FAIRLIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-14 published
Ormond HOPKINS, Chaplain General (1925-2006)
Military padre who compared his job to being a mosquito in a nudist colony spent more than 30 years ministering to troops
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Ottawa -- Serving in Egypt 50 years ago was an eye-opener for Ormond HOPKINS, a padre with the Royal Canadian Army Chaplain Corps. Not only did he have to cope with the heat, sand and flies, he also had to adjust to the local culture.
On New Year's Eve, 1956, Mr. HOPKINS, an Anglican priest known as Hoppy to his Friends, had the opportunity of observing Egyptian culture at close range. The brass had booked two belly dancers from Cairo to entertain Canadian troops and, as a man of the cloth, he felt obliged to protest the salacious nature of the festivities. His appeal made no impression. His Catholic colleague, Father Schmidt, left in "great disgust."
For his part, Mr. HOPKINS decided to apply the hoary old adage, "if you can't beat them, join them!" After the dancers had completed their performance, they were escorted to the officers' mess to change out of their costumes. Mr. HOPKINS and another officer put their heads together and decided a second show was in order.
"[We] donned the belly dancers' costumes and jewellery, and after bathing Father Schmidt with their musk [the effect was akin to being sprayed by a skunk], we tripped into the mess on stiletto heels," wrote Mr. HOPKINS decades later in a family memoir.
The effect on the troops and their guests was electrifying. "The Egyptians screamed like banshees, and went for Herb and me, grasping at our most vulnerable parts. Until they were restrained, I am told that I performed a hilarious version of the Highland fling."
It was 1957, and Mr. HOPKINS was one of 800 Canadians sent to the Sinai Desert as part of the United Nations Emergency Force to secure and supervise a ceasefire between the Egypt and Israel. While in the Middle East, he travelled around the Holy Land and saw Mount Sinai, the Mount of the Beatitudes and St. Catherine's Monastery. But what he found most meaningful, regarding his faith, "was to walk the walk which He had walked."
Ormond HOPKINS grew up on his family's 40-hectare farm near Perth, Ontario, during the hard years of the Depression. After graduating with honours from Bishop's University in Lennoxville, Quebec, he was ordained an Anglican deacon in 1949. He served as a curate at St. Matthias's Church in Ottawa, until he joined the army in April, 1953.
Seven months later, Mr. HOPKINS found himself in Korea, ministering to the tough gunners of 4th Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. The ceasefire between United Nations forces and North Korea had been signed on July 27, after three years of fighting up and down the Korean Peninsula.
Mr. Ormond wasn't prepared for the "terrible devastation [and] dire poverty" he found. "Everything constructed of brick or stone had been levelled. Pusan was a city of huts constructed from metal ration containers. The stench was so high that you could smell the city from 10 miles away."
Retired lieutenant-colonel Scotty Lamb of St. Albert, Alberta., met Mr. HOPKINS when they were working at a hospital in Japan, before Mr. HOPKINS went to Korea. They remained close Friends for 50 years. "He was a very conscientious padre, very popular with the troops. He mixed with them quite well. He had the unique ability of reaching people."
Famous for delivering his sermons in a booming voice, Mr. HOPKINS had a clarity and certainty of faith, said his daughter Sareena. "When it came to his role as a chaplain, he saw no conflict between his Christian values and military service. This never wavered. My father believed strongly in justice and democracy and was a realist -- he was certain that military weakness would leave Canada vulnerable."
During the 1960s and 1970s, Mr. HOPKINS served at bases across Canada and in Germany. Busy seven days a week conducting services, writing sermons, supervising church committees, ministering to the sick and dying, going on field exercises with the troops, Mr. HOPKINS also counselled the suicidal and helped save marriages.
"[He also] carried the heavy burden of informing a soldier that their parent, spouse, or worst of all, child, had died, and getting them through that terrible time. He did this literally hundreds of times," said Mr. HOPKINS's son, Michael.
Canon Bill FAIRLIE of Ottawa's Christ Church Cathedral met Mr. HOPKINS when the latter was serving in Germany, from 1972-76. "He was a very capable churchman, [and] a very able soldier. He was very colourful, with quick wit. He loved a good party with interesting people. He was extremely loyal to the military, but he wasn't afraid to criticize it when necessary."
In 1981, Mr. HOPKINS was promoted to brigadier-general and appointed Chaplain General (Protestant) of the Canadian Forces. Suddenly, he was responsible to the chief of the defence staff for the moral and spiritual well-being of Protestant personnel in all the different branches of the military.
That was a big job, to say the least. He visited every base and station, supervised the 150-plus regular and reserve chaplains, and related pastorally to the troops. Mr. HOPKINS also officiated at military investitures at Rideau Hall and the national Remembrance Day observances in Ottawa. He also "argued vigorously, and I believe convincingly, for the centrality of moral and spiritual values in the definition of Canada's military ethos."
Mr. HOPKINS relished the challenges he faced in an increasingly secular world and was fond of comparing it to being a mosquito in a nudist colony. "We have unlimited pastoral opportunity," he said in 1983. "A civilian rector can't go into the factories or offices where his parishioners work and join them in their coffee breaks and go and live with them as we do."
Religious pluralism was also an important feature of Mr. HOPKINS's job. "In our caring ministry, religious doctrine and tradition are seldom factors, but in the ongoing life of worship and Christian nurture this is something that places limitations on us and tests our skills and ingenuity."
In 1981, Mr. HOPKINS was made an officer of the Order of Military Merit. Three years later, he retired from the Canadian Forces after 32 years of service. Too young to retire for good, he spent the next 10 years as rector of the parish of Bradford, Ontario, where he succeeded in doubling his congregation. As a result, he was named Bradford's first-ever Citizen of the Year.
"He also, in very quiet ways, touched many individuals and families. Often, in the middle of the night [he helped] someone in distress and many credit him for their lives. Dad was a rare combination of a strong and effective leader, someone with the gift of walking quietly through troubled times," said Sareena HOPKINS.
Ormond Archibald HOPKINS was born on August 18, 1925, in Perth, Ontario He died as a result of complications from an aneurysm on May 15, 2006, in Ottawa. He was 80. He leaves his wife, Ernestine, daughter Sareena and son Michael.

