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"TAU" 2005 Obituary


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TAUBE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-07-07 published
SUGARMAN, Sonja
On Wednesday, July 6, 2005 at Princess Margaret Hospital. Sonja SUGARMAN, caring wife of the late Sam SUGARMAN. Loving mother of the late Maxine ROSENBERG. Dear sister of Bernard TAUBE. Devoted grandmother of Lori ROSENBERG and Marcelo LOPEZ. At Benjamin Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, July 8, 2005 at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Adath Israel Synagogue Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 38 Avenue Road following the service and Sunday from 12: 00 noon to 4: 00 p.m. If desired, donations may be made to the Sonja Sugarman Fund for Princess Margaret Hospital Palliative Care c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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TAUNTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-06 published
BONTHRON, Doris Marcella (formerly GROSSER, née SARARAS)
Surrounded by her family, Doris Marcella BONTHRON of London and formerly of Hensall passed away peacefully at Stratford General Hospital, on Friday, March 4th, 2005 in her 88th year. Doris was born September 10, 1917, the daughter of Simon and Elizabeth SARARAS. Doris was the loving Mother of Bryan BONTHRON (Brenda,) Bevan BONTHRON (Bonnie), Janice BONTHRON, and Shelley POPOVICH (Al.) Cherished grandmother to: Chris and Sinead BONTHRON, Toronto Katie and Alex BEWLEY, Toronto; Amy BONTHRON and her fiance Troy BRYSON, London; Heidi and Paul NEEDHAM, London; Erin and Malcolm FERGUSON, Toronto; Shawn POPOVICH, London; Robert and Christy TAUNTON, London and Juliana TAUNTON, Caronport, Saskatchewan. Dear great-grandmother to Robyn and Benjamin BONTHRON and Maya BEWLEY all of Toronto. She is survived by her sister Greta REED of Orangeville and by her sister-in-law Grace SARARAS of Exeter. Doris was predeceased by her husbands, Roy GROSSER (Royal Canadian Air Force 1944) and Harold BONTHRON (1973,) her brothers and sisters, Laura, Clara, Edna, Earl and Ross, and by her son Shawn (1954). Visitation will be held on Monday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7: 00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, (2 blocks north of Oxford), where the funeral and committal services will be conducted on Tuesday, March 8th, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. Reverend George VAIS officiating. Private family interment of ashes will take place at a later date in Exeter Cemetery. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Doris are asked to consider the Canadian Blood Services or the charity of their choice. On-line condolences may be made at www.westviewfuneralchapel.com

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TAUNTON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2005-03-08 published
BONTHRON, Doris Marcella (née SARARAS)
Surrounded by her family, Doris Marcella BONTHRON of London and formerly of Hensall passed away peacefully at Stratford General Hospital, on Friday, March 4th, 2005 in her 88th year. Doris was born September 10, 1917, the daughter of Simon and Elizabeth SARARAS. Doris was the loving Mother of Bryan BONTHRON (Brenda,) Bevan BONTHRON (Bonnie), Janice BONTHRON, and Shelley POPOVICH (Al.) Cherished grandmother to: Chris and Sinead BONTHRON, Toronto Katie and Alex BEWLEY, Toronto; Amy BONTHRON and her fiance Troy BRYSON, London; Heidi and Paul NEEDHAM, London; Erin and Malcolm FERGUSON, Toronto; Shawn POPOVICH, London; Robert and Christy TAUNTON, London and Juliana TAUNTON, Caronport, Saskatchewan. Dear great-grandmother to Robyn and Benjamin BONTHRON and Maya BEWLEY all of Toronto. She is survived by her sister Greta REED of Orangeville and by her sister-in-law Grace SARARAS of Exeter. Doris was predeceased by her husbands, Roy GROSSER (Royal Canadian Air Force 1944) and Harold BONTHRON (1973,) her brothers and sisters, Laura, Clara, Edna, Earl and Ross, and by her son Shawn (1954). Visitation will be held on Monday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7: 00 -9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, (2 blocks north of Oxford), where the funeral and committal services will be conducted on Tuesday, March 8th, 2005 at 3: 00 p.m. Reverend George VAIS officiating. Private family interment of ashes will take place at a later date in Exeter Cemetery. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Doris are asked to consider the Canadian Blood Services or the charity of their choice. On-line condolences may be made at www.westviewfuneralchapel.com

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TAURASI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-26 published
CAMPOLI, Antonio
God called Antonio peacefully on September 24th, 2005 from the Maple Health Care Centre at the age of 82. Re-united in Heaven with his loving wife Pia. He will be cherished by his dear children Gino (Mary), Tina (Tony TAURASI), Theresa (Ralph CERUNDOLO), and Nancy (Domenic SANGIULIANO.) Proud grandfather of twelve grandchildren, and seven great-grandchildren. He will be held dear in the hearts of his brother Domenic (Alfonza), his sister Rosa (Jiacomo), and his late brothers Agustino (Santina), Gerardo (Vera), Mario (Palmina), nieces, nephews, cousins, relatives, and many Friends. Family will receive Friends at the Fratelli Vescio Funeral Homes Ltd. (8101 Weston Rd., south of Langstaff Rd., 905-850-3332) on Monday from 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Wednesday at 10 a.m. from St. David Roman Catholic Church (2601 Major Mackenzie Dr., east of Jane St.). Entombment to follow at the Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery (on Bayview Ave., south of Hwy. 7). In lieu of flowers, the Campoli family will accept donations to the Alzheimer Association.

