckles down and says, 'We have a job here and a mission here.' "
The bodies will be returned to Canada early in the week, with a ramp ceremony on the tarmac at Kandahar airfield planned for tomorrow, said Col. Tom Putt, deputy commanding officer of Task Force Afghanistan.
Prime Minister Stephen Harper issued a statement extending his condolences to the family and Friends of the four slain soldiers.
"These men were working to bring security, democracy, self-sufficiency and prosperity to the Afghan people and to protect Canadians' national and collective security," Harper said. "I am proud of the work that is being done there and the men and women who put their lives on the line every day to do it."
The flag continued to fly yesterday on the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa. The newly elected Conservative government has said it will no longer lower the flag to half-staff every time a Canadian soldier is killed, a break with tradition established by the Liberals.
A total of 15 Canadian soldiers and one diplomat have died since 2002, when Canada first became involved in Afghanistan following the ouster of the hardline Taliban regime.
The last time the army suffered a one-day loss of this scale was in April 2002, when four Canadian soldiers were mistakenly bombed by a U.S. fighter jet.
Before that, army historians would have to reach back to May 1953, when the Royal Canadian Regiment suffered a horrendous one-day combat loss during the Korean War. About two dozen Canadians died while holding off an enemy attack during that battle.
Two more explosions shook the main coalition airbase in southern Afghanistan early today, officials said.
No damage or casualties were reported.

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GOODALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-25 published
JONES, (Annie) Angus (née McEWAN)
Peacefully, on March 19th, 2006, at her residence at Chateau Gardens, London, Ann joined her beloved husband of 71 years, Ira Elbert JONES, who predeceased her on January 3rd, 2006. Annie Angus McEWAN was born to Charles Baskerville McEWAN and Mary Lachlan ANGUS on November 23rd, 1915, in Dundas, Ontario. Her Scots heritage on both sides of her house was a continuing source of pride to her that is shared by her children. Ann was the eldest of four siblings. Two have predeceased her: Marjorie (Donald) POWERS and Gordon McEWAN, both of London, Ontario. One surviving brother, John (Jack) McEWAN, lives in Vernon, British Columbia. Ira and Ann were married on June 1st, 1934 at the Reorganized Church of Latter Day Saints in Chatham, Ontario. Ann and Ira's six children remember her with great love and pride: Ira Gordon (Pat) JONES, Waterloo, Ontario; Elbert Angus (Zibby) JONES, Bayfield, Ontario; Marjorie Ann CUNNINGHAM, London, Ontario; Dorothy Louise (Luca) RICCIO, North Vancouver, British Columbia; Douglas Murray JONES, London, Ontario and Janet Mary (Helmut RIEGGER) JONES, London, Ontario. Fondly remembering their Grandmother are twelve grandchildren: Carolyn (David) KINGSTON of Ottawa; Clark (Karen) JONES of Mississauga; Evan (Kayo) JONES of Yasu City, Shiga, Japan; Matthew (Annette WEERES) JONES and Michael (Karen NOBLE) JONES of Stratford; Linda (Tim GOODALL) CUNNINGHAM, Lisa (Ben MOOGK) CUNNINGHAM, of Toronto; Sarah (Dan INNAMORATI) CUNNINGHAM of Vancouver; Nadia MOUSSEAU of Kingston; Silvia RICCIO and Davide RICCIO of North Vancouver and Hazel MILES of London. Gifted with a prodigious memory well into her eighties, Ann continued to acknowledge family anniversaries, birthdays, graduations and other milestones. Great Grannie Annie particularly enjoyed marking special events for the youngest ones, sending cards for Easter, Hallowe'en to her seven great grandchildren: Julia KINGSTON of Ottawa; Selena JONES and Colin JONES of Mississauga; Sean Ira JONES, Yasu City, Shiga, Japan; Leah JONES of Calgary; and Clara Ann GOODALL and Cameron McEwan GOODALL of Toronto. Ann and Ira resided at various times in a number of Southwestern Ontario locations: Chatham, Dresden, Hamilton, Dundas, Walkerton, Brantford and London. Prior to moving to the Longworth Retirement Residence in 2003, they lived for many years on Glenrose Drive in Byron. In 2004, she and Ira moved together to Chateau Gardens Long Term Care Residence in London. Ann was a member of the Woodfield Branch of the Community of Christ, in London. We remember the continuing pride and admiration in which she was held by Ira, for the courage she displayed during World War 2, when she held their family together, a dedicated mother to their children, managing all the while to be cheerful and resourceful, despite her concerns for Ira's safety overseas. Most of all, we will remember a cheerful, generous, selfless woman who spent a lifetime putting others first. We love her and we are sad to see her go but we take solace in the knowledge that Mom and Dad are together again, the way it has always been and the way they would want it to be forever. Cremation has taken place. Visitation in the Needham Funeral Chapel, 520 Dundas Street, London, on Saturday, April 8, 2006 from 2: 00 p.m. until 3:00 p.m. Service from the chapel at 3:00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, a donation in Ann's honour to your favourite charity would be greatly appreciated.