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FAIRMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-01-12 published
DONCHUK, Alexander Samuel
At the Southampton Care Centre on Monday, January 9th, 2006, at the age of 84 years, Chuck DONCHUCK of Port Elgin and formerly of Timmins (Gold Centre). Loving husband of the former Theresa McDONALD. Wonderful father to Leona and her husband Harry ORSZTYNOWICZ of Port Elgin, Marlaine and her husband Michael NORKUM of Owen Sound, and Melinda and her husband Dino MARTIN of Fairbanks, Alaska. Poppa to Tanya, Andrea and her husband Shawn SWAN, Jeffrey, Kristen and her husband Jeremy QUINN, Drew, Megan, Kaila and her husband Chris CAMERON, and Brett MARTIN. Great-grandfather to baby Ethan Swan. Brother of Mary and her husband Bernard Spence of Timmins. He is predeceased by two sisters Sonia BOWKER and Kay FAIRMAN. Friends may call at the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin on Thursday evening, January 12th from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. Funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Friday morning, January 13th, at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Mike FRANCIS officiating. Interment Sanctuary Park Cemetery. A gathering with the family will follow in the Reception Suite of the funeral home. Memorial contributions to Canadian Food for Children would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Portrait and memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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FAIRMAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-01-13 published
FAIRMAN, Carl Richard
In loving memory of Carl Richard FAIRMAN, dear Husband, Dad and Papa, who passed away two years ago, January 13th, 2004.
Wishing today as we wished before,
That God could have spared you many years more.
In our hearts your memory is kept,
To love. to cherish and to never forget.
-Lovingly remembered by wife Marlene, children Brian; Bill and Bonnie; son-in-law, Daryl; daughter-in-law Anne and grandchildren Cody, Shayna, Karley and Karling.
Page B5

