BOUND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-10 published
BOUND, Eleanor K. " Polly"
Peacefully, at the Pines Long Term Care Residence in Bracebridge, on Sunday, April 9, 2006, in her 84th year. Beloved wife of Bill. Loving mother of Rod (Sandy), Phil, Tom, and Irene "Missy" (Stephen). Dear grandmother of Derek, Darren, Becky, Jeff, Amanda, Chantel, and Dillon. Sister of Thelma, and the late Madeline and Roy. Friends will be received at the Reynolds Funeral Home "Turner Chapel" in Bracebridge (1-877-806-2257), on Monday, April 10, 2006 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral will be held in the Chapel on Tuesday, April 11, 2006 at 2: 00 p.m. As your expression of sympathy, memorial gifts to The Pines Life Enrichment Fund (c/o 98 Pine Street, Bracebridge, Ontario P1L 1N5).

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BOUND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-19 published
BOUND, William C. " Bill"
Peacefully, at the Pines Long Term Care Residence in Bracebridge, on Tuesday, April 18, 2006, in his 94th year. Beloved husband of the late Eleanor "Polly". Loving father of Rod (Sandy), Phil, Tom and Irene "Missy" (Stephen). Dear grandfather of Derek, Darren, Becky, Jeff, Amanda, Chantel and Dillon. Brother of Roy "Mac" and the late Edward, Charlie, Ann and Doris. Brother-in-law of Edith, Bea, Queenie and the late Roy. Friends will be received at the Reynolds Funeral Home 'Turner Chapel' in Bracebridge, on Wednesday, April 19, 2006 from 7-9 p.m. A Legion Service of Remembrance will be held on Wednesday at 7: 00 p.m. The funeral will be held in the chapel on Thursday, April 20, 2006 at 1: 00 p.m. As your expression of sympathy, memorial gifts to The Pines Life Enrichment Fund (c/o 98 Pine Street, Bracebridge, Ontario - P1L 1N5).

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BOUNSALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-04-12 published
MORRISON, Eula (née BOUNSALL)
Peacefully at Toronto East General Hospital on Monday, April 10, 2006, in her 79th year. Beloved wife of the late Alden. Loving mother of Linda and her husband David BLACK, Terry, Helen and her husband David BLACK. Devoted grandmother to Kendra, Liam, Steven and Katelyn, who will dearly miss their Nana. Dear sister of the late Muriel IVY, Lou and Allan BOUNSALL. Fondly remembered by her nieces, nephews and cousins. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, April 12. Rosary prayers at 7: 30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be held at Holy Name Church, 71 Gough Avenue (Pape and Danforth), Thursday, April 13, at 10: 30 a.m. Interment Westminster Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society of Metropolitan Toronto, 2323 Yonge Street, Suite 500, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2C9.

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BOUNTIS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-05-27 published
BOUNTIS, Mary (née THEOFILOPOULOS)
It is with great sadness that the beloved family of George and Mary BOUNTIS announce Mary's peaceful passing on Friday, May 26, 2006 after a brave and courageous battle with ailing health. Mary loved her family and Friends unselfishly and brought an enormous amount of joy into their lives. She will be remembered for her strength, generosity and love for life. Mary was the beloved wife of the late George BOUNTIS. Dear mother of Panagiota (Pana) and Elias (Louie) BOUNTIS. Cherished daughter of Stavros and the late Vasiliki THEOFILOPOULOS. Will be deeply missed by sister Patra DEMETRIOS, brother Stelios THEOFILOPOULOS and sister Eva PISPIDIKIS. She will be forever loved and missed by her many Friends and family. Friends will be received at the Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas St. (between Waterloo and Colborne St.) on Sunday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 131 Southdale Road W. on Monday, May 29, 2006 at 11 a.m. with Father Elias DROSSOS, Father Demetrios TZANETEAS, Father Demetrios CHELONIS and Father Efstathios KONTORAVDIS officiating. Interment Woodland Cemetery. Prayers will be held in the chapel on Sunday at 2 and 8 p.m. Friends who wish may make memorial donations to the London Regional Cancer Centre or towards the iconostasis of Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church. On line condolences www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mrs. BOUNTIS.

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BOURBONNAIS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-17 published
LEPAGE, Lily Rose (PULLUM)
Peacefully at her home surrounded by her loving children on Wednesday, November 15th, 2006 Lily Rose (PULLUM) LEPAGE of Ottawa and formerly of London in her 82nd year. Beloved wife of the late Harold Preston LEPAGE. Dear mother of Bill LEPAGE and his wife Melanie; David LEPAGE; Barbara LEPAGE- MARGISON and her husband Barry; Irene LEPAGE; and Diane LEPAGE and her husband Eric BOURBONNAIS. Predeceased by her parents, her 3 brothers Fred, Bill, and Victor and her sister Doris RICHARDS. Loving grandmother of Adam WITT and his wife Sheri BELL; Laura WITT; Jeremie LEPAGE- BOURBONNAIS; and Emilie LEPAGE- BOURBONNAIS. Also loved by her great-grandchildren Colton BELL; Sorria WITT; Ashlyn WITT; and Kaine WITT. Cremation has taken place. Friends will be received by the family from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. on Sunday at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London where the funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Monday, November 20, 2006 at 10: 00 a.m. with Reverend David CARROTHERS of Colborne Street United Church officiating. Enurnment of cremated remains in Woodland Cemetery, London. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 123 St. George Street, London, Ontario N6A 3A1 or to the Hospice of May Court, 114 Cameron Avenue, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 0X1. (Online condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca)

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BOURDAA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-01 published
TURGEON, Guy Roméo, M.D.
Born Saint_Jean-de-Matha, Québec on August 18, 1916, died March 24, 2006 in Sun City, Arizona. Dearly beloved companion and husband to Bebe for thirty-two years, predeceased by first wife Georgette also predeceased by; parents Dr Roméo TURGEON and Cécile (Balète) TURGEON, beloved sister Françoise, his best friend and uncle, Roger TURGEON and many other aunts and uncles. Dr TURGEON attended Lycée Carnot in Paris, Trinity College at Cambridge University (B.A. 1937; M.A. 1938), and graduated in Medicine from McGill University, with an M.D.C.M. in 1940. After serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War 2 as a doctor, he set up a private practice in Montréal. He and his wife then moved to California where he became Chief Medical Officer for a state prison and spent fourteen years working for the State of California in the Social Security Administration. Other than his wife Bebe, Dr TURGEON is survived by his brother Jean TURGEON (Josette,) niece Adele (TURGEON) SMITH, (Maury) and nephew Cecil, great-niece Cécile and great-nephew Maury, step-children Alan FOITAG (Barbara,) Carol BOURDAA (Bruce,) Debbie GOLD and step-grandchildren Steven, Robert and David. Always a gentleman and truly a gentle man, his wit and keen intelligence will be greatly missed by his family and Friends, who bid him adieu.

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BOURDAA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-01 published
TURGEON, Guy Roméo, M.D.
Born Saint_Jean-de-Matha, Québec on August 18, 1916, died March 24, 2006 in Sun City, Arizona. Dearly beloved companion and husband to Bebe for thirty-two years, predeceased by first wife Georgette also predeceased by; parents Dr Roméo TURGEON and Cécile (Balète) TURGEON, beloved sister Françoise, his best friend and uncle, Roger TURGEON and many other aunts and uncles. Dr TURGEON attended Lycée Carnot in Paris, Trinity College at Cambridge University (B.A. 1937; M.A. 1938), and graduated in Medicine from McGill University, with an M.D.C.M. in 1940. After serving in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War 2 as a doctor, he set up a private practice in Montréal. He and his wife then moved to California where he became Chief Medical Officer for a state prison and spent fourteen years working for the State of California in the Social Security Administration. Other than his wife Bebe, Dr TURGEON is survived by his brother Jean TURGEON (Josette,) niece Adele (TURGEON) SMITH, (Maury) and nephew Cecil, great-niece Cécile and great-nephew Maury, step-children Alan FOITAG (Barbara,) Carol BOURDAA (Bruce,) Debbie GOLD and step-grandchildren Steven, Robert and David. Always a gentleman and truly a gentle man, his wit and keen intelligence will be greatly missed by his family and Friends, who bid him adieu.

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BOURDAGE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-01-05 published
BOURDAGE, Stephen John (April 9th, 1963-January 5th, 2003)
We though of you with love today But that is nothing new We thought about you yesterday And days before that too. We think of you in silence We often speak your name Now all we have are memories And your picture in a frame. Your memory is our keepsake With which we'll never part God has you in his keeping We have you in our heart. Loved and missed by Mom, Dad, Rick, Michael and all other Family Members.

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BOURDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-10-17 published
McLELLAN, William " Bill" Richard
A resident of Chatham (Eberts), died on Sunday, October 15, 2006, at the Chatham Kent Health Alliance with his family by his side, at the age of 80. Born in Southwold Township to the late Richard and Charlotte (KILLINS) McLELLAN. Predeceased by his Wife Violet (LUCAS) McLELLAN, (1982.) Loving father of Richard Neil McLELLAN and his wife Janine, of Minneapolis, Minnesota, William Thomas "Tom" McLELLAN and his wife Patti, of Eberts, Hugh Brian McLELLAN, Margaret McLELLAN, of Eberts, and Mary Louise McLELLAN and Ian BURBIDGE, of Niagara Falls. Devoted grandfather to Justin, Janice and Chad PRANGLEY, Erin and Scott BOURDEAU, Jeff, Braden, Chelsea, Hayleigh, Connor, and Cody. Bill will be sadly missed by special friend Minnie WALKER. He is survived by his sister Margaret "Peggy" McLELLAN, of Toronto, and brother Bob and Mary McLELLAN, of Markham. Predeceased by 6 brothers and sisters. Family will receive Friends at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair St. Chatham, on Monday, October 16, 2006, from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. and on Tuesday, October 17, 2006 from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at 1: 30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 18, 2006 from the Funeral Home with Rev. Sandra FOGARTY officiating. Memorial donations, made by cheque, to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Canadian Diabetes Association are welcomed. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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BOURDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2006-11-09 published
BOURDEAU, Nancy (née MIKULICA)
A resident of Chatham, Nancy BOURDEAU died on Tuesday, November 7, 2006 surrounded by her family at her residence at the age of 46. Born in Chatham, daughter of Laddie and Anne MIKULICA of Chatham. Beloved wife of Paul BOURDEAU for 25 years. Loving mother of Andrew BOURDEAU of Toronto and Meghan BOURDEAU of Chatham. Sister of Barbara (Al) POOLE of Richmond Hill, Larry (Irene) MIKULICA of Chatham and Ginny (Bob) O'NEILL of Chatham. Daughter-in-law of Wanda BOURDEAU of Chatham. Sister-in-law of Susan MOYNAHAN of Chatham, John (Mary Jane) BOURDEAU of Ipperwash, Bill BOURDEAU of Tilbury, Becky (Rob) CHAPPLE of Dover Township, Peggy (Bob) WRIGHT of Chatham and Pam BOURDEAU (Jim SULLIVAN) of London. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Nancy was the Principal of St. Vincent Catholic School, where she served the students and staff with love and dedication. Family will receive Friends at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham on Thursday from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. and Friday from 2:00-4:30 p.m. and 7: 00-9:00 p.m. Parish Prayers will be offered at the Funeral Home on Friday at 8: 00 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint_Joseph's Catholic Church on Saturday, November 11, 2006 at 10: 30 a.m. Interment St. Anthony Cemetery, Chatham. In lieu of flowers, donations, made by cheque, to the St. Clair District Catholic Education Foundation-Reading Room at St. Vincent School ("In Memory of Nancy's love of books"), Crohn's and Colitis Foundation, Alzheimer's Society or Canadian Cancer Society appreciated. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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BOURDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2006-03-14 published
POLIN, Genoveffa
Peacefully, with her beloved family at her side, on Sunday, March 12, 2006, in her 96th year, at Cawthra Gardens Mississauga, Genoveffa is reunited with her late husband Attilio (1979). Dearly loved mother and best friend of Franco, Julio, Rosanna and Bruno TOFFOLON. Cherished Nonna of Debbie and Kevin SMITH, Julie and Randy BOURDEAU, Paul, Annamaria, Dino, Lori, Mark and Andrea TOFFOLON. Great-grandmother of Melissa, Alexandra, Nicholas, Matteo, Jake and Sienna. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Tuesday from 6-9 p.m. A private family Funeral Mass will be held. Thank you to all those who cared for and loved our adored Nonna. If desired, remembrances may be made to a charity of your choice. A mother like ours is more than a memory. She is a living presence in the hearts of our family. Not time, not space - not even death can separate us.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-06 published
Maurice CLENNETT, Army Officer And Banker (1915-2005)
Skinny bank clerk, who was almost rejected by the army as too puny, rose to command a battalion and win the Distinguished Service Order. Later, he returned to banking and became a senior civil servant with the Inspector General of Banks
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S8
Ottawa -- At five feet, eight inches tall, Maurice CLENNETT was tall enough to join the army when Canada went to war in 1939. The problem was his weight. He weighed just 112 pounds, two pounds less than the minimum demanded by the army.
The situation looked grim, but Mr. CLENNETT, tongue firmly in cheek, convinced the medical examiner that the Allied war effort was doomed unless he, CLENNETT, personally led the fight against Adolf Hitler. It worked and he was in.
Mr. CLENNETT was eager to get overseas because he knew where his duty lay. He didn't even have to think about it, he wrote in a family memoir six decades later. "Because my people were English, we still thought as England as the mother country and believed that Canadians should come to its aid."
He didn't worry about his size, either. "It never bothered me. I was in pretty good shape. I had lots of stamina and could get things done."
By the time Germany collapsed in flames six years later, Mr. CLENNETT had proved himself a superb leader. Fighting with the 1st Battalion, North Nova Scotia Highlanders, he won an important decoration and was wounded.
On July 31, 1944, seven weeks after the North Novas hit the beach at Normandy on D-Day as part of the 9th Infantry Brigade of the 3rd Canadian Infantry Division, Mr. CLENNETT started his long slog across France, Belgium, the Netherlands and into Germany.
