FLANNIGAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-07-04 published
FLANNIGAN, Irene (née FINDLAY)
Much loved wife of Bob. After a courageous battle with cancer passed away on July 2, 2006 in her 77th year. Loving mother of Lynda CARR (Ken,) Daniel, Kevin (Judy,) Nancy (Mike.) Beloved grandma of 13 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Survived by sisters Mary AITKEN of London, Ina FLANDERS of Paisley, Jean SANDERCOTT of Grand Bend, Marg GIBBONS of Winnipeg, and brothers George and Bill of Saint Thomas. Predeceased by sisters Sadie, Betty and brothers Charlie and Jim. Family and Friends will be received for visitation Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. A memorial service will be held Wednesday July 5, 2006 -- 3: 30 p.m. at Memorial Funeral Home, 1559 Fanshawe Park Road East (east of Highbury), London. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to the charity of your choice.

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FLANZ o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-13 published
Mourning and mystery
How did a man from good family become linked to a biker crew?
By Tu Thanh HA, Page A3
Montreal -- He grew up in Côte St-Luc, a tidy, middle-class neighbourhood in Montreal. His father was a former senior partner in a boutique law firm that has handled the most prominent insolvency cases in Canada.
How did a young, Jewish man from a good family end up being labelled by police as a prospect for the Bandidos outlaw biker gang? How did he become one of the victims in a lurid gangland mass killing?
The unanswered questions were the subtext at the funeral yesterday of Jamie FLANZ, 37, one of eight men killed last weekend in Ontario's worst mass homicide. Police say all eight had ties to the Bandidos and were slain in an internal purge.
After yesterday's service, the few Friends who spoke to reporters struggled to reconcile their memories of Mr. FLANZ and his later years and death.
"For a boy from Côte St-Luc, it's mind-blowing," high-school friend Ramy Hus said.
"It doesn't correspond to the Jamie I knew," another former friend and schoolmate, Ilan Rose, said.
They and other mourners had come to Paperman and Sons, the funeral home of Montreal's Jewish community, where journalists usually come because the deceased is a celebrated figure such as Mordecai Richler or Irving Layton.
This was no biker funeral. There were no burly guys wearing vests with biker club colours. No motorcycle corteges. There was no visible police surveillance.
Instead, the 200 people who paid their respects included the likes of Liberal Senator Yoine Goldstein, a family friend and office colleague of Mr. FLANZ's father, Leonard.
Rabbi Chaim Steinmetz urged mourners to remember "the real Jamie, not the object of rumours and speculations."
Mr. FLANZ's younger brother, Robbie, also alluded to the recent headlines about his brother as a biker prospect who had been investigated by police.
"I challenge everyone to see who you were and not what you are presented to be," he said before mourners.
His sister Jennifer, in remarks read by Mr. Steinmetz, acknowledged that "before his death, [Mr. FLANZ] had spoken about turning his life."
Her remarks did not elaborate on what exactly Mr. FLANZ was turning away from recently, speaking rather about how charming and generous her brother had been.
Mr. Steinmetz noted how the timing of Mr. FLANZ's death meant that, for his family it will always be associated with Passover, which began last night.
"Unfortunately, at the seders for years to come, there'll be an empty chair for Jamie," Mr. Steinmetz said.
He recalled that Mr. FLANZ coached hockey and, as an ambulance medic, had saved lives, helping victims of accidents and heart attacks.
But Mr. FLANZ was no bookworm. He was a bulky, six-foot motorcycle aficionado with a shaved head, who combined his computer entrepreneurship with work as a nightclub bouncer.
In a description that he gave to an on-line dating site, he described himself as "a strong man who is very comfortable with who he is and who he has become."
His Friends suggest that his interest in motorcycles might have led him to mix with the wrong crowd, at the wrong time.
"I believe Jamie FLANZ just wanted to hang out. He was into bikes," Mr. Hus said.
Mr. FLANZ had no criminal record in Quebec. He had moved to Ontario nine years ago and was involved in computer technical support companies.