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GOODALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-29 published
JOBLING, Joyce (née GOODALL) (1931-2006)
Passed away on March 25, 2006, as the had wished, at home and surrounded by loved ones. Survived by her dear brother Alan, loving and devoted Mother to David, Peter (Brenda), Sally and Anne-Marie (Kevin). Precious Gran to Arden Marie, Brian, Nicholas, Jeremy, Rebecca, Charlotte Joy and Isabelle Grace. Joy was born and raised by loving parents in North Wales where she enjoyed an idyllic childhood. She married Lieutenant Brian JOBLING in 1955 and moved to the English Midlands where she began the family that forever after would be the center of her life. In 1963, the family left for Montreal, leaving her beloved home and parents. Following the early passing of her husband in 1976, she settled in Oakville, Ontario where she thrived with laughter and grace among family and Friends to her final day. Visitors may call at the Oakview Funeral Home, 56 Lakeshore Road West, Oakville, Ontario on Thursday, March 30 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at Saint_Jude's Anglican Church, 160 William Street, Oakville, Ontario on Friday, March 31 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Ian Anderson House Foundation, P O. Box 61034, 511 Maple Grove. Drive, Oakville, Ontario L6J 7P5. To the angels who cared for our darling mother during her last days, thank you.

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GOODALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-03 published
GOODALL, Robert Graydon Weir, M.D., F.R.C.S., F.A.C.S.
After a long battle borne with great dignity and grace, Gay has died from the complications of Parkinson Disease in Kingston, Ontario, on Saturday, May 27, 2006. Dearly beloved husband of Helen (AYER). Devoted father of Wendy CREECH (Chris), Jamie (Kathe), and Rob, and loving grandfather of Tierney, Tyler and Jay, C.J. and Tia, Maddie and Kenzie. Predeceased by his parents, Doctor and Mrs. J.R. GOODALL, and sisters Twink and Shirley. Born July 27, 1924, Gay attended Selwyn House School and T.C.S., served in W.W. 2 (Royal Canadian Naval Volunteer Reserve), graduated from McGill Faculty of Medicine in 1953 and practised surgery at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Montreal for over 30 years. He will be remembered with a smile for his irrepressible sense of humour and fair play, his love of medicine, sports and music, his great compassion for his patients and his deep love for his family. We extend heartfelt thanks for the great kindness and care given by Doctor Nick CRISTOVEANU for 8 years, and so many of the staff at Rideaucrest Home, the incredible care and compassion given to him at Kingston General Hospital, and the many Friends who kept in touch to offer a bit of cheer. Friends are welcome to join us in celebration of Gay's life, to be held at the James Reid Funeral Home, Cataraqui Chapel (1900 John Counter Blvd.) in Kingston, on Saturday, June 24, 2006 at 2: 00 p.m. The family will receive Friends one hour prior to the service, as well as in the James Reid Reception Centre immediately following the service. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Canadian Brain Tissue Bank, 399 Bathurst Street, Toronto Western Hospital, Toronto, M5T 2S8, for brain research, or to the charity of your choice. Happy memories will be gratefully received by email at rh.goodall@sympatico.ca