In August, during the battle of Falaise, Mr. CLENNETT -- described by author Will R. Bird as "small in stature but mighty in spirit" had a narrow escape when he scrambled up into the loft of a barn to hide from German troops. "All hell broke loose. Machine gun fire started coming in right through the door I had entered. A tank fired through the door. I waited, looking down at the yard filled with hundreds of Germans. The moon came out and it was impossible for me to get down without being seen. There I was, trapped, with German tanks rolling around."
Fortunately, most of the enemy had left by daylight and Mr. CLENNETT was able to convince the 20 who remained, "some wounded, some not, all armed, and sleeping" to surrender.
Mr. CLENNETT's first big battle was at Boulogne, a heavily defended port on the northeast coast of France. On September 17, his under-strength 'D' Company of only 60 men was ordered to attack six German pillboxes at the rear of Mount Lambert, a key feature covering the southern approaches to the city.
Almost 60 years later, Mr. CLENNETT still remembered the sight of his highlanders sweeping to the assault. "We went fast with measured steps. The men were in a straight line advancing if on parade, with me in the centre. The barrage went on, protecting us. Then it stopped when we were a couple of hundred yards from the pillbox. We thought, 'Okay, that's it!' and I led them in. I went ahead. All of a sudden a barrage opened up again after I'd started advancing."
Taking cover, Mr. CLENNETT and his men got up when the barrage ceased and launched themselves at the pillbox. Armed with only a pistol, Mr. CLENNETT was shot in the neck. "Lt. Grainger and Sgt. Jack Mackenzie continued the attack. Reinforcements were sent, we captured the pillbox and took 200 prisoners. Eventually, the entire fortress surrendered and out came 1,800 prisoners," Mr. CLENNETT wrote.
For his heroism, Mr. CLENNETT was awarded the Distinguished Service Order. His citation read: "He was wounded in the neck but refused to be evacuated. Throughout the action his own disregard for his own personal safety and outstanding leadership were the biggest factor in the success of the attack."
Mr. CLENNETT seemed to lead a charmed life during those desperate months. In contrast, almost all his junior officers and non-commissioned officers were killed or wounded. During the brutal, 25-day Battle of the Scheldt in the Netherlands, 'D' Company lost every officer except Mr. CLENNETT. It was a bitter struggle, in which the Canadians took the strategically important Scheldt estuary that lay between Antwerp, Belgium, and the sea.
Four months later, in late February of 1945, Mr. CLENNETT, by then a major, commanded his battalion during a fierce attack on the Hochwald Forest. The enemy was well dug in with 88mm guns and tanks. "He was always where things were the hottest and his decisions were largely responsible for the defeat of the enemy," his citation read. "His coolness under fire and his leadership when things were toughest, are beyond praise. He never ceased to be an inspiration to his men."
Maurice CLENNETT grew up in Nova Scotia before studying commerce at Dalhousie University. In 1934, he joined the Royal Bank of Canada as a junior clerk. Earning $500 per year in the middle of the Depression, Mr. CLENNETT was happy to have a job, said daughter Mary CLENNETT. " Dad progressed rapidly in his early years and, after just four years, he had more than doubled his starting salary and was earning $1,300."
After shipping out to Britain in 1940 with the West Nova Scotia Regiment, Mr. CLENNETT participated in the invasion of Sicily and the Italian mainland in 1943 as a staff officer. After that, he could have wangled a safe job at headquarters, but he was eager to see some more action and arranged a transfer to a fighting battalion.
Shortly after joining the North Novas, a tough regiment with many miners, farmers and fishermen in its ranks, Mr. CLENNETT discovered he was expected to wear a kilt. "A kilt is something like nine yards of material. The front is just a plain apron, but the back is all pleated. I didn't weigh much more than when I enlisted, and I didn't have the rear end to carry the bloody thing," wrote Mr. CLENNETT. "I went on parade with the aid of a pair of braces and two safety pins, and prayed to God that they would hold."
After the war, he relocated to the Royal Bank's head office in Montreal. In 1948, he married Catherine SENNAT, a "pretty young blonde" stenographer he'd met in the chief accountant's department. Over the next three decades, Mr. CLENNETT moved steadily up the corporate ladder, retiring in 1974 as the Royal's assistant general manager. An important part of the bank's enormous post-war expansion, he helped modernize its operations. He also found time to father 12 children.
Afterward, Mr. CLENNETT became a senior civil servant with the federal government's Inspector General of Banks before retiring again in 1983. A year later, Mr. CLENNETT and his wife visited the Netherlands, 40 years after he helped to liberate it. "It was a moving and gratifying experience to return with my comrades. People greeted us with open arms. It was touching to be treated as a hero."
Maurice Gascoygne CLENNETT was born on June 1, 1915, in Watanga, Nova Scotia He died of Parkinson's disease on November 8, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 90. He is survived by his wife, Catherine, and by daughters Anne, Mary, Norah, Margaret, Jocelyn, Louise and Janet, and his sons Mark, Bill, Andrew, Michael and Peter. He also leaves 30 grandchildren.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-03-17 published
Frank WATKINS, Royal Canadian Air Force Officer (1915-2005)
Pilot who won the Distinguished Flying Cross for flying missions over Germany was sustained by writing 258 letters home. When it came to wartime morale, few things were more important
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- Fighting hard to keep his sanity amid so much death, Frank WATKINS wrote hundreds of emotional and poignant letters to his wife during the Second World War. The young Royal Canadian Air Force flier's correspondence paints a fascinating portrait of a man thousands of miles from home trying to both do his duty and stay alive.
During the long months they were apart, Mr. WATKINS, a bomber pilot, wrote his bride Charmian 258 letters that told how he cherished her and the pain he felt at losing Friends. Writing every three days on the flimsy, blue airmail paper typical of the time, Mr. WATKINS began and ended every letter with a simple and heartfelt declaration: "I love you, I love you, I love you."
The couple married in Edmonton on March 22, 1943, two months before Mr. WATKINS shipped out to Britain. He was 27. After that, their only link was the mail. Canada's postal authorities -- both military and civilian -- handled millions of letters, postcards and parcels during the war. If humanly possible, the mail got through. When it came to morale, few things were more important.
In his letters, Mr. WATKINS not only told his wife about everyday squadron life but used them as a therapeutic safety valve to express his emotions. On June 13, 1944, in letter No. 224, he described his grief over losing his mentor, a wing commander. "He was the finest fellow I ever met and I a.m. going to miss him terribly. I know that even the best can be shot down but somehow I felt he would go on operating as long as he cared. He only had a few more trips to do…"
Then Mr. WATKINS told his wife how happy she made him. "Thank heaven we were married before we parted. If it hadn't been for the fact that I knew I had your understanding and love and respect I would have thrown in long ago."
Life wasn't all doom and gloom. In letter No. 247, written on August 12, 1944, he described shaking hands with the King. "After, there was a tea and they introduced men from each station to the royal party."
Mr. WATKINS closed that letter with a plea not to "stop praying and believing. I'm not through my tour yet and as the number [of missions] to do get smaller they seem to get tougher. God willing, we shall share the future."
Frank WATKINS joined the Royal Canadian Air Force on January 7, 1941. It took almost three years, but he eventually made it overseas after earning his wings. Known as Highpockets because he was 6 foot 4, he first flew with 428 Squadron. One day at the end of 1943, he and his crew had a narrow escape when a German fighter attacked their Halifax. "We did not see the fighter and were raked with cannon shell," Mr. WATKINS said. "The rear gunner was badly wounded but continued to advise [me] on evasive action and we finally shook the fighter off."
That was the good news. The bad news was that his aileron controls had been shot away, the elevator wires were cut in two and the hydraulics, undercarriage and flaps were useless. Fearing the worst, the crew prepared for a crash landing, but Mr. WATKINS managed to land the aircraft safely.
In March of 1944, he was promoted to squadron leader and posted to 434 Squadron. Just three months later, on June 11, five days after D-Day, he was promoted to wing commander. The squadron was in the thick of things, bombing the Germans' flying-bomb sites in northern France, plus oil storage depots, freight yards and coastal batteries. In August, the squadron flew 1,206 hours on 246 sorties for 19 bombing operations, dropping 2,149,670 pounds of high explosives and incendiaries. The cost came in casualties: 484 men killed or missing in a 20-month period.
Death could occur any day, yet Mr. WATKINS wrote that he had no regrets. "I have missed you terribly. But I could never have known any peace of mind if I had stayed at home and not taken my share of the work. A fellow owes it all to his Friends who have gone before him. I will feel I have done my duty. I hope this doesn't sound heroic. God knows, I have no illusions about dying for any great cause. There's nothing glamorous about being killed in an aircraft. When I come back I'll be wiser, more understanding. And I will come back. Don't ever worry about that."
On August 16, 1944, with his 30th and last mission still to come, he wrote that he got a "small measure of satisfaction of having successfully bombed [his] targets and, more important, getting away with it despite flak and fighters and weather and searchlights. It was quite an experience and, although I think it's changed me in a lot of ways, I'm not sorry I have had it."
A month after that, he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross.
After the war, Mr. WATKINS decided to stay in the Royal Canadian Air Force. Over the next 21 years, he occupied many senior positions and commanded two stations, Royal Canadian Air Force Station Rockcliffe, in Ottawa, from 1955 to 1958, and Royal Canadian Air Force Station Namao, outside Edmonton, from 1964 to 1966. After retiring in 1967 as a group captain, he worked for the Department of Regional Economic Expansion.
Francis Hubert WATKINS was born on August 13, 1915, in Winnipeg. He died on December 21, 2005, in Ottawa. He was 90. He leaves his daughter Melissa, sons Christopher and Michael and his brother Stanley. He was predeceased by his Charmian, his wife of 55 years.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-04-10 published
Murray LISTER, Royal Canadian Air Force Air Vice-Marshal (1912-2006)
In 1966 he was rising to the top of his cherished Royal Canadian Air Force when he resigned to protest against Ottawa's plan to unify the military and outfit Canada's Armed Forces in lamentable green serge
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S8
Ottawa -- Murray LISTER was a man of integrity. In 1966, as an Royal Canadian Air Force air vice-marshal in charge of Air Defence Command, he quit rather than stand by and watch Paul HELLYER unify Canada's armed services. Defying the minister of national defence in 1966 came at a very high price for Mr. LISTER, whose responsibility is was to defend Canada against aerial attack by the Soviet Union. Unlike hundreds of other senior officers, he deliberately refused to follow Mr. HELLYER's dictatorial party line and lost his promotion to air marshal, at that time a rank equivalent to an army lieutenant-general.
Mr. LISTER's decision took many by surprise, since he was fifth from the top of the Royal Canadian Air Force's seniority list, but he never regretted following his conscience at such a great personal cost, his son, Murray, said. "He was a man of principle and the main principle he followed was duty. He declined promotion and accepted early retirement on the principle of duty toward the traditions and morale of the air force."
The trouble had started after he made his feelings known. He believed that while the traditions of the Royal Canadian Navy and the army were important, those of the Royal Canadian Air Force were unique. "He didn't want any service tradition to be diluted," his son said. "He felt that the effectiveness of each of the three services was built on morale. There was no point in destroying this morale."
One day in mid-March of 1966, during the height of the unification crisis that gripped Parliament and the country, Mr. LISTER was summoned to Ottawa and found himself on the carpet. Air Chief Marshal Frank MILLER, the chief of the defence staff, accused him of criticizing unification in speeches to subordinates.
Fortunately, Mr. LISTER's aide, retired squadron leader Robert FLYNN, had taken notes on what his boss had actually said. "While he did not 100-per-cent support the concept, he impressed those over whom he had command that it was his and their duty to respect and honour the political directives. It was a very uneasy and stressful time for him, but he weathered the storm," Mr. FLYNN said.
Mr. HELLYER's ambitious drive to create one service from the navy, army and air force, unveiled in 1964 in a government white paper, created enormous controversy. Mr. HELLYER insisted his dual plan of integration and unification would save millions of dollars that would be better spent on new equipment, but many saw it as a direct attack on the military's cherished, British-based traditions. Thousands of sailors, soldiers and airmen were appalled that Mr. HELLYER wanted to scrap their traditional uniforms of navy blue and army khaki and replace them with a common green serge. Sailors and airmen would wear army ranks on their sleeves.
Mr. LISTER was a strong supporter of integration, which sought to eliminate costly triplication such as separate personnel and supply systems. If he'd decided to put his career before his principles, there's no telling how high he might have risen, since Mr. HELLYER desperately needed senior officers to toe his party line and take over from those who decided to resign.
Mr. LISTER, known as a strict disciplinarian, had a strong streak of stubbornness, his son said. "His sense of duty came from his mother, who was very strict herself and brought him up that way. He had enormous willpower. He used logic in arguing and was quite an intellectual. He was a super-achiever."
Tragically, the stress of coping with unification may have affected Mr. LISTER's first marriage to Janet RICHMOND, their daughter Sydney said. Her parents were divorced in 1971 after 32 years of marriage. Still, there was plenty of hope and happiness at the beginning, she said. "My dad always told us how much fun she was, how talented she was… It was a love story."
After graduating from the Royal Military College of Canada in 1935, Mr. LISTER flew fighters with the Royal Canadian Air Force. He and his bride of four months happened to be in England when war broke out on September 1, 1939. Naturally, he thought he'd soon be flying against the German Luftwaffe, but brass had a better appreciation of his talents.
A week later, he was recalled to Canada and put to work organizing all bombing and gunnery training facilities for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. Dubbed the "Aerodrome of Democracy," Canada built an enormous network of training bases that, over the next five years, trained 131,500 aircrew from the British Commonwealth and Allied nations. Overall, the Royal Canadian Air Force grew dramatically to 215,000 men and women and 88 squadrons.
Promoted to group captain in 1943 at the early age of 31, Mr. LISTER tried to get overseas to fly on operations but never made it, his son said. "He was too valuable. That bothered him to the end of his life, [since] his first love was flying."
The closest he came to going operational was to command Station Tofino, British Columbia, an air base that flew long-distance anti-submarine patrols far into the Pacific. His 1944-45 posting earned him a mention in dispatches: "By his ability and outstanding devotion to duty he has raised the standard of this unit to a high pitch of operational efficiency."