Four months ago, police searched Mr. FLANZ's house in Keswick, Ontario, as part of an investigation into the beating death of a crack addict. There was no indication, however, that he was the suspect.
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FLARITY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-12-08 published
ROTHWELL, Clarence P.
At Woodstock General Hospital on Thursday, December 7, 2006. Clarence P. ROTHWELL of Kendall Ave. Woodstock in his 73rd year. Beloved husband of Edith E. ROTHWELL (née FLARITY.) Dear father of Bessie CAMPBELL and her husband Colin of Woodstock, Stephen and his wife Wendy of Ingersoll, Laura ROTHWELL and her husband Wesley HUMPHREY of Woodstock, Edgar and his wife Laurie of Meaford. Loved grandfather of Katrina, Samantha, Amber, Stephanie, Steven, Clarence, Jessica and Ashley. Dear brother of Ken ROTHWELL and his wife Joyce of Meaford, and brother-in-law of Vi ROTHWELL of Collingwood and Helen ROTHWELL of Woodford. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by a daughter Myrtle May ROTHWELL, granddaughter Natasha Leslie and brothers Bob, Keith and Bill ROTHWELL. Friends may call at the R.D. Longworth Funeral Home 845 Devonshire Ave. Woodstock, 519-539-0004, Friday 7-9 p.m. where the complete funeral service will be held in the chapel Saturday at 2: 30 p.m. with Rev. David SNIHUR officiating. Interment later in McLean Cemetery, Bognor. Contributions to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com
Page B5

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FLATMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-19 published
KNOX, John Lewis (1918-2006)
Canadian Meteorological Service Atmospheric Environment Service At Toronto, on May 14, 2006, leaving Mary Hardy (MARTIN) KNOX, his wife of 57 years; children Paul (Lesley KRUEGER,) Roger and Sheila (Jim COBBAN;) grand_sons Gabe KNOX, Peter COBBAN and David COBBAN, all of Toronto; sister Peggie (Mrs. Philip LEE) and nieces Robin LEE, Mandy LEE (Greg PATTON) and Liz Aldwinckle (John) of Calgary; niece Tamara KNOX of Vancouver; sister-in-law Alice SHARPE (Charles) of Lakefield, Ontario, niece Jennifer FLATMAN (Mark) of Haliburton, Ontario, nephew Peter DANCE (Susan MONK) of Orillia, Ontario; 10 great-nieces and great-nephews; first cousins Lewis KELLEY of Deal, Kent, and Philip KELLEY of London, England; and cousins in Northern Ireland, Jersey and Australia. Predeceased by his brother David of Vancouver. Shaped like so many others by the wars of the 20th century, John's life was marked by a passion for science, the public service and family activities. His father, Robert KNOX (b. near Irvinestown, Co. Fermanagh, Ireland) emigrated to Canada in 1907 and was commissioned as a major in the Canadian Army in 1914. He met Vera MARKS (b. Leicester, England) in London while on medical leave after service in France. Invalided back to Canada, Robert was joined by Vera in Halifax, where they were married in 1917 and where John, the first of their three children, was born on July 28 of the following year. The family arrived in Toronto after sojourns in Saint John, New Brunswick, and Montreal, but owing to Robert's health problems, Vera and the children then spent three years with relatives in St. Helier, Jersey, Channel Islands. They returned in 1929 to Toronto, where John attended the Normal Model School and Jarvis Collegiate. The summers spent on the beaches and tennis courts of Ward's Island were among the happiest times of his adolescence. John graduated from the University of Toronto in 1939 with an honours B.A. in mathematics and physics. He worked for the Excelsior Life Insurance Co. but in 1941 seized the opportunity to apply his skills to the war effort, signing up for training as a meteorologist. Posted to Gaspé, Goose Bay and Gander, he served with a corps of forecasters and technicians that provided invaluable guidance to trans-Atlantic flight crews. Several became leaders of Canada's meteorological service in the post-war years. In 1947, John returned to Toronto to join the forecasting staff at Malton (now Pearson International) airport. He completed his M.A. degree from University of Toronto and also frequented the