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GOODALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-29 published
JOBLING, Joyce (née GOODALL) (1931-2006)
Passed away On March 25, 2006, as she had wished, at home and surrounded by loved ones. Survived by her dear brother Alan. Loving and devoted mother to David, Peter (Brenda), Sally and Anne-Marie (Kevin). Precious Gran to Arden Marie, Brian, Nicholas, Jeremy, Rebecca, Charlotte Joy and Isabelle Grace. Joy was born and raised by loving parents in North Wales where she enjoyed an idyllic childhood. She married Lieutenant Brian JOBLING in 1955 and moved to the English Midlands where she began the family that forever after would be the centre of her life. In 1963, the family left for Montreal, leaving her beloved home and parents. Following the early passing of her husband in 1976 she settled in Oakville, Ontario where she thrived with laughter and grace among family and Friends to her final day. Visitors may call at the Oakview Funeral Home, 56 Lakeshore Road West, Oakville, Ontario on Thursday, March 30 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at Saint_Jude's Anglican Church, 160 William Street, Oakville, Ontario on Friday, March 31 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Ian Anderson House Foundation, P.O. Box 61034, 511 Maple Grove Drive, Oakville, Ontario, L6J 7P5. To the angels who cared for our darling mother during her last days, thank you.

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GOODBODY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-13 published
GOODBODY, Barbara
Peacefully in her 72nd year in Peterborough on March 11, 2006. Loving sister of Dorothy SUTHERLAND, Marlyn PAIN, Carolyn SEEHAVER and Dawna BROWN. Aunt of Barbara PYNN, Bill and Shawn PAIN and several generations of nieces and nephews. A private family service will take place at a later time. Arrangements entrusted to Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 356 Rubidge Street, Peterborough.

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GOODBRAND o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-10-05 published
Barrie woman charged with murdering her children
Family embroiled in bitter custody battle
By Gregory BONNELL and Allison JONES / The Canadian Press
A troubled mother embroiled in a court battle over custody of her two young daughters was facing murder charges Wednesday after police discovered the girls dead in a west-end apartment.
An early-morning phone call summoned police to the apartment, where they made an emotional and grisly discovery: the bodies of a one-year-old girl and her three-year-old sister.
Also in the apartment was the mother of the victims, 31-year-old Frances Elaine CAMPIONE, who was taken to hospital for a brief examination before she was charged with two counts of first-degree murder.
Residents of the building expressed shock and disbelief as they described seeing the girls playing outside; those who know their mother said the family was in the midst of a bitter custody dispute. "Nobody would help her, it seemed like," said one of the building's tenants, speaking on condition of anonymity. "She was reaching out for help and she was struggling.
She was having a hard time."
CAMPIONE, whom the neighbour said lived in shelter before recently moving into the apartment complex, was scheduled to appear in family court today on what a judge would only describe as "family matters." She's now scheduled to appear in criminal court instead.
Sharon LYNN, whose daughter lives in the building and is a good friend of CAMPIONE, said it's impossible for strangers to understand what she's been going through.
"(She) was tormented and nobody saw the signs," said LYNN. "( Imagine) you are so desperate that you actually kill your children, to take away the pain to send them to be with the Lord."
"The little girls are precious, their eyes would light up," she continued. "My little grand_son (said he) was going to marry her (oldest daughter)."
CAMPIONE called 911 at about 6: 15 a.m. Wednesday "to notify us that there were two children dead in the apartment," Barrie police Insp. Jim FARRELL said.
The sight of the bodies being removed from the building on adult-size stretchers proved emotional for one officer on the scene. "To see two young bodies being brought out definitely choked me up," said Sgt. Dave GOODBRAND.
"I can only imagine what officers and staff had to face when they saw those children… three and one, they're very innocent and it's very difficult."
Police did not release the names of the girls or how they were killed. Post-mortem examinations were expected to take place Thursday in Toronto.
Neighbours walking their dogs in the small park beside the building said they would see the girls there every day.
"Last Sunday, one little girl was out in the yard looking for a prince," said Reid, who declined to give his last name.
When asked about the mother, Reid replied: "She kept to herself."
Another neighbour, John LAINE, said he didn't know the family well but he recalled seeing the two girls playing in a park outside the apartment building.
"They were happy, go-lucky kids," he said.
The Toronto Star reported on its website that the father lives with his parents in Woodbridge, Ontario - a suburb northwest of Toronto where he lived with CAMPIONE and the two girls before their marriage fell apart.
Neighbours identified the father as Leo CAMPIONE, a hard-working, soft-spoken construction worker who loved nothing more than time with his children, the Star reported.
"He wanted to work things out for the kids, and he loved his wife, too," said neighbour Elisa RIZZO, a grandmother who watched Leo CAMPIONE grow up on the street, fall in love, then suffer through marital breakdown.
"He's a very good guy," "she told the Star. "Always kept his nose clean. Very respectful."