After the war, Mr. LISTER filled four key positions as the Royal Canadian Air Force expanded dramatically to 52,000 men and women. In 1954, he was appointed chief of plans and intelligence. In 1958, he was appointed deputy vice-chief of the Royal Canadian Air Force and chief of training, a job that gave him and his wife Janet -- known as a gracious hostess -- a high profile on Ottawa's diplomatic cocktail circuit.
In 1960, Mr. LISTER went to Colorado Springs where he spent four years at North American Air Defence Command as deputy chief of staff, operations. Mr. LISTER played a key part in organizing North American Air Defence Command, an agency set up to protect North America from air attack. He had a first-hand view of the Cuban missile crisis that brought the United States and the Soviet Union to the brink of nuclear war in 1962.
Jaye LISTER, then 14, still remembers the worries she experienced when her father didn't come home for four days. It was the height of the Cold War and nuclear conflict seemed a horrible possibility for millions. "We had a red phone in the master bedroom, a direct line to North American Air Defence Command headquarters. One morning I asked mum where Dad was. Her reply was, 'I don't know. The red phone rang and your father left. I don't know when we'll see him.' We had no contact with him at all."
In 1964, Mr. LISTER took command of Air Defence Command, which included squadrons of CF-100 and CF-101 fighters. Mr. FLYNN remembers his boss as "a very demanding person yet very patient and understanding. He had a great sense of humour yet was a no-nonsense type. When toughness was demanded he could dish it out, but always in a human and respectful manner. [He] treated me, as he did everyone, with human understanding."
After retiring from the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1966, Mr. LISTER became a gentlemen farmer, growing apples and wheat and raising sheep and cattle on a farm near Picton, Ontario In 1997, more than 50 years after he had last flown an aircraft, Mr. LISTER took to the sky one last time as a pilot. Although by then blind in one eye, he made a "beautiful flight," an observer said.
"[It's] exactly like riding a bicycle," Mr. LISTER said at the time. "You never forget. Everything felt very natural. It was tremendously exciting."
Murray Duncan LISTER was born on January 17, 1912, in Edmonton.
He died of pneumonia on January 7, 2006, in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario He was 10 days short of his 94th birthday. He leaves his wife Elizabeth DAILLEY, son Murray, and daughters Sydney and Jaye. He also leaves stepdaughters Elizabeth and Lynne.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-02 published
Bill MILROY, Army Officer And Consultant: (1920-2006)
Major who won a D.S.O. during the closing weeks of the Second World War later became a lieutenant-general and was given command of the Canadian Army
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- By April of 1945, Bill MILROY was tired, bone tired, after more than a year of almost continuous fighting in Italy, Belgium and the Netherlands. Mr. MILROY, a major commanding B Squadron, 2nd Canadian Armoured Regiment, knew that Germany was in flames and close to surrendering, but when and where the Second World War would end was anyone's guess.
Hundreds of thousands of German soldiers fought tenaciously to defend their homeland and for Mr. MILROY and his battle-weary troopers, there were always more of them to kill or capture before they pointed their Sherman tanks toward the next objective. Still, they could almost smell the end.
"There was excitement in the air. It was difficult to realize that we were at last on Dutch soil and only a few miles from Germany," wrote Lieutenant-Colonel J.M. McAVITY in his 1947 history of the Lord Strathcona's Horse (Royal Canadians). "It had seemed very far away during the past year."
Fresh orders arrived on April 10, 1945. Mr. MILROY and his regiment were ordered to support the British army in Operation Cleanser, known as the second Battle of Arnhem, in the Netherlands. The Strathconas would fire their 75-millimetre guns in support for the assault, then push to the Zuider Zee, now called Ijsselmeer, 50 kilometres away.
Deploying his tanks with his customary skill, Mr. MILROY -- known affectionately to his men as Billy the Kid -- ran up against strong opposition from German anti-tank guns and infantry during the week-long race to the sea. On two separate occasions, on April 15 and April 17, Mr. MILROY, displaying "great personal gallantry," dismounted from his tank to make a personal reconnaissance on foot. "Then, in both cases, from the information gained, he put a plan into effect which was highly successful and most skillfully controlled and ensured the further advance of the regiment," an official citation said.
Sixty-one years later, Robert GREENE, an Anglican canon living in Calgary, remembers feeling alarmed when Mr. MILROY climbed down from their tank and walked down the middle of the road. At that time, Mr. GREENE was Mr. MILROY's gunner in their tank, which they had nicknamed "Brown."
"I jumped out with a Tommy gun and followed him to give cover. I said, 'Sir, shouldn't we be in the ditch?' He was fearless," said Rev. GREENE, who fought with Mr. MILROY for almost two years. "We would have followed him everywhere. He was a great commander." For his tactical brilliance, Mr. MILROY was awarded the Distinguished Service Order, one of only five Strathcona officers to receive it during the war. "During the entire period, Major MILROY was tireless in his efforts, consistently showing the greatest skill in handling his squadron and displaying magnificent coolness under fire," the citation said.
Bill MILROY grew up in small-town Saskatchewan where his father managed the local bank. After working on his grandfather's farm for several summers, he studied commerce at the University of Alberta and joined the Canadian Officers' Training Corps. Commissioned as an officer, he volunteered for overseas service and joined Lord Strathcona's Horse on August 13, 1941. That November, the regiment left Camp Borden, Ontario, for Britain.
Two years later, Mr. MILROY got his first taste of modern armoured warfare when he landed in Italy on December 1, 1943. For the next 11 months, he and B Squadron struggled up the Italian peninsula with the 5th Canadian Armoured Brigade. On May 24, 1944, he fought in the battle of Melfa River, part of Operation Chesterfield, in which Field Marshal Sir Harold Alexander's Eighth Army attack the Hitler Line south of Rome. In a two-day battle, the Strathconas' reconnaissance troop crossed the Melfa River, established a bridgehead and held it until a company from the Westminster Regiment, commanded by Major J.K. Mahony, arrived. Major Mahoney was later awarded the Victoria Cross. Shortly after, the Strathconas' commanding officer was wounded and Mr. MILROY took over temporarily.
Almost four months later, Mr. MILROY was wounded during the battle of the Gothic Line, a heavily fortified, mountainous defensive line that stretched across Italy north of Florence. During the action, Mr. MILROY and B Squadron repelled a German counterattack in the middle of the night that included fierce hand-to-hand fighting.
After things settled down, Mr. MILROY held a brief conference with two of his officers. Then the unexpected happened. "[It was] pitch black when what I assume was a German still in the area [threw] a grenade in our midst. When I came to, I was the only one left," he told his son Rollin in 1992. The explosion cost Mr. MILROY most of the hearing in his left ear.
He never spoke of his war experiences unless asked, said Rollin MILROY. " Then he was happy to answer. The stories that would spontaneously come out were always humorous, or about Friendship in some manner. While I don't think he ever attempted to convince himself war is anything but awful, he also recognized the many good qualities of people that emerge during such times."
After the war, Mr. MILROY remained in the army, serving at home and abroad in the United States and Britain. In 1953, he attended the Queen's coronation in London. Despite a fall of heavy rain, Mr. MILROY thoroughly enjoyed his job marshalling the Canadian troops marching in the procession. "[There was] a wonderful feeling of camaraderie that enveloped everyone during the period of the coronation. We all thought that we were in on the beginning of a bright new world. While it didn't quite work out that way, for those of us there the experience lightened our days for years to come. It was similar to the feeling one has when one is a member of a good Regiment, like the Strathconas," he wrote in In 1972, he was promoted to lieutenant-general and given command of the Canadian army, then called Mobile Command. After retiring in 1975, he worked in Ottawa as a consultant until 1988.
In 2001, Mr. MILROY was made a member of the Order of Canada, for his "exceptional leadership qualities as a volunteer. As national chair of the Canadian Corps of Commissionaires, he helped raised the status and profile of the corps. He also served on the board of governors of Ottawa's Ashbury College and has made immeasurable contributions to health care in the region and to the Salvation Army's fundraising operations."
Mr. MILROY never forgot his beloved unit and served as colonel of the regiment from 1971 to 1978. He donated the sabre he carried during the coronation to the regiment's commanding officers.
William Alexander MILROY was born on June 25, 1920, in Brownlee, Saskatchewan. He died of pulmonary fibrosis on February 20, 2006, in Ottawa. He was 85. He is survived by his wife, Ann, his son Rollin, his daughters Elizabeth and Alexandra. He also leaves his sisters Marion and Jean.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-05-18 published
Jack WALLACE, Soldier And Civil Defence Expert (1921-2006)
Tank commander who won the Military Cross in Italy became a driving force in the Civil Defence Organization, Canada's Cold War system of A-bomb shelters and warning sirens
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Ottawa -- Jack WALLACE was planning his next move in an Italian wood south of Termoli when an armour-piercing round bored through the back of his Sherman tank and destroyed his left leg.
The enemy projectile exploded in a blinding flash of light, killed his gunner and filled the tank with smoke and razor-sharp shrapnel on October 6, 1943. A second shell killed the driver.
Badly dazed, losing blood and with a suddenly useless limb, he knew he had to do something quickly. As a tank commander in charge of a troop of four tanks from the 12th Armoured Regiment (The Three Rivers Regiment), he thought only of his crew and how to save them. Realizing his Sherman was a sitting duck, he threw smoke grenades to hide his tank from the enemy and deny them a clear field of fire. At the same time, he yelled at his soldiers to get out.
Mr. WALLACE's quick thinking and concern for the lives of his men earned him a Military Cross, one of only nine awarded to officers of his regiment during the Second World War. "By his coolness and presence of mind while seriously wounded, and under heavy fire, he undoubtedly saved his crew from further injury while evacuating their tank," the citation said.
Radio operator Joe COLLINS, who was awarded the Military Medal for dragging Mr. WALLACE to safety, provided an eye-witness account. "If every officer had as much genuine guts as he showed then, we'd have a damn sight better army than we have. When a man can stand in the turret, with one leg dangling and useless and himself in agony, and still throw smoke grenades to give his crew a fighting chance to escape once they were out, the word I used was the only one which fits… guts," he wrote to Mr. WALLACE's father on December 9, 1943.
Two very senior British generals agreed. Within days, Gen. Sir Harold Alexander and Gen. Sir Bernard Montgomery had each approved Mr. WALLACE's immediate Military Cross. Soon afterward, the home front learned of Mr. WALLACE's "outstanding bravery" in a radio show broadcast across Canada to help sell war bonds. Described in the script as "a lone heroic figure wreathed in the swirl of grey smoke," the show featured his mother paying tribute to her eldest son, as well as to his brother Ted, a member of the 1st Hussars who was later killed.
At the time, the Three Rivers Regiment had been supporting a seaborne assault by the British Army at Termoli. Located a third of the way up Italy's east coast, Termoli was the Adriatic hinge of Germany's defence line along the Biferno River.
After sleeping fitfully through heavy shelling on the night of October 5-6, Mr. WALLACE and C Squadron started advancing after 7 a.m. "The plan of attack was for our squadron, led by No. 4 Troop and No. 5 Troop, to strike west and take over enemy-held territory. For a while, the only enemy we could see were infantry which we bypassed, or took on if they showed any anger," wrote Mr. WALLACE in a family memoir.
Elements of the squadron approached a wooded area that the 3rd County of London Yeomanry assured them was clear of Germans. The information could not have been more wrong. Two tanks from the 16th Panzer Division lay hidden in the copse and Mr. WALLACE was next in their sights. Seconds later, his tank was destroyed.
Fortunately, he had insisted that his men repeatedly practice evacuation drill while training in Britain and it paid off. "That day, they did it perfectly," he later said.
As he was being removed, he asked, "did they get the bastards?" Soon afterward, his leg was amputated above the knee and his three-month war was over.
Jack WALLACE grew up the eldest of three sons of a long-serving, non-commissioned officer who served in Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry. His father had fought in the First World War and stayed in the army afterward. "I suppose I was destined to become a soldier," he said.
He enlisted while still a teenager. During the summer of 1938, he was a batman, or servant, to Frank Worthington, the father of Canada's armoured forces. "During my spare time, having polished buttons, pressed uniforms, cleaned tents and latrines, I [went] to where the tanks were. I learned how to drive them before I could even drive a car."
At the time, the Canadian army still had horse-mounted cavalry regiments. Maj. Worthington pleaded for modern equipment, but what he got for his tank school at Camp Borden, Ontario, were 16 obsolete light tanks and 12 Carden-Loyd machine-gun carriers.
Fascinated by the possibilities of modern armoured warfare, Mr. WALLACE was the first man in line to join the tank school just three days after Canada declared war on Nazi Germany on September 10, 1939. After qualifying as a mechanic, he reached the dizzy heights of command when he was promoted to acting lance corporal.
Mr. WALLACE was commissioned as an officer in May of 1941, and posted to the Royal Canadian Dragoons. After reaching Britain in October, he transferred to the Three Rivers Regiment, where he joined his father, by then a major commanding A squadron.
After the war, Mr. WALLACE maintained his connection to the army. Frank Worthington, his old commander, had by then left the army to take up an appointment as Canada's civil defence co-ordinator and in 1949 he asked Mr. WALLACE to help set up the Civil Defence Organization. The Cold War had just started and Ottawa wanted to protect Canadians from nuclear war by organizing warning systems and building bomb shelters. Over the years, Mr. WALLACE became Canada's leading expert in civil emergency and disaster planning. In 1977, he took early retirement, worn out physically and mentally from promoting civil defence to a government that no longer cared.
He never forgot, though, his wartime role. On May 8, 2005, Mr. WALLACE attended the opening of the new Canadian War Museum in Ottawa. Wearing his medals and war-time beret, he rode all the way to the museum from the National War Memorial in his wheelchair.
John Francis WALLACE was born on August 12, 1921, in Esquimalt, British Columbia He died on March 7, in Ottawa. He was 85. He leaves his wife Cathy, his sons Ted and Peter, his daughters Ann, Jane and Caroline, and 14 grandchildren. He was predeceased by his brothers Ted and Doug.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-05 published
Jim DALE, Royal Canadian Air Force And Department Of Transport Pilot (1923-2006)
As the young captain of a Lancaster bomber, he flew countless dangerous missions over Germany. Years later, he once wept at the thought of how many civilians he had probably killed
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S11
Ottawa -- Jim DALE loved flying so much that he volunteered to keep going for an extra eight missions during the height of the Allied air war against Germany.