Bloor Street headquarters of the service. There he met Mary, who had been working as a meteorological technician since university graduation in 1944. They were married in 1948 and moved to Etobicoke, then a rapidly growing suburb. John's professional achievements included his analysis of the transformation of Hurricane Hazel, which struck the Toronto region with deadly force on October 15, 1954. He was part of the forecast team on duty at the time and later published scientific papers on the subject. He became chief forecaster at Malton and, after the death of his friend and colleague Fred Turnbull, acting director of the Ontario region of the Canadian Meteorological Service (later A.E.S.). John appeared on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television as a weather analyst and was well known to listeners of radio station CFRB for his daily afternoon weather updates. Cherished memories of his Ashbourne Drive years include the backyard ice rink he kept carefully maintained and available to the neighbourhood, and summer holidays at Sandy Lake in the Kawarthas with sister-in-law Alice and her family. John moved with his family to Vancouver in 1965 after being named director of the meteorological service's Pacific region. He relished not only the administrative challenge but also the chance to become familiar with weather patterns on the Pacific Coast. Always a keen student of meteorological science, he took early retirement in 1975 and embarked on graduate studies at the University of British Columbia, where he obtained a PhD in 1981. He was a pioneer in using computer analysis to re-interpret decades of observed weather data. His thesis on atmospheric blocking sought to employ these techniques to explain anomalies in the development of weather systems in the Northern Hemisphere. John's awareness of the value of observations taken by human beings led him to champion the cause - ultimately unsuccessful - of saving Ocean Station Papa off the Pacific Coast and the weather ships that kept it running. Armed with his doctorate, John spent several years as a consulting meteorologist for clients including A.E.S. and the U.S. Geological Survey, working on problems such as Arctic temperature variability and drought cycles in the Red River basin. His papers and reviews were published in scientific journals and he contributed to the work of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. He was a longtime member of the American Meteorological Society and the Canadian Meteorological and Oceanographic Society. He received the Andrew Thomson prize in applied meteorology in 1982 for his doctoral thesis, and in 1983 was awarded the Patterson Medal for distinguished service to meteorology in Canada. A lifelong sports enthusiast, John played intramural hockey and squash in university and also enjoyed tennis, racquetball and cycling. With their children grown and flown, John and Mary returned to Toronto in 1982 and spent many happy days in their garden on Deloraine Avenue, where John paid particular attention to his spectacular dahlias. Retirement was enriched by travel, including visits to Jersey and his father's birthplace in Fermanagh, as well as a fascination with computer games and the enjoyment of watching his grandchildren flourish. The frustration of failing faculties was eased greatly by caregiver Ron ANDRADA and the staff of Fourth Floor East, Isabel and Arthur Meighen Manor, to whom John's family is deeply grateful for their kindness and support. We look forward to greeting John's Friends and acquaintances on Saturday, May 27, 2006, at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, (416) 487-4523. Visitation from 2-3 p.m., memorial tribute from 3-4 p.m., followed by a reception. In lieu of flowers we would greatly appreciate support for a fund in John's memory to assist students in atmospheric science at University of British Columbia. Donations may be sent to the John Knox Memorial Fund, c/o Michelle Messinger-Orr, University of British Columbia Development Office, 500-5950 University Blvd., Vancouver, British Columbia, V6T 1Z3. So long John - we wish you sunny skies, fair winds and safe landings. We miss you already!

