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"TYL" 2005 Obituary


TYLER 

TYLER o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2005-05-25 published
TYLER, Eileen
In loving memory of a dear mother, grandmother and great-grandmother Eileen, who passed away May 25, 1998.
No matter how life changes,
No matter what we do
A special place without our hearts
Will always be with you.
Always loved and remembered, Almeda BOYCE, Reg and June TYLER and families.
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TYLER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-10 published
TYLER, William " Bill"

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TYLER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-02-17 published
TYLER, Cynthia M. (née FRYER)
Cynthia M. (FRYER) of Valleyview, Saint Thomas, on Tuesday, February 15, 2005 at her late residence, in her 79th year. Beloved wife of the late Colin G. TYLER (April 1, 1994) and dearly loved mother of Bernice E. MIEDZINSKI of Saint Thomas, Laurence E.M. TYLER and his wife Brenda of Richmond, Beverley A. TYLER and her husband Chen COHEN of Toronto and Derek A. and his wife Jill of Saint Thomas. Loved grandmother of Bryan and his wife Andrea, Adam, Jonathon and Fiona. Dear sister of R. Elizabeth SHARRATT, Desmond M. FRYER and Denise L. PEEL, all of England. Sister-in-law of Margaret SANDON. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews. Cynthia was born in Yarmouth, Isle of Wight on December 12, 1926, the daughter of the late Harold M. and Elizabeth (GRIFFITHS) FRYER. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Friday at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Visitation Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the Parkinson Foundation.

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TYLER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-09-19 published
JOHNSON, Gerald " Jerry"
Of 199 Hope Street East, Tavistock passed away peacefully on Saturday, September 17, 2005 at Stratford General Hospital surrounded by his family. Jerry was born on October 15, 1925 in Sylvan, the son of the late William Thomas and Ella Chloe CAMPBELL) JOHNSON (1952.) Jerry was an avid sports enthusiast whose love of ball, hockey and racehorses provided many lasting memories and many wonderful Friendships. He was a member of Grace United Church in Tavistock and had also served his community as an active member of the Tavistock Men's Club and Board of Trade. Jerry farmed in his early years and later worked for Lewis Thomson and Sons in the fruit and vegetable business for 40 years. In his retirement, he and Pat spent their summers at their summer home, "Lakeside Resort", where he enjoyed his family, the birds, the sunsets and their many Friends. He will be deeply missed by his loving wife, Priscilla "Pat" (WEAVER) (LUPTON) JOHNSON, whom he married on June 29, 1979; his step-children, Glen and Joan LUPTON, Sue and Ken WETTLAUFER, Dick and Sharon LUPTON, Pat and Jim SMITH, Gail and Ted DONALDSON, Carol and Wayne FRASER his special grandchildren, Stephanie and Kristen LUPTON, Matt and Stephen WETTLAUFER, Fraser and Mac LUPTON, Jeff and Margie SMITH, Tricia and Jerry HAYNES, Mike and Lisa DONALDSON, Jen and Mike LOWES, Kim and Cecil AVEY, Kelly and Richard SMITH, Mark and Anita FRASER; his dear great-grandchildren, Ashley, Emily, Amber, Madison, Erika, Taylor, Owen, Jonathan, Andrew, Aaron, Aric, Riley, Liam and Owen; his brothers and sisters-in-law, Mervil and Jessie JOHNSON, James and Ruth JOHNSON, Alvin and Ruby JOHNSON, Enid JOHNSON and Mickey JOHNSON; "Weaver" in-laws, Barbara and Alan BALL, Bill WEAVER and Pauline McGILLVERY, Bob and Marie WEAVER and many nieces and nephews. Besides his parents, he was predeceased by his sisters, Hannah, Madeline and Muriel his brothers, Earl, Bill, Lawrence and Campbell; his brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, Arthur MATHERS, Austin O'NEIL, Wilson SADLER, Lewis THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Jean JOHNSON, Ivy JOHNSON, Betty and Angus LUNN and Margaret WEAVER; his father-in-law and mother-in-law, Harold and Myrna WEAVER and his very special friend, Fraser LUPTON. Friends and loved ones will be received in the Francis Funeral Home, 77 Woodstock Street North, Tavistock on Tuesday, September 20th from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A memorial service to celebrate Jerry's life will be held at Grace United Church, 116 Woodstock Street, South, Tavistock on Wednesday, September 21, 2005 at 2 p.m. The Reverend Marion Jackson TYLER will officiate. At Jerry's request, his body has been willed to the Department of Anatomy, University of Western, Ontario for Scientific study. Burial of cremated remains will take place at a later date in Knox Presbyterian Cemetery, Harrington. As expressions of sympathy, memorial contributions in Jerry's memory to Stratford General Hospital Foundation, Tri County Mennonite Homes Tavistock Project or charity of choice would be appreciated and may be made through the funeral home by calling 1-519-655-2431.