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TAURASI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-02 published
MARCHESE, Tommaso
Peacefully on November 1, 2005 at the McCall Centre for Continuing Care, with his family by his side. Mr. Tommaso MARCHESE predeceased by his beloved wife Caterina. Beloved father of Felicia GUZZO and her late husband Frank, Sina PIANTA and her husband Joe, Tony and his wife Brigitte, Donna TAURASI and her husband Dario, and Naz and his wife Marylane. Nonno will be fondly remembered and forever loved by his twelve grandchildren and twelve great-grandchildren. He will be sadly missed by his brother Joe and his wife Rosa. Friends will be received at the "Woodbridge Chapel" of Scott Funeral Home, 7776 Kipling Avenue (at Hwy. 7) on Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. and Thursday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Friday, November 4th at 9: 30 a.m. at St. Roch's Roman Catholic Church (2889 Islington Ave.). Entombment Glendale Memorial Gardens. Memorial donations to the Hospital for Sick Children would be greatly appreciated.

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TAURINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-08 published
Susan GRAVES, Musician (1954-2005)
Connecticut-born bassoonist who 'played like an angel' fell in love with chamber music and co-founded Canada's now-famous Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Saturday, October 8, 2005, Page S9
Susan GRAVES, co-founder of Tafelmusik, the internationally acclaimed Baroque orchestra, played the bassoon like an angel and looked as though she had just stepped out of a painting by Dante Gabriel Rossetti. She had long, wavy copper-coloured hair, blue eyes, freckles, a calm authority and a legendary kindness.
"She had the most beautiful chocolaty, velvety bassoon sound that I have ever encountered," says Jeanne LAMON, music director of Tafelmusik. "She played solos with us frequently in the early years and it was always a highlight for everybody. She was a marvellous musician."
Susan "Susie" GRAVES was the younger child and only daughter of John GRAVES, a chemical engineer and his wife Jane Elizabeth, always known as Betty. Susan went to school in Westport, Connecticut.
"As soon as she learned to read, she took piano lessons," her mother said this week. Every weekday morning, Susan, the Siamese cat Baby, and her mother would get up half an hour early and go downstairs to the family room where Susan practised on an old upright piano. "The cat sat in my lap and when Susan was finished it would get up and walk back and forth across the keys," said Mrs. GRAVES.
At Staples High School, Ms. GRAVES fooled around with an old clarinet that had belonged to her father. Her parents meant to rent a better instrument, but her music teacher said no, we need a bassoon player. Ms. GRAVES obliged and the bassoon became her instrument. "It is not easy to play," her father conceded in a conversation from the GRAVES's retirement home in a suburb of Minneapolis.
After high school, Ms. GRAVES attended the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston where she received a bachelor's degree in 1972 and began studying for her master's. That's where she met her future husband Kenneth (Kenny) SOLWAY, an oboist from Toronto, in October of 1975.
Sharing a love of music and period instruments, they went to Europe together in 1976 to study at the Sweelinck Conservatory in Amsterdam and at the Royal Conservatory of The Hague. "We wanted to play chamber music," her husband said this week from their home in Cobourg Ontario "It didn't matter whether it was baroque or modern."
