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"TEM" 2005 Obituary


TEMMERMAN  TEMMINCK  TEMOS  TEMPELMEIER  TEMPERTON  TEMPLE  TEMPLETON  TEMPORAL 

TEMMERMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-08-23 published
TEMMERMAN, Rosette
A very dear wife, wonderful mother and caring grandmother who passed away August 23, 2002.
Time passes
Missing you never does.
Lovingly remembered by husband Peter, children Kathy, Rita, Michael, Debbie, Anita and their families.

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TEMMINCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-30 published
BERNARDO, Geoffrey John
Suddenly on Thursday, April 28, 2005 at Peterborough General Hospital, at the age of 44. Under girding every aspect of his life was his deep faith in God. As an Urban Planner and G.I.S. specialist, he mapped and studied many of the waterways and lakes of Ontario. As a result of this he loved canoeing and backpacking into remote lakes and wilderness areas in Canada. Along with a group of keenly interested Friends, he worked to conserve fish species, lakes and rivers and sought to assist in protection of key wilderness areas from unnecessary encroachment. Board Director of Christian Week Newspaper. Over all was his devotion to family and Friends. Beloved husband of Vita Mirwani SIMAMORA and devoted father of Phoebe Kencana, age 1. Dearly loved son of Robert J. BERNARDO and Leslie Doreen (née JOHNSON.) Deeply loved brother of Karen BERNARDO. Grandson of the late Samuel R. BERNARDO and Denta Lal BERNARDO and of the late Leslie Charles JOHNSON and Elsie Elizabeth JOHNSON. Loved son in law of Ibu Hermita Simamora PANGGABEAN and brother in law of Tinexcelly PATTINAYA, Lastputrinami LUBIS, Indah TEMMINCK, Sahat SIMAMORA and Carolina SIMAMORA. Dear nephew of Marianne L. REIMER and Ed REIMER, and Brian and Dinah JOHNSON. Cousin of Susan AMANATIDES, Ruth TIEMENS, Dr. David REIMER and Paul REIMER, and cousin of the late Justin JOHNSON. Dear friend of fellow Sportsman John WALKER. Donations to the Yonge Street Mission would be greatly appreciated in lieu of flowers, 270 Gerrard Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5A 2G4 416-929-9614. Friends may call at the Turner & Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, 905-279-7663 (Hwy. 10 N of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Monday. Funeral Service to be held at 1: 30 p.m. Tuesday, May 3, 2005 at Chartwell Baptist Church, 228 Chartwell Avenue, Oakville, Ontario 905-844-2801.

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TEMMINCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-30 published
BERNARDO, Geoffrey John
Suddenly, on Thursday, April 28, 2005, at Peterborough General Hospital, at the age of 44. Under girding every aspect of his life was his deep faith in God. As an Urban Planner and G.I.S. specialist, he mapped and studied many of the waterways and lakes of Ontario. As a result of this he loved canoeing and backpacking into remote lakes and wilderness areas in Canada. Along with a group of keenly interested Friends, he worked to conserve fish species, lakes and rivers and sought to assist in protection of key wilderness areas from unnecessary encroachment. Board Director of Christian Week Newspaper. Over all was his devotion to family and Friends. Beloved husband of Vita Mirwani SIMAMORA and devoted father of Phoebe Kencana, age 1. Dearly loved son of Robert J. BERNARDO and Leslie Doreen (née JOHNSON.) Deeply loved brother of Karen BERNARDO. Grandson of the late Samuel R. BERNARDO and Denta Lal BERNARDO and of the late Leslie Charles JOHNSON and Elsie Elizabeth JOHNSON. Loved son-in-law of Ibu Hermita Simamora PANGGABEAN and brother-in-law of Tinexcelly PATTINAYA, Lastputrinami LUBIS, Indah TEMMINCK, Sahat SIMAMORA and Carolina SIMAMORA. Dear nephew of Marianne L. REIMER and Ed REIMER, and Brian and Dinah JOHNSON. Cousin of Susan AMANATIDES, Ruth TIEMENS, Dr. David REIMER and Paul REIMER, and cousin of the late Justin JOHNSON. Dear friend of fellow Sportsman John WALKER. Donations to the Yonge Street Mission would be greatly appreciated in lieu of flowers, 270 Gerrard Street East, Toronto, Ontario M5A 2G4, 416-929-9614. Friends may call at the Turner & Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga, 905-279-7663 (Hwy. 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way), from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Monday. Funeral Service to be held at 1: 30 p.m. Tuesday, May 3, 2005 at Chartwell Baptist Church, 228 Chartwell Avenue, Oakville, Ontario, 905-844-2801.

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TEMMINCK - All Categories in OGSPI

TEMOS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-19 published
RAPPOS, Nick
Passed away at the Scarborough Grace Hospital on Tuesday, January 18, 2005 in his 78th year. Beloved husband of 57 years to Apasia. Loving father of Helen and her husband Chris TERZIS, Tom RAPPOS and his wife Maria, Steve RAPPOS and his wife Frances, Mary and her husband Joe TEMOS, and Mike RAPPOS and his wife Beverley. Loved grandfather of 13 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. The family will receive Friends at the Highland Funeral Home, 3280 Sheppard Ave. East, (just west of Warden Ave.), Scarborough on Wednesday from 5-9 p.m. and on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church, 3840 Finch Ave. East (west of Kennedy Road), Scarborough on Friday, January 21st at 10 a.m. Interment Elgin Mills Cemetery, Richmond Hill.