A normal tour of operations for aircrew of the Royal Air Force's Bomber Command was 30 missions, but Mr. DALE, a Canadian pilot with the Royal Air Force's 166 Squadron, flew his mighty Lancaster bomber over the German Reich for a total of 38 hair-raising missions in all.
Starting on October 31, 1944, Mr. DALE climbed into the cockpit of his four-engine Lancaster and, night after night, headed out on some of the biggest raids of the Second World War. Cologne, Düsseldorf, Dortmund, Essen, Hanover: The list of German cities bombed by Mr. DALE and his crew resonate from the pages of his logbook more than 60 years later. What those terse entries don't mention is the gut-wrenching fear often experienced by aircrew as they struggled to survive.
Besides fighting off wily and persistent German night fighters, Mr. DALE and his fellow Lancaster captains also faced a storm of flak shells exploding near their vulnerable, soft-skinned aircraft. Bright moonlight was an unavoidable hazard that lit up the sky, making juicy targets of those bombers. German searchlights were also deadly, targeting Allied bombers by 'coning' them with several beams of high-powered light. Once coned, many bombers could not escape, making them an easy target for the Germans' vaunted 88-mm flak guns.
Despite losing close Friends, Mr. DALE kept doing his job, bombing a wide range of targets by flying some of Bomber Command's deepest penetrations into enemy territory. There was little opportunity to rest, except when bad weather washed out a mission.
Mr. DALE's daughter Ann thinks her father kept risking his life because he "loved the adventure, of being free in the air, of fighting for his country, and yet, he also knew fear. He didn't know the meaning of stress, as that word didn't exist then, but often, he was scared. He once told me it would be stupid not to have been afraid going on a bombing mission. It was what you lived with."
In November of 1944, Mr. DALE flew eight missions. For the next three months, he flew six missions a month. Beginning March 1, 1945, with the Germans making a ferocious final battle, he flew a mind-numbing 10 missions in 16 days.
"His last op was Nuremburg [on March 16] and he was petrified, as that was where Mother's first husband had been killed. It was also a night called 'bomber's moon' when the moon lit up the sky and made [them] more vulnerable to attack," Ms. DALE said.
Mr. DALE's unassuming heroism did not go unrewarded by the Royal Air Force. "For his devotion to duty, courage and magnificent operational spirit, [showing] a complete disregard for his own personal safety and a high degree of skill," he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross on July 5, 1945.
"Throughout [his] attacks he has displayed a fine offensive spirit in action and has allowed no hazard to deter him from his purpose. Several of the sorties in which he has been engaged have involved a flight of nine or 10 hours and his qualities of endurance and tenacity have been manifest to his crew, to whom his conduct has been a continuous source of inspiration."
Jim DALE joined the Royal Canadian Air Force on April 20, 1942. After training at various British Commonwealth Air Training Plan stations across Canada, he graduated as a sergeant pilot on May 14, 1943. Commissioned as an officer the next year, he joined 166 Squadron in October, 1944. Over all, about 25 per cent of Bomber Command aircrew were Canadian. One of its sub-units, No. 6 (Royal Canadian Air Force) Group, was made up of 15 Canadian bomber squadrons flying Wellington and Lancaster bombers.
Dubbed "Tail-up Dale" because he liked to take off with his Lancaster tail in the air, Mr. DALE was known as a devil-may-care character who enjoyed annoying stuffy Royal Air Force officers obsessed in maintaining military decorum, his daughter said. "Always a daredevil, he had little respect for authority unless it was earned, qualities that got him into a lot of trouble over his career, but which made him an outstanding pilot able to fly without ever losing a crew member. He did not hesitate to speak his mind. Political acumen and diplomacy were not his strong suit."
After being demobilized in March of 1946, Mr. DALE decided he loved flying too much too remain a civilian and rejoined eight months later only to find the Royal Canadian Air Force was being reorganized on a tiny peacetime scale. He had to serve two years as an airman before he regained his commission in 1948.
Two years flying C-47 Dakotas with 414 Squadron out of Royal Canadian Air Force Station Rockcliffe, in Ottawa, followed before Mr. DALE was posted to Royal Canadian Air Force Station Centralia, Ontario, as a flying instructor. Training a new generation of postwar pilots, Mr. DALE -- by then a flight lieutenant -- proved an inspiration to the young fliers. "The saying in Centralia [was], 'Even when birds won't fly, Dale will," Ms. DALE said.
In 1954, after 2,477 hours in the air in peace and war, Mr. DALE retired from the air force for the second time and joined the Department of Transport as a pilot. Over the next 25 years, he did a variety of jobs with Department of Transport, including investigating aircraft crashes and flying government V.I.P.s. His passengers included Prince Philip and Pierre Elliot Trudeau, who apologized when he was late.
Bill BOONE of Ottawa, now retired from Department of Transport as a chief flight dispatcher, remembers Mr. DALE with great affection. "He was one of the last great characters in aviation before it became very serious and regimented. He liked to fly by the seat of his pants, not always observing the rules. The rules were for others." Despite that, Mr. DALE is credited with contributed greatly to safety standards during his Department of Transport years.
Characterized as a man's man who liked sports and hunting, Mr. DALE was typical of his generation because he kept his feelings hidden, Ms. DALE said. He was happiest while flying. "It was as if in the air, he became everything, the real person, whereas on the ground, he had trouble, people didn't understand him. Pilots have to have so much maturity since they're responsible for people's lives, that on the ground they party hard and don't always have common sense about people and emotions. And yet, he had extreme sensitivity. Once he cried after watching a documentary on the war. He had been on that bombing raid and was acutely aware of how many people he had killed."
Milton Clarence James DALE was born on December 10, 1923, in Ottawa. He died of a bladder infection on March 5, 2006, in Ottawa. He was 82. He leaves his wife Catherine, daughters Ann, Elaine and Adrienne, son James, sisters Elaine and Helen, and brother Ashton.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-06-13 published
Mary MacDONALD, Civil Servant (1918-2006)
For decades, she guarded the gates of power in the Prime Minister's Office, first as an 'indispensable' executive secretary to Lester PEARSON and then to Pierre TRUDEAU
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S11
Ottawa -- In 1967, Prime Minister Lester PEARSON needed to find a birthday gift for his executive assistant, and it had to be special. Mary MacDONALD had been with him 20 years and, as he admitted handsomely in his autobiography, "[she was] indispensable as my Girl Friday. Nobody ever served anyone with greater devotion."
So, what to give Miss MacDONALD for her 49th birthday on April 30, 1967? In the end, he settled on the perfect gift: the Bible presented to him by Prime Minister Mackenzie KING on September 10, 1948, when Mr. PEARSON was sworn as a member of the King's Privy Council for Canada. At the same time, Mr. PEARSON, arguably Canada's most famous diplomat, was appointed secretary of state for External Affairs, and the Bible had become a treasured family memento.
On the flyleaf, Mr. PEARSON wrote a warm and heartfelt message: "To Mary, with all of my best wishes and grateful appreciation for helping a P.C. become a p.m. … L. B. PEARSON." The Bible is now held in trust by Mr. PEARSON's grand_son, Michael, for his infant son.
Miss MacDONALD first joined Mr. PEARSON in 1947 at the then-Department of External Affairs. They had made a terrific team together, travelling the world when he was minister of External Affairs and then the country after he became leader of the Liberal Party of Canada in 1958.
As one of the gatekeepers to Mr. PEARSON, Miss MacDONALD did not suffer fools gladly. "My father owed his success in part, to her," said retired diplomat Geoffrey PEARSON at her funeral last week. "Success in politics, as in life, is often due to those who stand at the door."
Miss MacDONALD's working day always extended past 5 p.m., for 10 or 12 hours overall. She once wrote 91 letters in one day. Politics was her life, to the exclusion of everything else including marriage, except her family. Weekends were no different. If Mr. PEARSON and his wife Maryon needed her, Miss MacDONALD would be there.
"She really knew who was useful and kept him in touch with his constituents and vice-versa. She was a great organizer," said retired senator Landon PEARSON.
Mary MacDONALD grew up in Ottawa during the Depression. After graduating from the University of Ottawa in 1938, she spent five years with the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company. In 1941, she joined the Canadian Red Cross Corps, shipping out to Britain two years later. A month after D-Day, June 6, 1944, she was sent to No. 12 Canadian General Hospital as a welfare officer. Since there was a shortage of nurses, her organizational skills were used to regulate the efficient flow of patients from the wards to the operating theatres.
Janet FLANDERS of Ottawa first met Miss MacDONALD in 1943, in a battered London at war. "She was bright and cheerful… She could do anything."
After returning to Ottawa in December of 1945, Miss MacDONALD joined the Department of External Affairs. Soon after, she was assigned to the new undersecretary of external affairs, just back from Washington as Canadian ambassador. Lester "Mike" PEARSON was a rising star and it took very little time for them to develop a working relationship, although she never called him anything other than "Mr. PEARSON."
For the next 12 years, Miss MacDONALD received an education in foreign affairs, as her boss helped Prime Minister Louis SAINT_LAURENT make Canada an important player on the world stage. It was the beginning of the Cold War and Canada's foreign policy included giving strong support to her allies in North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the United Nations. She also obtained a master's degree in political science in 1948, but paused in her own advancement to help old Friends, one of whom was Janet FLANDERS. " After the war, she got me a job in External in 1947&hellip We were close Friends for 60 years. You don't come across people of her calibre very often."
Another of her Friends was Aline CHRÉTIEN, wife of former prime minister Jean CHRÉTIEN. They had met in 1963 after Mr. CHRÉTIEN was first elected to the House of Commons. "We saw her all the time. She was devoted to her boss, Mr. PEARSON, her Friends and family," said Mrs. CHRÉTIEN. " She was like a mother to all sorts of people… Jean and I loved her."
During Mr. PEARSON's 20 years in federal politics, Miss MacDONALD played a part in getting him elected eight times in his riding of Algoma East, in Northern Ontario. He was fortunate to have Miss MacDONALD as his riding secretary, he once wrote. She was a "very friendly, outgoing person who enjoyed meeting new people. She became the bulwark of my political life and soon knew everyone in the constituency, to my great advantage."
In fact, Time magazine said the only person who could ever dethrone Mr. PEARSON in Algoma East was Miss MacDONALD. After Mr. PEARSON was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in Oslo in 1957 for helping secure peace in the 1956 Suez Crisis, he found himself out of office when John Diefenbaker's Conservatives won the next election. An exhausted Louis SSAINTURENT resigned as Liberal chief and Miss MacDONALD became the executive assistant to the new leader of Her Majesty's Loyal Opposition. Five long years in opposition followed, until Mr. PEARSON beat Mr. Diefenbaker and became the 14th prime minister of Canada on April 22, 1963.
A devoted Liberal, she also served Mr. PEARSON's successor. When Pierre Elliott TRUDEAU took over as Prime Minister on April 20, 1968, he was advised that continuity in the Prime Minister's Office was important and that Miss MacDONALD could provide it. After all, she knew everyone in Ottawa.
For the next 11 years, she was Mr. TRUDEAU's administrative and constituency liaison officer, ruling a staff of 15 secretaries with tact and humour. Isabel METCALFE of Ottawa was one of them. "She was marvellous to us. She encouraged us, gave us advice she was fun. She was meticulous in upholding the standards of the Prime Minister's Office. She was an inspiration to us in the context of political activism."
It was the role in which she probably felt most comfortable and most effective. In 1968, rumours swirled around Parliament Hill that Mr. PEARSON was thinking about appointing her to the Senate. For reasons that may never be fully known, it didn't happened. Instead, former Liberal cabinet minister Paul Martin, Sr., got the call.
Landon PEARSON, who was Lester PEARSON's daughter-in-law, believes Miss MacDONALD "would have made an excellent senator. She had excellent political instincts and knew politics. She was a great organizer. In my view, she was never adequately recognized by the men."
In 1979, Miss MacDONALD retired and the following year she was content to receive the Order of Canada. From her point of view, it was probably more than enough. After sitting at the right hands of Lester PEARSON and Pierre TRUDEAU, she had seen it all.
"Behind every great man is a surprised woman, my mother used to say," said Geoffrey PEARSON. " Mary was never surprised."
Mary Elizabeth MacDONALD was born on April 30, 1918, in North Cobalt, Ontario She died of a stroke on June 5 in Ottawa. She was 88. She leaves her sister Kay, her nephews Peter, Joe, Paul, John and Greg. She was predeceased by her brother Neil.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-04 published
Alex TRIMBLE, Royal Canadian Air Force Officer (1920-2006)
Meticulous worker began his career during the Battle of Britain, repairing and maintaining the delicate instruments that crowded the cockpits of his squadron's Hawker Hurricanes
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- Alex TRIMBLE climbed out of the cockpit of a Hawker Hurricane fighter aircraft and wiped his brow. Nearby, a dozen Hurricanes stretched down the airfield, each of them swarmed by Royal Canadian Air Force technicians intent on servicing their aircraft for the next flight.
From the fitters who maintained the engines and the riggers who repaired the airframes, wings and undercarriage, to the men who fixed the radios plus the armourers who cleaned and loaded each aircraft's eight.303-inch machine guns, the technicians knew the pilots of No. 1 (Fighter) Squadron depended on them.
Mr. TRIMBLE had a vital job of his own. Known for his painstaking accuracy, he was an instrument maker, responsible for repairing and maintaining the dozen or so delicate instruments that crowded each Hurricane cockpit.
Speedometer, tachometer, oil-pressure gauge, air-pressure gauge, compass -- every instrument had to be in perfect working order because a pilot's life could depend on it, especially when flying blind in clouds.
The Royal Canadian Air Force regarded servicing extremely seriously. "Before a plane can take off, a chart has to be signed by eight different men, including the five airmen in charge of the main ground jobs, and the flight sergeant," said a newspaper story entitled Ground Men Playing Vital Roles In War. "As a result, accidents from mechanical faults seldom occur and when a pilot sets out on a sweep across northern France he can be reasonably certain that if he doesn't get in the way of enemy guns he'll come safely back to his base."
