CREERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-10 published
Peter BERRY, Naval Officer (1923-2006)
During the Second World War, he had a hand in sinking three U-boats and later became a pilot on Canada's last carrier
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Peter BERRY was just a couple of years out of Lisgar Collegiate in Ottawa when the Canadian destroyer he was on sunk a German U-boat in the English Channel. H.M.C.S. Kootenay and its sister ship, H.M.C.S. Ottawa, helped by a British corvette, sank the German submarine U-678 on July 6, 1944, just off the English coast near the seaside resort of Brighton.
The chase had taken more than two days and sub-lieutenant BERRY was awake for almost all of it. He was the operations officer working in a room just below the bridge. Chasing down a submarine wasn't as easy as it looked in the movies. It took hours, even days, and required sonar and radar and all the other leading-edge technology of the time.
"He worked at a table with a mechanized control underneath with lights that calculated the course of the ship. He worked to plot the course of the submarine we were chasing," said Ray CREERY, later a captain in the navy who also served on the Kootenay with Mr. BERRY during the war. "I don't think he could have had more than a couple of hours sleep, here and there."
The Kootenay was one of the top submarine hunters in the Royal Canadian Navy and sub-lieutenant BERRY was on board for all three of her kills. The next two U-boat sinkings were in the Bay of Biscay, on August 18 and August 20. Mr. BERRY was mentioned in dispatches.
When Peter BERRY joined the Royal Canadian Navy he was assigned to the Kootenay in the North Atlantic. The warships ran from Saint John's, Newfoundland., to Londonderry in Northern Ireland. By chance, he and Mr. CREERY served on the same ship. They had been in Grade 7 together at Rockcliffe Park Public School in Ottawa. The winter of 1943-44 was particularly bitter, and Mr. CREERY remembers gales so strong that the under-powered merchant ships they were escorting would make no headway. "We had to go and round them up and bring them back into the convoy. Maybe the toughest part was refuelling the warships at sea from tankers."
In the spring of 1944, the Kootenay and other ships were taken off convoy duty and assigned to Escort Group 11, one of the specialist submarine hunting groups in preparation for the invasion of Normandy. There were 126 Canadian vessels involved in D-Day, June 6, 1944. The Kootenay was patrolling the western approaches to the English Channel, acting as a blocker against German U-boats.
"Escort Group 11, of which Kootenay was a part, was the most successful inshore submarine hunting group in the Normandy campaign," says Marc Milner, professor of history at the University of New Brunswick and author of The U-Boat Hunters, The Royal Canadian Navy and the Offensive against Germany's Submarines.
After the war, Mr. BERRY stayed in the navy and eventually became captain of H.M.C.S. Algonquin, a destroyer. The Algonquin was a V-class destroyer that Canada bought from the Royal Navy. It remained in service until 1970.
One of his first post-war assignments was on land as flag lieutenant to Admiral Rollo Mainguy. Part of the time that involved living in the admiral's house in Halifax. His son, Dan Mainguy, who also went on to become an admiral, recalls the slightly older Lieutenant BERRY and his prodigious appetite. "He would empty the fridge, eating plates of chicken and huge amounts of ice cream, but he never gained weight," he said. "He was kind of unique in that he became a pilot after being an observer. He served in that wonderful era when we had aircraft carriers."
Mr. BERRY served on many ships in his post-war career, including H.M.C.S. Magnificent and H.M.C.S. Bonaventure, both aircraft carriers. Peter WORTHINGTON, the Toronto Sun columnist, also served as a naval flier and remembers him as a dashing figure who managed to remain a bachelor until he was 33.
Peter BERRY was born in Shanghai where his father worked for Sun Life Insurance. The family returned to Canada when Peter was about 2. He went to private school, Ashbury College, for a year or so, but his father thought he was too involved in sports and so sent him to Lisgar Collegiate. Mr. BERRY went to Queen's University to study engineering but quit to join the navy.
After leaving the navy in 1964 with the rank of commander, he retired to his farm at Milton, just outside Toronto. It was more than a hobby farm and there the family tended a large flock of chickens as well a herd of beef cattle. His children remember he liked to execute navy-style, kitchen haircuts -- much to their embarrassment when they showed up at school.
Mr. BERRY tried a number of different business ventures, including a project to build a small submarine that could navigate under the Arctic ice. He also translated his love of British sports cars into a car dealership in Mississauga, Ontario One half of it sold British Leyland products, the other half Volkswagens. When British Leyland went under, both dealerships closed.
Mr. BERRY had many narrow scrapes throughout life, both in the navy and in civilian life. In September of 1948, he was an observer aboard a Fairey Firefly, when it ran off the deck while landing on H.M.C.S. Magnificent. He and the pilot were picked from the water. The incident was recorded by someone on deck with a camera. Many years later, he was helping out on a neighbour's farm when he severed his arm with a post-hole auger. The arm was later successfully reattached.
As he was being wheeled into the operating room, Mr. BERRY quipped to his wife, "Well, we always wanted a Lord Nelson in the family," a reference to the one-armed British Admiral who won the battle of Trafalgar in 1805.
Peter Cushing BERRY was born in Shanghai on October 24, 1923. He died in Milton, Ontario, on February 13, 2006 after complications from a fall. He leaves his wife, Anne, a daughter and three sons.