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TEMOS - All Categories in OGSPI

TEMPELMEIER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-11-11 published
CORTAN, Elizabeth (formerly HAGEMEIER, née TEMPELMEIER)
Peacefully at the Country Care Seniors Residence in Allenford on November 4th in her 88th year. Beloved wife of the late Bill CORTAN and the late Hermann HAGEMEIER. Dear mother of Hans HAGEMEIER and his wife Mary of Tara, John CORTAN and his wife Alison of Ripley, Reiner CORTAN and his wife Genet of Winnipeg and Margaret JELINSKI and her husband Eric of Bowmanville. Dear Grandmother to Brian, Linda, Christopher, Jennifer, Laurie and Justin. Great Oma to Zyphlen, Aiden, Ethan, Damien, Jeremy and Dalton. Also survived by Special friend Marlene DONALDSON and her nephews and nieces in Germany and Switzerland. Predeceased by her parents Heinrich and Christine TEMPELMEIER, sisters Luise TEMPELMEIER and Paula NEIDERBAUMER. Cremation. A celebration for the life of Elizabeth CORTAN will be held at the Tara United Church on Saturday, November 12th, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to the service. Memorial donations to the Tara United Church or the Grey Bruce Health Services would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Condolences may be expressed online at www.paulheaglesonfuneralhome.com
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TEMPELMEIER - All Categories in OGSPI

TEMPERTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-03-05 published
KERBY, Pearl
Passed away after a lengthy illness on Tuesday March 1st, 2005, in her 75th year. Loving mother of Jane and Sandra (Graeme) of Georgetown. Loving grandmother of Christian MORAVAC. Predeceased by Dr. J.R. KERBY and her parents Winnifred TEMPERTON of England and Joch WHITE/WHYTE of Scotland. At Pearl's request, a private family funeral service will take place at a later date and a tree will be planted in her memory. In lieu of flowers, in memory contributions to the Halton Region Lung Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the J.S. Jones and son Funeral Home, Georgetown (905) 877-3631. To send expressions of sympathy visit www.jsjonesandsonfuneralhome.com

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TEMPERTON - All Categories in OGSPI