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FAIRMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-02-17 published
BESRUKY, Eugene
By Sandra FAIRMAN and Iris WILDE, Page A18
Force of nature, Renaissance man. Born July 11, 1949, in Malartic, Quebec Died August 30, 2005, in Ottawa, of complications from paraplegia, aged 56.
Eugene BESRUKY once said that if he ever wrote his autobiography he'd call it Looking Up. This title conveyed not only the way he saw the world from his wheelchair, but his optimism and boundless determination.
Eugene contracted polio as an infant. Growing up on a farm in Grimsby, Ontario, he was sent to a school for disabled children. When province-wide testing was done in Grade 7, Eugene's results confirmed that intelligence does not reside in the legs. He went on to attend his local high school, University of Waterloo and he graduated from Carleton University.
After university, spinal surgery meant spending 11 months on his back in hospital. A pragmatist as well as an optimist, he used his IV pole as a macramé frame and sold his wares to visitors and staff. Money was a driving force in Eugene's life: it meant independence, security -- and toys.
In 1976, Eugene joined the federal civil service and worked for 29 years as a criminal investigator at the Competition Bureau where he was known as Gene, "Ruky," or "Wheels." He was one of the bureau's best negotiators
Eugene's life was a whirlwind of activity. He was a superb cook and had mastered the making of sausage, cheese, wine and beer. He enjoyed music, gardening, electronics, sailing, fishing, and horseback riding. Eugene was active in Toastmasters, studied gemology, grew orchids, skied downhill, went scuba diving in Curaçao, crossed the continent in his van several times; photographed the rain-forest of Costa Rica, kayaked in the Yukon and canoed among alligators in the Everglades -- going where no wheelchair had gone before. Most recently, he was learning to fly a glider. As his friend George asked at his memorial, "How many of us have done all of those things? How many have done any of them?"
Of Eugene's passions, photography was the most enduring. He won prizes for his work, which was exhibited at the National Press Gallery in Ottawa. His photograph of a young girl playing with leaves was used by Nikon in a promotional brochure. When his friend Klaus asked why he needed such cumbersome equipment to take pictures, Eugene said: "Because I want to make art and this is the only way I know how."
Perhaps his most surprising undertaking, for a man of action, was his decision to explore his spiritual side with the Inner Journey group. This led him to his wife, Rita FINNIGAN, a person as extraordinary as Eugene himself -- only quieter about it.
The stories of Eugene's exploits will be told for years to come. There was the time he talked his way into centre-ice seats at the World Figure Skating Championships, without tickets. The time he arrived unannounced on his Friends' doorstep with a hundred pounds of milk and declared, "We're making cheese." And the time he was to meet a client to whom he had only spoken on the phone. When asked how they would recognize each other, Eugene said he'd be wearing a red carnation, but didn't mention his wheelchair.
Eugene's spirit of showmanship was evident to the last. At his memorial service, when his friend Joanne spoke the words, "Eugene was one of the most powerful people I knew" the power went out. The dark room erupted in cheers, clapping and shouts of "Way to go, Eugene!" Later the power failed a second time as the final piece of music drew to a close. Family, Friends and colleagues sang the last refrain: "I did it my way." The lights never did come back on.
Sandra and Iris are two of Eugene's many Friends.

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FAIRMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-02-10 published
COSGROVE, William " Bill" Joseph
(Member Session Board and Chairman of Board of Managers for Knox Presbyterian Church, 26 year Member of Gideons International)
At his residence on Wednesday, February 8, 2006, Bill COSGROVE of R.R.#4, Havelock, in his 74th year. Beloved husband of Elaine GRAHAM for over 51 years. Dear father of Randy and his wife Kelly and Robert and his wife Lori-Ann both of Ajax and Karen HUBERT and her husband Dave of Whitby. Loving grandpa of Christopher, Kyle, Carolyn, Courtney; Bradley, Blair; Jennifer and Renee. Brother of Marie FAIRMAN and Jim COSGROVE. Also survived by his nieces and nephews. Resting at the Brett "Havelock" Chapel (705-778-2231) 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Friday. Service at the Havelock United Church on Saturday at 2: 00 p.m. Reverend Roger MILLAR officiating. Temporary entombment Havelock Rotary Vault. Spring interment Pine Grove Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made (by cheque only) to the Gideons or Knox Presbyterian Church.

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FAIRS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-09-18 published
McCONNELL, June E.
Peacefully at Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Saturday, September 16, 2006. June E. McCONNELL of R.R.#1, Eden in her 80th year. Beloved wife of the late Homer "Spike" McCONNELL (2003.) Dear mother of Mark, Paul and wife Dianne and Brian and wife Lucy all of Cambridge. Grandfather to 8 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. Sister to William FAIRS and Robert FAIRS and wife Carol. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews. Born in Saint Thomas on March 30, 1927 Cremation has taken place. A public memorial service will be held at Saint Paul's United Church, Aylmer on Wednesday, September 20, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment of ashes will follow at the Aylmer Cemetery. Rev Don GRAHAM, officiating. Donations to the Kidney Foundation would be appreciated. Condolences can be expressed at kebbelfuneralhome.com