The couple dreamed up the idea for what is now the Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra and Chamber Choir, while they were still in Holland and even played a couple of "table-music" chamber concerts with two Friends. They returned to Toronto in 1978, burbling with schemes and enthusiasm, started the Toronto Chamber Music Collective and presented chamber and orchestral concerts of contemporary and baroque music in small theatres and churches in downtown Toronto.
Their vision was immediately embraced by a number of musicians including double bass player Alison MacKAY, harpsichordist Charlotte NEDIGER and violist Ivars TAURINS all of whom still play with Tafelmusik, more than 25 years later.
"Everything they did in the beginning was exactly the right thing to do," says violinist Jeanne LAMON, who has been music director of Tafelmusik since 1981. Ms. GRAVES and Mr. SOLWAY worked as a team, trying out different people, training modern players in baroque techniques and even landing a Wintario grant to buy bows and wind instruments for the fledgling orchestra and organizing a tour to New York City. "They booked without having an orchestra and pulled it off. We got a good review."
Mr. SOLWAY was the talker with the "go-gettum energy," according to Ms. LAMON, and Ms. GRAVES was the grounded one with the practical skills to write grant proposals and persuade musicians to join them.
"She was a brilliant musician with a beautiful sound and virtuosic technique," said Alison MacKAY. "I regarded her as a mentor." It was "heartrending" at a recent Tafelmusik concert when she recognized Ms. GRAVES's handwriting on the music sheets. "The fact that her presence is still felt, is because her talent penetrated every arena of the organization. She did everything. She played like an angel, she pasted posters on lamp posts, she organized accounts and she wrote out all the parts."
Playing with like-minded Friends and running an orchestra are very different enterprises. "With an oboe in your mouth, you can't talk very much," Mr. SOLWAY explained this week from his home in Cobourg, Ontario "I decided to be general director and to let somebody else do the artistic managing in conjunction with me."
Orchestras often have tensions between the string and wind players and Tafelmusik was no exception. At the same time, imagining an orchestra and running one demand different skill sets. Artistic differences meant that Mr. SOLWAY and Ms. GRAVES went to Vienna to study for a few months and then officially stepped down from the running of the orchestra, although she continued to play with Tafelmusik for a few years.
The couple spent a couple of years in a cabin in Algonquin Park that had belonged to Mr. SOLWAY's family. During winter, their nearest neighbour was 10 miles away by snowshoe. And yet, "those were by far the two most beautiful years of our lives," says Mr. SOLWAY. "We realized then we were near-hermits -- and loved it."
They bought canoe forms from the Chestnut Canoe Company after it disbanded in 1979, and started making and marketing handmade cedar-strip and canvas canoes. After Algonquin Park, they moved to a farm north of Cobourg where they built their own house, raised sheep and grew organic vegetables, which they would bring in to Toronto to sell at the St. Lawrence Market.
Ms. GRAVES began playing as principal bassoonist with the Kingston Symphony Orchestra in the mid-1980s. Gordon FAST became the musical director in 1991.
"In the 14 years I worked with her, she commuted from Cobourg," he said. "That means driving through countless snow and ice storms and I can never remember her missing a concert or a rehearsal."
Besides her dedication, she had a great sense of humour and was always a happy part of the symphony," according to Mr. FAST.
Principal oboist Barbara BOLTE sat in front of Ms. GRAVES for the past five years. They became very good Friends especially after the two of them spent an evening playing Baroque trio sonatas together. "We were playing for fun but we realized we spoke the same language."
Ms. BOLTE found her colleague "amazingly talented" and a very strong player. "When I had to play a solo and she was playing the bass part underneath I found it wonderfully supportive."
In March, Ms. GRAVES played "an absolutely pristine and beautiful Mozart bassoon concerto" in a Kingston Symphony Orchestra concert according to Mr. FAST. "It was astonishingly good, perfect really."
She finished the season and everything seemed fine. Of course, it wasn't. Mr. SOLWAY had begun noticing "weird little things" in his wife's behaviour last November, but thought it was depression.
It wasn't until the Kingston Symphony Orchestra's summer concert at Fort Henry in July that her musical colleagues spotted any problems.
"Susie didn't play as well as usual," said Ms. BOLTE. " She was making mistakes and she hardly ever played a wrong note or came in late." After the concert Ms. GRAVES complained that her eyes hurt and that she couldn't see very well, but she thought a new prescription from the optometrist would fix her up.