Despite a lack of formal recognition -- ground crew weren't entitled to a campaign star, like the Aircrew Europe Star awarded after the war to aircrew -- Mr. TRIMBLE enjoyed his job. He knew his pilots as human beings, since he strapped them into their cockpits and wished them good hunting before taking off. Scanning the sky anxiously, Mr. TRIMBLE was there for them when they returned, physically and emotionally drained after combat.
A key member of the only Royal Canadian Air Force squadron to participate in the epic Battle of Britain, fought from July 10 to October 31, 1940, Mr. TRIMBLE watched history being made in the skies over Britain that hot summer of perfect weather as the German Luftwaffe tried to destroy the Royal Air Force as a prelude to invasion. Over all, 105 Canadian pilots flew in the Battle of Britain, 77 with the Royal Air Force and 28 with No. 1 Squadron.
Organized in 1937 at Royal Canadian Air Force Station Trenton, Ontario, No. 1 Squadron and its Hurricanes were mobilized on September 10, 1939, the day Canada declared war against Germany. In May, 1940, No. 1 absorbed No. 115 (Fighter) Squadron and moved to Britain.
On August 26, No. 1 Squadron engaged the Luftwaffe for the first time when 10 Hurricanes scrambled against a force of 25 to 30 bombers. Flight Lieutenant G.R. McGREGOR destroyed a Dornier Do. 215 and Flying Officer T.B. LITTLE was awarded a bomber probably destroyed. Flying Officer R.L. EDWARDS was killed.
It had been quite a day for Squadron Leader Ernie McNAB and his pilots. His unit was the first Royal Canadian Air Force squadron to score victories, suffer combat casualties and win gallantry awards. On March 1, 1941, No. 1 was renumbered as 401 Squadron after the Royal Canadian Air Force was awarded the 400-block series of numbers.
For Mr. TRIMBLE and his comrades, life during the Battle of Britain was hectic. Described as unsung heroes for their dedication, ground crew worked long hours -- often starting before dawn and finishing after midnight -- but the bright lights of London also beckoned, with its "tonight we live for tomorrow we may die" atmosphere.
In 1941, Mr. TRIMBLE was at a party when he spied a pretty girl. Sparks ignited and he asked Isobel KIRKPATRICK to dance. That was the beginning of a whirlwind romance that ended in marriage a year later, on March 17, 1941.
"It must have been the uniform. We danced, we dated, he got posted then came back. It was war time and we didn't know what tomorrow would bring," said Mrs. TRIMBLE. "It was love at first sight. He was a handsome lad, had a great sense of humour, a wonderful personality."
Alex TRIMBLE joined the Royal Canadian Air Force the day after Canada declared war on Nazi Germany on September 10, 1939. After training in Ottawa, he was sent to No. 115 (Fighter) Squadron. On August 25, 1941, he was posted to the newly formed 408 Squadron. A month later, he was promoted to sergeant, just 24 months after first enlisting. Mr. TRIMBLE spent the next two years in charge of 408's instrument section. Formed as the second Royal Canadian Air Force bomber squadron overseas, 408 attacked targets all over Europe with its Hampden and Halifax bombers.
After the war, Mr. TRIMBLE remained in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He served from 1948 to 1956 with 412 (Transport) Squadron, based at Royal Canadian Air Force Station Uplands, in Ottawa, in command of the instrument and electrical sections. Then, as now, 412 is known as the "V.I.P. squadron," flying prime ministers, governors-general and the royal family. It was the golden era of the Royal Canadian Air Force, which soon reached 52,000 men and women and 2,000 aircraft.
In 1956, Mr. TRIMBLE became an officer, specializing in aeronautical engineering. He and his family spent three years in France before going to air force headquarters in 1959. He retired in 1968 as a captain and bought a 100-acre farm in Lanark County, Ontario, in 1973.
Gail PROUDE of Ottawa remembers family life with her father during the 1950s with affection. "He went to work every day and every night the family sat down for supper together. Afterwards, Ann and I did the dishes and Mom and Dad would retire to the living room and read the paper. Families established their parameters and kids followed the rules, for the most part. It was a secure time."
Known as an organized, meticulous man, Mr. TRIMBLE loved repairing clocks and watches. "[It] became his hobby when we kids were all very young. He used to tell us that whatever money he made&hellip he used it to put gas in the car," said Mrs. PROUDE. He continued his repair work for a jewellery store in Perth, Ontario, until Alexander George TRIMBLE was born on September 3, 1920, in Ottawa. He died of heart disease on April 11, in Perth, Ontario He was 85. He is survived by his wife, Isobel, his son Gordon, his daughters Gail and Ann, six grandchildren and four great-grandchildren.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-14 published
Ormond HOPKINS, Chaplain General (1925-2006)
Military padre who compared his job to being a mosquito in a nudist colony spent more than 30 years ministering to troops
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Ottawa -- Serving in Egypt 50 years ago was an eye-opener for Ormond HOPKINS, a padre with the Royal Canadian Army Chaplain Corps. Not only did he have to cope with the heat, sand and flies, he also had to adjust to the local culture.
On New Year's Eve, 1956, Mr. HOPKINS, an Anglican priest known as Hoppy to his Friends, had the opportunity of observing Egyptian culture at close range. The brass had booked two belly dancers from Cairo to entertain Canadian troops and, as a man of the cloth, he felt obliged to protest the salacious nature of the festivities. His appeal made no impression. His Catholic colleague, Father Schmidt, left in "great disgust."
For his part, Mr. HOPKINS decided to apply the hoary old adage, "if you can't beat them, join them!" After the dancers had completed their performance, they were escorted to the officers' mess to change out of their costumes. Mr. HOPKINS and another officer put their heads together and decided a second show was in order.
"[We] donned the belly dancers' costumes and jewellery, and after bathing Father Schmidt with their musk [the effect was akin to being sprayed by a skunk], we tripped into the mess on stiletto heels," wrote Mr. HOPKINS decades later in a family memoir.
The effect on the troops and their guests was electrifying. "The Egyptians screamed like banshees, and went for Herb and me, grasping at our most vulnerable parts. Until they were restrained, I am told that I performed a hilarious version of the Highland fling."
It was 1957, and Mr. HOPKINS was one of 800 Canadians sent to the Sinai Desert as part of the United Nations Emergency Force to secure and supervise a ceasefire between the Egypt and Israel. While in the Middle East, he travelled around the Holy Land and saw Mount Sinai, the Mount of the Beatitudes and St. Catherine's Monastery. But what he found most meaningful, regarding his faith, "was to walk the walk which He had walked."
Ormond HOPKINS grew up on his family's 40-hectare farm near Perth, Ontario, during the hard years of the Depression. After graduating with honours from Bishop's University in Lennoxville, Quebec, he was ordained an Anglican deacon in 1949. He served as a curate at St. Matthias's Church in Ottawa, until he joined the army in April, 1953.
Seven months later, Mr. HOPKINS found himself in Korea, ministering to the tough gunners of 4th Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. The ceasefire between United Nations forces and North Korea had been signed on July 27, after three years of fighting up and down the Korean Peninsula.
Mr. Ormond wasn't prepared for the "terrible devastation [and] dire poverty" he found. "Everything constructed of brick or stone had been levelled. Pusan was a city of huts constructed from metal ration containers. The stench was so high that you could smell the city from 10 miles away."
Retired lieutenant-colonel Scotty Lamb of St. Albert, Alberta., met Mr. HOPKINS when they were working at a hospital in Japan, before Mr. HOPKINS went to Korea. They remained close Friends for 50 years. "He was a very conscientious padre, very popular with the troops. He mixed with them quite well. He had the unique ability of reaching people."
Famous for delivering his sermons in a booming voice, Mr. HOPKINS had a clarity and certainty of faith, said his daughter Sareena. "When it came to his role as a chaplain, he saw no conflict between his Christian values and military service. This never wavered. My father believed strongly in justice and democracy and was a realist -- he was certain that military weakness would leave Canada vulnerable."
During the 1960s and 1970s, Mr. HOPKINS served at bases across Canada and in Germany. Busy seven days a week conducting services, writing sermons, supervising church committees, ministering to the sick and dying, going on field exercises with the troops, Mr. HOPKINS also counselled the suicidal and helped save marriages.
"[He also] carried the heavy burden of informing a soldier that their parent, spouse, or worst of all, child, had died, and getting them through that terrible time. He did this literally hundreds of times," said Mr. HOPKINS's son, Michael.
Canon Bill FAIRLIE of Ottawa's Christ Church Cathedral met Mr. HOPKINS when the latter was serving in Germany, from 1972-76. "He was a very capable churchman, [and] a very able soldier. He was very colourful, with quick wit. He loved a good party with interesting people. He was extremely loyal to the military, but he wasn't afraid to criticize it when necessary."
In 1981, Mr. HOPKINS was promoted to brigadier-general and appointed Chaplain General (Protestant) of the Canadian Forces. Suddenly, he was responsible to the chief of the defence staff for the moral and spiritual well-being of Protestant personnel in all the different branches of the military.
That was a big job, to say the least. He visited every base and station, supervised the 150-plus regular and reserve chaplains, and related pastorally to the troops. Mr. HOPKINS also officiated at military investitures at Rideau Hall and the national Remembrance Day observances in Ottawa. He also "argued vigorously, and I believe convincingly, for the centrality of moral and spiritual values in the definition of Canada's military ethos."
Mr. HOPKINS relished the challenges he faced in an increasingly secular world and was fond of comparing it to being a mosquito in a nudist colony. "We have unlimited pastoral opportunity," he said in 1983. "A civilian rector can't go into the factories or offices where his parishioners work and join them in their coffee breaks and go and live with them as we do."
Religious pluralism was also an important feature of Mr. HOPKINS's job. "In our caring ministry, religious doctrine and tradition are seldom factors, but in the ongoing life of worship and Christian nurture this is something that places limitations on us and tests our skills and ingenuity."
In 1981, Mr. HOPKINS was made an officer of the Order of Military Merit. Three years later, he retired from the Canadian Forces after 32 years of service. Too young to retire for good, he spent the next 10 years as rector of the parish of Bradford, Ontario, where he succeeded in doubling his congregation. As a result, he was named Bradford's first-ever Citizen of the Year.
"He also, in very quiet ways, touched many individuals and families. Often, in the middle of the night [he helped] someone in distress and many credit him for their lives. Dad was a rare combination of a strong and effective leader, someone with the gift of walking quietly through troubled times," said Sareena HOPKINS.
Ormond Archibald HOPKINS was born on August 18, 1925, in Perth, Ontario He died as a result of complications from an aneurysm on May 15, 2006, in Ottawa. He was 80. He leaves his wife, Ernestine, daughter Sareena and son Michael.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-07-17 published
Bill WATERTON, Test Pilot (1916-2006)
Former Royal Air Force flier was Canada's most internationally famous and accomplished test pilot, yet, 'to this day, he remains virtually unrecognized in this country'
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S8
Ottawa -- Diving over the Arc de Triomphe and down the Champs Élysées just 15 metres above the pavement, Bill WATERTON thrilled a huge French crowd gazing in admiration at his Gloster Meteor IV jet, then the world's fastest aircraft.
Flying more than 1,000 kilometres an hour over Paris on January 15, 1947, in a publicity stunt staged by his employer, the Gloster Aircraft Company, Mr. WATERTON, one of the world's top test pilots, added some upward rolls and inverted climbs for good measure.
There was no margin for error, wrote Mr. WATERTON in his 1956 autobiography, The Quick and the Dead. "The slightest error could mean the slaughter of spectators as the Meteor fell among them. Timing and precision were essential. The row must have been frightful as the Meteor shrieked over the city. For blurred split seconds I glimpsed upturned faces."
Flying around the Eiffel Tower, Mr. WATERTON, a Canadian who flew with the Royal Air Force during the Second World War, was close enough to see people waving at him. "But with an icy stab of fear I suddenly saw the sloping, almost invisible steel cables which guy the tower. In dropping my height to fly around the tower, I had missed one by no more than 12 feet. A bit closer and the steel rope would have sheared off a wing as easily as a hot knife slices butter."
The next morning, Mr. WATERTON climbed back into his twin-engine Meteor. "As I left the ground, things fell into their usual pattern: as though I had been given a powerful shot in the arm, tiredness and tenseness vanished, my brain was clear and my hand steady, and only one solitary butterfly flapped in my stomach -- the worry of possible failure."
He didn't fail, though. In just 20 minutes and 11 seconds, Mr. WATERTON established a new Paris-to-London speed record. His boss congratulated him with typical English understatement. "[He] shook my hand and said, 'Jolly good show, WATERTON.' I went to the pictures."
Bill WATERTON saw his first aircraft when he was 3. "I heard a noise. I looked up and there was an airplane. It was silver and blue, a Stinson biplane," he said in 2003. When he was 16, he paid two dollars in Camrose, Alberta., to take his first flight. He was hooked.
After two years at the Royal Military College of Canada, Mr. WATERTON went to Britain, took flying lessons and joined the Royal Air Force on June 10, 1939. Three months later, Canada declared war on Nazi Germany.
Posted to No. 242 (Canadian) Squadron, Mr. WATERTON flew in the Battle of France until he suffered severe head injuries on May 25, 1940, when he crash landed his Hurricane fighter near Dover. While instructing pilot trainees in Canada in 1942, he was awarded the Air Force Cross for "acts of gallantry for fighting with the Royal Air Force."
Things took off for Mr. WATERTON in 1946 when he was posted to the Royal Air Force's High Speed Flight, a group that was determined to keep the world's speed record in Britain. On September 7, despite an attempt by Royal Aero Club officials to disqualify him because he was Canadian, Mr. WATERTON flew his Meteor at an average speed of 988 km/h.
A defective port aileron forced him to "jam my left arm like a rod between the side of the cockpit and the stick. As long as my palm, wrist and arm held out, the 'plane could not alter course to the left. At 605 miles an hour, the agony was indescribable. It seemed as though every bone from the tip of my elbow to the palm of my hand was in the grip of a giant, remorseless nutcracker: this in addition to the spine-jarring bounce of the bucking aircraft."