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-20 published
BROWN, Robert Francis " Bob"
On April 18, 2005, at Saint Mary's of the Lake Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, in his 89th year. Beloved husband and best friend of Audrey (née ESLER,) beloved father of Carol CAMPBELL (Neil,) Robert Francis Jr. (Shirley), and Annie BRADLEY (Richard), and well loved stepfather of Deborah Savage TYLER (Rob.) Greatly missed by his grandchildren Claire, Neil, William, and Nicholas and by his dear cousins, Charles and Stewart BROWN. Robert was born in Montreal on December 24, 1916. In his youth he attended Lower Canada College, St. Andrew's College, and McGill University. In 1939 he enlisted in #1 Squadron (City of Westmount Squadron). Pilot Officer BROWN served as a Hurricane pilot with 115f Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force in England. After the war, Robert studied hotel management at Cornell University, and in 1950 he opened Hovey Manor, a country inn on Lake Massawippi in North Hatley, Quebec. He owned and managed "Hovey" until his retirement in 1979, but Hovey Manor remains today one of the preeminent resort hotels in Canada. The family wishes to thank the nurses, doctors and volunteers of Kingston General Hospital and of the palliative care unit of Saint Mary's of the Lake Hospital. A memorial service will take place in North Hatley at a later date. Memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or to St. Barnabas Anglican Church in North Hatley. Arrangements entrusted to the care of the Robert J. Reid and Sons Funeral Home, 309 Johnson Street, Kingston, Ontario (613) 548-7973.

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-08 published
LANGSTONE, William " Bill"
Passed away after a short illness at Lakeridge Health Centre in Port Perry on Monday, February 7, 2005, in his 80th year. Bill LANGSTONE, dearly beloved husband of Doreen LANGSTONE of Seagrave. Loving father of Karen and her husband Gerry TYLER and Donna and her husband Steve CATLEUGH. Dear grandfather of Bradley, Lisa and Kari CATLEUGH, Kaillie, Kendall and Stephani TYLER. Brother of Margaret, Clifford, Eleanor, June, Shirley and predeceased by Evelyn, Ed and Fred. Family and Friends may call at the Low and Low Funeral Home, 1763 Reach Street, Port Perry (905) 985-7331 on Saturday, February 12, 2005 from 10 to 11 a.m. A memorial service will be held in the chapel on Saturday, February 12, 2005 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-02-10 published
LINDSAY, Marion (RITCHIE)
Suddenly on Tuesday, February 8th, 2005 at her home in Georgetown. Marion RITCHIE, in her 76th year, wife of the late Bruce LINDSAY. Loving mother of John and his wife Debbie of Acton, Cathy Brown of Georgetown and Anne LINDSAY of Thompson, Manitoba. Loved grandmother of LINDSAY, Shawn and Michelle, Mary Ann and Kevin, Brooke and Lionel, Maggie, Kim, Ryan and Jennifer. Great-grandmother of Dustin, Jenna, Jessica and Curtis. Loving mother-in-law of Ted BROWN of Limehouse. Dear sister of Betty REEVE of Georgetown, Rita and her husband Glenn Christian of Woodstock and sister-in-law of Lillian RITCHIE of Dryden, Barbara LINDSAY and Jean DAVIDSON of Guelph, Bob LINDSAY of Limehouse and Mary and Tom CARBERRY of Caledon East. Predeceased by her sisters Marie McCALLUM (Marion's twin,) Lillian McMENEMY, Dorothy HUGHES, Helen EZEAR and Margie TYLER and brothers Andy, Bill, Jim and Larry RITCHIE. Friends will be received at the J.S. Jones and son Funeral Home (11582 Trafalgar Road, north of Maple Ave., Georgetown), 905-877-3631 on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Friday, February 11th, at 11 o'clock. Interment Limehouse Presbyterian Church Cemetery. Reception to follow in the Trafalgar Room. In memory contributions to the Cancer Assistance Services of Halton Hills or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. To send expressions of sympathy visit: www.jsjonesandsonfuneralhome.com