Mr. FAST agrees that "there were a few bobbles" in her playing. He knew that she wasn't feeling well and he thought she would soon be back in top form.
In fact, she was suffering the effects of a tumour that had began in the emotional centre of her brain, according to Mr. SOLWAY. She quickly became sicker and, at Mr. SOLWAY's urging, she was taken to Toronto for treatment. She underwent an operation to remove much of the tumour and then Mr. SOLWAY took her home to be with their teenage son Jesse, a double bass player, in Cobourg.
Susan Elizabeth GRAVES was born on May 7, 1954 in Norwalk, Connecticut. She died in Cobourg, Ontario, from a brain tumour on September 26, 2005. She was 51. She is survived by her husband Kenny SOLWAY, her son Jesse, her parents and a brother and his family. The Kingston Symphony is dedicating its per formance of Verdi's Requiem on Sunday, November 27, at the Kingston Gospel Temple, to her memory.

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TAUS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-10-04 published
DEL_GRECO, Remo
Passed away peacefully at the age of 77 on October 3, 2005 at Collingwood General and Marine Hospital. Loving husband of 52 years, Remo will be dearly missed by his wife Gloria DEL_GRECO (TAUS.) Beloved father of Martha (Gino DODARO,) Tullio, Raymond (Mary-Jo) and Maria (Jacob DIANA.) Adoring grandfather of Raymond, Piero, Amanda, Jennifer and Brandon and great-grand_son Nicholas. Remo will be greatly missed by his sisters, brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews, cousins, relatives, and many Friends. Family will receive Friends at the Fratelli Vescio Funeral Homes Ltd. (8101 Weston Rd., south of Langstaff Rd., 905-850-3332) on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Wednesday at 10: 00 a.m. from St. Clare of Assisi Roman Catholic Church (on Rutherford Rd., west of Weston Rd.). Burial to follow at the Holy Cross Catholic Cemetery (on Yonge Street, south of Hwy. 7). Our heart felt thanks to the medical team of the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital. If so desired, donations to the General and Marine Foundation in Collingwood would be greatly appreciated by the family. "We are enriched to have had him in our lives. His memory and love will forever be in our hearts."

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TAUSK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-12-08 published
Paul ROAZEN, Scholar And Writer: (1936-2005)
York University professor chronicled the development of psychoanalysis and explored Sigmund Freud's complex relationships with Friends, family and followers
By Stephen STRAUSS, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, December 8, 2005, Page S9
Toronto -- Of the many accomplishments that could be attributed to York University professor Paul ROAZEN, perhaps the most lasting may be that he created a field of study that had never existed meta-psychotherapy.
Over the course of a long and extraordinarily productive career, the teacher of social and political science deconstructed the many different relationships that existed within the world of psychotherapy, particularly those that wove in and around its iconic founder, Sigmund Freud.
"He was not involved in psychotherapy itself, but he was involved in the analysis of psychoanalysis," says Cyril GREENLAND, a former professor of social work at McMaster University and a friend of Dr. ROAZEN.
The bedrock of his work were lengthy interviews that Dr. ROAZEN conducted in the early 1960s with 70 of Freud's patients and colleagues -- interviews that uncovered quirks and diversions in the techniques that eventually turned into psychoanalytic orthodoxy. Among the striking findings was the revelation that the classic position of a psychoanalyst and his patient -- patient verbalizing on couch, doctor sitting behind him silently taking notes -- wasn't how the process originally began.
Freud was initially quite chatty and spoke directly to his patients until surgery for mouth-and-throat cancer made him so self-conscious about his appearance that he preferred to interview without being seen.
Dr. ROAZEN also revealed that Freud had broken what might be thought of as the sacrosanct boundary between patient and parent by psychoanalyzing his daughter Anna. His deconstruction of Freud and his methods infuriated the psychoanalytic community in general and Anna FREUD in particular. So much so that she subsequently wrote in a letter: "Everything Paul ROAZEN writes is a menace." But illustrative of how much Dr. ROAZEN saw his duty to speak the truth as he saw it, the remark was something he quoted proudly.
Another classic among his other 22 books was Brother Animal, in which Dr. ROAZEN (pronounced Roe-zuhn) unravelled the relationship between Freud and Viktor TAUSK -- a student who became a brilliant but troubled colleague, was the lover of one early woman psychiatrist and the patient of another, and eventually committed suicide. A reviewer in The New York Times called the book "an altogether compelling excursion into psychoanalytic history that develops like an intellectual mystery story."