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FAIRS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-09-24 published
Surgeon excelled at four sports
By John HERBERT, Free Press Golf Reporter, Sun., September 24, One of Western's all-time sports greats, Reg ORT was also one of the university's most outstanding citizens.
The 78-year-old ORT died recently in Tillsonburg Memorial Hospital after a long illness.
A funeral service was held Friday in Tillsonburg where he practised general surgery for 33 years.
A member of Western's W Club sports hall of fame since 1984, ORT was recruited by long-time friend Jack FAIRS to come to Western from his hometown of Welland to play football for coach Johnny METRAS.
Before graduating with an honours degree in physical education in 1953, ORT starred in football, swimming, hockey and wrestling.
He was a member of the 1953 Western football team that won the Yates Cup Ontario senior intercollegiate championship for the eighth time.
After teaching for a few years, ORT returned to Western to study medicine and graduated in 1957.
He also earned his fellowship in general surgery in 1962 and a fellowship in the American College of Surgeons in 1966.
While at Western, ORT also won two of Western's most prestigious awards for achievement in athletics, academics and university life -- the Doctor Claude Brown Memorial Award and the Hon. G. Howard Ferguson Award.
FAIRS first met ORT in Welland in the late 1940s when they played on the same baseball team. At the time, FAIRS was also recruiting talent for the Western football team and became aware ORT was an outstanding high school prospect.
"He was a big lineman and Johnny METRAS obviously liked him," said FAIRS, also an assistant coach with the Mustangs. "In those days, linemen weren't as big as today and he was bigger than most when he came to Western. He was an outstanding player who played with some of the best teams Western had at the time."
"He was a four-star athlete," said another long-time friend Bob GAGE, a former London Free Press sports writer who covered Western sports for decades. "He played four sports and that's not done today. He was one of the best and one of the last to play four sports. He was one of the last to graduate in physical education and then become a doctor.
"What impressed me was his athletic ability," GAGE said. "He was certainly a likeable guy. Everybody liked him."
ORT is survived by his wife of 50 years, Joan (CRANSTON) ORT, and their children Chris ORT, Lisa RAHN of Vancouver and Robert ORT of Guelph.
Joan ORT was a teacher at Central secondary school.

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FAIRS o@ca.on.peterborough.north_monaghan.peterborough.the_peterborough_examiner 2006-03-02 published
FAIRS, Patricia June Fairs (née FINN)
Passed away peacefully in Calgary, Alberta, on February 23, 2006 at the age of 76 years. Patricia is together again with her beloved husband, Robert FAIRS and lovingly remembered by her children, Neil (Linda) DECK of Fallis, Alberta, Jeffrey (Shelagh) DECK of Calgary, Alberta, Michael W. DECK of Douro, Ontario and Penny (David) MONTGOMERY of Calgary. Grandmother of Irvin (Melissa,) Tanya, Theresa (Haddy), Brandy (Ryan), Lisa, Andrea, Joshua (Sara), Jason (Kim), Amy (Dale), Amanda (Adam), Jennifer (Jason), Alisha and Carly. Great-grandmother of Ethan, Daniel, Veronica, Jacalyn, Jasmine, Jewel, Kasandra, Autumn, Cameron and Matthew. Special Auntie to Patrick and Barbie Jo. Those wishing to pay their respects may do so at Kaye Funeral Home and Memorial Chapel, 539 George St. N., Peterborough, on Saturday, March 4, 2006. 1-4 p.m. Prayers at 2 p.m.

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FAIRSERVICE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-09-28 published
FAIRSERVICE, Elaine (née TROTT)
Peacefully, at Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, on Wednesday, September 27, 2006. Elaine FAIRSERVICE (née TROTT) in her 69th year. Loving wife of George, and mother of Bob (Doreen) of London, Sandy of London and Peter (Rose) of Strathroy. Dear sister of Fran (John) WOOD, Mary-Margaret BOYD, and sister-in-law of Isabel FAIRSERVICE (Raynie BUJOLD.) Survived by many nieces, nephews and 4 grandchildren. Friends will be received at the Evans Funeral Home, 648 Hamilton Road (1 block east of Egerton) on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the Evans Chapel on Saturday, September 30, 2006, at 11: 00 a.m. with The Rev. Gwen FRASER, of St. George's Anglican Church, officiating. Interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, London Regional Cancer Centre or Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences can be expressed at www.evansfh.ca. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mrs. FAIRSERVICE.