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-05 published
LAW, Robert Christie
Passed away at the General and Marine Hospital in Collingwood on Wednesday, March 2, 2005, in his 43rd year. Robert LAW, beloved son of Donna LAW- ANDREWS and the late Roy Christie LAW and the late step-dad Donald ANDREWS. Dear brother of Linda, Roy (Ola) and Jayne (Aurelio). Dear uncle of Zackary, Tyler, Samantha, Viktoria, Julia and great-nephew Nicholas. Dear grand_son of Gramma Annie DAVIES. Robert will be fondly remembered by Anne and sadly missed by Uncle Dave, Auntie Coon, Auntie Dubbie and special family Friends Reg and June TYLER. A Memorial Service will be held at the Chatterson-Long Funeral Home, 404 Hurontario Street, Collingwood (705-445-4700) on Monday, March 7, 2005 at 11 a.m. Cremation. Memorial donations made to the General and Marine Hospital Emergency Unit would be appreciated by the family. A special thank-you to Reverend Judy WALTON, the caring and supportive Emergency Staff and Dr. Enright.

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-22 published
McDOWELL, Robert Alexander " Bob"
(Longtime employee of Colgate Palmolive) It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Bob, peacefully in his sleep, on Sunday, March 20, 2005. Loving and devoted husband and father to his wife Sue and daughter Kelly. Dear son of Marg and Alex and son-in-law of Ray and Emily HEWLETT. Beloved brother of Debby TYLER (Bill,) Patricia HYATT (Rick) and John McDOWELL (Robin) and brother-in-law of Kathy FEE (Pat) and Steve HEWLETT (Joan.) Special uncle to his 11 nieces and nephews. Bob will be remembered for his love of life, witty humour and his ability to face adversity with incredible strength and courage. He will be loved and missed by many. Special thanks to nurses Janette and Debbie and doctors at Sunnybrook and Markham Stouffville Hospitals. Friends will be received at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main St. N. (Markham Rd.), Markham on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service in the Chapel on Wednesday at 11: 00 a.m. Private interment. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. "Life is a journey, Not a destination." "I love you Bud."