He was awarded a second Air Force Cross. Five weeks later, he joined the Gloster Aircraft Company as a test pilot. Over the next seven years, Mr. WATERTON, the picture of a fighter pilot with his huge, upswept mustache, flew into aviation history by setting speed records and making the first flights of several new aircraft. The jet era was just getting airborne and test pilots quickly became heroes to a British public looking for excitement.
The tiny fraternity, which included Mr. WATERTON, John Derry, Neville Duke and John Cunningham, had all been war-time Royal Air Force pilots. They appeared almost daily in newspapers and newsreels and became household names.
"The sounds were different, the speeds were different, the rate of climb -- it was absolutely new. People just never experienced it before. The stars of the new jet age were the test pilots. Thousands flocked to see them and their records grabbed the headlines. Their achievements shaped the modern world of aviation," said a 1998 British Broadcasting Corporation documentary.
Test piloting, described by Mr. WATERTON as 'suck it and see,' required "a good pair of hands and you had to use all your senses sound, vision, feel, like the old days of flying by the seat of your pants. There was always an unknown with a new airplane," he once told the British Broadcasting Corporation. "You never knew what the hell was going to happen next. Hydraulic failure meant you had to belly land the thing at 150 mph, you got engine failure, you got high temperature, it was new ground you were breaking."
On June 2, 1952, Mr. WATERTON survived a spectacular crash of the prototype Javelin, the world's first twin-engine delta wing fighter. He found himself trapped in the cockpit as his fuel tanks exploded. "I banged around like a man gone mad. I cursed, pressed buttons, pulled, tugged and heaved -- but nothing would yield. Neither the jettison handle nor the canopy would give a fraction of an inch."
Nevertheless, he got out and managed to rescue the aircraft's data package, for which he was awarded a George Medal on July 29, "for exemplary behaviour and outstanding courage beyond the call of duty." He was one of only 30 Canadians to receive the medal.
But Mr. WATERTON's fierce integrity made him many enemies in the aircraft industry, both in Britain and in Canada, where he returned in 1949 after an absence of 11 years to fly the prototype Avro CF-100 Canuck all-weather interceptor, the first fighter designed and built in Canada.
Some Avro employees disliked the flamboyant Mr. WATERTON. He found he couldn't win on either side of the Atlantic. "In postwar Britain, he could never be more than an energetic, temporarily useful colonial. To Canadian eyes and ears he also seemed foreign more British than the British," wrote author Sean Rossiter.
Fellow test pilot Richard BENTHAM, of Flesherton, Ontario, believes that Mr. WATERTON "set the bar for human courage. His career was marked by his turbulent personality. Tact was not his strong suit. He did not play the game… he told it like it was."
While some aviation colleagues disliked his outspoken manner, he was Canada's most internationally famous and accomplished test pilot, Mr. BENTHAM added. "No one else even approached his record of achievement. To this day, he remains virtually unrecognized in this country."
In 1954, Mr. WATERTON quit Gloster after seven years as its chief test pilot. He felt underpaid and was disillusioned with the Javelin and the British aircraft industry. For the next three years, he reported on aviation for the Daily Express, but the newspaper fired him after his controversial autobiography was published. The aircraft companies had stopped buying ad space.
Mr. WATERTON's son, William, believes his father was brought up to be honourable and honest, and that he tried to apply the same standards to the air industry.
"I think he never really realized, when he left the Royal Air Force and went to private industry, that he was working for big business, where money many times overrides safety," he said. "He refused to compromise the safety of the aircraft."
He said his father also treated everyone equally, "from the factory sweeper, to the barons of industry, which didn't make him Friends."
After returning to Canada in 1957, Mr. WATERTON spent the rest of his life near Owen Sound, Ontario He never forgot the thrill of flight, though -- just himself and his aircraft. "One of the great things of flying is just looking at the countryside in the evening when the air is calm."
William Arthur WATERTON was born on March 18, 1916, in Edmonton, Alberta. He died of natural causes on April 17 in Owen Sound, Ontario He was 90. He leaves his wife Marjorie, sons William and John and stepdaughter Karen.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-02 published
Paul MAYER, Soldier And Civil Servant (1916-2006)
He survived the Second World War and the wrath of King George to almost lose his life to a Congolese rebel
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- On January 27, 1964, Paul MAYER thought he was a dead man. Surrounded by Congolese rebels intent on slaughtering as many whites as possible in Kwilu Province, he was clubbed unconscious for trying to arrange the release of eight missionary nuns and a priest. As a lieutenant-colonel in the Regiment of Canadian Guards serving with the United Nations, he had already rescued two nuns and three priests.
When he regained consciousness, Mr. MAYER found a native council arguing the case for killing him on the spot. A member of the Jeunesse, a fanatical rebel army, stuck a pistol in his stomach and pulled the trigger. Click. There was no round in the chamber. Enraged, the fanatic pulled the trigger again. Another click. "He looked at the pistol, spat on it then slammed it against the side of my head. My ears rang like cathedral bells. Finally, he threw it on the ground. I could not believe my luck; there were another nine rounds in the magazine of the pistol, but he did not know how to work the slide," Mr. MAYER wrote in his 2006 autobiography I've Had a Good Innings.
But his ordeal wasn't over yet. Walking toward his helicopter, Mr. MAYER was struck from behind and knocked to the ground. A religious man, he called to God for help. "I had no one else to turn to. I said as loud as I could, 'Dear Lord, please help me,' and oh boy, did I ever mean it. I will swear to my dying day that I felt a friendly hand touch my shoulder and grip it as if to say, 'Go on, get up, it's going to be all right.' "
Mr. MAYER climbed into his helicopter and took off. He was safe and so were the missionaries. He was just doing his job. Sent to Congo in 1963 after rebellion broke out, he commanded the United Nations Airborne Rescue Force of 900 men. For saving more than 100 teachers and missionaries, plus almost 500 children, he was later decorated with the George Medal.
Paul MAYER, a scion of a family that first served the Crown in 1689, grew up a privileged member of the English upper-middle classes. His father was a colonel in the Royal Field Artillery and his mother was a French countess and "tempestuous diva" who could sing 32 operas in five languages. Destined for the British army, Mr. MAYER was forced to change his plans when at 17 he fell seriously ill. Advised to seek a better climate, he moved to Ontario and worked on a dairy farm, soon regaining his health.
In 1938, sensing that war with Germany was certain, Mr. MAYER joined the Algonquin Regiment. Seven days after Canada declared war on Germany on September 10, 1939, he was commissioned as an officer. He was later sent to England.
Training for war was serious, but there were a few light moments. On September 9, 1943, Mr. MAYER wrote, he drove his jeep onto a beautifully manicured lawn, where it got stuck. A group of men standing nearby shook their heads sadly. One of them was King George VI. Mr. MAYER had driven his jeep onto the King's croquet lawn at Sandringham. "Well, yyyoung man, you've bbbuggered up my croquet lawn," said the King in his well-known stutter.
After the Allies invaded Europe on June 6, 1944, Mr. MAYER commanded a company of the Algonquin Regiment in action in France, Belgium, Holland and into Germany.
Mr. MAYER remained in the army after the war, serving in Korea with the 1st Commonwealth Division and the 25th Canadian Infantry Brigade. He was made a member of the Order of the British Empire for his work in intelligence, one of 17 decorations and medals he received from Canada, Britain, France and Belgium.
Mr. MAYER transferred to the Canadian Guards when that short-lived regiment was founded on October 16, 1953. One of his fellow officers, retired major-general G.R. CHERITON of Ottawa, remembers him well. "He was an unusual man, something of a lone wolf. He gave a lot of attention to protocol; always understood the proper thing to do. He was always impeccably dressed."
In 1959, Mr. MAYER was sent to Indochina as a military adviser with the International Truce Commission, and once thwarted North Vietnamese soldiers who tried to confiscate a Canadian diplomatic bag. President Ho Chi Minh was sympathetic, but advised him to leave the country. As a parting gift, the president, who confided "I am only 15 per cent Communist," gave Mr. MAYER a bronze statue that had been in his family for 150 years.
By 1965, Mr. MAYER was a military adviser to the United Nations Secretary General. He was sent to the Dominican Republic as an observer. During a golf game, he recalled in his memoir, he was tipped off that an assassin was waiting for him on the second green. After a 36-minute trial held that afternoon, Mr. MAYER was invited to the luckless assassin's execution an hour later. He declined the opportunity to deliver the traditional coup-de-grace to the head.
A few months later, Mr. MAYER was shot at, at point-blank range, only to have his cap badge deflect the round. "It took a piece of my forehead with it and left a dent in my head above my right eye." In April, 1966, he and his second wife, Ruth, survived another assassination attempt.
After retiring from the Canadian Forces in 1968, he spent 10 years with the Asian Development Bank and the World Bank. In 1987, he married Pamela McDOUGALL, Canada's ambassador to Poland from 1968 to 1971.
Paul Augustus MAYER was born on December 17, 1916, in Santiago, Chile. He died of natural causes on July 5 in Ottawa. He was 89. He leaves his wife, Pamela, his sister Laura, his granddaughter Crystal and his grand_son David. His son Owen predeceased him.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-10-25 published
Don HILLMAN, Doctor And Educator: (1925-2006)
For 35 years, Don HILLMAN saved the lives of children in Africa, Asia and South America -- sometimes from the middle of a shooting war
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- Pediatrician Don HILLMAN couldn't contain his excitement when he arrived home one day in 1969 to tell his wife the big news. A brand new medical school was to be established at Kenya's University of Nairobi, and his name had been put forward as the person to go and help it get off the ground.
Liz HILLMAN, herself a pediatrician, agreed the opportunity was too good to pass up. Two weeks later, the entire HILLMAN clan, including five children under the age of 12, uprooted themselves from their comfortable home in Montreal and started a new life half a world away.
Moving to Africa turned out to be a bit of a culture shock, to say the least. There were lots of things to adapt to over the next two years, as Doctor HILLMAN and his wife helped develop the university's clinical services and establish a teaching hospital, complete with students in classrooms and on hospital wards, focusing on the management of disease. The HILLMANs also came up with something different. They thought there should be a focus on the child and family life, on disease prevention and public health. Dr. HILLMAN helped the university's medical faculty recognize the importance of health in rural areas, and of alternate sites for learning.
Those two years in Kenya were just the beginning of Doctor HILLMAN's adventures in international child health, a personal crusade that took him all over the world and made him many Friends, including hundreds of medical students who saw him not just as their professor, but as a mentor. Over the years, he was to save the lives of many children and, by training local doctors, to help the yet unborn have a fighting chance. Over a period of 35 years, Doctor HILLMAN practised medicine and taught in Kenya, Uganda, Kuwait, Zambia, Tanzania, Laos, Malaysia, Singapore, Pakistan, the Philippines, India and Guyana.
An unassuming man who loved to sing, Doctor HILLMAN experienced many adventures during his decades abroad, including at least six coups d'état in Africa. The first occurred in 1971 when dictator Idi Amin took over Uganda. Realizing they might have to leave quickly, the HILLMANs began wearing fanny packs called "coup kits" that held their passports and money.
One dark night, Mr. HILLMAN was told it would be a good idea to get out of the country and experienced some tense moments before slipping across an unmarked border crossing to Kenya. "We escaped under a tarp on a logging truck," recalled Liz HILLMAN. "It was fun. We could hear shooting."
On another occasion, Doctor HILLMAN was forced to leave his wife alone in their car, which had broken down on a mountain road, while he walked to find help. "He said he thought he'd seen a church. I heard shooting in the distance. It was a long five-hour wait for him [to return]."
In both cases, the children were away at school or elsewhere in the care of nannies.
Don HILLMAN first studied engineering at McGill University, and late in the Second World War was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Canadian Artillery. He spent the last three months of the war fighting with 7 Medium Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery.
After the war, he switched to medicine and graduated from McGill. In 1956, he completed a pediatric endocrine fellowship at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. He also took time to get married. Doctor Liz SLOMAN had known Doctor HILLMAN briefly in Montreal three years earlier, when they were both residents at the Montreal Children's Hospital.
Displaying a decidedly unconventional approach, he had challenged her to an arm-wrestling contest. "I said, 'What's arm wrestling?' He showed me. I told him I thought I could beat him and I did!" As it happened, romance did not bloom -- at least, not then. "He had lots of girlfriends," she said. "I babysat for his sister's kid and he asked me out for supper, but nothing else happened."
In November of 1955, they met again in Boston, where she was interning. The hospital wasn't paying her anything and she'd run out of money. "I asked him if I could borrow $60. I was very embarrassed and I didn't like to approach an American. He said that it was a lot of money and that he'd better come over and talk about it. He came over and a month later we went up to Montreal and got married."
By all accounts, the HILLMANs enjoyed a happy and fruitful life together, both on the home front and in medicine. Doctor HILLMAN was the front man of the team, while his wife used her organizational skills.
"He was funny, a terrifically good doctor who never frightened a child in his life. He was very hard working. Mostly, we just looked after kids together all over the world. It was fun working together," she said. Naturally, they had the odd disagreement. "I liked disagreeing with him, but I always did it in private. We worked it out."
After returning to Montreal in 1957, Doctor HILLMAN obtained his doctorate in experimental medicine in clinical investigation and eventually became associate professor of pediatrics, then associate dean of postgraduate studies, at McGill.
In 1976, he relocated to Newfoundland's Memorial University, where he taught pediatrics and headed the Janeway Child Health Centre. In 1985, he returned to Africa with his wife, teaching social pediatrics at Makerere University in Uganda. He also established a child health and development centre. Idi Amin had been deposed six years earlier and his disastrous regime had pretty much destroyed the country's infrastructure. There was much to do, so Doctor HILLMAN rolled up his sleeves and repaired broken incubators, Land Rovers and the like.
In 1989, both HILLMANs went to McMaster University and set up a child-health component within the International Health Centre. They weren't there long, however. There were always more students to teach abroad, and Doctor HILLMAN went to Laos, Vietnam, and China. In 1991, he and his wife taught at a medical school in Malaysia. Believing that prevention is central to child health, they developed a family medicine department.
In all this, Doctor HILLMAN also found time to be a regular father. Jamie HILLMAN remembers a father-and-son sports day at his Cub Scout camp, when his father's sense of humour cheered up a lot of small boys. "Our team was getting pretty upset because we weren't winning anything. I kept dropping my egg, I was crying and we were getting more and more depressed."