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FLATTERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-18 published
BAYES, Richmond Allan
A beloved husband, brother, father, uncle, grandfather and friend passed suddenly Monday evening at the age of 58. Born in Toronto, he was a son of the late Allan and Jean (PALMER) BAYES. " Richie" was a teacher by trade whose zest and enthusiasm for life was passed to all who sat in his classroom. He was also an excellent hockey player, starring with the Saint Mary's University Huskies, Toronto Marlies and the Canadian National Team during his younger years and rounding out his career with the Truro Bearcats Oldtimers. He later passed down his knowledge and skills to the next generation while acting as a coach for Truro Area Minor Hockey. He was a man who loved Fridays more than anyone and a Friday's experience could only be enhanced by a steak and draught at the Midtown tavern. His favorite times of year were March break and summer during which he would travel with the "regular crew" to an exotic All-Inclusive resort. Richie was well known and liked everywhere he went. He will be missed and remembered by all who were lucky enough to have met him. He is survived by his wife, Judy (SHEARD) daughter, Brandy BAYES (Yaniv,) Toronto; son, Richmond BAYES (Kathy), Winnipeg; sister, Bonnie BAYES- SOKOWLOWSKI, Carleton Place; grandchildren, Courtenay and Whitney BAYES, Winnipeg sister-in-law, Patti GRANVILLE (Jim;) Truro; nephews, Bret GRANVILLE, Halifax, Dal GRANVILLE, Truro; nieces, Amy FLATTERS (Ryan,) Kingston, Ontario, Amanda HALL (Chris,) Toronto; grand-niece, Katy FLATTERS grand-nephew, Carson HALL. Visitation will be held on Thursday from 6-8 p.m.; memorial service on Friday at 4: 00 p.m., both in Colchester Community Funeral Home, 512 Willow Street, Truro with Rev. Brent Robertson officiating. Private family interment in Robie Street Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or a charity of choice. On line condolences may be sent to: colchestercommunityfh@ca.ns.aliantzinc.ca

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FLATTERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-12 published
FLATTERY, David "Daithí" Patrick Gerald Francis
Peacefully, surrounded by his family, Tuesday, April 11, 2006 at Oakville Trafalgar Hospital. son of the late Ronnie and Harry FLATTERY. Cherished father of Erin, Brendan, and Patrick. Fondly remembered by Sonya FLATTERY (Stebner) and Loretta FLATTERY (Solow.) Dear brother of Mary (John), Henry (Alexis), Peter (Monica), Fergus, Darina (Mark), and Sheila (John). Loved and missed by many nieces and nephews. Visitation Thursday, April 13, 2006 at Marlatt Funeral Home, 195 King Street West in Dundas, Ontario at 12: 00 to be followed by a service at 1:30 p.m. Interment at Park Lawn Cemetery, Etobicoke. "May the road rise to meet you. May the wind be always at your back. May the sun shine warm upon your face. And rains fall soft upon your fields. And until we meet again, May God hold you in the hollow of His hand."

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FLAVELLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-15 published
Margaret GIBSON, Writer: (1948-2006)
Author of Opium Dreams and The Butterfly Ward produced works of singular vision, writes Sandra MARTIN. It was an intense and brilliant output that was too often sidelined by the march of mental illness
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
There were many Margaret GIBSONs and all of them were complicated. She was like a prism that could shimmer with refracted brilliance one moment and then fracture into dangerous shards the next. As a writer, she was like a foreign correspondent reporting from the front lines of insanity, taking readers places where most of us have never been in collections of stories such as The Butterfly Ward and Sweet Poison, screenplays such as Outrageous, Ada and For the Love of Aaron and in her only published novel, Opium Dreams, which won the Chapters/Books in Canada first-novel award in 1997.
Although she self-diagnosed as autistic after she read Donna Williams's memoir, Nobody Nowhere, Ms. GIBSON was probably a paranoid schizophrenic. In one of her "good" periods in the early 1990s she described what it felt like to have a mental illness. "It is not so much that madness… is a muddied eyehole, but rather it is seeing things too sharply, clearer than clear, a light that fills up your eyeholes and is, in the end, blinding with its visions."
Ms. GIBSON worked with some top literary editors, including Ellen SELIGMAN at McClelland and Stewart, Phyllis BRUCE at Harper Collins and Barry CALLAGHAN of Exile Editions. "All writers write out of their experiences, but this was like an open vein," said Mr. CALLAGHAN. "If ever a writer in this country hit on the terrors that seem to strike at women who are defenceless and vulnerable," it was Ms. GIBSON. " She was frightening in her presence and she was frightening in her work because she was really in touch with the madness that was loose inside herself" and by extension, in "metropolitan life." "Losing the words" to describe her terrors was often a signal that her illness was on the march again. And that made knowing Ms. GIBSON a desperate struggle to keep her afloat without being sucked into the whirlpool that was her life. As her loyal friend, Shirley FLAVELLE, said: "She was a 24/7 girl. You could only live with her when you were young."
