All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"VIP" 2005 Obituary


VIPOND 

VIPOND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-21 published
JENNER, " Ida" Ruth (née CALHOUN)
(Ida) Ruth of Charing Cross passed away at Meadow Park Nursing Home in Chatham on Monday, June 20, 2005, in her 96th year. She was the daughter of the late William CALHOUN and Mary GRIFFIN. Ruth was the beloved wife of the late Ralph JENNER (1966.) Loving mother of Marion VIPOND of Victoria, British Columbia, Reverend Harold and wife Nancy JENNER of Gabriola Island, British Columbia, Eleanor and husband Lyle LITTLE of Exeter, Carl and wife Trijntje JENNER of Chatham, and Sylvia and husband Bill VANDERWEL of Sarnia. Fondly remembered by twenty-three grandchildren and forty-four great-grandchildren. Predeceased by son Allan (1942), daughter Viola HEUSTON (1999) and her husband Roy HEUSTON (1990) and by granddaughters Mary HEUSTON (1958,) Sandra VANDERWEL (1963,) Laura JENNER (1985) and one greatgranddaughter Robin HEUSTON (1982.) Also predeceased by two brothers, Jim and Harry CALHOUN.
As a life long resident of Raleigh Township, Ruth was a faithful member of Charing Cross United Church and was organist there for twenty-five years. She served twenty-five years on the Kent Presbytery and was a past chairperson. She was also a licensed piano teacher and a first-rate scrabble player. Resting at the J.L. Ford Funeral Home in Blenheim for visitation on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at the Charing Cross United Church on Wednesday at 1: 00 p.m. Interment will take place in Pardoville Union Cemetery. Friends planning an expression of remembrance are asked to consider the Charing Cross United Church Building Fund.

  V... Names     VI... Names     VIP... Names     Welcome Home

VIPOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-18 published
I Remember -- Scott YOUNG
By Gerry FRYER, Saturday, June 18, 2005. Page S9
Thornhill, Ontario -- Scott YOUNG's obituary appeared on June The passing of Scott YOUNG this week brought back for me memories of September, 1964, and the conversion of Toronto's CJBC into a French radio station. I came to Toronto at the time to work as an announcer on the newly converted station.
There was some hostility in the newspapers regarding the conversion, as CJBC was popular with the English-speaking audience. But we found an unexpected friend in the most unexpected place: Scott YOUNG, a columnist for The Globe and Mail who had written several columns supporting a French CJBC.
On October 1, 1964, our first day on air in French, we had wanted to interview Mr. YOUNG. When we phoned him for an appointment, we found out he did not speak French. But we agreed to meet anyway. We met at his Rosedale home and, for the next two hours, painstakingly, we put together a good minute and a half of Scott YOUNG in French.
Word by word, Mr. YOUNG repeated each word of a prepared French text several times until he had reached a perfect pronunciation for each one. Back at CJBC, it was my job to edit Mr. YOUNG's voice. It took me a good three hours of minute splicing of quarter-inch audiotape. But, at the end, we had Mr. YOUNG wishing the best for the new CJBC in a more than passable French.
This was my first interview with a member of our new Toronto audience. I could not have had a better introduction to this city than the one I got with this most civilized and broadminded Torontonian.
Vive Scott YOUNG!
Jacques GAUTHIER, Toronto
On learning of Scott YOUNG's passing, I was immediately taken back to the early 1960s in Winnipeg. Then, most schoolboys played hockey year-round, watched Hockey Night in Canada every Saturday and read every book that could be found about the greatest team sport in history and "the world's fastest game."
At the time, many of us still thought we had a legitimate shot at playing professional hockey, despite the nearly insurmountable odds against that prospect. Mr. YOUNG's scintillating trilogy Scrubs on Skates, Boy on Defence and Boy at the Leafs' Camp was the cornerstones of most of our rather limited personal libraries.
I ripped through the pages of Scrubs on Skates so many times that the book nearly disintegrated. Somehow, Santa knew to put another copy under the tree that year.
Mr. YOUNG's books were the first works of fiction that ever set my heart racing while broadening my horizons to consider some of life's possibilities. For many, it was the closest we ever got to the training camp of a professional hockey team, and we can all thank Scott YOUNG for that opportunity. His power with the pen could thrill and excite while magically transporting you to the world of your dreams.
Roy MacGREGOR notes that Canadians now have "no Scott YOUNG to connect the national game to the national culture" (This Country June 15). Fortunately for many of us, he already has and his legacy will live on for generations to come.
Jeffrey PECKITT, Oakville, Ontario
About 45 years ago, during my first (and only) year in Ryerson's journalism program, I decided -- in my desire to become Canada's greatest sportswriter -- that I should write about my school's teams for The Globe and Mail.
Shamelessly invoking the name of an uncle who knew him, I visited Jim VIPOND, the Sports editor, and suggested that The Globe needed to cover Ryerson sports -- and that I was just the man to do it. Without missing a beat, he sent me out of his office to write a brief autobiography to help him make a decision.
Choosing an empty chair in front of an old manual typewriter, I almost froze when I noticed that the man pounding away next to me was Scott YOUNG, an icon in sports journalism and one of my heroes. I recall no greeting or sign of acknowledgment from my neighbour (and I certainly would not have dreamed of interrupting him); but that brief near-encounter remains one of my fondest memories.
Despite shaking, clammy hands, a suddenly dry throat and a blank mind, I managed to bang out something for Mr. VIPOND. I got the non-paying "job" and, for a few months, wrote for the same newspaper as Scott YOUNG at the peak of his career.
Eventually, I met my wife, Gail. She bettered my story: She and a former boyfriend used to double-date with Scott YOUNG's son Neil. Together, we still feel a certain affinity with the YOUNGs.
Carl A. CHRISTIE, Winnipeg
In the late 1950s, my parents purchased the full Encyclopedia Britannica on my behalf. Being more sports mad at the time than now, I was delighted to find an article titled Hockey -- A Nation's Pastime in the 1960 yearbook. The article left an indelible impression on me, and I have read it many times since.
It was built around a 1-0 game in December, 1959, between the Maple Leafs and the Canadiens. The author, Scott YOUNG (at that time a Globe and Mail columnist), described the atmosphere inside and outside Maple Leaf Gardens beforehand, including the scalpers and the standing-room patrons, who at that time were about 15 per cent of the Gardens' ticket holders. Then came "the whole beauty of the game" - teamwork, body checks, high skills and reflexes, and the individuality of stars like Doug Harvey, the Pocket Rocket, Jean Beliveau ("moving with the effortless power of a big buck deer"), and the only goal scorer, Frank Mahovlich.
Mr. YOUNG's article soared by translating the Canadian passion for ice hockey into poetry. He wrote, "Throughout the game the noise of the crowd was a constant series of great Ohs," and, at game's end, "Here I had seen something to remember -- the Canadian equivalent of an Italian opera audience, rising as one to shout 'Bravo.' "
That article is a time capsule of my love for the game, and also of what the return of great hockey would mean for our country. Thank you, Scott YOUNG.