Then came Doctor HILLMAN's turn to run across the field, balancing a hard-boiled egg in a spoon. He decided to try and lighten the atmosphere and taped his egg on with one of the Band-aids he always carried in his pocket. He ran across the field, wildly waving the spoon and egg. Of course, he was immediately disqualified, said Jamie HILLMAN, but "he raised our spirits."
Dr. Kate Wotton, a former colleague at Newfoundland's Janeway Hospital, described how Doctor HILLMAN helped her deal with a case of child abuse in Davis Inlet. The community had expected the child's parents to be arrested but instead they continued to be at large. He "heard me out and asked a few pertinent questions. He seemed to appreciate what a miscarriage of justice this would be and how devastating [it would be] in this small community. Then he asked, 'What can I do?' I was so taken aback, I was, for a short minute, speechless. I had been hearing so many versions of, 'It really isn't my problem' that I was totally unprepared for someone who cared."
In 1994, Doctor HILLMAN accepted an appointment as professor of pediatrics, epidemiology and community health at the University of Ottawa. For 10 years, he and his wife worked on projects in Pakistan, Kenya, Guyana, India and the Philippines. They also served as consultants in eight other countries.
In 2005, both HILLMANs were awarded a fellowship by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, allowing them to return to Africa to reassess Canadian university contributions to child health.
Over the years, Doctor HILLMAN received many awards, including the Order of Canada in 1994. Doctor Liz HILLMAN also received the order at the same time.
Donald Arthur HILLMAN was born on June 25, 1925, in Montreal. He died in Ottawa on July 4, 2006, from complications from asthma. He was 81. He leaves his wife Elizabeth, his sons Jamie, Don and Alan, daughters Alison and Elizabeth, and his sister Elizabeth.
On October 15, colleagues paid tribute to Doctor HILLMAN during a medical conference in Ottawa.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-06 published
Gordon MOORE, Airman (1925-2006)
Royal Canadian Air Force tail gunner claimed he won the Distinguished Flying Cross for saving his Lancaster, and buzzed Buckingham Palace into the bargain
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- Gordon MOORE spent a lifetime dining out on a yarn that told how he won the Distinguished Flying Cross in the Royal Canadian Air Force during the Second World War. While winning such a medal was not unusual, he was a not a pilot but a tail gunner in a Lancaster.
This is the story he liked to tell: Flying home one dark night from one of the 64 bombing missions he flew over the German Reich, Mr. MOORE fired his guns at the Luftwaffe fighters attacking his stream of Lancasters. A few moments later, the bomber flying in front of his aircraft blew up and debris from the explosion shattered the cockpit windows and wounded the pilot. Mr. MOORE said he had some experience at the controls and, knowing this, the pilot called for help. Mr. MOORE snaked his way forward along the narrow fuselage, took over the controls, and managed to keep the aircraft in the air, putting it down safely at an airfield near London. Mr. MOORE even said he buzzed Buckingham Palace, though it had happened only because the plane was far off course.
Mr. MOORE liked to tell his Friends that he and his wife, Helen, had an audience with the Queen Mother years later. The incident came up and the Queen Mother said she recalled the low-flying Lancaster.
According to him, they also met in Toronto. During a Royal tour, he was a policeman on guard duty at the Royal York Hotel when she happened past. He said she did a double take and turned in surprise. "Gord?" she asked. "Is that you?"
Gordon MOORE grew up in Toronto during the Depression. After joining the Royal Canadian Air Force, he trained in Canada as an air gunner and was eventually posted to 428 Squadron. A diminutive five foot, three inches tall, Mr. MOORE was just the right size to fit in the turret. Once he climbed inside, dressed in his heavy flying suit, complete with parachute and harness, there was little room to move around.
Scanning the skies though panels of clear Perspex, Mr. MOORE strained his eyes to get the jump on high-speed German fighters. He learned how to lead his target, because if he fired directly at an aircraft then it was long gone when his stream of bullets arrived. Even so, he never managed to shoot down any enemy aircraft.
Years later, he told his Friends that he was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross for saving the Lancaster. An exhaustive check of the Royal Canadian Air Force association's web site, which is equivalent in length to 5,000 pages, did not support his claim. His name does not appear and, as an enlisted man, he would have won the Distinguished Flying Medal. The Distinguished Flying Cross was for officers.
Mr. MOORE never gloated about the Germans his Lancaster's bombs had killed or wounded. To him, it was a terrible, yet necessary job that had to be done. After reaching England and safety, he would sit in his turret for about 30 minutes, praying for the people he had helped kill, his friend Shelley HILL said.
After the war, Mr. MOORE joined the Toronto police force, where he continued to live an adventurous life as a sergeant in the traffic division. He later told how, in 1952, he had a hand in capturing the Boyd gang. Eddie BOYD and his boys had terrorized Toronto banks for almost five years. They also managed to escape twice from the Don Jail. Mr. MOORE's cousin, a police detective working on the manhunt, got a tip that the gang was hiding in the Don River valley. Mr. MOORE told his cousin he'd help find him if he could tag along. The cousins agreed and Mr. MOORE was present when police arrested the gang. Two of its members were hanged for murder, while Mr. BOYD got 14 years.
Years later, Mr. MOORE and his wife were vacationing in Victoria when he spotted someone who looked like Eddie BOYD. " He's done his time," he told his wife. "Let's invite him over for a coffee."
During the 1950s, decades before Canada abolished the death penalty, Mr. MOORE claimed to have spent time with three condemned prisoners. One wanted to play cribbage to pass his final hours on Earth, so Mr. MOORE obliged. When asked if he let the condemned man win, he replied no: "He had to earn it."
After retiring from the police, Mr. MOORE became a glass engraver. He then built furniture, also refinishing it. After undergoing successful triple bypass surgery in 1993, he decided to show his gratitude to London, Ontario's University Hospital by giving it money.
Over the years, Mr. MOORE and his wife gave between $100,000 and $500,000 to the London Health Sciences Foundation. "He was an exceptional gentleman," the foundation's Colleen DEJAGER told the London Free Press. "He liked recognition for what he had done. He loved telling stories, but he was a modest man, too."
Gordon Ross MOORE was born in Toronto in 1925. He died of internal bleeding on August 18, 2006, in London, Ontario He was 81. He is survived by his wife, Helen, and his sister Barbara.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-07 published
Jack ARMSTRONG, Soldier And Administrator: (1915-2006)
Sergeant came back from the 'dead' after the disastrous raid on Dieppe
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- Jack ARMSTRONG was so busy tending to the survivors of the bloody battle of Dieppe that he forgot to make sure his own name was added to the list of those who made it back from the ill-fated 1942 raid.
A few days later, his fiancé, Ruby WAY of Ottawa, received the telegram every Canadian family dreaded getting during the Second World War. It informed her that Sergeant Jack ARMSTRONG of the Corps of Military Staff Clerks was missing, presumed dead.
If that wasn't traumatic enough, Ottawa's daily newspapers published his name, plus his photograph, in their casualty lists. The pair had become engaged two years earlier when Mr. ARMSTRONG shipped out to Britain in 1940.
But Mr. ARMSTRONG wasn't dead, as his fiancé found out to her joy soon after. He had simply slipped through the cracks of army administration, which sometimes happened in an era when a forest of paperwork engulfed Canada's fighting services. Ironically, Mr. ARMSTRONG himself was an experienced army administrator.
At the end of the Dieppe raid, Mr. ARMSTRONG moved carefully from soldier to soldier lying on the deck of HMS Calpe as the ship steamed for England and safety. Many of the soldiers were badly wounded and delirious from pain. Mr. ARMSTRONG took names and tried his best to find out who was still in France, either as a prisoner or as a corpse.
After the smoke had cleared on August 19, 1942, more than 900 Canadians from the untested 2nd Canadian Infantry Division lay dead on and near the stony beach of Dieppe out of the 4,963 who crossed the English Channel in Operation Jubilee. Almost 2,000 had been taken prisoner. Only 2,210 returned to England, many of them wounded.
Championed by Chief of Combined Operations Lord Louis Mountbatten, the raid's purpose was to see if it was possible to seize the northern French port of Dieppe, hold it for a few hours and assess the German response.
Although his job was to watch and wait, Mr. ARMSTRONG came under fire as he stood on the Calpe's deck. The Royal Navy ship played host to the commander of the 2nd Division, Major-General J.H. Roberts, and the staff of his headquarters, where Mr. ARMSTRONG worked.
German aircraft tried to sink the Calpe and several men standing near Mr. ARMSTRONG on deck were hit, he told his son Charles many years later. "He said the British captain knew what he was doing and he saved [their] lives by zigzagging," said Charles ARMSTRONG.
Mr. ARMSTRONG remained haunted by the disastrous battle for the rest of his life, although he never talked about it. Once a year, though, on its anniversary, he told his son: "This is the day that Canadians shouldn't forget."
Jack ARMSTRONG grew up in Montreal and Ottawa. By the time he was 16, he had lost both his parents and found himself on his own at the beginning of the Depression. Determined to make something of himself, he went to school, played the trumpet with the Ottawa Boys' Band and served with the Royal Canadian Artillery from 1931 to 1935.
After graduating from the High School of Commerce in Ottawa, Mr. ARMSTRONG displayed the fierce independence he was known for when he turned down a generous offer that would have seen him study medicine, all expenses paid. Instead, he got a job with a printing company. Ten weeks after Canada declared war against Germany on September 10, 1939, he joined the army.
It didn't take long for the brass to see that Mr. ARMSTRONG had potential. Seven months after enlisting, he was a sergeant. For his war service, Mr. ARMSTRONG was made a member of the Order of the British Empire. By the order of King George VI, Quarter-Master Sergeant ARMSTRONG was also mentioned in dispatches on March 22, 1945, "for distinguished service." Britain's secretary of state for war was "charged to record His Majesty's high appreciation."
After being released from the army in October, 1945, with the rank of Warrant Officer Class One, he decided seven months later to re-enlist and make a career of it. Canada's huge wartime military had been ruthlessly cut, though, so Mr. ARMSTRONG had to start at the bottom as a private again. A week or two later, he was made a staff sergeant. In December, 1952, Mr. ARMSTRONG was commissioned as an officer in the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps. He served 15 years in staff appointments in Ottawa and Kingston before retiring in 1967 as a captain. He spent the next 10 years as an administrator at Queen's University's student health service.
Mr. ARMSTRONG's daughter Cynthia remembers her father as a proud soldier who taught her useful things. "Even though I was a girl, he wanted me to learn skills so I wasn't dependent on others for every little thing. For example, he taught me to change fuses, change a tire on a car, take a fish off a hook, fix the chain on my bike. He taught me not to waste food because he knew what it was like to go without."
An ardent fisherman and hunter who loved the outdoors, sailing and curling, Mr. ARMSTRONG was also "defiant about maintaining his independence. He never asked for help. He did things his way and if there was a hard way of doing it, he'd do it," said Charles ARMSTRONG.
In August, 1962, Mr. ARMSTRONG, resplendent in his uniform complete with seven medals, decided to attend his son Charles' graduation parade. The latter had joined the Princess of Wales' Regiment and had done well enough to be picked to command the parade. "He's a captain and people were saluting him. He told me that he was proud of me. That day is still very vivid to me. He was slow to give praise but when we got it we felt good."
John William ARMSTRONG was born on February 7, 1915, in Barrie, Ontario He died of a stroke on May 12, 2006, in Ottawa. He was 91. He is survived by his daughter Cynthia and his sons Charles, John and Robert. His wife Ruby died in 1989.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-11-08 published
John ORTON, Gunner (1918-2006)
After seeing fierce fighting in the Italian campaign, he made the army his career
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Ottawa -- Growing up during the 1920s in rural Alberta, John ORTON lived an innocent, idyllic life where there was world enough, and time, to swim, take long walks, get to know his neighbours and learn about the wonder of nature.
Mr. ORTON, whose father was the Anglican clergyman of Saint Mark's Church, lived in Innisfail, a small prairie town of 1,200, which boasted more horses than cars. It was a world away from the cauldron of total war where he flourished 20 years later, winning the Military Cross.
About 30 minutes after reporting to the Royal Military College of Canada, in Kingston, Ontario, Mr. ORTON and the 41 other recruits of the class of 1940 learned that they were a "very low form of life." The upperclassmen, resplendent in their perfectly tailored uniforms and pillbox caps, were determined to turn those scruffy recruits into officers and gentlemen. Discipline could be harsh and the standards the newly minted gentlemen cadets were obliged to meet were high.
Mr. ORTON -- destined for the Royal Regiment of Canadian Artillery quickly adjusted to the frantic pace of life, which started at 5 a.m., finishing 17 hours later. With defaulters' parade, room inspections, sports, parade-square drill and classes, the class of 1940 was run ragged.
Canada declared war on Germany on September 10, 1939. By August, 1941, Mr. ORTON was in Britain.
He finally reached the fighting, in January, 1944, when he was posted to 2nd Field Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, in Italy. For the next 14 months, 2nd Field supported the infantry in chasing the Germans up the Italian peninsula in dozens of actions, both big and small. Mr. ORTON also acted as a forward observation officer with the 1st Battalion, Royal Canadian Regiment, a dangerous and solitary job that saw him direct artillery fire on enemy positions.
At Pontecorvo, in May, 1944, Mr. ORTON's 25-pounder guns fired 500 rounds per gun during the attack on the heavily defended Hitler Line. The Gothic Line was next, with the Germans mounting a "bitter and savage opposition," Mr. ORTON wrote. One day saw "4,000 rounds [fired] between 1600 hours and 2000 hours."
For his gallantry in action, Mr. ORTON was awarded the Military Cross on July 30, 1944.
Fighting a modern war as an artillery officer was mentally gruelling for him, since he was required to calculate complex fire plans to place his rounds exactly where they were needed. An error could mean his shells landing on Canadian troops. It was a long, deadly campaign -- made miserable with rain and mud -- as town after town fell to the Canadians.
At war's end, Mr. ORTON decided to stay in the army. In October, 1950, he was appointed second-in-command of 2nd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery for its year-long tour of duty in Korea. For one memorable month, he commanded the regiment when the commanding officer was away. For his service, he was made a member of the Order of the British Empire.