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CREERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-07-14 published
George BAIN, 86: Political columnist set standard
A must-read in Canada for nearly 40 years
Helped clarify muddle over 'fuddle duddle'
By Isabel TEOTONIO, Staff Reporter
For Canadian political junkies from the 1950s through the 1980s, George BAIN's newspaper column was a must-read.
Witty, urbane, and an incisive observer of Parliament Hill and Washington, BAIN's elegant prose and musings about politics and politicians informed and delighted readers for more than 40 years.
Remember "fuddle duddle," the late prime minister Pierre Trudeau's explanation of an expletive he directed to an opposition member of Parliament in the House of Commons? Thank BAIN for setting the record straight on it.
The rest of the Ottawa press gallery reported only that Trudeau "mouthed an obscenity" in the now-famous 1968 incident. In his Globe and Mail column, BAIN wrote that Trudeau told the member of Parliament to fuck off, and without the dashes -- the first time the word had ever been published in a Canadian newspaper.
BAIN, who also wrote for The Toronto Star, died in Halifax yesterday (May 14) at age 86. He had suffered from Alzheimer's disease.
"He wrote the most important column in Canada," said Val SEARS, a former Star reporter who worked with him. "He was the most stylish of the people writing about Canadian politics. His columns were often hilarious, which made him tremendously popular."
"George wrote with real wit and style," said Tim CREERY, a former Southam News and Montreal Star reporter who worked with him in Ottawa and Washington.
"He was clever and funny and not a guy who accepted the party line."
BAIN's column in the Globe set the standard to which political columnists aspired. He was considered the unofficial opposition in Ottawa and never cowered from pointing out when politicians' words didn't square with their actions.
Allan FOTHERINGHAM, who himself occupies a formidable place in Canadian journalism, once called him "the wittiest columnist ever to grace Ottawa."
When the late Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio giant Peter GZOWSKI was asked if he read BAIN, he responded, "Do Catholic priests read the Bible?"
BAIN's " Letters from Lilac, Saskatchewan.," were columns in which he created fictional prairie reactions to political events. The columns distilled his trademark humour and wit, were hugely popular and were later published in a book.
Born in Toronto in 1920, BAIN quit school at age 16 to work as a copy boy at the Star for $6 a week. But he ended up back in school, vowing to return to the paper over the summer.
"I can't explain where his interest in newspaper work arose but he had the reputation of being a funny guy -- not a class clown at North Toronto Collegiate," said brother Ian BAIN, who attended the same school.
When he returned to the Star that summer, the editor who'd promised him a job was on vacation.
Rather than "waste a streetcar ticket," as BAIN later told a reporter, he went over to the Toronto Telegram and was hired on the spot.
He worked there until 1941, when he became an Royal Canadian Air Force bomber pilot -- despite a fear of flying that lasted throughout his life. He served in Britain and North Africa, piloting Wellington bombers on raids against Italy. He was given temporary leave to act in a film about the air force.
At the end of the war, BAIN was lured from the Telegram by the Globe, where he wrote about municipal politics. He eventually moved on to Queen's Park and Parliament Hill.
In 1957, BAIN opened the Globe's first London bureau, where he covered Europe, Africa and the Middle East. From 1960 to 1964 he was posted to Washington and reported on the civil rights movement, the Cuban missile crisis and the assassination of John F. Kennedy.
In 1964, BAIN returned to Ottawa to begin work as the national affairs columnist and remained there for nearly a decade.
He returned to the Star as editorial page editor in 1973, but realized he didn't like the committee process of writing editorials. "Writing editorials is like wetting your pants while wearing a blue serge suit," he once said. "Nobody notices and it leaves you with a warm feeling."
The next year, the Star sent him to London as a European correspondent.
Editors at the Star knew him as a "perfectionist" who would rewrite his opening paragraph 30 times before being satisfied.
BAIN's last newspaper column ran in the Star on August 10, 2001 a fitting end to a career launched in those same pages.
"There are very few people to whom you could apply the word giant. Pierre Berton was one and I think Walter Stewart was one and certainly George BAIN was one," said former King's College journalism professor Eugene MEESE, who worked with BAIN.
BAIN and his wife Marion were eventually seduced by Nova Scotia and in 1982 they designed and built their home in Mahone Bay, complete with a wine cellar to house his vintage collection.
While out east, he continued writing about wine while serving as dean of journalism at King's College in Halifax and maintaining a critical watch on Ottawa for two Halifax dailies.
BAIN authored books including I've Been Around and Around and Around, Letters from Lilac, Champagne is for Breakfast, Gotcha and Nursery Rhymes to be Read Aloud by Young Parents with Old Children, which won the Stephen Leacock Medal for Humour.
After Marion died in 1998, BAIN's health deteriorated. He is survived by his son Christopher and grand_sons Sam and Jonathan, his brother Ian of Maple Ridge, British Columbia, and sisters Moyna SEIDERMAN and Sheila BAIN of Vancouver.

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CREGAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-18 published
FOLEY, Christopher Columba
Passed away at home, on Good Friday, April 14, 2006, at the age of 80, in the High Park neighbourhood where he lived for more than 40 years. Christopher was born in Kells, County Meath, Ireland on May 10, 1925. He was the beloved father of Margaret FOLEY and devoted husband to his late wife, Anne Teresa, née CLIFFORD. He is survived by his loving wife Marie Terese, née BONENFANT. Christopher was known affectionately as Christy by his wide circle of Friends, many of whom shared his passion for Irish culture. His was a life marked by a devotion to those institutions that nurtured the values he held dear, among them, the Catholic Church, the St. Vincent de Paul Society and numerous Irish social organizations. Although he moved away from his native Ireland as a teenager, Christy carried his roots with him wherever he went. He flew to Canada in 1948 on one of the early trans-Atlantic flights in search of greater opportunity. It was in Toronto that his enterprising spirit rose to the fore. Christy worked for C.N. Rail and the Royal York Hotel. Saving enough to buy his first home within six months, Christy turned it into yet another opportunity - becoming a landlord and giving other young Irish men a roof over their heads. He worked with the Metro Toronto Waterworks Department for 30 years and continued a close relationship with fellow retirees through the rest of his life. Family, work and his many community activities filled his days. Sickness did nothing to quell his stubborn streak nor dash his great love of travel. Christy will be sorely missed and fondly remembered. He leaves behind his cherished sisters-in-law Margaret HERRING, Evelyn FOLEY and longtime family friend, Mildred CREGAN. He is also survived by his loving nephews and nieces and their families: Ray FOLEY, Ann PALEN, Brian and Thomas HEGARTY, Thomas CARROLL, Peter, Gerard and Michael O'LOUGHLIN and Angela BYRNE. Christy, the youngest of six children born to Margaret SMITH and Thomas FOLEY, is predeceased by all his siblings, Kathleen, Gerty, May, Lily and brother Paddy. Special thanks to his doctor, Eckhart SCHWEIHOFER and Margaret GORECKI, the home care worker who became such a good friend. Visitation for our beloved Christy will be held Tuesday, April 18 and Wednesday, April 19 from 2-4 and 7- 9 p.m. at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, Toronto, at Windermere Ave., east of Jane subway. Funeral Mass will be held Thursday, April 20 at 10: 30 a.m. at Our Lady of Sorrows Church, 3055 Bloor Street West. In lieu of flowers, donations in the name of Christopher Foley to the St. Vincent de Paul Society or ShareLife would be much appreciated.