Margaret Louise GIBSON was the second of five children of Bell Telephone engineer Dane GIBSON and his wife Audrey (neé McCULLOUGH.) She grew up on a small rural property on what was then the eastern edge of Scarborough, Ontario, on land her father, an air force tail gunner in the Second World War, had been able to buy with a veteran's grant. Her older sister Dana was bright, gregarious and an excellent student. Her twin sisters, Lenore and Deirdre, were a younger playful unit. Margaret, or Margie as her family called her, was the solitary dreamy one.
"We were a typical Canadian family except that there was one daughter who was always ill, her whole life," said Deirdre GIBSON, a planner. Margaret GIBSON herself once said that "colours hurt" when she was a child. "A leaf was a kaleidoscope," she said. "Starting kindergarten damn near killed me. But I was never lonely I'm a one-piece band." Puberty is difficult for most adolescents but for Ms. GIBSON it was catastrophic. Always withdrawn, she started slashing her arms and eventually attempted suicide. She spent about a year at the Homewood Health Centre in Guelph, Ontario, experiences that she would later use as a trigger for her fiction. After she was released, her parents sold the beloved family property and moved to a housing development so she could start "over again" in a fresh environment.
The new school was even more disaffecting than the old one, but Margaret did make Friends with two alienated classmates, Shirley FLAVELLE and Craig Russell EADIE. He later became well known as the female impersonator, Craig RUSSELL. A bisexual, he was addicted to drug and drinks and died of an Aids-related stroke in 1990.
In September of 1971, Ms. GIBSON married Stuart GILBOORD, a young man she had met briefly six years earlier through her father. "She was damn interesting to talk with," Mr. GILBOORD said, adding that she was an attractive woman who wore heavy makeup as a defence against the world. Their son Aaron was born on November 22, 1972.
At the time, Ms. GIBSON's psychiatrist was encouraging her to write as therapy. "I would come home from work and we would talk for three or four hours about her writing," said Mr. GILBOORD. Her concentration was all-consuming and obsessive and she used phrases that were brilliant, but the process was "draining."
Mr. GILBOORD took some of his wife's stories to a script supervisor he knew at TVOntario. She showed them to Michael MacKLEM of Oberon Press in Ottawa. Ms. GIBSON's stories subsequently appeared in Oberon's annual Best Canadian Stories anthologies and in a solo collection, The Butterfly Ward, under her married name, Margaret Gibson GILBOORD. (She and Mr. GILBOORD, who now works for a call centre, divorced when their son was a toddler.)
Reviews were exultant. William FRENCH, then literary editor of The Globe and Mail, described her as a "writer of burning intensity and rare vision, an accomplished explorer of hidden caves of the mind." This debut shared the City of Toronto Book Award in 1977 with Margaret Atwood's Lady Oracle.
Meanwhile, Ms. GIBSON's story Making It (from The Butterfly Ward) about her Friendship with Craig RUSSELL was made into the low-budget film Outrageous. Starring Mr. RUSSELL as himself and Hollis McLAREN as Ms. GIBSON, it was the hit of the 1977 Toronto film festival.
Former Chatelaine editor Rona Maynard was a young writer at Flare magazine at the time. Intrigued by both Ms. GIBSON and The Butterfly Ward, she began writing a profile of the "hot" writer. "She had a deep Lauren Bacall voice, kohl-rimmed eyes, an air of world-weary glamour," smoked long black cigarettes in a holder and "had a burning passion for language unlike anything I have ever seen," said Ms. Maynard.
The two women became Friends, but when the profile was about to be published, Ms. GIBSON had her lawyer send a threatening letter to the magazine, and "so she dropped out of my life." At the time, Ms. GIBSON was also immersed in a bitter custody battle with her former husband. She turned some of that experience into Sweet Poison, a collection of stories published by Phyllis Bruce at HarperCollins. Another story was turned into the television movie, For the Love of Aaron.