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GOODBRAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-05 published
Girls slain on eve of custody battle
Their mother is facing two counts of first-degree murder after the deaths in Barrie.
By Kim BRADLEY, Sun Media, Thurs., October 5, 2006
Barrie -- Two young sisters described as the picture of innocence with blond hair and bright eyes were found dead in their Barrie apartment yesterday on the eve of a family court appearance.
The girls, three-year-old Sophie and one-year-old Serena CAMPIONE, were at the centre of a vicious custody battle between their parents that involved allegations of all-out abuse, Friends and neighbours said.
Frances Elaine CAMPIONE, 31, was taken to hospital for observation and was later charged with two counts of first-degree murder. She's to appear in court this morning.
CAMPIONE and her estranged husband, Leo, were to appear in family court today and that had put the single, 31-year-old mother living on social assistance under a tremendous amount of stress, said Sharon LYNN, whose grandchildren played with the girls.
"This was a tormented woman," LYNN sobbed from outside the apartment. "This woman needs a hug. She needs to know people love her."
LYNN said every social agency has been involved in the case, including the police, but, with her parents living in the Maritimes, she had little support of her own. She called CAMPIONE a "wonderful" mom.
"Imagine you are so desperate to want to take (the children) away from the pain so they could be with the Lord," she said, adding there were no warning signs. "That's what makes this so bad."
LYNN and her daughter, Amanda, had the grim task of explaining to Amanda's sons, ages 4 and 11, what happened.
"My grand_son said he wanted to marry Sophie," LYNN cried, adding the "sweet and precious girls' eyes sparkled."
Police said the woman called 911 at 6: 15 a.m. saying the girls were dead. When officers arrived, they found "evidence to indicate that the children had been the victims of homicide," Barrie police Sgt. Dave GOODBRAND said.
Diana ROBINSON, a neighbour, said the woman had a restraining order against her ex-husband.
"They were trying to keep him out of the building," she said through tears.
Ann HARVEY, community relations manager for Barrie municipal non-profit housing, which owns the building, said the horrific murders have shocked the community.
"This just makes us realize the importance for advocating for everybody and making sure the social supports that are needed in our community are here," she said.