TEMPLE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2005-05-03 published
JACKSON, Eileen Bernice
Peacefully at the Atrium Villa Retirement Home in Hamilton Friday morning, April 29th, 2005. Eileen JACKSON of Hamilton and Sauble Beach in her 92nd year. Loving daughter of the late Albert and Annie (TEMPLE) JACKSON. Survived by several cousins. She was born in Amabel Township. Eileen earned a B.A. from the University of Toronto. Victoria College in 1940 and an M.S.W. from the University of Toronto School of Social Work in 1957. She practiced social work for over thirty years, including Director, The Children's Aid Society of the District of Parry Sound, and Executive Director, Family Services of Hamilton-Wentworth. Eileen served on the boards of Ontario Association of Children's Aid Societies, Ontario Association of Social Workers, Canadian Welfare Council, Canadian Council on Social Development, Canadian Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs and Melrose United Church, Hamilton. She loved her cottage at Sauble Beach, genealogy, curling and lawn bowling. The family is grateful for the care shown by the staff of Atium Villa, Hamilton. Funeral service will conducted from Zion Amabel United Church, Sauble Beach Wednesday, May 4th at 1: 00 p.m. with Rev. Jack FEARNALL officiating. Visitation at the church one hour prior to service. Interment Zion Cemetery following cremation. Memorial contributions to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth 1-888-340-3467 or 935-2754.
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TEMPLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-03 published
KUIZENGA, Ann (BRINK)
The Lord took unto Himself, at Holland Christian Homes in Brampton on Saturday April 30th 2005, Ann (BRINK) KUIZENGA of London in her 86th year. Beloved wife of the late Leendert KUIZENGA (1992.) Dear mother of Jacob KUIZENGA and his wife Margaret of Guelph, John KUIZENGA and his wife Colleen of Blenheim, Hilda NUSSELDER and her husband Wim of Stoney Creek, and Agatha Tietia TEMPLE and her husband Keith of London. Dear sister of Stewart BRINK and his wife Margaret of Darmouth, Nova Scotia, John BRINK and his wife Helen of St. George, Jake BRINK and his wife Helen of Ridgetown, Akke SELDENTHUIS and her husband Jake of Cambridge, and predeceased by her brother George BRINK. Dear sister-in-law of Truis BRINK of Chatham. Also loved by her 12 grandchildren and 11 greatgrandchildren. Friends will be received by the family from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Tuesday at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London (433-5184). The funeral service will held at Pilgrim Canadian Reformed Church, 465 Horton Street, London, on Wednesday May 4th at 1: 30 p.m. with Reverend Richard POT officiating. Interment in Woodland Cemetery, London. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations would be appreciated to the Canadian Breast Cancer Foundation, P.O. Box 39011, London N5Y 5L1. Online condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-16 published
TEMPLE, Paul Norman (April 19, 1957-May 16, 2004)
In loving memory of Paul Norman (formerly of Dutton).
Today is remembered and quietly kept,
No words are needed I will never forget,
Deep in my heart you will always stay,
Loved and remembered ever day.
Love Mom.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-05-17 published
TEMPLE, Paul Norman (April 22, 1957-May 16, 2004)
In loving memory of Paul Norman (formerly of Dutton).
Today is remembered and quietly kept,
No words are needed I will never forget,
Deep in my heart you will always stay,
Loved and remembered every day.
Love Mom.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-06-20 published
EGAN, Paul A.
Suddenly at Sarnia on June 16th, 2005 Paul A. EGAN of Forest age 44. Beloved father of Justin, Tanya, Cindy, Mark, Dalton and Dylan. Predeceased by his twin brother Richard (2003). Cherished nephew of Donna TEMPLE and the late Wes (1994.) Loving cousin of DiAnn, and Susann, Fred and Lee. Resting at the Gilpin Chapel, Thedford for visitation on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9. Funeral service on Wednesday June 22nd at 1 p.m. Interment Strathroy Cemetery. Memorial donations to the charity of your choice gratefully acknowledged.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-05-03 published
JACKSON, Eileen Bernice
Peacefully at the Atrium Villa Retirement Home in Hamilton Friday morning April 29, 2005. Eileen JACKSON of Hamilton and Sauble Beach in her 92nd year. Loving daughter of the late Albert and Annie (TEMPLE) JACKSON. Survived by several cousins. She was born in Amabel Township. Eileen earned a B.A. from the University of Toronto, Victoria College in 1940 and an M.S.W. from the University of Toronto School of Social Work in 1957. She practiced social work for over thirty years, including Director, The Children's Aid Society of the District of Parry Sound, and Executive Director, Family Services of Hamilton-Wentworth. Eileen served on the boards of Ontario Association of Children's Aid Societies, Ontario Association of Social Workers, Canadian Welfare Council, Canadian Council on Social Development, Canadian Federation of Business and Professional Women's Clubs and Melrose United Church, Hamilton. She loved her cottage at Sauble Beach, genealogy, curling and lawn bowling. The family is grateful for the care shown by the staff of Atrium Villa, Hamilton. Funeral service will be conducted from Zion Amabel United Church, Sauble Beach Wednesday, May 4 at 1: 00 pm with Reverend Jack FEARNALL officiating. Visitation at the church one hour prior to service. Interment Zion Cemetery following cremation. Memorial contributions to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth 1-888-340-3467.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-11 published
SMITH, Constance Charlotte
Peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, in Toronto on November 8, 2005 at age 84, after a brief unexpected illness. Longtime resident of Toronto at 14 Kingsway Crescent for thirty-nine years. Connie traveled extensively and lived abroad for fifteen years in England and the United States. For the last three years, Connie made her home with Charles by the lake in Toronto at Palace Place. Beloved wife of Charles Franklin SMITH for over sixty-four years. Loving mother of Patricia HILLMER and Michael SMITH and his wife Laura TEMPLE- SMITH. Cherished grandmother of Michael HILLMER and his wife Melinda and Charlotte and Roddy SMITH. Dear sister of Joan BATCHELLOR and Norma HARDY. Those who knew Connie were certain that her family was the most important part of her life. The family would like to thank the staff of the St. Joseph's Health Centre Intensive Care Unit for their compassionate care. Friends and relatives are welcome to attend the Memorial Ser vice at the Old Mill Inn Chapel, 21 Old Mill Road, Toronto, at 1 p.m. on Saturday, November 19, 2005. Reception to follow immediately. Cremation. If desired, donations may be made to The Arthritis Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Arrangements entrusted to Turner and Porter 'Butler' Chapel, 4933 Dundas St. W. M9A 1B6 (416) 231-2283.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-15 published
SMITH, Constance Charlotte
Peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, in Toronto on November 8, 2005 at age 84, after a brief unexpected illness. Longtime resident of Toronto at 14 Kingsway Crescent for thirty-nine years. Connie traveled extensively and lived abroad for fifteen years in England and the United States. For the last three years, Connie made her home with Charles by the lake in Toronto at Palace Place. Beloved wife of Charles Franklin SMITH for over sixty-four years. Loving mother of Patricia HILLMER and Michael SMITH and his wife Laura TEMPLE- SMITH. Cherished grandmother of Michael HILLMER and his wife Melinda and Charlotte and Roddy SMITH. Dear sister of Joan BATCHELLOR and Norma HARDY. Those who knew Connie were certain that her family was the most important part of her life. The family would like to thank the staff of the St. Joseph's Health Centre Intensive Care Unit for their compassionate care. Friends and relatives are welcome to attend the Memorial Service at the Old Mill Inn Chapel, 21 Old Mill Road, Toronto, at 1 p.m. on Saturday, November 19, 2005. Reception to follow immediately. Cremation. If desired, donations may be made to The Arthritis Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Arrangements entrusted to Turner and Porter 'Butler' Chapel, 4933 Dundas St. W. M9A 1B6 (416) 231-2283.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-16 published
CLARKE, Glen Orval
Surrounded by family, passed away peacefully on January 13, 2005 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto. Survived by his loving and devoted wife of 50 years, Marjorie CLARKE, and three adoring daughters Tracey Clarke RANKINE, Christy TEMPLE, Kathleen CLARKE, and dear sons-in-law Andy RANKINE and Rob TEMPLE. Will be fondly remembered by his treasured grandchildren Alex, Aynsley, Heather and Stephen. Sadly missed by his siblings and extended family, Frances CLARKE, Fern ASTLES and her husband Ralph, Bill CLARKE, Alda LAUDON, Nancy and her husband Ed. Predeceased by Alfred CLARKE, Betty CLARKE and Eddie LAUDON. Family and Friends will be received for visitation on Saturday, January 22, 2005 from 7-9 p.m. at the York Visitation, Chapel and Reception Centre, 160 Beecroft Road (at North York Blvd. 416-221-3404). A Celebration of Glen's life to be held on Sunday, January 23, 2005 at 11 a.m. in the cemetery chapel with a reception to follow. "Think good thoughts."

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-19 published
CLARKE, Glen Orval
Surrounded by family, passed away peacefully on January 13, 2005 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto. Survived by his loving and devoted wife of 50 years, Marjorie CLARKE, and three adoring daughters Tracey Clarke RANKINE, Christy TEMPLE, Kathleen CLARKE, and dear sons-in-law Andy RANKINE and Rob TEMPLE. Will be fondly remembered by his treasured grandchildren Alex, Aynsley, Heather and Stephen. Sadly missed by his siblings and extended family, Frances CLARKE, Fern ASTLES and her husband Ralph, Bill CLARKE, Alda LAUDON, Nancy and her husband Ed. Predeceased by Alfred CLARKE, Betty CLARKE and Eddie LAUDON. Family and Friends will be received for visitation on Saturday, January 22, 2005 from 7-9 p.m. at the York Visitation, Chapel and Reception Centre, 160 Beecroft Road (at North York Blvd. 416-221-3404). A Celebration of Glen's life to be held on Sunday, January 23, 2005 at 11 a.m. in the cemetery chapel with a reception to follow."Think good thoughts."