Mr. GILBOORD provides a convincing anti-story to Ms. GIBSON's claims of abuse, saying that he and his father-in-law were in constant communication with each other and with child-welfare officials trying to protect Aaron and manage Ms. GIBSON's erratic behaviour.
"She tried the best she could to raise me," said Aaron GILBOORD, who is now 33 and living with his wife and three sons in Manitoba, where he works as a juvenile counsellor with young offenders. He left home when he was 16, but remained in touch with his mother and his father. Ms. GIBSON wrote a poem about her son, when he was 5, saying in part, "and to phone the doctor when I a.m. crazed and always you bring my pill bottles/offering them up with renewed hope each time." The poem appeared in Aurora: New Canadian Writing, edited by Morris Wolfe. By the late 1980s, Ms. GIBSON was living in a subsidized unit in a housing co-op. That's how she met her second husband, Juris RASA, an architectural draughtsman who was living in the same development. Apparently, she showed up at his door one day to ask for bandages because her fingers were bleeding from banging on the keys on her typewriter. Eventually, they moved in together and married. He helped her learn to use a computer and to make the transition from short stories to the longer form of the novel.
Her literary Friends, including the late Timothy Findlay and his partner, screenwriter William Whitehead, and journalist June Callwood helped her get grants to support her writing and introduced her to agent Dean Cooke, who agreed to represent her in the early 1990s. He believes that Mr. RASA made it possible for her to write Opium Dreams, the novel that Ellen Seligman published at McClelland and Stewart.
"I was always amazed by her stamina and staying power because I anticipated the editing of the book would be hard for her," said Ms. Seligman, who came to treasure their long conversations on the telephone. "I think writing sustained her, more so than any other form of nourishment."
The novel was a literary success, but Ms. GIBSON was sinking again into mental illness. She and Mr. RASA separated in the late 1990s after she repeatedly accused him of trying to murder her. He died about a year ago. Ms. Maynard had reconnected with Ms. GIBSON in the mid 1990s during one of her many episodes of instability and formed an unofficial support group with Mr. Cooke, Mr. Wolfe and Ms. Callwood. "She was getting farther and farther away from reality," said Ms. Maynard.
About four years ago, Ms. GIBSON was diagnosed with an aggressive breast cancer. She was seeing an oncologist, but stopped chemotherapy, probably because she was afraid of the side effects of her complex combination of medications.
Margaret Louise GIBSON was born in Scarborough, Ontario, on June 4, 1948. She died of metastasized breast cancer in the Palliative Care Unit at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto on February 25, 2006. She was 57. She is survived by her son Aaron, his wife Jennifer LAMBERT, their sons Logan, Drew and Ayden, and her three sisters Dana, Lenore and Deirdre and their families.

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FLAVELLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-08 published
LYNN, Lucy
Passed away peacefully at the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga, on Monday, March 6, 2006 at the age of 75. Beloved wife of the late Doug. Much loved daughter of Luella and the late Charles FLAVELLE. Loving sister of Linda, Jo-Ann and Charlene, aunt of Ashley, Katelin, and Brendan, and cousin of Ruth, and the late Eleanor. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service to be held in the Chapel on Friday, March 10, 2006 at 1 o'clock. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Lung Association.

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FLAXMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-24 published
PLUMB, Ivy Alice (FLAXMAN)
Peacefully, at Parkwood Hospital on Thursday, November 23, 2006, Ivy Alice PLUMB (FLAXMAN,) in her 79th year. Loving wife of Albert Charles for 58 years. Mother of Maureen, Michael and Melissa. At Ivy's request there will be no visitation or funeral service. Cremation has taken place. Donations to the Children's Wish Foundation would be greatly appreciated by the family. Evans Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements (519-451-9350). Online condolences can be expressed at www.evansfh.ca. A tree will be planted as a living memorial Ivy PLUMB.

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