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FAIRWEATHER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-02-28 published
DEANE, Kenneth Charles " Tex"
Unexpectedly on Saturday February 25/'06 as a result of an automobile accident, Kenneth Charles "Tex" DEANE, passed away in his 45th year. Dear husband of Lucie SIROIS of Sudbury. Beloved son of Catherine DEANE and the late Robert "Diz" DEANE (1997.) Affectionately known as Mrs. DEANE's little boy. Much loved brother, confidante and best friend to Bill and Lynn DEANE, Nancy and Don CAMPBELL, Barb and Grant TEEPLE, all of Aylmer, Sue and Tom MORGAN of London and Judy DEANE of Caledon Village. Proud uncle of Ryan and Brett DEANE, Adam, Sandy and Matt TEEPLE, Kayla CAMPBELL, all of Aylmer, Darcy and Brad CRAMER of Mechanicsburg, Pennsylvania, Morgan FAIRWEATHER and Bryan MORGAN of London, Curt SWEETAPPLE and Taylor WATKINS of Caledon Village. Son-in-law to Jackie and Dan SIROIS, brother-in-law to Dan SIROIS and Karen McEWEN, Lise SIROIS and Anne SIROIS. Special nephew to Norma and the late Chuck BLACKWELL (1993) of Saint Thomas. Helen and the late Max HUDSON (1990,) Bill and Gladys DEANE and Bill MANN, all of London. Will be sadly missed by his cousins, extended family and Friends. Will be especially missed by cousin Bob DEANE, " Super Bob" of Port Stanley. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury, 705-673-3611/ 705-673-2525. Visitation Wed. March 1st, 12-2 (family), 2-5 and 7-9. Private family service Thurs. at 9: 30 a.m. Funeral procession to Caruso Club, 385 Haig Street, Sudbury, for the service at 11 a.m. Cremation to follow. Memorial Service to be held in London at a later date. In keeping with Ken's true spirit, donations to the London Regional Cancer program, 800 Commissioners Rd. E., London, N6C 2V3, would be greatly appreciated. "It is not for the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again; who knows great devotions and spends himself in a worthy cause; who, at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement; and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat." Theodore Roosevelt