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-01-27 published
GENTILE, Vincent
March 11, 1939. Peacefully on Tuesday, January 25, 2005 in Mississauga. Beloved husband of Gina (née TADDEO) for 40 years. Loving father of Gus, Anna, and Carmela Petrucci and her husband Anthony. Cherished Nonno of Sydney, Noah and Lauren. Dear brother of Anthony GENTILE and the late Agnes TADDEO, and brother-in-law of the late Joseph TADDEO. Vincent will be sadly missed by his many family and Friends. The GENTILE family wish to thank Dr. TEMPLE and the staff at Villa Forum for their care. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy 10 North of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 7-9 p.m. on Thursday and 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Friday. Funeral Mass to be held at Sts. Peter and Paul Church, 4070 Central Parkway East, Mississauga on Saturday, January 29, 2005 at 10: 00 a.m. Entombment Assumption Mausoleum. If desired, donations to the Parkinson Foundation of Canada would be appreciated.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-04 published
SCOTT, A.V. Bernice (née TEMPLE)
(Graduate Toronto General Hospital School of Nursing, 1938) Passed away peacefully at the McCall Centre on Wednesday, June 1, 2005 in her 90th year. Bernice SCOTT (née TEMPLE) beloved wife of the late Howard James SCOTT. Survived by her sisters Mary HERSOM and Elsie RIVA and sisters-in-law Margaret GREER/GRIER and Joyce TIGHE and her 16 Nieces and Nephews. Predeceased by her sisters Jean ADAMSON and Margaret STECKENREITER and her Nephew Gordon STECKENREITER. She will be sadly missed by her many Friends. She was a member of Streetsville United Church and enjoyed working on projects with the United Church Women Friends are invited to a Memorial Service in her honour to be held at Streetsville United Church, 274 Queen Street South, Streetsville on Monday, June 6th, 2005 at 2: 30 p.m. (visitation 1 hour prior). Donations, for those who wish, may be directed to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, the Streetsville United Church or the Arthritis Society. Arrangements entrusted to Lee Funeral Home Limited, Streetsville.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-06 published
TEMPLE, George
Peacefully, at Sunnybrook Helath Sciences Centre, on Saturday, June 4, 2005, at the age of 81. George is survived by his beloved wife Marion TEMPLE (NEELY,) brother Lorne and his wife Lucy, sister Helen and her husband Harry, and sister-in-law Joyce, and predeceased by his brother Ted. Father to his many extended family, grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Lynett Funeral Home, 3299 Dundas St. W. (east of Runnymede Rd.), on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Wednesday at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Prospect Cemetery.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-12 published
SMITH, Constance Charlotte
Peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, in Toronto, on November 8, 2005, at age 84, after a brief unexpected illness. Longtime resident of Toronto at 14 Kingsway Crescent for thirty-nine years. Connie travelled extensively and lived abroad for fifteen years in England and the United States. For the last three years, Connie made her home with Charles by the lake in Toronto at Palace Place. Beloved wife of Charles Franklin SMITH for over sixty-four years. Loving mother of Patricia HILLMER and Michael SMITH and his wife Laura TEMPLE- SMITH. Cherished grandmother of Michael HILLMER and his wife Melinda and Charlotte and Roddy SMITH. Dear sister of Joan BATCHELOR and Norma HARDY. Those who knew Connie were certain that her family was the most important part of her life. The family would like to thank the staff of the St. Joseph's Health Centre Intensive Care Unit for their compassionate care. Friends and relatives are welcome to attend the Memorial Service at the Old Mill Inn Chapel, 21 Old Mill Road, Toronto, at 1 p.m. on Saturday, November 19, 2005. Reception to follow immediately. Cremation. If desired, donations may be made to The Arthritis Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Arrangements entrusted to Turner and Porter "Butler" Chapel, 4933 Dundas St. W., M9A 1B6 (416) 231-2283.

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TEMPLE - All Categories in OGSPI

TEMPLETON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-01-05 published
BRANTON, Laurene Sarah (TEMPLETON)
At Sydenham Hospital, Wallaceburg on Monday, January 3, 2005, Laurene Sarah (TEMPLETON) BRANTON, age 93 of Sombra. Beloved wife of the late Gordon BRANTON (2001.) Loved stepmother of Alfred BRANTON and his wife Sharon of Sombra, and the late John BRANTON (2002). Dear step grandmother of Beth, Carolyn, Margaret, Jeff, Kevin, and Alan. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Pre-deceased by parents Ernest and Geraldine TEMPLETON, a brother George TEMPLETON and a sister Dorothy CURLEW. Funeral Service will be held at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia, Ontario, on Friday, January 7th, 2005 at 11: 00am. Cremation to follow. Friends will be received at Smith Funeral Home on Thursday afternoon from 2 to 4pm and evening from 7 to 9 pm. Sympathy through donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. Memories and condolences may be emailed to smithfuneralhome@cogeco.net

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-16 published
BRAITHWAITE, Virginia (ALLAN)
At Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital, on Monday, March 14, 2005, Virginia BRAITHWAITE (ALLAN) of Strathroy and formerly of Glencoe in her 82nd year. Beloved wife of the late Robert BRAITHWAITE (2001.) Dear mother of Beverly and Harold CHURCHILL of Petrolia, Marilyn and Ken HERRINGTON of Strathroy, Brenda and Dave PALMER of Vienna and Morris SAUNDERS of Petrolia. Loving grandmother of Scott and Susan, Stephen and Aimee, Debbie and François, Jamie and Jayne, Darin, Doug and Shannan, Michael and Sandra, Tammy, Mark and Melissa, Jason. Special great grandmother of Kristopher, Dayna, Paige, Danielle, Jodie, Cassie, Brianna, Jarrett, Colton and Haleigh. Also survived by 2 brothers and 2 sisters, Donald and Jim ALLAN, Shirley EDGAR and Joanne REMICK. Predeceased by 2 daughters, Patricia SAUNDERS, Carol TEMPLETON, and 2 sons, Ronald and Thomas and 1 sister, Georgina MARLATT and 4 brothers, Nelson, Jack, Doug and Ken ALLAN. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Van Heck Funeral Home, 172 Symes Street, Glencoe on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Friday March 18 at 11: 00 a.m. Pastor Brian McKENZIE officiating. Interment Oakland Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital or Four Counties Health Services.