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-03-17 published
DAY, Bruce
The family of the late Bruce DAY, who passed away peacefully at home with his loving wife and 5 sons by his side on February 22, 2006, wish to express their sincere thanks to relatives, Friends and neighbours for their sympathy cards, flowers and donations. Thank you to Doctor CREIGHTON for his care over the past 4 years. A very special thanks to Victorian Order of Nurses nurses Laura and Valerie for their daily visits. You are truly the best. Thanks to our grand_son Owen DAY for the beautiful song he sang for his Grandpa. Thanks to Jim and Marion for all their help. Pat for being there when I needed her, and to Cathy SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER for the delicious lunch. Thanks also to Brian E. Wood Funeral Home for their kindness and support, and Rev. Roy COWIESON for his heartfelt service. Bruce touched the lives of many people and will be truly missed.
- Gloria DAY and Family
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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-04-21 published
MALLARD, Kathleen (née HARRINGTON)
Passed away peacefully on Wednesday, April 19th, 2006 at Golden Dawn Nursing Home in Lions head in her 95th year. Beloved wife of the late Harold Melford MALLARD (1992.) Dear mother of Marion (Dave) HILL of Sauble Beach and Jack (Jeanette) MALLARD of Oxenden. Cherished grandmother of Sharon (Dieter) NIEMEIER of Cargill, Roger (Kirsten) HILL of Owen Sound, David (Cecile) MALLARD of Oxenden, Kathleen (Bruce) CREIGHTON of Oakville, Sandra (Elliott) GOOD of Oliphant and Deanne (Blake) CROTHERS of Winnipeg, Manitoba and great-granchildren Webster, Elise, Emma Jane, Annaelise, Joshua, Ania, Kaitlin, Wesley, Jack, Hayden and Samuel. She will also be sadly missed by her many Friends. Kathleen was predeceased by her parents James and Mary HARRINGTON, her son Bert, grand_son Gary HILL and his wife Wendy and great-grand_son Dakota James MALLARD. Kathleen's family wish to express their heartfelt thanks to all who cared for her in all her years at Golden Dawn and in her final days there. The family will receive Friends at the George Funeral Home, 430 Mary Street, Wiarton on Monday, April 24th from 1: 00 p.m. until time of the service to celebrate her life at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Oxenden Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com
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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-02-10 published
BLAIR, Ella Eunice (HENDERSON)
Passed away peacefully at Longworth Long Term Care, London, Ontario on Wednesday, February 8, 2006. Ella Eunice (HENDERSON) BLAIR, formerly of Strathroy, in her 98th year. Beloved wife of the late Jack BLAIR (1988.) Dear aunt of R.J. CREIGHTON (Karen) of Walkerton, Ontario, Joan McFARLAND (the late Don) of Cookstown, Ontario, John HENDERSON (Joyce) of Salmon Arm, British Columbia, Rudi AKSIM (Martha) of Carp, Ontario and John ALLAN (Cherrie) of Courtice, Ontario. Fondly remembered by many great nieces and nephews. Ella was a well known teacher and she taught school in Lobo and Watford, Ontario for many years. Friends may call at the Denning Bros. Funeral Home, 32 Metcalfe Street West, Strathroy on Friday, February 10th from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral will be held from the funeral home on Saturday, February 11th at 1: 00 p.m. with Reverend Fred LUDOLPH officiating. Interment in Strathroy Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Ella.

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-02-18 published
WEEKS, Aileen (CREIGHTON)
At Mount Hope Centre for Long Term Care, (Marian Villa), London on Thursday, February 16, 2006, Aileen (CREIGHTON) WEEKS of London in her 83rd year. Beloved wife of the late Al WEEKS. Dear mother of Barbara HARRISON and her husband Brock of Calgary and Nancy HENRY and her husband Robert of London. Dear sister of Lyall CREIGHTON and his wife Sigrid of Vancouver and Warren CREIGHTON and his wife Jean of Ottawa. A private family service will be conducted in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London on Monday, February 20th with Reverend David R. CARROTHERS of Colborne Street United Church officiating. Interment in Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice. On line condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-03-22 published
CREIGHTON, Doctor Douglas G. (July 8, 1923-March 22, 2001)
An enthusiastic professor, Renaissance man, loving husband to the late Margaret, father and grandfather. He taught us all with his gentle manner and wit. Always missed and fondly remembered by his children, grandchildren and Friends.

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-04 published
CREIGHTON, John Osler (1908-2006)
John Osler CREIGHTON, F.R.C.P.. F.R.C.S., M.D., Captain (British Army), died peacefully at his home on Friday, 17 February, 2006. Born in Melita, Manitoba in 1908, he attended school in California and Manitoba before taking his medical training at Saint Thomas Hospital in London, England. son of the late James Forbes CREIGHTON, M.D., and Agnes May Cross, R.N., he married the late Lillian ('Pat') PATTERSON, a fellow speed skating champion. He served with the British Overseas Medical Corps in Nyasaland (Malawi) and the British Army in Kenya during the Second World War. He then served in Welland, Ontario as a physician and surgeon. While in semi-retirement he served in several northern communities. He and his wife Jenny traveled widely before retiring to their home on Belleview Beach in Wainfleet, Ontario. He is survived by his second wife, Jenny, son, David in Ottawa, daughter, Janet (McLEAN) in St. George, Ontario plus four grandchildren, four and a half great grandchildren, and stepson Ronald WING. Cremation has taken place. Ashes will be interred in Parklawn Cemetery, Sudbury, Ontario in May.

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-22 published
CREIGHTON, Doctor Douglas G. (July 8, 1923-March 22, 2001)
An enthusiastic professor Renaissance man, loving husband to the late Margaret, father and grandfather. He taught us all with his gentle manner and wit
Always missed and fondly remembered by his children, grand-children and Friends.

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-13 published
STAEBLER, Edna (CRESS) 100
Cookbooks brought author wide audience
Canadian Press, Page S7
Waterloo, Ontario -- Author Edna STAEBLER, who celebrated her 100th birthday in January, died yesterday at the nursing home where she had lived since suffering a minor stroke in 2003.
Ms. STAEBLER suffered another stroke on Saturday, said her longtime friend Judy CREIGHTON, a freelance food writer for the Canadian Press.
Her cookbook Food That Really Schmecks: Mennonite Country Cooking, published in 1968, brought Ms. STAEBLER distinction and a wide audience. Two other popular books in the Schmecks series were to follow.
In 1996, she was awarded the Order of Canada.
Aside from cookbooks, Ms. STAEBLER wrote historical non-fiction, including Cape Breton Harbour, published in 1972.
Ms. STAEBLER was a voracious reader, and established the annual Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction in 1991.
Edna (CRESS) STAEBLER was born January 15, 1906 in what is now known as Kitchener, Ontario; at the time, it was known as Berlin.
She grew up in the Kitchener area before moving on to receive a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Toronto in 1929 and later graduate from teachers college.
Ms. STAEBLER married in 1933 but the couple divorced in 1962. They had no children.
Funeral arrangements were not announced.