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GOODBRAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-10-05 published
Barrie mom faced custody hearing
Girls, 1 and 3, found dead at home
Family court appearance set for today
By Jim WILKES and Jessica LEEDER, Staff Reporters with files from Peter EDWARDS
Barrie -- Friends say a woman charged with killing her two young daughters feared she was about to lose them in a bitter custody battle with her estranged husband.
The latest chapter in the custody dispute was to have played out in family court today, but yesterday's slayings of Sophia CAMPIONE, 3, and her year-old sister Serena have brought that hearing to a tragic end.
Frances Elaine CAMPIONE, 31, will instead face two counts of first-degree murder in the deaths of the blond-haired tots who one friend described as "perfect little angels."
Neighbours in the 13-storey apartment building on Coulter Street, a stone's thrown from Bayfield St. and Highway 400 in Barrie's north end, were stunned by news that police had found the children dead when they answered an emergency call shortly after 6 a.m. yesterday.
Insp. Jim FARRELL said CAMPIONE had placed a 911 call reporting "two dead children inside an apartment."
As officers stood watch over the slain youngsters' bodies, CAMPIONE was taken to Royal Victoria Hospital for a medical examination and then moved to police headquarters for questioning.
Police were awaiting the results of autopsies today to learn how the children were killed.
"It's a sad day for the city of Barrie," FARRELL said.
CAMPIONE had moved to the apartment, behind the huge Bayfield Mall, a few months ago after separating from her husband, Leo, who was living with his parents in Woodbridge.
Neighbours said Children's Aid Society workers had visited her twice in recent weeks as she prepared for today's custody hearing.
Some recalled seeing the little girls running in the hallways of the building or holding on to their mother in the elevators.
"They were the sweetest little girls that you've ever seen in your life -- tiny, petite and well-behaved," said neighbour Cathie MORGAN, 50. "The mother always took such good care of them. They were always dressed in princess dresses."
MORGAN said she was struggling to understand how anyone could take two precious, innocent lives.
CAMPIONE was a "woman who was tormented," said friend Sharon LYNN, who wiped tears from red-rimmed eyes as she placed flowers outside the building late yesterday afternoon.
LYNN said CAMPIONE was struggling to cope with a life that was "so bad.
"That mother needs a hug," she said. "She needs to know that people love her."
John KERR said he last saw the mother and daughters in an elevator a day earlier.
"She's not a happy woman," said KERR, 37. "I've never ever seen that woman smile.
"She was not a happy person at all."
A resident of the Woodbridge neighbourhood where Leo CAMPIONE grew up said the girls' mother went into a deep depression after the birth of her second child last year.
She said the mother dropped the children off at her in-laws, saying she couldn't deal with them.
At one point, she didn't even want to see the kids, so the grandmother took them in, the neighbour said.
One neighbour on the Woodbridge street where the dead girl's grandparents live collapsed when she heard the news of the slayings.
Other neighbours described the girls' father as a hard-working, soft-spoken construction worker who loved to spend time with his children.
"He loved his kids," said Elisa RIZZO, a grandmother who watched Leo CAMPIONE grow up on the street, fall in love, then suffer through marriage break-up.
"He wanted to work things out for the kids, and he loved his wife too," said RIZZO.
Family members guarded the grandparents' door from the media as red-eyed neighbours dropped in to pay their respects.
Neighbours said the girls' grandparents loved to walk the girls through the neighbourhood where many families have lived for a quarter-century.
"They would walk them every day," one said.
"They loved to take them to the park and to church," said another.
The building where the slayings took place is operated by the Barrie Municipal Non-Profit Housing Corporation, which provides geared-to-income and full-market-rate units.
Ann HARVEY, the corporation's community relations manager, said she had met the family and described the two dead girls as "very sweet."
"The whole family was very wonderful -- gentle, sweet people," she said. "They were nice young children.
"There's just sadness, just overwhelming sadness."
Barrie had just two homicides in 2005.
"Barrie doesn't see too many homicides in a year," said Sgt. Dave GOODBRAND. "To make it two children, it touches the hearts of everybody.
"It's going to take some time for people to try to consume why this occurred," he said. "Hopefully we'll have some answers for the public in time to come.
"There's still a lot of legwork that has to be done by investigators."
GOODBRAND said he was moved as he watched the youngsters' bodies removed from the building.
"It chokes me up," he said. "I have two children about the same ages.
"I can't imagine anything like this. It would be my worst nightmare."

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