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-11-26 published
CLARKE, Catherine (née GUTHRIE)
Of 240 William Street, Stratford passed away at the Stratford General Hospital on Thursday, November 24, 2005, in her 81st year. Born in Edinburgh, Scotland, she was the daughter of the late Thomas GUTHRIE and the former Catherine TEMPLETON. Catherine was a member of Central United Church, Stratford, a member and former President of the United Church Women at the church, a member and former President of the Stratford General Hospital Auxiliary, a past Regent of the Perth Regiment Chapter Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire and a member of the Friends of the Festival. Beloved wife of Victor CLARKE. Also surviving are several cousins in Scotland. At Catherine's request, cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be held at Central United Church, 194 Avondale Avenue, Stratford on Tuesday, November 29, 2005 at 11 a.m. Reverend Cheryl-Ann STADELBAUER- SAMPA will officiate. Interment of cremated remains will be in Avondale Cemetery, Stratford. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Victorian Order of Nurses, the Stratford Public Library or a charity of one's choice through the Heinbuck Funeral Home, 156 Albert Street, Stratford at 1-519-271-5062.

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-30 published
MOUNTJOY, Mary (née HARDING)
Passed away peacefully at Lakeridge Health-Oshawa on Thursday, April 28th, 2005 in her 72nd year. Beloved wife of the late Donald MOUNTJOY. Loving mother of John and his wife Terri of Port Perry, Dr. Jim MOUNTJOY and his wife Dr. Jennifer TEMPLETON of Galesburg, Illinois and Catherine of Oshawa. Survived by her sister Margaret JACKLIN (Eric) and her brothers Bill HARDING, Fred HARDING (Barb) and Bruce HARDING (Georgina.) Predeceased by her brothers George HARDING (Marion) and Bert HARDING (Evelyn.) Friends may call at Oshawa Funeral Service "Thornton Chapel", 847 King St. West (905-721-1234) for visitation on Sunday, May 1st from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Monday, May 2nd at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Thornton Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in Mary's memory to the Canadian Diabetes Association, Centennial Albert United Church or charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-05-15 published
TEMPLETON, Sydney
(Longtime member of Royal Canadian Legion Coronation Branch), Thistletown) Peacefully, after a short illness, at Headwaters Health Care Centre, Orangeville, on Thursday, May 12, 2005, Sydney TEMPLETON, in his 69th year, beloved husband of Joan. Loving father of Bruce, Anne and her husband Michael COCHRAN. Cherished grandfather of Jessica. Dear brother of Andrew, Joyce, Jim, Marian and predeceased by Frank. Cremation has taken place. The family wishes to thank Dr. MARTIN- SMITH, the nurses and staff of Headwaters Health Care Centre. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S., Bolton (905-857-2213). Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-12 published
SWIERZEWSKI, Czeslaw Joe
Peacefully on October 9, 2005 at St. Michael's Hospital. Dad will be greatly missed by his two daughters and son-in-law Helen and S. Gordon TEMPLETON and Yvonne Margaret. He also leaves to grieve his sister-in-law Vicky SWIERZEWSKI, nephew Jim and his wife Irene and their daughter Katharine and his brother-in-law George A. SPASHETT. He is a former employee of Compact Mold, James McTamney and Henry Birks. A graveside service is to be held at Elgin Mills Cemetery (Richmond Hill) on Thursday, October 13, 2005 at 2: 00 p.m. Reception at 21 Elizabeth St. S. No. 201 afterwards.