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-21 published
CREIGHTON, Wilson Lyall, B.S.M.E., B.S.E.E., P.Eng.
Much loved husband of Sigrid, father of Heidi, Ellen and the late Lori; and grandfather to Celia, Bean and Romy, father-in-law to Victor CHAN and Nicolas SCHOENENBERGER, died of cancer at age 80, on October 15, 2006, peacefully at home in West Vancouver, surrounded by his family. He is survived by brother Warren and sister-in-law Jean and family in Ottawa; predeceased by sister, Aileen and brother-in-law Al WEEKS of London, Ontario. Lyall was born in Ottawa on August 3rd, 1926 to Laura Pearl SPRATT and Wilson Robert CREIGHTON. He liked to say he was a 'capitalist'. Lyall served proudly in the Canadian Navy on the HMS 'Sheffield' and on the 'Warrior'. At 6'2' tall and thin as a reed, he was aptly nicknamed 'Lofty'. Lyall held degrees in mechanical and electrical engineering and had an extensive engineering career in Europe and Canada. He found employment as an engineer-in-training with Brown Boveri in Baden, Switzerland, where he met his wife, Sigrid. He was employed by Brown Boveri for over thirty-five years, rising to President in 1973. Subsequently he was President of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - International, and lastly President and owner of Dynamic Engineering Inc., in Vancouver, British Columbia. Lyall was a kind and gentle man, an optimist with a subtle sense of humour and a great love of history. His family wishes to thank the Palliative Care Unit of Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver, Doctor Jenny Shaw and nurses Donna Jimena and Tracy and all of the nurses and caregivers who attended Lyall at home, as well as Friends. The family will hold a private service but for those who wish to remember Lyall, donations to the N.O.A.C. Endowment Fund, P.O. Box 2402, 349 W. Georgia Street, Vancouver, British Columbia V6B 3W7 or The Mission to Seafarers, 401 East Waterfront Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6A 4G9 Tel: 604.253.4421, would be greatly appreciated. Hollyburn Funeral Home 604.922.1221 www.hollyburnfunerals.com

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-23 published
TOMPKINS, Ken
In his 75th year, Ken passed into the presence of Jesus on October 18th, 2006. He is survived by beloved wife, Lillian. A loving Father to Darrell (Audrey) TOMPKINS of Olds, Alberta; David (Hee Jeong) TOMKINS of Toronto, Ontario; Richard (Barb) CREIGHTON of Penticton, British Columbia and Jennifer of Mississauga, Ontario. Loved greatly by his grandchildren: Cheryl, Joel, Katie, Liam, Yuha, Christopher, and Margo. Dear brother to Keith (Loray) TOMPKINS of Colorado, Ina NORBO of Washington, Ruby FLETCHALL of Oregon. He is sadly predeceased by his brother Bill and sisters Orma and Laura. "And we know that all things work together for good to them that love God, to them who are called according to His purpose." Romans 8: 28 Memorial Services will be held on Tuesday, October 24, 2006 at 2 o'clock p.m. from Concordia Lutheran Church, 2800 South Main Street, Penticton, with Pastor Vic Morris officiating. Interment will follow at the Lakeview Columbarium, 775 Lower Bench Road, Penticton. Memorial Tributes may be made to Moog and Friends Hospice House in Penticton or the Canadian Cancer Society. Condolences may be directed to the family: parkview@vip.net