Following in the path of Freud, who co-wrote a psychoanalytic history of Woodrow Wilson, Dr. ROAZEN published in 1998 a study of Mackenzie KING, Canada's King: An Essay in Political Psychology. In 1916, after King fell into a deep depression, he went to Johns Hopkins University for treatment by a psychiatrist. Using notes and letters in the Johns Hopkins archives, Dr. ROAZEN produced a vivid picture of a man so mentally disturbed he believed other people were influencing him through electrical currents and, conversely, that he could influence them back with currents he generated himself.
In a review of the book, Paul ADAM/ADAMS, a former Globe and Mail Middle East correspondent, wrote that Dr. ROAZEN's "cautious, knowledgeable and sympathetic approach cuts quite a contrast to the half-baked psychologizing we read all the time about everyone from Saddam Hussein to Lucien Bouchard."
Part of what ensured Dr. ROAZEN's even-handedness was his phenomenal memory for detail -- particularly when it came to Freud.
"If you would ask him what Freud did on September 2, 1916, he would ask back, 'In the morning or afternoon?' -- that's how detailed his memory was," recounts Hans MOHR, a friend of 40 years and a former colleague of Dr. ROAZEN's at York.
But, like the subject matter he pursued, it was difficult to encapsulate Dr. ROAZEN in a single frame.
He was born in Massachusetts and attended Harvard University, where he received his doctorate in 1965. He soon joined the faculty and stayed until 1971, when he moved to Toronto's York University as part of a stream of new professors joining a quickly growing institution full of multi-disciplinary energy. "His persona was his work; his life was his work," his son Jules said about his father's central passion.
As a teacher, Dr. ROAZEN was, in equal parts, brilliant, daunting and acidulously dismissive. While open to students on many levels, "Paul often overwhelmed undergraduates with the breadth and diversity of his historical allusions and references, expecting a depth and sophistication... that many graduate students do not yet possess," recalls Daniel BURSTON, a former graduate student of Dr. ROAZEN who now teaches at Duquesne University in Pittsburgh.
As an individual, he also was -- the word is used repeatedly by people who knew him -- irascible. "He could be very bad tempered and very demanding," says Prof. GREENLAND. "On the other hand, he could be very wise and very generous and very helpful. On any given day, it was difficult to predict which Paul ROAZEN you would get."
Author John Robert COLOMBO, who was a friend, recounts attending a presentation by a graduate student to a small group of people where Dr. ROAZEN exploded because "it was not up to the master's level, and, oh, it was appalling. He later followed and phoned everyone and didn't apologize but gave reason for his attack, as though there was no moral culpability there."
Nonetheless, the energy that he put into analyzing psychoanalysis produced works so instructive both to the therapy community and to those wishing to understand the effect of the psychotherapy world view on the intellectual zeitgeist of the 20th century that any personal flaws were overlooked by those who came after.
"I think Paul's greatest contribution to psychotherapy was his willingness to confront legends and, in the process, to reveal truth," said Deirdre Bair, the British author of a much-praised biography of psychotherapist Carl Jung. "He did not hesitate to go where angels fear to tread and, in the process, he trampled... many iconic images.
"His gift to the discipline was to seek out the truth, no matter how unpleasant it might have been for the entrenched 'authorities' to read it," says Ms. Bair, who had been encouraged by Dr. ROAZEN to write the Jung book.
"Whether they know it or not, everyone working in this field today is directly or indirectly in his debt," says Prof. BURSTON.
After taking early retirement from York, Dr. ROAZEN moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts., and continued writing. He was elected a member of the Royal Society of Canada in 1993 and made an honorary member of the American Psychoanalytic Association in 2004.
Paul ROAZEN was born in Boston in 1936. He died of complications from Crohn's disease at his home in Cambridge on November 3. He was 69. He leaves his sons Daniel HELLER- ROAZEN, a professor of comparative literature at Princeton University, and Jules ROAZEN, a banker in New York; a brother, Dr. Bernard ROAZEN, of San Francisco; and a sister, Sheila WEISS, of Westport, Connecticut.
His marriage to Deborah HELLER, now a professor of English at York University, ended in divorce.

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