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-09 published
He made his mark on city and nation
By WARREN Gerard, Special To The Star
Beland HONDERICH rose from plain beginnings to become one of the most influential Canadians of his day, using his power as publisher of Canada's largest newspaper to influence the agenda in politics and business at every level.
At the same time he set new standards for informed, in-depth, responsible reporting.
HONDERICH, publisher of the Toronto Star for 22 of his 52 years at the paper, died in Vancouver at 86 yesterday following a stroke.
HONDERICH was a fiercely private man, almost reclusive, but that didn't keep him from being an impatient perfectionist, a leader whose principal ethic was work.
The Star was his life, his passion.
Among his many honours, and one he treasured, was his election in 1986 to the News Hall of Fame by journalists across Canada for leading "Canadian newspapers into a new direction, taking readers backstage to explore and explain the current events that shaped their lives."
HONDERICH left the publisher's office in 1988, going on to become board chairman of the newspaper and its parent company, Torstar Corp. He retired from that position in 1994, but maintained an office across from the newsroom on the fifth floor at One Yonge St. until 1999.
Beland Hugh HONDERICH was born in Kitchener on November 25, 1918, and grew up in the nearby village of Baden. He was proud of his pioneer roots -- Mennonites from Germany who found religious freedom in Waterloo County in the early 1800s.
"My father was a man who stood for religious freedom, and I am proud to follow in his footsteps," HONDERICH once said.
His father, John HONDERICH, was ostracized in the staunchly traditional Mennonite community because he and young Beland went to hear a speaker from another Amish sect. The shunning, as it was called, meant that other Reform Mennonites were forbidden to sit down to eat with them or to shake their hands.
Nor did his father quite fit in with his thrifty, hard-working neighbours in other ways. A sometime beekeeper, homespun village philosopher, printer and pamphleteer for liberal causes, he was "not a very good provider" in a community where work was next to godliness.
His mother, Rae, was the family's main breadwinner. She was the local telephone operator, a job that included the use of a train station in Baden which served as a home for the HONDERICHs and their six children. HONDERICH recalled that the family never went hungry, but there was little money for anything but food.
He gathered coal along the railway tracks to heat their home and carried water in summer to gangs of workers repairing the roads. In the mornings, he worked around the Canadian National Railway station, sweeping and cleaning up for 40 cents a day.
Despite winning a regional debating championship with his sister Ruth -- they defended the proposition that the Soviet way of life was superior to the American way -- he struggled to pass high school entrance examinations.
HONDERICH didn't do well in high school. And it didn't help that he had to hitchhike 16 kilometres to and from school in Kitchener. As a result, his attendance was spotty and his marks were poor. He was demoted in his second year to a commercial course "where at least I learned to type."
Discouraged, he dropped out of school and got a job as a farmhand at the beginning of the Great Depression, much to his mother's displeasure. "You can do better than that," he recalled her saying on more than one occasion.
The farm job didn't last. His introduction to reporting came about because his father was hard of hearing and took his son to public meetings and political rallies to take notes. It taught the young HONDERICH, who was later to battle deafness himself, to write quickly and accurately.
He inherited a Kitchener-Waterloo Record paper route from one of his brothers, which led him to become the paper's correspondent for Baden at 10 cents a column inch. He created news by organizing a softball team and covering its games for the paper.
When he was 17, fires on successive nights destroyed two barns owned by a prominent Baden farmer. Arson was suspected and the young HONDERICH's coverage so impressed his editors that they offered him a tryout as a cub reporter in Kitchener at $15 a week.
He showed up for work in a mismatched jacket and pants and with his two front teeth missing from a tough hockey game the night before. He didn't shine as a reporter.
The publisher, W.J. MOTZ, concluded after a week that HONDERICH was in the wrong line of work and told city editor Art LOW/LOWE/LOUGH to fire him. But LOW/LOWE/LOUGH saw something in the youngster and persuaded MOTZ to give him a second chance.
LOW/LOWE/LOUGH worked HONDERICH hard. He gave him an assignment each evening to go along with his day job. Ed HAYES, who worked at the Record in those days, recalled in an interview that HONDERICH (or "Bee" as he was nicknamed) was determined to succeed.
"Each reporter was supposed to turn in a story every afternoon at the end of his shift. Bee wasn't satisfied with that. He'd turn in two, three or more.
"He was the darling of the city desk."
As time went by, he improved, becoming more and more confident. He was also developing into a perfectionist. So much so, in fact, that he'd bet an ice cream with an assistant city editor that he would find nothing that needed to be changed in a HONDERICH story.
At first, he recalled, it cost him a lot of ice cream cones, but later he rarely had to pay off.
In those early days at the Record, HONDERICH knew he had a country bumpkin image. So when he had saved enough money, he went to a quality menswear store and asked the manager to show him how to dress. He bought a dark pin-striped suit, complete with vest, and that look became his uniform in life.
A fellow staffer at the Record recalled HONDERICH borrowing a bike from a delivery boy and speeding off to an assignment in his pin-striped suit.
And co-workers described him as a loner who rarely headed for the beer parlour with the boys after work, though he was known to sip a scotch on special occasions. Mostly, he went to Norm Jones' restaurant for a milkshake.
Though he spent most of his time working, he taught Sunday school at a Presbyterian church, and served as secretary for a minor hockey league.
This involvement brought him into contact with Milt DUNNELL, the legendary Star sports columnist, who had made a name for himself at the Stratford Beacon Herald before heading for Toronto. He told HONDERICH that the Star was looking for reporters to replace those who had enlisted to serve in World War 2. HONDERICH, who had been rejected by the Royal Canadian Air Force and merchant marine because of poor eyesight and hearing, applied to the Star in 1943 and was hired as a reporter for $35 a week.
He was proud that the Kitchener city council gave him a vote of thanks for his fair reporting. And MOTZ, the publisher who thought he would never make it in the newspaper business, begged him not to go.
Stepping into the grandly marbled lobby of the Star's building at 80 King St. W., HONDERICH recalled that he was "scared as hell." But he was in the right place. This was the world of Joe ATKINSON.
As publisher, Joseph E. ATKINSON had guided the paper through most of the first half-century and was seen by friend and foe alike as one of the country's leading reformers. It turned out that the publisher and his new employee had some things in common.
Both had come from large, impoverished, God-fearing families in small-town Ontario, and quit school early to put food on the table. "One thing I had in common with Joe ATKINSON," HONDERICH recalled, "is that I knew need."
There was a major difference, however. ATKINSON was a star of Canadian journalism in 1899 when the new owners of the Toronto Evening Star hired him at 34 to run the paper. HONDERICH was 24 when he arrived at the paper, an unproven asset at the time.
But he didn't take long to prove himself. His work was soon noticed by Harry C. HINDMARSH, ATKINSON's son-in-law and the man who ran the newsroom.