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CREIGHTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-02 published
McKenzie PORTER, Journalist (1911-2006)
Deliberately outrageous or outrageously deliberate, he was a Toronto Sun columnist who loved to upset sacred cows and apple carts. 'He had a forked tongue in both cheeks simultaneously'
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Erudite windbag. Pontificating right-wing snob. Upper-class Brit-twit monarchist loudmouth. Racist and misogynist. He'd heard them all, and they all rolled right off his tweeded back. Whatever else was said of him -- some of it unprintable -- McKenzie PORTER was either a fearless pricker of balloons who shot from the lip, or he was putting us on.
Turns out it was healthy dollops of both. In any case, he was the very personification of political incorrectness decades before the term was coined.
An incorrigible columnist for 19 years at the Toronto Sun -- whose 35th anniversary yesterday the Globe herewith graciously acknowledges -- and for its predecessor, the storied Toronto Telegram, Mr. PORTER was the master of elegant invective and purple phraseology. To say he was irrepressible or irreverent would be clichéd folderol, the kind he abhorred. A small sampling (with apologies all around):
Most feminists were "deservedly cast-off wives, pseudo-intellectual frumps and incurable lesbians, a vociferous motley of shrews, viragos, prudes and charlatans."
Many homosexuals "no longer are satisfied with acceptance and freedom from prosecution. They now seek approval, acclaim and authority."
All his "known enemies" were "pseudo-intellectuals, artistic charlatans and specious socialists with cunning eyes, avaricious inclinations, flaccid bodies, theatrical garments and ignoble records of service to Queen and country."
Any man who avoids household duties as "women's work" and cannot sew a button, boil an egg, operate a vacuum or scour a saucepan was "a sexist despot."
Was that last one the proverbial pot calling the kettle black? Who knows?
"One could never be sure whether PORTER was spoofing or serious, writing for real or effect," recalled his some-time boss at the Sun, Peter WORTHINGTON, in a 1999 column of his own. "Whatever, indisputably, he was the most graceful and stylish writer in the business."
One contemporary ended an interview some 30 years ago by wondering whether Mr. PORTER was being deliberately outrageous or outrageously deliberate. He finally decided that being preposterous was "a way of life" for the columnist… "even when PORTER is kidding, he's not kidding."
As in a column under the headline "Body Hygiene," in which he fulminated that defecating in the men's room at the office, while reading a newspaper, was "not merely theft of one's employer's time but often, an offence to the eyes, ears and nose of one's colleagues." It was vintage stuff and became a collector's item. The Sun later ran a photo of a regal Mr. PORTER, enjoying that day's edition while ensconced on a commode. The picture was republished in the American humour magazine, National Lampoon.
Mr. WORTHINGTON recalled a man who revered good manners, was unfailingly courteous and gentlemanly, and fiercely denied being a snob ("There are few flavours I enjoy more than snob blood," Mr. PORTER insisted.) The closer he got to the truth, the more outrageous he seemed. And accusations of racism were false, Mr. WORTHINGTON felt; they merely reflected Mr. PORTER's elitism.
"He was a cartoonist who used words," said his son, Tim, a one-time reporter and public relations man. "People thought he was snooty, but he was sending up people he thought were snooty. He had a forked tongue in both cheeks simultaneously. He kicked uphill."
Born into a mercantile family in England, Mr. PORTER was smitten by journalism when he encountered a reporter who was boarding at the clan's 20-room house. A cub reporter's job at the Manchester Evening Chronicle lasted two years, followed by a stint at the northern edition of the Daily Express, where he covered Hitler's early stirrings and the Spanish Civil War. Then came Fleet Street and the Daily Mirror, where, at 25, Mr. PORTER became news editor with 75 reporters under him, and where he helped break the story of Edward VIII's abdication. He would later concede that he had been spoiled by his quick success.
A fight with his editor resulted in a move to the Beaverbrook-owned Evening Standard as a film Critic. It didn't last. Lord Beaverbrook, the Canadian-born Max Aitken, loved corny movies and expected Mr. PORTER to share his tastes. A 1978 Sun profile of Mr. PORTER related that the end came when the press baron's valet called to say his master had enjoyed the latest Ritz Brothers comedy. Mr. PORTER buttonholed an editor and gave precise directions as to where His Lordship could put the movie.
Briefly, he wrote for the Daily Sketch, and was upbraided by an executive for beginning a story, "If all the civil servants in Lytham Saint Annes were laid end to end, I would be surprised."
When war came, Mr. PORTER could have signed up to flak for the armed services, as many reporters did. After all, the job was safe and it paid well. Instead, he enlisted as a private and gave up a salary of £1,500 a year for two shillings a day.
He began as a rifleman in the London Irish Rifles and after being commissioned, served with the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) in Egypt, Syria and Lebanon. Along the way, he won a commission and in Calabria, Italy, in 1943, led a charge against a Nazi position. "As my platoon piper ceased his blood-curdling, enemy-demoralizing overture to hand-to-hand combat, we trotted into the final assault," he wrote in his inimitable style, years later. "Firing rifles and submachine guns from the hip and yelling and bawling like barbarians on the threshold of ancient Rome, we noticed that the cheeks of the Panzers became almost as pale as the whites of their eyes.
"Of course, the Panzers ran away. Who wouldn't in the circumstances? And they left behind on army cookers a sizzling array of mouth-watering breakfast sausages, new black bread, fresh figs and real coffee."
He took four bullets in the Battle for Cassino, and was awarded the Military Cross from King George VI. He ended the war as a major and then spent three years as a Paris correspondent for English newspapers, one of them under Ian Fleming of James Bond fame ("a very poor journalist," he said.) Fed up with post-war rationing, he arrived in Canada in 1948.
A self-confessed "remorselessly gluttonous carnivore," he insisted that the following happened: While sharing a drink with a public relations man, the latter inquired why Mr. PORTER had chosen Canada. " Well," Mr. PORTER replied, not entirely in jest, "it was mainly because of the meat." The result was a long-running advertising slogan for the Dominion supermarket chain.
Soon after his arrival, Mr. PORTER began writing for Maclean's magazine. June Callwood, at the time a fresh freelancer, recalled, with noticeable warmth in her voice, a man who was "openly racist, sexist [and] snobbish both intellectually and socially. He was just atrocious, to a point where you weren't sure he wasn't doing a caricature."
Which he probably was, Ms. Callwood allowed. "He really did have a heart of gold. He was kind of adorable [and] had a huge amount of charm. I'll never forget the pomposity, but it had to be a joke."
Mr. PORTER authored a biography of Queen Victoria's father, Prince Edward, Duke of Kent. In 1962, he moved to the Toronto Telegram where he pounded out columns and arts criticism, and almost proved too hot for publisher John BASSETT. Editors killed about one of his columns a month, but when a libel suit was lost over one that slipped by, Mr. BASSETT could not bring himself to fire a decorated war veteran.
At the Tely, he crossed swords with fellow writer Pierre Berton, who never forgave him for openly mocking the "Sordman's Club," a group of high-profile men who took other men's wives to monthly lunches.
The late Charles Templeton, evangelist and one-time Toronto Star editor who referred to Mr. PORTER as "a professional Englishman," recalled in his memoirs that Mr. PORTER greeted him at their first meeting with: "Well, Templeton, how are things with God these days?"
In October of 1971, Mr. BASSETT decided to fold the Telegram, even though it remained profitable. In response, a group of employees, Mr. PORTER among them, hatched a plan to launch a tabloid replacement. On November 1 of that year, with Douglas CREIGHTON as publisher and Peter WORTHINGTON as editor, the first Toronto Sun hit the streets.
At the Sun, Mr. PORTER continued in his characteristic, immoderate manner. His file thickened over a 1989 column in which he wrote that Italian-Canadians were using methods "alien to British practice" to gain political power, and therefore, no Canadian citizen born outside Canada should be allowed to vote in any elections or stand for office. That earned him an acid rebuke in Ontario's legislature and the City of Toronto withdrew its advertising in the Sun, valued at $40,000 a year. Stung by accusations of censorship, the city lifted its ban two months later.
He retired, reluctantly, in 1990, and went about parodying himself better than anyone could in freelance travel articles, essays and commentaries for The Globe. Whether it was folding his lanky, vaguely David Niven-ish self under a Japanese dining table or losing a shoe in a raging English rainstorm or flying to London to get a new ferrule (cap) placed on the tip of his walking stick, the copy was always in Technicolor.
Journalism was good to him. "A millionaire's life on a beggar's income," he once boasted. His son confirmed a similar motto. "Scribbling: Sure beats working."
John McKenzie PORTER was born in Accrington, England, on October 21, 1911, and died of natural causes in Toronto on October 21, 2006, on his 95th birthday. His wife, Kathleen, died in 1985, He leaves a son, Tim, and two granddaughters. A family memorial is planned for a later date.