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-05 published
TYLER, George
(Veteran World War 2) Peacefully, at Etobicoke General Hospital, on Wednesday, May 4, 2005, George TYLER, Bolton, in his 84th year, beloved husband of Jane COOMBS. Dear father of Barbara and Eric LARSEN, Bolton; Douglas and Linda TYLER, Brampton; Glenn and Bruce TYLER, Brampton. Loving granddad of Kim, Jason, Melissa, Michael and Brandon. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213) Saturday, May 7 from 3 o'clock until time of funeral service in the chapel at 4 o'clock. Followed by cremation. If desired, memorial donations may be made to World Wildlife Fund Canada, 245 Eglinton Ave. E., Suite 410, Toronto M4P 3J1. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-28 published
Rafael ALFANDARY: Jeweller to the stars
By Tabassum SIDDIQUI, Staff Reporter
Rafael ALFANDARY was a man's man, but it was his affinity for women that led to his career as a jeweller whose bold pieces adorned flamboyant celebrities in the 1970s.
He had been around the world and back but returned to Toronto in 2000 to die after being diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a rare form of blood cancer.
ALFANDARY, whose chunky metal and stone jewellery was worn by Liberace, Margaret Trudeau, Muhammad Ali and actor Lorne Greene during the heyday of his career in Toronto in the '70s, died Tuesday in his apartment studio at the age of 66.
"He wanted to die in Canada -- he had a great time in Toronto and he always identified himself as Canadian," his wife Eriko MIYAZAWA said. "When I first met him, he had a heavy Yugoslavian accent so I was surprised to hear he was Canadian."
Born in Belgrade, ALFANDARY and his mother were the only members of his Jewish family to escape a concentration camp. She died when he was 11. He emigrated to Israel when he was 20 and trained as a mechanical engineer.
In 1970, he and his first wife relocated to Toronto because he did not want his two young daughters, Dalia and Ruth, who would later go on to become jewellery designers in New York and Bali, to join the army.
While studying English at George Brown College, he stumbled into the career that would bring him fame and fortune.
"He was always a ladies' man," MIYAZAWA said. "He wanted to give a gift to his teacher, so he made some jewellery with copper wire that his landlord had. She really loved that piece and showed it to Friends who wanted more, and it all took off from there."
ALFANDARY could hardly keep up with the orders pouring in for his handmade pieces. One of his first high-profile clients was Margaret Trudeau, who wore one of his necklaces to an opening of Parliament.
"The '70s in Canada was a time of boldness, and his jewellery made sense in that era because everything else at the time was dainty and all the same, but his pieces were very individual, with a distinctive look," MIYAZAWA said. "One day Mr. Trudeau recognized him in a crowd when he was giving an interview, and he was very proud of that."
ALFANDARY soon became a media darling, known simply as Rafael. In 1973, he was commissioned to create the crown for the Miss Canada beauty pageant. He worked with Marilyn Brooks, designing pieces for her clothing line. And his jewellery also appeared as featured prizes on the popular television game show Let's Make a Deal!
By the late 1970s, ALFANDARY had sold more than half a million pieces. His jewellery was sold in all the major department stores across Canada, in airports, and six stores of his own. He had 60 employees, including a small throng of lawyers, accountants, and advertising people.
Boxer Muhammad Ali liked the large size and heft of the pieces. Jewellery-loving entertainer Liberace became a good friend. Earlier this year, singer Prince wore one of ALFANDARY's necklaces to the People's Choice Awards.
"I first met Rafael in his glory in the '70s, when he was quite well-known in Toronto circles," says friend Sam BERKEL, who was ALFANDARY's neighbour in the Manulife Centre in the '70s. The pair renewed their Friendship more than two decades later when ALFANDARY moved back into the highrise after his return to Toronto.
BERKEL recalls his old friend as a "man's man" who liked to gamble and enjoyed the high life. "His jewellery was worn by a lot of celebrities, so back then he led a very popular lifestyle -- lots of wine parties with the who's who."
In the 1980s, ALFANDARY remarried and moved to Austin, Texas, where he dabbled in fine jewellery before divorcing and heading halfway around the world to an ashram in Goa, India. He and MIYAZAWA met at a meditation retreat in Pune, India, in 1999.
The two married in Goa in 1999 but moved back to Toronto the following year when ALFANDARY was diagnosed with myeloma. Doctors told him he only had two years to live.
ALFANDARY threw himself into his work, creating new pieces of jewellery, including a line for pets, sculpture-like clocks, and intricate knobs for doors and drawers.
Though increasingly debilitated by the cancer, ALFANDARY refused to give up smoking or change his diet despite taking eight different medications daily.
"He was getting worse and worse every day, but he was still doing his thing," BERKEL said. "He had a hunger to create and design. It gave him pleasure to see women wearing his jewellery. ALFANDARY" died peacefully in the Manulife Centre apartment that doubled as his work studio."He had a full view of Toronto from his bedroom it's a beautiful view, and his life ended there," said his wife. "He lived his life so fully -- he was an amazing survivor and took total charge of his own life, and Toronto gave him a new future and broadened his horizons."
Yesterday, Friends and family gathered in a room on the 31st floor of the Manulife Centre, looking south over the city skyline, to remember ALFANDARY. It was a day for intimates, not celebrities.
"He was crazy about this building," MIYAZAWA said.
With files from Tracey TYLER

