All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1 +1

"RCA" 2005 Obituary


RCA 

RCA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-02-12 published
O'DONOVAN, Michael Valentine, C.M. (1936-2005)
Val died quietly at his home in Bermuda on Saturday, February 5, suddenly but peacefully, 16 months after learning he had cancer of his larynx. He was attended by his wife of 44 years, Sheila. Val is predeceased by his parents, Patrick Joseph and Mary Imelda (née O'DONOVAN,) and brother Patrick and sister Noreen and survived by brothers Seamus and Aaron, sisters Rita and Dolores, wife Sheila, sons Simon, Christopher and Stephen, daughter Caroline, daughters-in-law Geraldine, Fuyuko and Lori, grandchildren Brian, Patrick, Tyler, Tiffany, Deborah, Michael, Kelly, Adam and Ashley, goddaughter Joanne and by many nieces and nephews. Val was born in Clonakilty, Co. Cork, Ireland on Valentine's Day in 1936. After graduating as an electrical engineer from the Cambridge College of Technology in 1959 he worked at Pye Telecommunications. Soon after graduating he met Sheila and they were married in 1960. In 1963 Val, his pregnant wife and their two infant sons immigrated to Canada. After working in the satellite division at RCA in Montreal Val, joined with two partners who founded Com Dev in 1972. On Hallowe'en in 1979 Com Dev, along with 44 families, moved to Cambridge, Ontario. Under Val's leadership Com Dev continued to thrive and in 1996 became a publicly listed company. In 1998 Val retired as Chief Executive Officer of Com Dev but continued on as Chairman of the Board until December 2004. In 1992 Val was awarded the McNaughton Gold Medal by the Institution of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. In 1995 the University of Waterloo awarded him the degree of Doctor of Engineering (Honoris Causa). In 2001 Val was awarded with the John H. Chapman Award from the Canadian Space Agency. In 2003 Val was appointed to the Order of Canada, Canada's highest civilian honour. From 1997-2003 Val was Chancellor at the University of Waterloo where he relished giving degrees to many thousands of students, to each of whom he has something special to say. In 1998 Val and Sheila started a charitable foundation to establish a residential hospice in Waterloo Region for terminally ill cancer patients. In July 2000 Lisaard House (lisaard.com) was open for its first residents. Val's special interests included his rose garden, his bookshelves and his wine cellar. There will be a private family funeral followed by a celebration of Val's life on the afternoon of Sunday, February 20th. All whose lives have been touched by Val are welcome to attend. For details please either email (celebration@odonovan.ca), fax (519-624-0182) or telephone (519-653-6412). In lieu of flowers donations to Lisaard House (990 Speedsville Rd., Cambridge, Ontario, N3H 4R6) would be appreciated.

  R... Names     RC... Names     RCA... Names     Welcome Home

RCA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-10-28 published
Patrick Gregory SCOTT
By Clark DAVEY, Friday, October 28, 2005, Page A24
Journalist, jazz critic. Born January 7, 1927, in Ottawa. Died May 10 in Cumberland, Ontario, of bone cancer, aged 78.
Life for Patrick SCOTT, virtually from beginning to end, was all about jazz and journalism. At Jarvis Collegiate Institute in Toronto, he was already the correspondent for Canadian High News -- the Bible in its day for high-school students. He also studied piano, guitar and clarinet at the Royal Conservatory with a thought to teaching music.
But after graduation he started as a cub reporter at the Guelph Mercury and soon became the youngest city editor at a Canadian daily. Subsequently, he spent a year in Kirkland Lake as managing editor of the Northern Daily News. Then it was on to the Windsor Star before gravitating back to Toronto and The Globe and Mail in 1957.
At The Globe, he moved around on the desk -- city editor, telegraph editor, news editor and chief of the copy desk -- jobs that finished in the late evening, freeing SCOTT to hustle the two blocks to the Colonial Tavern or the Town Tavern, both now long gone.
The constant in his life was his Jazz Scene weekly column. Marked by his acerbic, mordant wit and fuelled by his developing relationships with some of the greats of the jazz world -- the likes of Count Basie, Buck Clayton, Earl Hines -- the column quickly became the word on jazz in Toronto.
He wrote an illuminating piece for The Globe Magazine about his favourite, Louis Armstrong, including the details of Armstrong's legendary laxative fixation, chronicling the 10 hours he spent with Satchmo before a concert at the O'Keefe Centre in Toronto. When Armstrong died, SCOTT was an invited mourner at the Harlem funeral.
In 1967, using his own money, he brought together Don Ewell and Willie " The Lion" Smith in the RCA recording studio on Mutual Street in Toronto to produce the record Grand Piano, which has just been re-issued as a Compact Disk on the Sackville label.
SCOTT's sardonic style wasn't always appreciated by his editing colleagues, who brought union grievances against him based on his admonishing memos about their editing lapses. Even the mediator who heard the grievances had to smile at some of his phrases.
Though tortured by migraine headaches, Patrick moved to The Toronto Star in late 1967 to write an entertainment column. He became entertainment editor and then, in 1971, city editor. But most important was his meeting with Margaret (Maggie) URMSTON, a city desk clerk from Liverpool who expressed her appreciation for his review of the movie Blow-Up. That led to their first hand-holding date at the movie In Cold Blood and, ultimately, their marriage in May of 1971. It was his second; he had two sons from his previous one.
Then, Pat was sent to the Star's Paris bureau. He covered the Egyptian side of the Yom Kippur War, managing to get himself beaten up by what he always assumed were government agents, and filed another of the Star's legendary expense accounts covering the rental of a camel for desert transportation.
After he left the Star and a brief stint in England, he taught journalism at St. Clair College in Windsor.
His escalating health problems, including removal of a cancerous kidney and a heart attack, and the drugs he had taken to washing down with Crown Royal whisky soon overtook him. He retired and moved to Ottawa with Maggie. They both wound up in institutional care and when bone cancer swept through him earlier this year, he refused all treatment and asked to be moved back to his seniors' residence where, as he put it: "I can be among people I know and listen to my music to the end."
Clark is Patrick's friend and was The Globe's managing editor through his tenure.