  V... Names     VI... Names     VIP... Names     Welcome Home

VIPOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-17 published
VIPOND, Ruth Cradock (SIMPSON)
In Amherst, Nova Scotia on Friday, September 9th, as the result of a severe stroke. A wonderful mother and friend, she is mourned by her children, Hudson (Lise) and Susan (Morris), her grandchildren, Maria (Fred), Christa (Todd), Marianne and Stephanie, and her great-grandchildren Nicole, Kirsten, Lauren and Nicholas. Predeceased by her husband Fletcher. Ruth Cradock SIMPSON was born on June 29th, 1912, spent her early childhood in an apartment overlooking Dominion Square, and was a dyed-in-the-wool Montrealer for 90 years of her life. She will be missed by her Friends at Orford Lake, in the Town of Mount Royal, and in Nova Scotia. Ruth was a dedicated volunteer for both the Mount Royal United Church and in particular for the Montreal General Hospital where she received her 6,000 hour pin for service spanning over 50 years. The funeral was in Amherst, and a memorial service was held at Mount Royal United Church. Burial was in Hudson, Quebec.

  V... Names     VI... Names     VIP... Names     Welcome Home

VIPOND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-17 published
VIPOND, Ruth Cradock (née SIMPSON)
In Amherst, Nova Scotia on Friday, September 9th, 2005 as the result of a severe stroke. A wonderful mother and friend, she is mourned by her children, Hudson (Lise) and Susan (Morris), her grandchildren, Maria (Fred), Christa (Todd), Marianne and Stephanie, and her great-grandchildren Nicole, Kirsten, Lauren and Nicholas. Predeceased by her husband Fletcher. Ruth Cradock SIMPSON was born on June 29th, 1912, spent her early childhood in an apartment overlooking Dominion Square, and was a dyed-in-the-wool Montrealer for 90 years of her life. She will be missed by her Friends at Orford Lake, in the Town of Mount Royal, and in Nova Scotia. Ruth was a dedicated volunteer for both the Mount Royal United Church and in particular for the Montreal General Hospital where she received her 6,000 hour pin for service spanning over 50 years. The funeral was in Amherst, and a memorial service was held at Mount Royal United Church. Burial was in Hudson, Quebec.

  V... Names     VI... Names     VIP... Names     Welcome Home

VIPOND - All Categories in OGSPI