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-16 published
CORRIVEAU, Ernest
Suddenly at his home on Wednesday, June 15, 2005. Ernest CORRIVEAU, dearly beloved husband of Barbara, dear father of Kellie and her husband Duncan POTTER, Clifford, Ernest Jr. and his wife Tracey, and Yvette and her husband Michael McGEE. Loving grandfather of Victoria, Taylor and Kyle and Cody TYLER and Haley. Sadly missed by his mother Fernande and family and Friends. Resting at the Newediuk Funeral Home, Kipling Chapel, 2104 Kipling Ave., Etobicoke (two blocks north of Rexdale Blvd.) from Friday 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel, Saturday 1: 30 p.m., followed by cremation. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-25 published
LASKIN was Supreme
The late Supreme Court chief justice Bora LASKIN went where no Canadian had gone before A non-conformist, he reinvented a stuffy bench while appealing to the layman, writes Tracey TYLER, Page F3
Canada's great chief justice of the 20th century had a word for his successes in life: accidentalism. If true, Bora LASKIN's arrival at the Supreme Court in the spring of 1970 might have been one of the best-timed accidents in Canadian history.
To the south, the United States Supreme Court was coming off a series of star turns with its history-making decisions on civil rights, from an end to school segregation to the Miranda ruling on the right to remain silent.
Life at Canada's top court had little of the same electricity.
Caught in a straitjacket of English law, never daring to take the pulse of the public, its nine male judges saw their job as correcting errors of courts below rather than developing a body of Canadian-made law, an approach that earned the court no profile internationally and little respect at home. Lawyers bemoaned its hidebound style.
Within a decade, however, an unassuming former law professor delivered the shock treatment many felt it needed.
LASKIN's appointment was the legal equivalent of Pierre Elliott Trudeau sweeping into office, Supreme Court Justice Ian BINNIE told a recent Toronto symposium that examined LASKIN's legacy and his enduring appeal -- 35 years after his appointment to the court, as its first Jewish judge, and 40 years after his appointment to the Ontario Court of Appeal.
Many judges have served on the Supreme Court longer, but LASKIN had an indelible impact.
The court that captured the country's attention this month with a landmark ruling on health care was essentially one he created. He took a court that banned lawyers from citing works by living authors and "reinvented" it -- opening its doors to interveners and narrowing its focus to issues of national importance, BINNIE said.
LASKIN, who died in 1984 at age 71, never lived to see the impact of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms. But as they assess his place in history, many legal scholars credit him with paving the way for the Charter by pushing judges to look beyond the letter of the law and consider social realities.
There's something more.
"He was the only serious, intellectual, non-conformist disturber to serve as chief justice," BINNIE said.
It seems Canadians liked what they saw.
"In my research, everyone knew Bora LASKIN... but no one who was not a lawyer could ever identify any chief justice after him," said Philip GIRARD, an associate dean at Dalhousie Law School and author of Bora LASKIN: Bringing Law to Life, a new book out this fall.
"LASKIN had a certain spark and he was associated with a lay person's idea of justice. He sort of helped convince them the court was on their side."
It helped that he appealed to notions of what a chief justice should be. Looking every inch a part of the establishment, LASKIN fit perfectly with his mutton-chopped predecessors pictured around the Supreme Court, BINNIE said.
In truth, he was the justice system's most trenchant critic and an anti-establishment figure, a trait sometimes discernible through an "armour-piercing gaze" that would put former Montreal Canadien Rocket Richard to shame, he said.
LASKIN enjoyed the oyster special at Ottawa's Rideau Club, but his favourite snack was a sardine and onion sandwich. He once pinch-hit for the governor general by delivering the throne speech (coached in French by daughter Barbara) but considered his proudest achievement belting the longest home run out of the ballpark in his hometown of Fort William, now part of Thunder Bay.
Frequently parting company with fellow judges on the law, he earned a reputation, some say undeservedly, as a "great dissenter" and some detractors.
"There were many lower court judges who hated him. They thought he was totally crazy," GIRARD said.
LASKIN dissented in no less than 108 cases in his 14 years on the court and many of his opinions, considered radical at the time, did become law, including a groundbreaking 1975 ruling that Iris Murdoch was entitled to an equal share of the family's Alberta ranch after separation.
He most famously broke rank in the politically charged 1981 patriation reference. True to his belief in strong central government, LASKIN found it would not defy convention to bring the Constitution home from England and entrench a Charter without consent from the provinces. The majority view forced a first ministers' conference and a deal that alienated Quebec.
BINNIE said LASKIN's independent streak is why he remains intriguing. Trudeau's decision to name him chief justice in 1974 would have been like making Martin Luther the Pope, he added.