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CREMMEN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2006-06-02 published
GRACE, Ella (née CREMMEN)
Peacefully at Lee Manor in Owen Sound on Thursday, June 1, 2006. In her 94th year, Ella GRACE (née CREMMEN,) the beloved wife of the late Raymond GRACE (1971.) Loving mother of Mary (Patrick BRIGGS), Teresa (Ennis MURPHY), Patrick (Kathryn), Raymond (Eileen) and Thomas (Carolyn). Loving grandmother of seven grandchildren and three great grandchildren. Dear friend of Marg WOODS. Predeceased by her sisters Irene (Mrs. Walter COLLIE) and Alice (Mrs. Wesley HICKERSON.) Mrs. GRACE was a member of the Catholic Women's League and a co-founding member of Birthright in Owen Sound. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Friday from 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Mary's Church on Saturday morning at 10 a.m. Interment in Saint Mary's Cemetery. A Vigil service will be held at the funeral home on Friday evening at 8: 30 p.m. Father Paul McGILL officiating. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.
Page B5

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CREMONA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-02-01 published
MAMO, Frances Saveria (née FORMOSA)
At Chatham-Kent Health Alliance, Chatham, on Tuesday, January 31, 2006, Frances Saveria MAMO, age 80, of Chatham, wife of the late Louis MAMO (1993.) Born in Hamrun, Malta on February 27, 1925, daughter of the late Carmela Bray and Carmel FORMOSA, she came to Canada in 1963. She will be sadly missed by her daughters Marlene and Ted GEHL of Chatham, Mary Rose and Michael PATTERSON of London; Eugene MAMO and Richard MURRAY of Dresden and sons Alfred and wife Cathy of London and Charles and his friend Magali of Kingsville; 12 grand and 3 great-grandchildren and 5 step-grandchildren 3 sisters Polly CREMONA of Toronto, Mary XUEREB of Chatham and Carmen BRAY of Toronto and 3 brothers, Alfred, Arthur and Maurice FORMOSA all of Chatham. She is predeceased by a brother Trajano FORMOSA. Friends and relatives may call at the Hinnegan Peseski Funeral Home, 156 William St. S., Chatham from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Thursday, where Parish Prayers will be offered at 7 p.m. Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated on Friday, February 3, 2006 at 11 a.m. in St. Ursula's Church, Chatham. Burial will be in St. Anthony's Cemetery, Chatham. Donations to The Heart and Stroke Fund would be appreciated. Online condolences welcomed at www.peseski.com.
How X Surnames like XUEREB work in OGSPI

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CRERAR o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-02-06 published
CRERAR, Murray Gordon
Passed away peacefully at Longworth Long Term Care Facility on Saturday, February 4th, 2006. He was born in Stratford, Ontario, the son of Gwen CLARK and the late Joseph CLONEY. He was predeceased by his adoptive parents, Peter and Gladys CRERAR of Shakespeare, Ontario. He is survived by two sons Troy of Waterloo and Todd as well as 2 grandchildren, his mother Gwen McKELLAR of Zurich, brothers Archie CRERAR of Stratford, Gary BAKER of Kelowna, British Columbia, Jack BAKER of Zurich, Ross BAKER of Kitchener, Ted and Jim BAKER both of Mitchell, Kevin and Brian CLONEY both of London, his sisters Bonnie CRONIN of Port Albert, Marilyn MARRIOTT and Jane Baker SCALA both of Mitchell, Rita CALIA of London, Helen CLONEY of Toronto and numerous nieces and nephews. Cremation has taken place. The memorial service will be conducted at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, 641-1793 at a later date, time to be announced. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Murray are asked to consider the Multiple Sclerosis Society or the charity of your choice.

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CRERAR o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-03-06 published
CRERAR, Murray
Memorial Mass for the late Murray CRERAR to be held at St. Justin's Church, Jalna Blvd., London on March 11th, 2006. Visitation at 12: 30 p.m. Mass at 1 p.m.

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CRESPIGNY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-10 published
GUNTHER, Magnus
On Tuesday March 7th 2006 after a brief illness. Beloved husband of Jan DE CRESPIGNY, loving father of David, Kathy, Julian and Harriet; grandfather of Roy, Lola and Mikela. Magnus was a man of books, a hero to his Friends, and a great companion. He will be missed by loving Friends in many parts of the world. Magnus was driven by his belief in social justice, his hope for the future, and his implacable hatred of apartheid and racism during his years in South Africa and after. Born in Munich in 1934, raised in Johannesburg; Magnus spent most of his life in Canada. Friends may visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa on Saturday, March 11th from 2 p.m. until service time in the Chapel at 4 p.m. Condolences/Donations/Tributes: www.mcgarryfamily.ca (613) 233-1143