  R... Names     RC... Names     RCA... Names     Welcome Home

RCA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-11-25 published
Dottie WILSON
By David WILSON, Friday, November 25, 2005, Page A24
Hospice pioneer, stepmother, wife. Born September 16, 1923, in Aurora, Ontario Died June 1 in Bayside, New York of heart failure, aged 81.
Dottie WILSON fervently believed that the traditional practice of forcing terminally ill patients through a gauntlet of pain in their process of dying, in the unrealistic, faint hope of miraculous recovery was morally indefensible, unnecessary and barbaric. And so in 1974, she became captivated with the new field of hospice and palliative-care medicine, just then being introduced into Canada at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal by Dr. Balfour Mount.
She immersed herself in the hospice movement, becoming the administrator of the palliative care service at the Royal Victoria Hospital, North America's first hospital-based hospice. In 1979, we left Quebec and moved to Chevy Chase, Md., to work with Elm Services Inc., one of the largest U.S. health care consulting firms. As their hospice consultant, she worked internationally with local health care organizations, teaching and encouraging hospice development.
In 1982, after completing a feasibility study of a hospice for children at Saint Mary's Hospital for Children in Bayside, New York Dottie was retained to oversee its design, construction and startup. The facility became the first hospice for children in the world. After its completion, she remained as its director for five years until her retirement.
Born Dorothy Nettie CLARKE in Aurora, Ontario, to Caroline and Ernest CLARKE, she was the second of three children, between older sister Mary Louise and younger brother Douglas.
Many years ago, I asked her father what he thought was the most important thing about a sign for my new store. I was stunned when he answered "that it not fall down." Yet it was fundamental, down-to-earth and revealed his methodical, basic and practical way of thinking. I believe that her father instilled that way of looking at things into her.
After graduating with a degree in sociology from the University of Toronto in 1946, she worked for several years with Dr. Perry Culver at the Massachusetts General Hospital until she moved to Montreal in 1951, where she became a systems and procedures analyst for what was then the RCA Victor company. She then became Canada's first female management consultant with the Montreal accounting firm of Riddell, Stead, Graham and Hutchison.
In 1959, she married David WILSON, a Montreal businessman and later a psychoanalyst and group therapist in New York City. This marriage was her second.
Dottie is remembered for her skill in empowering the infant dreams of nascent startups in the health care field. Her expertise was honed in guiding the development of her husband's many startup projects.
After her retirement from Saint Mary's, Dottie helped Dr. Louis Ormont create the Center for Group Studies. Ironically, Dottie herself was forced into the gauntlet of severe pain by the development of an excruciating ulcer during a recent hospitalization for disorientation. She knew that common hospice protocols for wound care might have avoided this tragedy, so, after weeks of pointless suffering, and recognizing the hopelessness of her situation, she chose to enter a local hospice program. She knew that the hospice focus on the quality of life, rather than clinging to life at any cost, would help her win the relief she deserved.
She is survived by her husband David WILSON, her nephews Rory CAMERON, Gordon CAMERON and David CLARKE, and her nieces Susan CAMERON, Margaret McCUTCHEON, Wendy ZAROWSKI and Sandra RANA. Stepsons David Andrew WILSON, Daniel Thompson WILSON and Douglas S. WILSON will sorely miss her.
David is Dottie's husband.

  R... Names     RC... Names     RCA... Names     Welcome Home

RCA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-22 published
WARREN, Dorothy Andrea (née BARTON)
(November 30th, 1912-November 19th, 2005)
Peacefully on November 19th, 2005 at 2 p.m. at Leisure World - O'Connor Court, in Toronto, in her 93rd year. Beloved wife of the late Captain William John Edward WARREN of the Toronto Fire Department. Sadly missed by her much loved devoted and loyal daughter Karen Andrea WARREN of Toronto, Ontario. Predeceased by her parents Joseph Alfred BARTON of Turnbridge Wells, Kent, England and Margaret Ethel BARTON (née LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH) of Williamstown, Cornwall, Ontario. Predeceased by her brother William Courtney BARTON of Peterborough and her sister Jessie Margaret BARTON of Montreal, Quebec. Dorothy Andrea WARREN (née BARTON) was born in Montreal, Quebec. She worked for RCA Victor in Montreal for 12 years and met "Bill" at the Air Force House and later married him at St. James' United Church on April 20th, 1946. Sincere thanks to the staff and residents from Leisure World - O'Connor Court, her home for almost 3 years, for the love and support, especially for making her last months in Palliative Care comfortable. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday, November 23rd. The funeral service will take place in the chapel on Thursday, November 24th at 1 o'clock. Interment Resthaven Memorial Gardens. If desired, donations to the Alzheimer Society of Ontario - Research Department, 1200 Bay Street, Suite 202, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2A5 or the Canadian Cancer Society - Research Department, 20 Holly Street, Suite 101, Toronto, Ontario M4S 3B1.

  R... Names     RC... Names     RCA... Names     Welcome Home

RCA - All Categories in OGSPI