HINDMARSH sent HONDERICH to Saskatchewan for the election that brought Tommy Douglas and the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation (later to become the New Democratic Party) to power in 1944.
The next year he was sent back to do a progress report on North America's first socialist government. His stories were so enthusiastically some thought naively -- positive that the Saskatchewan government asked permission to reprint them.
They also caught the eye of Joe ATKINSON, whose reform ideas were at home with the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation's, although he never endorsed the party at election time. HONDERICH was marked as someone worth watching. He was asked to fill in as an editorial writer, the newspaper job he enjoyed most of all.
Some critics said HONDERICH's writing lacked flair or style. But it was clear. He explained complicated matters in simple, accurate terms. His idea was to dive right into a story, delivering the promise of the headline in the first paragraph.
In his reporting career, HONDERICH covered a wide variety of assignments, collecting his share of scoops, enough to impress HINDMARSH. In 1946, he called in HONDERICH, congratulated him on a story, then remarked, "Oh, by the way, the financial editor left today. I'd like you to start as financial editor on Monday."
"But I don't know the difference between a stock and a bond," HONDERICH replied.
"You'll learn," HINDMARSH said.
HONDERICH told HINDMARSH he would take the job on the condition that he be allowed to go back to feature writing if it didn't work out.
"If you don't make a go of it, you'll go out the door," HINDMARSH said in a menacing way.
It goes without saying that HONDERICH made a go of it.
One of the first things he noticed from his new desk was a tailor at work in a building across King St. He decided his business section would write for that tailor, for the ordinary person.
His News Hall of Fame citation noted: "He led in turning the writing and presentation of financial news into a readable subject in terms that interest the average reader." He criticized the stock exchange, questioned banking methods, recommended profit sharing, and supported credit unions and other co-operatives.
But when there were major stories to be covered, HINDMARSH often took HONDERICH out of his financial department and sent him all over the globe -- to Newfoundland on the eve of its joining Canada, to Argentina where press freedom was under attack, to Asia with Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent for the first round-the-world trip taken by a Canadian prime minister, and to Britain for the funeral of George VI.
In 1948, HONDERICH, along with 12 other employees, chartered the first Canadian local of the American Newspaper Guild. As president of the union, he signed the first contract with the Star.
Some members of the union were suspicious, however, thinking that as financial editor he was "a company stooge" trying to make sure the Guild didn't fall into the hands of disgruntled left-wingers.
They weren't aware, however, that he knew all about bad working conditions because he had done both day and night assignments as a young reporter in Kitchener.
He served three terms as Guild president and helped win better pay and working conditions. Later, on the other side of the negotiating table, he continued to believe in the need for an organized newsroom, although that view was severely tested in a bitter strike in HONDERICH had become a major force in the newsroom when ATKINSON died in 1948 after nearly 50 years as publisher of a racy paper with principles.
His death, however, created a crisis at the paper. ATKINSON's will had left the Star to a charitable foundation to be administered by his trustees. However, the Ontario Conservative government passed the Charitable Gifts Act, which said no charity could own more than 10 per cent of a business.
The government may have viewed the will as an attempt to escape death duties, but more likely the legislation was an attempt to muzzle the Star, a liberal thorn in the Tory side.
Nevertheless, it became a distinct possibility the paper might be sold to outside interests. Bidders, including beer baron E.P. TAILOR/TAYLOR, were lining up for a chance to buy what had become Canada's most profitable daily.
The Star was granted stays of execution however, and HINDMARSH, the founder's son-in-law, succeeded ATKINSON until his own death in 1956. In the HINDMARSH years, the paper seemed to lose direction and much of its fairness, particularly in the reporting of politics. The paper's reputation was going downhill.
Meanwhile, HONDERICH had been appointed editor-in-chief in 1955 and a couple of years later he was appointed to the board, after HINDMARSH's sudden death. It put him in the position of becoming an owner of the paper.
Walter GORDON, an accountant who was to become finance minister in Lester Pearson's Liberal government, worked out a plan for the trustees to buy the Star by putting up $1 million among the six of them, including HONDERICH. The paper was valued at $25.5 million.
At the time, the sale price was the most ever paid in Canada for a newspaper, and it turned out to be a steal. Under HONDERICH's leadership, Torstar, the Star's parent company, would become a more than $1 billion enterprise over the next 30-plus years.
For readers and the staff, the HONDERICH years had begun, although he didn't take over as publisher until 1966. Immediately, however, he went about remaking the paper. Headlines didn't scream any more, and the silly and the sensational disappeared from the paper.
HONDERICH was putting his stamp on the Star. Reporting only the facts wasn't good enough. He demanded thorough backgrounding of stories to make them understandable to the average reader. Or, as he said, for "my barber."
He created a great newsroom that included sports columnist DUNNELL and leading Canadian writers such as Pierre BERTON, Peter NEWMAN, Charles TEMPLETON and Nathan COHEN, as well as award-winning cartoonist Duncan MacPHERSON.
HONDERICH returned the Star to the principles of Joseph E. ATKINSON, including a reform-centred editorial policy. Unemployment, affordable housing, adequate welfare benefits, medicare, pensions, minority rights, the need for an independent Canada -- these became subjects he demanded be dealt with on a daily basis.
In one of his rare public appearances, he told a group of editors in 1961 that "the basic function of a newspaper is to inform, to tell the public what is happening in the community, in the nation and in the world. You will notice I did not use the word, entertain." He felt that television had made entertainment a secondary function for newspapers. "How much better then, to concentrate on what we can do best, and that is to inform the public."
The change was most evident in the Star's treatment of politics and economics. The background feature gradually became commonplace in North American journalism, and a poll of U.S. editors rated the Star one of the world's 10 top foreign papers.
Critics of the HONDERICH way -- many of them highly placed in the paper -- couldn't wait for HONDERICH's grey, humourless Star to fail, but they were doomed to disappointment, just as surely as the Star's competitor -- the unchanging Telegram -- was doomed to extinction.
Not only did the Star's circulation grow, so did its profits.
Honesty and integrity were words that most people associated with HONDERICH. But many on his staff found him a demanding taskmaster, an uncompromising and often difficult man to deal with. There was never any doubt that Beland HONDERICH was the boss. He wasn't one for chit-chat.
Early in his career as publisher, he all but cut himself off from the social whirl of movers and shakers. He admitted to becoming almost reclusive after finding himself challenged at social functions and parties to defend Star policies he felt needed no defence, especially since he had put them into place.