It couldn't have helped that he leapfrogged over other judges with more seniority.
A chilly atmosphere predated his arrival at the court and may explain why he felt one of his great contributions had nothing to do with law. It was building a lunchroom, said his son, John, a judge on the Ontario Court of Appeal.
"At times, I think my dad found the Supreme Court of Canada to be a pretty isolated place. Judges tended to go their own ways."
LASKIN said he's not sure what his father would have thought of the symposium. He preferred to look to the future, not the past. But the irony of the Law Society of Upper Canada hosting the event in Osgoode Hall would have brought a smile to his face, he said.
The law society snubbed LASKIN and two fellow professors, Caesar WRIGHT and John WILLIS, by refusing to recognize the faculty of law they created at the University of Toronto after they quit their Osgoode Hall teaching jobs in 1949.
LASKIN studied undergraduate law at U of T, then completed a master's and his legal articles before heading to Harvard University to study for a master of law under future U.S. Supreme Court Justice Felix Frankfurter in 1936-37.
Franklin Delano Roosevelt's New Deal was in full swing and people like Frankfurter were challenging conventional legal thinking. A similar skepticism permeated LASKIN's academic writings.
"His basic message was the courts are really out of touch. They don't understand modern conditions and are living in a nostalgic dream world," GIRARD said.
LASKIN was born in Fort William on October 5, 1912, to Russian immigrants whose priority was a good education for their sons and who helped pay for it by renting out their home.
LASKIN's father moved into a hotel and ran the family's furniture store, while LASKIN's mother went to work as a housekeeper in Toronto. LASKIN and his brothers followed.
The academic credentials he racked up at Harvard weren't enough to get him a job after graduation.
Shut out of Toronto law firms by restrictions on Jewish lawyers, he wrote case summaries at 50 cents each for law reports. In 1940, he took over for his former teacher at University of Toronto and became a "workhorse" later at the law school, teaching more courses than anyone else, said former student and retired judge Horace KREVER. LASKIN's children say he would have happily stayed a professor.
"I think he enjoyed his work more than anyone I have known," said his son. "He also had a capacity to work extremely long hours and a tremendous ability to survive on very little sleep, which I don't have."
Two and 3 a.m. bedtimes were common, said daughter, Barbara, who recalls her father coming down the hall late at night, rubbing his hands "in glee" after knocking off another judgment.
LASKIN worked in a basement office his children called "the dungeon" but always had dinner with his children and wife, Peggy.
There were many family vacations by car. Though not a good swimmer, LASKIN liked being near water and found it soothing. When they were together, he rarely talked shop.
"My dad had two great loves in his life. One was law. The other was his family," his son said. "He watched me play basketball he watched Barbara dance."
"The LASKINs had a hoop in their driveway and it got a lot of use from the neighbourhood," said Justice Stephen GOUDGE of the Ontario Court of Appeal, who got to know LASKIN as the father of his nursery school friend John.
Later, he came to appreciate LASKIN's role in shaping the country's postwar labour law.
Courts were hostile to administrative tribunals, such as labour relations boards, but LASKIN argued they should be left to do their work. He was also in high demand as a labour arbitrator and GIRARD considers LASKIN's arbitration rulings among his most significant.
They include his decision during a 1958 strike at a Scarborough plant that arbitrators could award damages for breach of a collective agreement.
On the Supreme Court, LASKIN was in the minority in siding with Sophie Carswell's right to picket her employer's business at a Winnipeg shopping centre, considered off limits as private property. LASKIN likened malls to modern-day town squares.
As a judge, LASKIN liked nothing more than having former law students appear before him. But nothing "peeved" him more than sloppy English, Barbara said. A lawyer who uttered the words "at this point in time" was likely to be met with a stern stare, followed by the question, "You mean, 'today?'"
He was proud when a former English teacher called to say she used one of his judgments as an example of good writing. He always wrote in longhand, said his son, who does the same.
As he settled in on the court, LASKIN churned out more judgments every year, said symposium organizer Neil FINKELSTEIN. He dissented less often. When he did, Justices Wishart SPENCE and Brian DICKSON/DIXON often joined him. They were known as the " LSD gang."
And the others? LASKIN rarely spoke candidly of those who disagreed with him, but former law clerk John McCAMUS, now an Osgoode Hall Law School professor, recalls him letting down his guard just once. When he arrived at the chief justice's office, LASKIN, with a twinkle in his eye, handed him a dissenting judgment.
Then, he dusted off an apocalyptic phrase, one used by reporters to describe conservative judges who blocked progressive U.S. legislation in the 1930s. "I wonder," he said, "what the Four Horsemen will think."