Another highlight quickly followed. On June 2, 1953, Mr. ORTON along with three other officers from 2 Royal Canadian Horse Artillery -- formed a mounted escort in the Commonwealth contingent for the Queen when she travelled to Westminster Abbey for her coronation.
After commanding 3rd Regiment, Royal Canadian Horse Artillery in Canada and Germany from 1957 to 1961, Mr. ORTON was appointed base commander of Canadian Forces Base Shilo, Manitoba, in the late 1960s. He was also commandant of the Royal Canadian School of Artillery.
Carol SUTHERLAND- BROWN remembers her father as a social man who liked to help people. Since he was a gunner, he was also very organized. "My Dad believed any problem could be solved by plotting and graphing it. Whenever I had life challenges, he was there to plot and graph them out and take care of all logistics. My childhood memories were not so much of playing with dolls but of being taken [to see guns and tanks]."
Mr. ORTON finished his career in Turkey as Canadian military attaché. On one visit to Iraq, Mr. ORTON met the army chief of staff. Three months later, he went back and learned that the man had suffered two broken knees. His replacement was a young Saddam Hussein.
John Swaffield ORTON was born on June 19, 1918, in Innisfail, Alberta. He died of cancer on July 14 in Ottawa. He was 88. He leaves his daughter Carol, his granddaughter Marisa, his brother Fred and his sisters Molly, Joan and Ruth. His wife, Zelma, and his brother Tony predeceased him.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-12-23 published
Mary DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY, Civil Servant (1943-2006)
Known as the voice of Rideau Hall, she served five governors-general and set exactly the right tone at ceremonies and investitures. 'People stood a little straighter when she walked into a room.'
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- When Mary DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY retired from Rideau Hall, after 18 years of working for five successive governors-general, Governor-General Michäelle JEAN asked her to reconsider and stay on. Her experience and knowledge were just too valuable to lose.
Working as the director of honours in the Office of the Secretary to the Governor-General from 1995 to 2006, Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY held a key position in the Chancellery of Honours. Leading a team of 28 people, she was responsible for administering the nomination and selection process for 30 honours and awards.
Each year, hundreds of Canadians receive honours and awards from the governor-general, who is the personal representative of the Queen. While the sovereign rarely presents honours in person to her Canadian subjects, "The Crown [remains] the fount of all honour," wrote Christopher McCreery in his 2005 book The Order of Canada: Its Origins, History and Development.
Established in 1972, five years after the Order of Canada was introduced, the honours system includes the Victoria Cross, the Cross of Valour, the Star of Courage and the Medal of Bravery. Over the past 15 years, Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY played a key role in creating many new decorations and orders, including the General Campaign Star and the General Service Medal.
But she was best known for her very public role as master of ceremonies during investitures held in the gold-and-white ballroom at Rideau Hall. Presided over by the governor-general of the day -- Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY worked for Jeanne SAUVÉ, Ray HNATYSHYN, Roméo LEBLANC, Adrienne CLARKSON and Ms. JEAN -- her job was to read, with suitable aplomb, the names and citations of each recipient as they walked forward to accept their award.
Officiating at about 20 investitures per year, the modest and unassuming Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY quickly became known as "the voice of Rideau Hall." Standing at her podium to the right of the governor-general, her clear, precise and elegant tones in both official languages -- she was perfectly bilingual -- lent an air of dignity and solemnity to the event.
"On occasion, she was also the voice of Canada. She emceed the ceremony held on Parliament Hill as a tribute to all those affected by the terrorist attack on the U.S. on September 11, 2001," said her deputy, Danielle DOUGALL. " She was often recognized in public and people would say, 'you're the elegant lady on television.' People stood a little straighter when she walked into a room. Her whole demeanour spoke volumes."
But Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY never took anything for granted, Mrs. DOUGALL said. "She was very professional. She'd rehearse before the ceremony. You have to know where to pause, where to be emotional. If it got emotionally stressful [for her] she'd just concentrate on reading the words, and not the story behind the words. She was a very caring and compassionate person. She was everything to me. We were best Friends and soulmates for 10 years."
Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY was also good at making people feel welcome in Rideau Hall, helping to dispense hospitality at about 200 events per year. She met hundreds of celebrities, athletes, business moguls, politicians and foreign heads of state and government, but she never failed to connect with ordinary people, Mrs. DOUGALL said.
"I remember one shy 10-year-old who had just received a Medal of Bravery. With her usual magic touch, Mary went to him and I saw them leave the ballroom together. When they returned shortly after, the child was holding a plate [of food]. Lunch was running late and he was hungry."
She understood that Rideau Hall's formality could be intimidating, "particularly [to] recipients of bravery awards and their families who sometimes came from remote parts of Canada," Mrs. DOUGALL said. "Some of them had never left their community, let alone travelled by plane to the nation's capital. When Mary noticed people looking a little lost or anxious, she immediately went over and reassured them."
Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY also rubbed elbows with such celebrities as Nelson Mandela and Wayne Gretzky, yet never acquired airs, said her daughter, Kimberly. "She was extremely modest and humble about what she did. She didn't boast or brag about it even though she met some very famous people. It never went to her head."
What seemed to affect her was meeting people who had committed acts of bravery, said her husband, Keith. "She'd come back in the evening and talk about what people had done to get their award. She was really touched by their feats of bravery and service to the community -- the qualities and dedication of ordinary Canadians."
Kimberly DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY only once saw her mother on the job. In 2003, she went along to a military investiture at Quebec City's Citadel, an imposing structure that is sometimes called the second viceregal home. "It was a moving [and] emotional ceremony and it was wonderful to see her in action," Ms. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY said. "She had a presence about her in both her personal and work life. People were really drawn to her."
Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY grew up in Ottawa. A clever youngster, she was admitted to the University of Ottawa at the precocious age of 16. After teaching French and English to Grades 3 to 9 in Ottawa and Fort William, now Thunder Bay, she worked as a writer, producer and on-camera presenter for educational television programs for the Ottawa Board of Education.
Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY was also something of an actress, appearing in Ottawa Little Theatre productions in the late 1960s and early 1970s. In 1972, she took the role of Betty in Paddy Chayevsky's play Middle of the Night. Playing the part of a girl who falls for an older man, she soon fell for her leading man, her future husband Keith. They married two years later.
"She blew me away. I thought she was the beginning and the end sexy and smart," said Mr. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY. He swept her off to Washington, where he worked as a diplomat at the Canadian embassy. After they returned home to Ottawa, she spent from 1974 to 1976 as the office manager of The Globe and Mail.
In 1988, everything changed. Rideau Hall hired Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY as director of information services and was given the job of increasing public awareness of the governor-general's role and responsibilities. "She was absolutely dedicated to the office of the governor-general and its role," Mr. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY said. "She would have been happier if the role was better understood."
Over the years, Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY got her share of awards, too. In 1992, she received the 125th Anniversary of the Confederation of Canada Medal, and 10 years later was given the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee Medal. This year, she was awarded centennial medals by the governments of Alberta and Saskatchewan.
During Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY's final 15 months at Rideau Hall, she served as acting deputy secretary of the Chancellery of Honours, with responsibility for policy advice and the administration of honours and heraldry.
Earlier this year, Ms. JEAN learned that Mrs. DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY's decision to retire was final and decided to honour her with a farewell reception in Rideau Hall's historic Tent Room on June 30. "Mary, herself, is irreplaceable," she told about 60 guests.
Mary Kathleen DE BELLEFEUILLE- PERCY was born on January 28, 1943, in Ottawa. She died there of a heart attack on November 7, 2006. She was 63. She leaves her husband Keith, daughter Kimberly, son Kristian, brothers Terry and Pat. She was predeceased by her brother Mike.

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BOURDON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2006-12-27 published
Michael GUTOWSKI, Soldier And Equestrian: (1910-2006)
Polish officer who participated in one of the last cavalry charges in history settled in Ontario after the Second World War to teach horsemanship. In 1968, he groomed a Canadian team to equestrian gold at the Olympics in Mexico City
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S7
Ottawa -- All Michael GUTOWSKI wanted to do was get some food to his wife, Zofia, and their two small sons. Foraging in the smoking ruins of a building destroyed by the invading Germans, Mr. GUTOWSKI found some milk. It was late in 1939, and millions of exhausted Polish refugees were on the move. There wasn't much food to be had anywhere.
It wasn't enough, but his family was grateful when the 29-year-old cavalry captain brought them the milk. Their world had collapsed when Germany hurled its army against Poland's western frontier on September 1, 1939, in the opening shots of the Second World War.
Commanding No. 1 Squadron of the 17th Uhlans, Mr. GUTOWSKI and his cavalrymen did their best to stop the Germans' overwhelming attack, but it was no use. Displaying great courage during three weeks of desperate combat, he was awarded Poland's highest decoration, the Virtuti Militari, 5th class, for his gallantry at the 10-day battle of Bzura River west of Warsaw.
Although Poland still fielded 11 cavalry brigades as a mobile reserve, cavalrymen usually fought as infantry after dismounting from their horses. Mr. GUTOWSKI, a born horseman who had competed at the Olympics, relished the unit's devil-may-care spirit. Two decades earlier, during the Polish-Bolshevik War of 1919-21, mounted Polish units armed with sabres and lances played a vital part in defeating Soviet forces and guaranteeing Polish independence, with the result that many cavalrymen still believed their natural élan would triumph over mere machines.
History tells a different story. By October 6, it was all over. Poland was carved up between Germany and the Soviet Union, and the government fled to Britain. For Mr. GUTOWSKI, a scion of the highly conservative, patriotic land-owning gentry who had been taught from the cradle to believe strongly in God, honour and country, it was a catastrophe. He didn't give up, though, and joined the Polish Underground. As he told The Globe and Mail in 1994, he believed in "fighting to the last drop of my blood."
Mr. GUTOWSKI was captured and sentenced to be shot for attempting to reach his family in a detention camp near Krakow. Fate intervened when a German officer recognized him as a member of the 1936 Polish equestrian team and he was spared.
By the following March, he had made his way to Britain to continue the fight. Six days after the Allies went ashore at Normandy on June 6, 1944, he landed with the 1st Polish Armoured Division. By 1945, the Polish armed forces in the West totalled 195,000 and played an important part in defeating Germany.
After fighting through France, Belgium, the Netherlands and into Germany alongside Canadian forces, Mr. GUTOWSKI was commanding the 2nd Polish Armoured Regiment as a lieutenant-colonel when the war ended on May 8, 1945.
Michael GUTOWSKI had decided to be a soldier when he was 10. After graduating from the Cavalry Military College in 1930, he was posted to the 17th Wielkopolski Cavalry Squadron and met his future wife, Zofia, at a hunt ball. They were married in 1934, the same year he qualified for the Polish equestrian team. He loved riding and spent as much time as he could in the saddle.
Two years later, Mr. GUTOWSKI competed at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin and shared in the silver medal won in a team event.
During the war, he fought with distinction. Like all Polish soldiers who fought on the side of the Allies, they wished only to rid their country of Germans. When the last shot was fired, however, Poland was still not free. He and his men were devastated to learn that the Soviet Union had been given control of Poland. Forming up his regiment on parade, Mr. GUTOWSKI gave his men the terrible news. "There was such a silence, you could hear the flag flying. Everything we were fighting for was gone," he once told The Globe and Mail. "All that was left was honour."
In 1948, Mr. GUTOWSKI immigrated to Canada when Major-General Churchill Mann invited him to train the Canadian Army's equestrian team. After that was disbanded two years later, he spent many years instructing at the Caledon Riding and Hunt Club in Toronto. He also trained the Canadian Olympic team from 1948 to 1955.
Olympic equestrian Jim ELDER, then a junior rider, met Mr. GUTOWSKI in 1948. Two years later, he started taking lessons from him. "He was instrumental in Canada for introducing the European cavalry style for both riders and horses. He gave us the insight and the training so we could reach the international and Olympic level."
Putting his students through their paces, the "ram-rod straight" Mr. GUTOWSKI was "a really tough taskmaster. Your arms and legs were aching but he kept you going. Everybody admired him," said Mr. ELDER. "He used to get his Polish and English swearwords mixed up. He'd be there screaming at you, really chew you out. A lot of people could not take it. But right after the lesson, he was a great guy. He had a job to do and he did it. He wanted to get Canada to the international level."
At the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, Mr. ELDER and teammates Jim Day and Tom Gayford won a gold medal, a success attributed to Mr. GUTOWSKI's training methods.
He also instructed his niece, Tanya GUTOWSKA- NORMAN in 1970. She still remembers him jumping up and down in a rage. "He was very demanding," she said. "He was a perfectionist who demanded the absolute best and tried to teach [us] the highest and purest form of horsemanship. Drills were performed with military precision."
Describing him as "ambitious, loyal and proud," she said he cared deeply about his family, students and army comrades. "His character at times was difficult, since he had a military upbringing, so his tolerance of sloppiness and stupidity was low." He was, however, "especially susceptible to the charms of [women], and a tear could get you anything. He was a softie where women were concerned. With men, he expected them to be brave but most of all, to be gentlemen."
In 2000, Mr. GUTOWSKI returned to his beloved Poland 11 years after the fall of communism. He was promoted to brigadier-general and helped establish the Cavalry Parade Squadron. In 2003, at age 92, he famously drew his sabre and led a cavalry charge.
Besides his British and Polish war medals, he was awarded Poland's Cross of Valour five times. The U.S. government presented him the Legion of Merit and France gave him the Croix de Guerre with palm. On June 6, 2004, at a ceremony in Normandy, he received the Legion of Honour from President Jacques Chirac of France.
Michal Mieczyslaw Wojciech GUTOWSKI was born on September 13, 1910, in Maciszewice, Poland. He died on August 23, 2006, in Warsaw, from complications resulting from a broken thigh. He was 20 days short of 96. He leaves his son Peter and brother Zbyszek. He was predeceased by his son Marek and his wife, Zofia, of 65 years.
On September 16, he was accorded a military funeral at Warsaw's Cathedral of the Army. Hundreds of officers, dignitaries and admirers attended, and artillery thundered a 21-gun salute.

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