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CRESPIGNY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-14 published
Magnus GUNTHER, Professor And Activist (1934-2006)
Raised in South Africa, he left to escape apartheid and eventually settled in Canada where he regrouped and mounted a private war on the racist regime in Johannesburg. He later became an expert on Inuit land claims
By Douglas McARTHUR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Toronto -- The cut and thrust of politics fascinated Magnus GUNTHER. As a youth in Johannesburg and later in the Netherlands, he played active roles in the international student movement and in the struggle against apartheid. When those activities left him without a South African passport, he brought his passion for political science to Canada, where he taught at York and Trent Universities, and took on a number of fact-finding missions for the federal government.
As a student leader, he lobbied for democracy in Franco's Spain, for an end to French rule in Algeria and for black rights in South Africa. Yet he steered clear of Communist groups that had similar aims. As an opponent of apartheid, he gave support from abroad to the African Resistance Movement's campaign of sabotage against property within South Africa. Although always to the left of the political centre, he became a target of leftist critics himself in 1992, over a report he wrote for the federal government. It took the side of Ottawa over Inuit villagers who claimed they had been relocated to the high Arctic against their will.
For more than three decades, Prof. GUNTHER suffered from Crohn's disease, undergoing major surgery and periods of hospitalization. Yet he continued to be involved in international political causes even into his retirement.
"He was a very skillful backroom politician," says John Shingler, a former South African student leader and now a financial consultant in Montreal. "He knew the dynamics of a group and how to garner a majority of support."
Magnus GUNTHER, an only child, was born in Germany in 1934. When he was 2, his parents, Johann and Katerina GUNTHER, moved to Johannesburg to escape the Nazi regime and ensure a Catholic education for their son. But the father was soon interned in his new homeland because of his German nationality. He moved to South-West Africa (now Namibia) when Magnus was 12, leaving the mother to raise the boy.
After dropping out of medical school at 19, Magnus GUNTHER worked underground in a Johannesburg mine. But he hated having to supervise black workers who were more experienced than he was. Later, while attending the University of the Witwatersrand, he served as president of the Student Representative Council in 1957-58 and led a highly-publicized march through the streets of Johannesburg to protest apartheid at the university. He went on to become vice-president of international relations with the National Union of South African Students. From 1959 to 1964, he worked in Leiden, the Netherlands, with the Co-ordinating Secretariat of the International Student Conference, which represented national student organizations from a number of countries. While there he gave speeches, organized conferences, wrote articles and travelled extensively, working to further the group's fights against racism and colonialism.
A rival organization, based in Prague, was believed to be directed from Moscow. But it was years later before he found out that his own group had been largely financed by the U.S. Central Intelligence Agency. Despite the revelation, he continued his Friendship with an American student leader who had known all along. Friends cite that as an example of his forgiving nature.
Michael Stevenson, now president of Simon Fraser University, was involved in student politics at Witwatersrand in the early sixties. He recalls Magnus GUNTHER returning to South Africa from Holland at great personal risk to speak at a student conference. He showed up "like the Scarlet Pimpernel" with no advance publicity and was greeted as legendary hero.
By then, he was giving support from outside the country to the National Committee of Liberation, later the African Resistance Movement, a clandestine anti-apartheid organization of mostly white Liberals. It was founded in 1960 after 250 unarmed blacks were killed or wounded by police during a rally in the Township of Sharpeville. The group supported bombings and sabotage against property and government installations, as long as no people were killed or injured. African Resistance Movement was crushed by the South African government in 1964 after one member, Adrian Leftwich, testified against his associates under threat of execution. By then a professor at the University of York in England, he was disowned by most African Resistance Movement supporters. But Magnus GUNTHER continued to keep in touch.
"His view was there but for the grace of God go I," says Prof. Leftwich.
In his retirement, Prof. GUNTHER chronicled the history of African Resistance Movement in a chapter written for Vol. I of The Road to Democracy in South Africa, published in 2004. He writes there of his personal involvement in a failed attempt to use a Second World War torpedo boat to transport arms and explosives into South Africa and to bring exiles out. He also cites his various unsuccessful attempts to raise money and obtain explosives for African Resistance Movementusing his international student contacts in Algeria and elsewhere.
Leaving his post in Holland, he obtained a doctorate in political science at the University of North Carolina in the mid-1960s. While there he married his first wife, Phyllis SHAFER. With South Africa refusing to issue him a new passport, he was admitted to Canada in 1966 on a laissez-passer permit, which allowed him to teach at York University in Toronto.
Before long he had bought a 60-hectare farm near Keene, Ontario, with a friend and lived on it for a while with his wife and children. He loved ploughing fields with a tractor because it was one place where he could see instantly the results of his labours, says Phyllis GUNTHER. The professor believed he could teach himself to do anything, she says. So he took a course in plumbing and then installed running water and a bathroom in the dilapidated farmhouse.
In 1975, after Prof. GUNTHER was diagnosed with Crohn's disease at 40, he moved from York University to Trent in Peterborough, which was closer to the farm. Otherwise he refused to slow down. Few people were aware of his suffering, says Derek COHEN, a colleague at York. As always Prof. GUNTHER was the centre of attention at any social gathering. Friends say he had an infectious sense of humour, a love of conversation and a sincere concern for the problems of others, as well as a passion for books. While at Trent, Prof. GUNTHER supported many aboriginal and environmental causes, says Bruce HODGINS, then a history professor. The two were among dozens charged with mischief in 1989 for blocking a logging road in the Temagami wilderness in a bid to protect an old-growth forest. He was detained and fingerprinted, but the charges were dropped before trial.
From 1980 to 1983, Prof. GUNTHER took a leave from Trent to serve as a senior policy adviser with the federal ministry of social development in Ottawa as part of an executive exchange. Contacts he made then helped him win a number of future contracts with the federal government. In 1980, the professor separated from his first wife. Six years later, he married Jan DE CRESPIGNY, an Ottawa psychologist who had been born in South Africa.
In 1990, he wrote a report for the federal department of Indian affairs on the overlapping land claims of the Inuit, Métis and Dene in Canada's Arctic. John Parker, a former Northwest Territories Commissioner, used the research as source material when he advised Ottawa on the boundary line that would separate the new territory of Nunavut from the Northwest Territories. He calls Prof. GUNTHER's report "an important piece of work, well-done."
In 1992, the professor found himself embroiled in controversy after he was commissioned to write a report for the same department on the relocation of Inuit families in the early 1950s from Northern Quebec to the high Arctic. The Inuit were seeking compensation from Ottawa, claiming they were dumped and abandoned in order for Canada to assert sovereignty in the far north. Prof. GUNTHER's 400-page report, along with testimony he gave the following year at a royal commission into the issue, asserted that the Inuit were moved to an area where game was abundant, that the government had not acted maliciously and the relocation was actually a success story.
One critic of his stand was Andrew J. Orkin, a McGill professor. Ironically Prof. Orkin was also a South African and an opponent of apartheid, although the men were not aware of this link. In an opinion article in The Globe and Mail, Prof. Orkin wrote: "In short, the government-commissioned report is a systematic assault on the veracity and understanding of the Inuit who have testified about the event and its effects on their lives and society. As a result, it compounds the profound wrong done to them by the relocation itself."
But Sheila Meldrum, a former bureaucrat in the Indian affairs department, says Prof. GUNTHER produced a thorough and competent report, and was criticized only because opinion was polarized on the issue. The royal commission's findings were that Canada's attempt to restore "the natural state of the Inuit" had been "dishonest, inhumane and illegal." Eventually Ottawa paid $10-million in compensation.
After taking early retirement from Trent in 1998, Prof. GUNTHER continued to travel widely in pursuit of his political interests. He attended a United Nations summit against racism in Durban in 2001, was a member of Oxfam Canada's observer mission to the fist post-apartheid elections in South Africa in 1994, and travelled to Ukraine over Christmas in 2004 to monitor elections there.
Magnus GUNTHER was born on September 17, 1934, in Munich. He died in Ottawa on March 7, 2006, two months after being diagnosed with cancer of the pancreas. He was 71. He is survived by his wife Jan de Crespigny, and by his children David, Katherine, Julian and Harriet. He also leaves his first wife Phyllis and three grandchildren.