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FAIRWEATHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-09-11 published
Fisherman dies off Port Credit
Son, girlfriend survive 3-metre swells
3 in water 90 minutes before rescue
By Phinjo GOMBU and Jim WILKES, Staff Reporters
A routine fishing trip for salmon off Port Credit on Lake Ontario turned into a tragedy when a 16-foot aluminum boat suddenly began to draw water and capsized, killing a 55-year-old Georgetown man.
And for almost 90 minutes after the boat sank yesterday morning, Bryan RICHARDS, 27, and his girlfriend Elizabeth SUTTON, 24, hung on for dear life, bobbing up and down in three-metre waves, desperately waiting for help
SUTTON had a life jacket on, while RICHARDS, who didn't, lay flat across a floating seat from the boat, all the while clinging to his dead father. RICHARDS said his father, Albert "Roger" RICHARDS, died within moments of hitting the water. Police said it is unknown whether the father was wearing a life jacket, but his son said he was.
"My dad started panicking," said RICHARDS yesterday from his hospital bed at the Trillium Health Centre where he was being treated for hypothermia.
"I reached over, grabbed him, and as I pulled him back he turned around and said 'I'm cold' and then passed away."
"I knew he was dead. It was just the look on his face."
RICHARDS said the three had headed out on their boat called the Left-Handed Newfie around 7.30 a.m. to take part in a salmon derby. Around 9.30 a.m., just as they were in the process of changing lures on a downrigger system, the boat suddenly began to draw water at the back and went down, stern first, throwing all three into the water.
"It went back, up, down," said RICHARDS, describing how his girlfriend managed to grab on to a life jacket for herself in the nick of time.
RICHARDS said while he bobbed in the waves in a bay just west of Port Credit holding on to his dead father, he tried to keep in touch with SUTTON. Both of them shouted back and forth at each other, encouraging each other to stay conscious and saying they loved each other, he said.
RICHARDS said that throughout the experience, rage built inside him because he had his father in his arms and just wanted to get SUTTON to safety.
"This is a dream and I want it to end right now," he recalled thinking, but since it wasn't, he said he began to think about his mother and his girlfriend's 14-month-old baby.
"I wanted to do more but I couldn't," he said. "I wasn't going to let (my father) go."
Several fishing boats passed by but didn't see them despite the fact that fishing gear was strewn all over the water. One boat finally saw them and immediately radioed a distress signal around 11 a.m.
That was when police and other boaters converged around the scene to mount the rescue.
Both RICHARDS, who works as a shipper and receiver with PL Foods in Georgetown, and SUTTON were taken to the Trillium Health Centre. SUTTON was discharged late yesterday afternoon, while RICHARDS was kept overnight for observation.
RICHARDS said his father, whose passion was fishing, was on disability from a workplace accident in a brake factory that had resulted in his right leg being amputated.
He said his father, whom he called his dearest friend, had taken part in countless fishing derbies in the area over the decades. "All I know is that I won't step on another boat," said RICHARDS. "I may not even go fishing anymore. It was 'our' thing."
Among the first on the scene of the rescue were Peter FAIRWEATHER and Dan LETUAL of Oakville, who found RICHARDS and SUTTON shivering in another fisherman's boat. The son was reaching over the stern, holding onto his father's leg, unable to pull him over the gunwale.
"There was no way to hoist him," said FAIRWEATHER, 42. "He was a pretty big guy."
He said they looped a rope around the drowned man's leg, so the son could be treated by police and paramedics.
"The son was definitely in shock," he said. "That was just his reaction to hold on to him."
FAIRWEATHER said it was a rough day on the lake, with waves nearly three metres high.
"We were bouncing around a lot," he said, adding that in such conditions things can go from good to bad in an instant. "It doesn't take much water in the back of the boat to swamp it."
"If you get hit by a wave sideways, the whole thing goes down in 30 seconds it's gone," said fishing charter operator Brian SLANEY, 45, whose huge boat dwarfs the 16-foot open aluminum craft belonging to RICHARDS. " You have no time to get on your radio and call.
"Wind is a powerful thing, water is powerful. I don't think it would take long for them to start getting into trouble" once the boat started filling with water, he said. "It's a real tragedy."
Another boater said it was "the worst conditions I've ever seen," recalling how the wind-whipped waves pushed his boat's bow "way up into air."
Paul KRISTOFIC, who runs Salmon Strike Charters, was about three kilometres offshore when he heard the mayday call over his radio.
"That's your duty as a boater on the water," he said. "So I pulled the rods up and burned over there as quick as I could."
He saw debris from the sunken boat floating in the water, including two seats later brought to shore by police.
"This is a tight community down here," he said. "It really hits home.
"The water was pretty rough this morning, so you just have to be careful out there."
He called the man a "friendly guy" who hung out at the dock to chat up the charter captains and learn about good fishing spots.
Fishing Friends said Roger RICHARDS' nickname was also the name of his boat. Others said they simply called him Lefty, because his amputated leg had been replaced by a prosthetic one.
SLANEY recalled the man as "a real jovial guy" who loved to prowl the docks near the mouth of the Credit River.
"This is where he liked to be," he said. "That's all we talked about -- boating and fishing.
"It was his passion."
KRISTOFIC said boaters and anglers alike have to be ready for trouble.
"Accidents happen everywhere, on the road and on the water," he said. "So you just have to be careful and make sure you're well-prepared out there for anything.
"A lot of times the water can be pretty cold, so you should wear your lifejacket all the time."
LETUAL was more pointed.
"You're a fool to go out if you're not wearing a life jacket," he said.

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FAITZ o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-28 published
SIMPSON, Roberta (née CRAIG)
Peacefully at Huronlea Home, Brussels, on Thursday, January 26, 2006. Mrs. Roberta (CRAIG) SIMPSON of Brussels and formerly of Blyth in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late John SIMPSON (1990.) Loving mother of Joan and Donald DEITNER of Grey Township. Cherished grandmother of Anthony, Francis and Madelaine. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Annie WIGHT of Listowel, William and Isabelle CRAIG of Blyth and Olive FAITZ of Stoney Creek. Predeceased by her parents Robert and Ada May CRAIG and by sisters and brothers Agnes CRAIG, Ada May CRAIG, Harvey and Margaret CRAIG, Velma and Orval COOK, Gordon and Ruth CRAIG, Margaret and Ed CRAIG, Mary CRAIG, David CRAIG and Steve FAITZ. Friends will be received at the Blyth Visitation Centre of the Falconer Funeral Homes, 407 Queen Street, Blyth, on Sunday from 2-5 p.m. and on Monday, January 30, 2006 from 1 p.m. until time of service at 2 p.m. Spring interment Blyth Union Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations to the charity of one's choice would be greatly appreciated.

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