But he never felt that way about the public at large. The so-called Little Guy could get him on the phone more easily than a celebrity could. His home number was in the book. And in the days when the Star was an afternoon paper, it wasn't unusual for an evening editor to get a call from HONDERICH, who in turn had received an irate call at home from a reader whose paper hadn't been delivered.
The paper would be delivered by taxi, and the taxi company was instructed to report to the editor the moment the paper had arrived. Then HONDERICH would phone the reader to make sure he was satisfied.
The first part of his 12-hour working day was spent poring over page proofs, quarrelling about leads of stories, questioning something in the 25th paragraph, asking for more background, and demanding follow-ups.
He was articulate, often painfully so for the person at the other end of his complaints. His editors took great pleasure when he demanded "antidotal" leads. He meant anecdotal leads.
Notes with the heavy-handed BHH signature on them rained from his office.
The difficulty everyone had in pleasing him and the way he prowled the newsroom won him the nickname "The Beast." And he was called "Drac" by some editors who thought he, like the vampire, sucked the staff dry.
When the paper departed from what the reader had come to believe was a Star tradition, he took to the typewriter to explain the reasons himself. In 1972, for example, he put his initials on an editorial that explained why the Star was supporting Progressive Conservative Robert Stanfield over Liberal Pierre Trudeau in the federal election.
In his rare public appearances, the nasal flatness of his voice often disguised the passion he felt for a subject. However, he was an effective spokesman for the causes he championed. In defending the Star's strong stand on economic nationalism, he told the Canadian Club it was based on the need to preserve the differences between Canada and the United States.
"I think our society tends to be more compassionate, somewhat less extreme and certainly less violent," he said. "We put more emphasis on basic human needs such as health insurance and pensions."
He warned that increased U.S. ownership of Canadian resources would endanger our ability to maintain those differences.
In a 1989 speech at Carleton University in Ottawa, he caused a stir when he argued that objectivity in newspapers was neither possible nor desirable.
"No self-respecting newspaper deliberately distorts or slants the news to make it conform to its own point of view," he said. "But you cannot publish a newspaper without making value judgments on what news you select to publish and how you present it in the paper.
"And these value judgments reflect a view of society -- a point of view if you will -- that carries as much weight, if not more, than what is said on the editorial page."
Just as ATKINSON used the news pages to popularize reform ideas, HONDERICH used them as a weapon in his own causes.
One example was his reaction to a document leaked to him outlining then-prime minister Brian Mulroney's government strategy on free trade. It said the communications strategy "should rely less on educating the public than getting across the message that the free trade initiative is a good idea -- in other words a selling job."
HONDERICH made sure all aspects of free trade were put under the kind of scrutiny the government wanted to avoid, particularly the possible effects on employment and social benefits.
Simon REISMAN, the bellicose chief trade negotiator, accused HONDERICH of personally waging a vendetta against free trade. He said HONDERICH used the Star "in a manner that contradicts every sense of fairness and decency in the newspaper business."
In reply, the unrepentant publisher said: "The role of a newspaper, as I see it, is to engage in the full and frank dissemination of the news and opinion from the perspective of its values and particular view of society. It should report the news fairly and accurately, reflect all pertinent facts and opinions and not only what the official establishment thinks and says."
As publisher, he demonstrated an impressive business savvy for a man who once said he hardly knew the difference between a stock and a bond. In 1972, he moved the paper to new quarters at One Yonge St.
And later, in his position as chief executive officer of the parent company, Torstar Corp., he acquired Harlequin Enterprises, the world's largest publisher of romance books, and 15 community newspapers to add to the 14 the Star already owned in the Toronto area.
At the same time, HONDERICH still was very much making his mark in journalism. He was the first in Canada to introduce a bureau of accuracy and to appoint an ombudsman to represent the reader in the newsroom. In a wider sense, he was the main force behind the establishment of the Ontario Press Council, where readers can take their complaints to an independent body.
As well as his election to the News Hall of Fame, he was honoured in other ways, receiving doctors of law degrees from Wilfrid Laurier and York universities, and the Order of Canada in 1987.
HONDERICH was married three times, the last time on New Year's Day 2000 to Rina WHELAN of Vancouver, the city where he lived until his death. He had two sons: John, who followed in his father's footsteps to become publisher of the Star, and David, an entrepreneur and one daughter, Mary, a philosophy and English teacher. He also had six grandchildren.
Even into his eighties, HONDERICH exercised daily and loved to play bridge, golf and fish.
Charles E. PASCAL, executive director of the Atkinson Charitable Foundation, recalled golfing with HONDERICH after he had entered his eighties. PASCAL was in his mid-fifties.
"I expected to be slowed down by playing with a couple of guys in their seventies and one in his eighties," PASCAL said. "Bee, as with everything else, played golf with determination, focus and tenacity. I was quite impressed with his golfing. He was very competitive."
After HONDERICH stepped down as publisher in 1988, and as a director of Torstar in 1995, he lost none of his zeal for pursuing causes. He did this through the Atkinson Charitable Foundation and his own personal philanthropy.
"His role on our board was absolutely essential, forceful, radical," PASCAL said.
"I had the sense that the older he got he became more and more impatient. He was impatient, just impatient, about all that is yet to be done by governments and others to reduce the inequities for those who are disadvantaged through no fault of their own."
He was generous in his giving and, as was his character, he had no interest in public recognition or praise.
"He just had no time whatsoever for personal recognition," PASCAL recalled.
"I think he would have liked to have been around forever if for no other reason than to contribute more."
At HONDERICH's request, there will be a cremation, after which the family will hold a small private gathering to celebrate his life.

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TEMPORAL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-29 published
PASUTTO, Pietro
Passed away peacefully at Pine Grove Lodge Nursing Home on Tuesday, September 27, 2005, in his 80th year, with his family by his side. He will be greatly missed by his dear wife Norina of 56 years. Dear dad to Anthony and his wife Monica, Mara and her husband Andrew BORTOLOTTI and to his beloved grandchildren Michael and his wife Nadia, David, Robert, Ashley and Steven. Survived by sisters Elizabeth TEMPORAL and Anna and Angelo CILIO and sister-in-law Alda PASUTTO. Friends will be received at Delmoro Funeral Home, 61 Beverly Hills Dr., (1 light south of Wilson Ave., west of Jane St. 416-249-4499) on Thursday, September 29, 2005 from 4-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held on Friday, September 30, 2005 from Immaculate Conception Roman Catholic Church at 10 a.m. Entombment to follow at Holy Cross Cemetery.

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