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CRESS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-02-10 published
ADAM/ADAMS, Margaret Annie (née NORTHCOTT)
Born on May 30, 1922 in Sarnia. Passed away on Monday, February 6, 2006 in Lindsay. She was the proud daughter of John and Iva NORTHCOTT. Margaret had two sisters June Marie and Francis Mae and four brothers Jack, Cecil, Bill and Lyle all who have predeceased her. She was much loved by her step dad, James Llewellyn BURLEY, who most often called her "Annie". Margaret was married for more than 50 years to her husband Lloyd ADAM/ADAMS, who died a short three months ago. The most endearing thought by those left behind is that Lloyd and Margaret are happily romping through a meadow or finding a new adventure to explore. Margaret was and always will be loved by her many nieces and nephews, who shall miss her attentive presence. They are; The Reverend Dr. Janet BRIGHAM- TUROWSKI and Gunter, Cheryl and James CRICKS, James and Brenda SHERRELL, Shelley and Carl MAKELA, and the late John NORTHCOTT. Margaret's great nieces and nephews are; Christi and Wayne CRESS, Chase ANDERSON, Hillary and Ben ANDERSON, Brian MAKELA, Christa and Marc JONES, Jamie Sue SHERRELL, Jay SHERRELL, Larry NILES, and Kevin NILES. Her great-great-nieces and nephews are Ben, Brooke, wyatt, Bailee, Blake, Cameron, the late little Nicholas, and Myia. Margaret's passing brings to a close an era in our family but her legacy lives on in those she loved. We will all miss her but wish her God speed in her new land. Family and Friends are invited to gather for a memorial visitation at Cambridge Street United Church, Lindsay on Saturday, February 25th from 1: 00 until the time of memorial service, celebrating Margaret's life, at 2: 00 p.m. Graveside service at Clinton Cemetery in the spring. Memorial donations to Cambridge Street United Church would be appreciated by the family and may be arranged through the Mackey Funeral Home, 33 Peel Street, Lindsay (705-328-2721).

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CRESS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-05-02 published
BAXTER, Kay
At Kensington Village on Sunday April 30, 2006 -- Kay BAXTER of London passed peacefully in her 91st year with her family by her side. Beloved wife of the late Sam BAXTER (1994.) Dear mother of Judy and her husband Jack IRWIN of Simcoe, Ontario, Sandi and her husband Bob CRESS of Simcoe, Ontario, Joyce and her husband Gord GRAHAM of Calgary, Alberta, Jim and his wife Marlene BAXTER of Toronto, Ontario. Also survived by her brother Done WARREN and his wife Betty of Regina, Saskatchewan. Lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Robert Curtis CRESS of Phoenix, Arizona, David, Ken and Don IRWIN of Simcoe, Ontario, Allister and Cathy GRAHAM of Calgary, Alberta, Erin, Megan and Colin BAXTER of Toronto, Ontario and their families. Ever loved by her great-grandchildren Sarah and Reese. Auntie Kay will be missed by her nephews, nieces and cousins. The family would like to extend their appreciation to Doctor PAYNE and the staff at Kensington Village for their loving care. A Celebration of Kay's life will be held at The Church of St. Alban The Martyr, 1350 Huron Street, London on Wednesday May 3, 2006 at 2: 00 p.m. Rev. Canon Kim VAN ALLEN officiating. Interment of ashes to follow at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association 442 Adelaide Street North, London N6B 3H8 or The War Amps 1 Maybrook Drive, Scarborough, Ontario M1V 5K9 would be appreciated. On line condolences may be made through www.memorial-funeral.ca

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CRESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-13 published
STAEBLER, Edna (CRESS) 100
Cookbooks brought author wide audience
Canadian Press, Page S7
Waterloo, Ontario -- Author Edna STAEBLER, who celebrated her 100th birthday in January, died yesterday at the nursing home where she had lived since suffering a minor stroke in 2003.
Ms. STAEBLER suffered another stroke on Saturday, said her longtime friend Judy CREIGHTON, a freelance food writer for the Canadian Press.
Her cookbook Food That Really Schmecks: Mennonite Country Cooking, published in 1968, brought Ms. STAEBLER distinction and a wide audience. Two other popular books in the Schmecks series were to follow.
In 1996, she was awarded the Order of Canada.
Aside from cookbooks, Ms. STAEBLER wrote historical non-fiction, including Cape Breton Harbour, published in 1972.
Ms. STAEBLER was a voracious reader, and established the annual Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction in 1991.
Edna (CRESS) STAEBLER was born January 15, 1906 in what is now known as Kitchener, Ontario; at the time, it was known as Berlin.
She grew up in the Kitchener area before moving on to receive a bachelor of arts degree from the University of Toronto in 1929 and later graduate from teachers college.
Ms. STAEBLER married in 1933 but the couple divorced in 1962. They had no children.
Funeral arrangements were not announced.

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CRESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-09-14 published
STAEBLER, Edna Louise (née CRESS) (1906-2006)
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Edna STAEBLER, peacefully in her sleep at the Columbia Forest nursing home on September 12, 2006. Fondly remembered by her niece Barbara (née HODGSON) WURTELE and her husband Peter, by her nephews Jim HODGSON and John DIMMA and his wife Jill, grandniece Meghan and grandnephews Christopher, Michael and Andrew. Also remembered by her grandniece Patti WURTELE, her husband Dick MATTINSON and her great-grandniece Alex. Remembered by her grandnephew Kenneth WURTELE and her great-grandnieces Thea and Jasmine WURTELE. Survived by her sister Ruby DIMMA. Predeceased by her parents Louise (nee SATTLER) and John CRESS, her sister Norma HODGSON, her brothers-in-law Ralph HODGSON and Robert DIMMA and her niece Mary Lou DIMMA. Edna was the author of the Food That Really Schmecks cookbook series, several creative non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles included in publications such as Macleans, Saturday Night, Canadian Living. She established the annual Edna Staebler Award for Creative Non-Fiction in addition to many scholarships and bursaries. Several of Canada's most well-known writers were her Friends. Edna has been a mentor to people from all walks of life. Edna received many awards and distinctions, the highest becoming a Member of the Order of Canada. At Edna's request, cremation has taken place. The family will arrange a private gathering at Edna's Sunfish Lake home to celebrate her life. A public tribute will be held at a later date. Condolences for the family and donations to the Kitchener or Waterloo Public Libraries would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and may be arranged through the Erb and Good Family Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, (519)-745-8445 or www.erbgood.com In memory of Edna, a tree will be planted through the Trees for Learning Program by the funeral home.

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CRESS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-07 published
ROSS, James Hawthorn
Peacefully, on April 6, 2006, at the Village of Tansley Woods, in his 85th year. Predeceased by his loving wife Wilma (1984). Loving father of Jane (David) SMITH, Donald (Phyllis), Alan (Pat), and Andrew (Jane) ROSS. Loved grandfather of Naomi (Mark,) Clint, and Brett (Vera). Fondly remembered by many great-grandchildren and very dear Friends Marion FARNWORTH and Diane CRESS. Predeceased by his brother Robert ROSS. The family wishes to extend their heartfelt appreciation to all the staff at the Brant Wing of the Village of Tansley Woods, for their very kind compassion, humour and support. Friends will be received at the Oakview Funeral Home, 56 Lakeshore Road West (one block east of Kerr) in Oakville, 905-842-2252, on Saturday from 5-7 p.m. Funeral Service to be held in the Chapel on Sunday at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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