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-21 published
KRAMER, Delores Elizabeth (GRESSER)
In spite of all her best efforts, Delores (Dee) succumbed to cancer on Tuesday, July 19th, 2005, just 4 days prior to her 51st birthday. At her side were her loving husband Ron Murphy, mother Wally, sisters Marianne (David O'DELL,) Lisa (David FAY,) Doreen (Spence SAUNDERS) and Karol, brothers Peter (Lynn) and Willy (Colleen) and best friend Sherri TYLER, along with nieces, nephews and many other close Friends. Delores's quick sense of humour and graciousness will be sadly missed by all those whose lives she touched in many ways. Visitation to be held at The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre - Mississauga, 1535 South Gateway Rd. (2 lights south of Eglinton at Dixie) on Thursday, July 21st from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. Service will be held Friday, July 22nd at 10: 00 a.m. followed by interment at Assumption Cemetery, Tomken and Derry Rd. At the request of the family, in lieu of flowers, donations to the Carlo Fidani Peel Regional Cancer Centre, 2200 Eglinton Avenue West, Mississauga L5M 2N1 would be greatly appreciated.

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-08 published
TYLER, Norman F.
(T/O Signalman with the Royal Canadian Navy during World War Two.) Norm TYLER of Acton (formerly of Hillsburgh, Erin, Mississauga and Lachine, Quebec), passed away peacefully at the Georgetown Hospital, on Thursday, October 6, 2005, in his 83rd year. Loving husband of Nellie (CLINTON) and the late Betty, father of Susan SHEPHERD of Mississauga, Rick and his wife Diane of Guelph, Colin and his wife Shanlee of Mississauga, Monica and her husband David BELYK of Barrie, and a loving grandfather to nine grandchildren and one great-grandchild. Norm was the step-father of Stephen CLINTON and his wife Paulette, Sandra and her husband Dan HOWEY, and grandfather to seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. He is survived by his brother Clifford of Calgary and was predeceased by his brothers Russell and Charles. The family will receive Friends at the MacKinnon Family Funeral Home "Shoemaker Chapel," 55 Mill Street East, Acton, on Saturday, October 8th from 3 to 5 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. The Legion tribute will follow at nine o'clock. The Funeral Service will be conducted by the Reverend Canon J. Mark TILLER at St. Alban the Martyr Anglican Church (Acton) on Monday, October 10th at eleven o'clock. Following cremation he will be buried in the Field of Honour at Lakeview Cemetery, Pointe Claire, Quebec. In lieu of flowers, donations to St. Alban the Martyr Anglican Church (Acton), All Saints Anglican Church (Erin) or the William Osler Health Centre, Georgetown Campus would be appreciated. MacKinnon Family Funeral Home "Shoemaker Chapel," 519-853-0350 or 1-877-421-9860 (toll free).

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-05 published
STEIGENGA, " Jan" John
Peacefully passed away, on Wednesday, November 2, 2005, at the age of 80. Dearly beloved husband of Katie (TIET.) Loving father of Kathy (Mike RUIGROK,) Durk STEIGENGA (Linda CARTER,) Ingrid (John HALLS,) and John STEIGENGA (Susan TYLER.) "Uncle John" will be missed by his grandchildren, great-grandchildren, brother, sister, family and Friends. As per John's wishes, a private service has taken place. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Parkinson Society in John's memory.

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TYLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-05 published
WALTON, Kenneth Paul (January 15, 1970-October 2, 2005)
Suddenly passed away in his 35th year. Loving son of Doreen WALTON and predeceased Wayne WALTON. Loving stepson of Albert TENENBAUM. Cherished father of Matthew, Christopher and Kenneth TYLER. Loving stepfather of Justin and Jordan. Dear brother of Darlene, Christa, Guy, James. Grandson of predeceased Eileen and Norman GRAHAM, Francis Richard. Dear uncle of Jordan, Dylan, Marques. Fiancé of Zen. Nephew of Karen and Tom, Don and Margo. Cousin of Dana, Jennifer and Ian. You will be dearly missed by your family and Friends. Dead in body, alive in spirit! Forever loved, always remembered. In memory of Ken's life his family is having a gathering on November 12, 2005 at 2 p.m. at The Black Sheep (located two blocks north of Sheppard on Yonge St.).

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